Eudora Welty Society ALA May 27-30, 2010 San Francisco

full name / name of organization: 
Eudora Welty Society
contact email: 
mclaxton@email.wcu.edu

Eudora Welty and Friendship
American Literature Association
San Francisco, CA
May 27-30, 2010

Eudora Welty cultivated important friendships throughout her life that sustained her both professionally and personally. Among her literary friends, Welty counted Katherine Anne Porter, Ford Maddox Ford, Elizabeth Spencer and Reynolds Price. Her friends hailed from Jackson, New York, Ireland, and Italy (V.S. Pritchett and Elizabeth Bowen, for example). In 1991 she co-edited The Norton Book of Friendship with Ronald Sharp. This panel will consider Welty’s friendships as well as her portrayal of friendships in her fiction. Writers might wish to consider letters documenting many of these friendships archived at the Mississippi Department of Archives and History in Jackson. Writers might also wish to consider recent historical and theoretical scholarship on friendship. Please send a 1-2 page abstract of your proposed paper to Mae Miller Claxton at mclaxton@email.wcu.edu by December 1, 2009.

Hot Topics/Controversies in Eudora Welty Studies
American Literature Association
San Francisco, CA
May 27-30, 2010

Anyone who was at the Welty Centenary conference in Jackson and even those who were not, know that Welty studies is coming of age and that there are new young scholars and more established scholars who are starting to see the relationships between each other’s work-- both points of complimentarity and conflict. Patterns that we once thought we knew are appearing more complex, and texts that have received little critical attention are now becoming hot. With these potentially exciting new directions in Welty criticism we would like to devote a panel at the ALA entirely to the latest hot research. We are looking for the most challenging, unexpected papers on new subjects or hot new takes on old subjects. Possible directions that you could take, but please do not feel limited to these areas, are: Welty as a world citizen countering the regional bias, how Welty perceived and lived in the literary and political “South,” class conflict, the quirky Welty, violence in Welty’s texts, men in Welty, the secret Welty, Welty’s experimental forms, Welty’s detective stories, and even murder in Welty. Let us hear about your latest groundbreaking research. Please send abstracts to Rebecca Mark at rebecca @tulane.edu by December 15, 2009.

cfp categories: 
american