Early Modern Dramatic and Literary Spaces [11/06/09 - 11/07/09]

full name / name of organization: 
California State University Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies
contact email: 
lkermode@csulb, mvanelk@csulb.edu

The California State University Long Beach Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies with the cooperation of UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, UC Irvine Group for the Study of Early Cultures, and USC Early Modern Studies Institute

Is pleased to announce a conference for fall 2009 to be held on the campus of CSULB, Friday and Saturday, November 6 & 7

"Early Modern Dramatic and Literary Spaces." Possible topics for panels and seminar discussion include:

• Global Space: from the Globe theater to global travel.
• Recovering Space: early modern reception, modern reconstruction, critical empathy.
• Space Travel: bodies in space and time, materiality, historicity, modernity.
• Making Space: early modern writers describing and creating secular, sacred, public, personal, and domestic space(s).
• Shakespearean Space: does Shakespeare show a unique spatial awareness? Do we “read” Shakespearean spaces uniquely?
• Space and Genre: tragic, comic, and romantic space.

Abstracts are invited for papers that discuss current theoretical and critical approaches to early modern dramatic and literary work within the parameters outlined above. We envision 2-paper panels, with the possibility of additional seminar/round-table discussions over two days. Please submit 400+ - word abstracts (for 30-minute paper presentation or 12-15 pp seminar essay) in one or more of the categories above. Papers should address methodology in early modern literary studies and authors are encouraged to interpret the categories above as they see appropriate to a discussion of current and future critical trends.

Abstracts or papers plus short CV should be sent as MS Word attachments by email to Lloyd Kermode and Martine van Elk at lkermode@csulb.edu and mvanelk@csulb.edu by Tuesday, September 1st.

cfp categories: 
renaissance
theatre
theory