Spaces of Consumption and Disposable Culture: A Material Dialogue in Medieval Europe (c.1100-1500)

full name / name of organization: 
Dr. Rebecca Flynn and Dr. Salvatore Musumeci
contact email: 
Rebecca.Flynn@usd.edu, Salvatore.Musumeci@usiouxfalls.edu

CALL FOR ESSAYS

Rebecca Flynn and Salvatore Musumeci are seeking further proposals for a collection of essays entitled Spaces of Consumption and Disposable Culture: A Material Dialogue in Medieval Europe (c.1100-1500).

This volume seeks to thematically explore the social and cultural implications of how private or public acts of consumption during the medieval period defined relationships between people and the spaces they inhabited. Proposals concerning the consumption of material goods and how such acts relate to gender, power, and culture will be of particular interest. By exploring the complexity of material consumption in the medieval period, the authors seek to advance the recent movement of material and consumption studies from the margins of social history to a fertile cross-section of the humanities and social sciences.

We seek submissions pertaining to consumption and/or material exchange in relation to the following areas:

---Religious Experience, Devotion and Practice: Sacred Spaces, Sacred and Profane Consumption, and Holy Relics

---Forging Bonds and Making Connections: The Politics of Circulating Material Goods in Secular Spaces

---Cultural Crossroads: Consumption, Trade and Circulation between East and West

We invite submissions from various disciplinary, interdisciplinary, and comparative perspectives. If you are interested in contributing to this volume, please send your C.V. and a 250-500 word abstract of your proposed essay including your theoretical framework and your primary sources to Rebecca.Flynn@usd.edu and Salvatore.Musumeci@usiouxfalls.edu by February 1, 2010.

cfp categories: 
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
gender_studies_and_sexuality
general_announcements
journals_and_collections_of_essays
medieval
religion
renaissance
theory
travel_writing