CFP: CRITICAL APPROACHES TO HORROR SCHOLARSHIP; PCA/ACA National Conference, 31 March-3 April, 2010; Propsal Deadline : 30 Nov.

full name / name of organization: 
Horror Area, Popular Culture Association / American Culture Association
contact email: 
pcahorror@gmail.com

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CRITICAL APPROACHES TO HORROR SCHOLARSHIP

 

In his 2007 article assessing the
contemporary academic climate around horror, Steffen Hantke sees horror
scholars responding to a genre in a state of “crisis” and suggests that only
scholarly work on horror can initiate a rescue effort. To what degree is the
horror scholar’s task not just to distinguish the work of horror, but to legitimize the critical project itself?
How are scholars writing about horror? How have their approaches and ideas
changed? What methodological concepts have they adopted or created in service
of horror criticism? (How) Has the genre itself responded to such concepts?

 

The Horror Area of the 2010 PCA Conference
invites submissions for a panel focusing on critical approaches to horror
scholarship. This panel would not be an assessment of the state of the horror
genre itself; rather, it would offer revealing surveys, retrospectives,
analyses and other explorations of the state of the discipline that has formed
around the horror genre. To this effect, presenters might focus on such topics
as 1) changing approaches to the study of horror; 2) the exploration of
methodologies and concepts currently in use; 3) an exploration of the critical
discourse on horror in a selected journal (or selection of journals); 4) an
assessment of the ways that the critical discourse around horror is taken up
by/in other critical disciplines; 5) the voguish nature of concepts such as
“the final girl” and “body horror,” and the crossover cultural currency of such
terms as “splatter,” “slasher,” “weird” and “fantastic”; 6) the effect that an
online presence has had on horror criticism, particularly through scholarly
blogging; 7) indications in horror criticism (past and/or present) that the
horror genre is "in decline" (or otherwise); 8) a critical
retrospective of horror scholarship, and so on.

 

We look forward to your submissions.

 

Submit proposals to Kristopher Woofter:
pcahorror@gmail.com.

cfp categories: 
american
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
eighteenth_century
film_and_television
gender_studies_and_sexuality
popular_culture
postcolonial
religion
romantic
science_and_culture
theatre
theory
twentieth_century_and_beyond
victorian