CFP: Post-Colonial Cannibalism in Literature and the Arts (9/15/06; NEMLA, 3/2/07-3/4/07)

full name / name of organization: 
mxcomp_at_wm.edu
contact email: 
mxcomp@wm.edu

Post-Colonial Cannibalism in Literature and the Arts

 A primary trope for interpreting cultural difference, the term 'cannibalism,' whether real or imagined, was repeatedly used by imperial Europe in an effort to distinguish itself from the subjects of its colonial expansion and justify the colonization of territories. Through more recent theory, literature, and art, cannibalism has also reappeared as a useful concept, trope, and image to deconstruct and renegotiate identity, to explain cultural processes and to draw new boundaries between the "self" and the "Other." As a literary symbol, a tool, or a weapon, cannibalism fosters reconsiderations, challenges hegemonic norms, and either unsettles or displaces western cultural practices. This panel will explore the construction of such a concept and how it has been used in post-colonial literature and the arts.

please send abstracts of 200 words by September 15, 2006 to Magali Compan (mxcomp_at_wm.edu)

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Received on Sat May 27 2006 - 13:28:07 EDT

cfp categories: 
twentieth_century_and_beyond