NATIONAL SEMINAR-IDENTITY AT THE MARGINS Supported by the UGC SAP DRS-I 19-20 March 2010

full name / name of organization: 
DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH, FACULTY OF ARTS, THE Maharaja Sayajirao University Of Baroda,

Department of English, Faculty of Arts,The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, VADODARA-2

National Seminar
" Identity at the Margins ",
Supported by the UGC SAP DRS-I
19-20 March 2010

The idea of identities in the margins has been in circulation for quite a while now, both in the popular domain and also in realm of mainstream academics. Movements catalyzed by a sense of a shared marginal identity have challenged dominant characterizations of the world across a range of disciplines and also in the fields of culture and politics. These rival definitions of what constitutes knowledge have unsettled the certainty of disciplines. Consequently, disciplines of the Social Sciences and the Humanities, perhaps more than most, have needed to rethink the status of the knowledge that they have legitimized with the value of "truth". This would be a good time to rehearse the fact that a significant proportion of this challenge to the status of disciplinary knowledge came from experiences, narratives and strategies of understanding the world that were organized around identitarian collectives. Since then, as Dipesh Chakrabarty has demonstrated in "Minority Histories, Subaltern Pasts", academic disciplines have tended to confer an easy legitimacy on 'minority histories' without caring to examine the logic with which disciplines gather their own rationality.

This seminar seeks to explore the way marginal identities have been shaped in the popular domain as well as in academic disciplines and in both together, in texts, in performance, in the realm of culture, politics and history. We look towards a wide ranging understanding of identity: caste, class, community and gender, certainly, but also region, sexual orientation as well as more ephemeral identities such as slum dweller, under trial, rowdy sheeter and so on. The seminar proposes to examine the way identities have been constituted, rethought and modulated, the way new identities have come into play. In other words, we see the seminar as an opportunity to think through the question of identity, the ways it circulates and most importantly, the limits and possibilities that it offers.

We invite papers and presentations that critically engage with the seminar theme. Kindly send in abstracts of papers to deeptha.achar@gmail.com and rajanbarrett@gmail.com by 20 February 2010; we will respond to you by 22 February.

35873Tempest in a Teacup: Perspectives on Domesticity (NAVSA 2010; 11/11-11/13/10)Amy Robinson / North American Victorian Studies Association (NAVSA)robinsa@eckerd.edu1265028665victorianfull name / name of organization: Amy Robinson / North American Victorian Studies Association (NAVSA)contact email: robinsa@eckerd.edu

NAVSA 2010; 11/11-11/13
Paper Proposals due 2/19/10

Tempest in a Teacup: Perspectives on Domesticity

Is Lucilla Marjoribank's desire to revolutionize Carlingford through her "Thursday Evenings" silly or strategic? Are the Cranfordian's lengthy list of rules and regulations for visiting unnecessarily oppressive or necessary to the preservation of their way of life?

This panel seeks papers that consider Victorian texts in which character perspectives diverge from the perspective of the narrator and/or reader. While characters may initially fail to keep things in perspective, texts such as Oliphant's Miss Marjoribanks and Gaskell's Cranford ultimately validate the importance of taking domesticity seriously. In other words, these texts arguably make a case for not "keeping it in perspective." Papers may address such as issues as: When is a lack of perspective celebrated? Is there a link between a novel's setting and the ability to "keep it in perspective"? How do gender and class relate to perspective? What is the relationship between point of view and comedy? How does a mock-epic tone impact perspectives on domesticity? Are small-scale crises indicative of more important, substantial crises occurring in Victorian culture?

Please submit abstracts of 500 words and a one-page CV by February 19, 2010 to Amy Robinson (robinsa@eckerd.edu).

Panel subject to approval.

cfp categories: victorian 35874[UPDATE] Modernism and Utopia: Convergences in the Arts; 23-24 April 2010Nathan Waddellmodernism-utopia@hotmail.co.uk1265029863african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Nathan Waddellcontact email: modernism-utopia@hotmail.co.uk

Registration for 'Modernism and Utopia: Convergences in the Arts' (23-24 April 2010) is now open.

In order to register, please visit the conference website at the following address (http://www.mod-utopia.bham.ac.uk/) and click on 'Conference Registration'. This will open a University of Birmingham webpage containing the registration form and details.

A conference programme / schedule will be made available in due course. If you have any questions regarding the registration process please do not hesitate to contact Nathan Waddell at modernism-utopia@hotmail.co.uk.

Conference registration costs (2-day attendance) (early / late (after April 1st) registration fees)

Non-postgraduate: £80 / £90

Postgraduate: £40 / £50

Conference fees include venue costs, plus lunch and refreshments on both days

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35875CFP: 'Textual Bodies' - The Luminary (Lancaster University PG Journal)Lancaster Universitysubmissions@lancasterluminary.com1265030177african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Lancaster Universitycontact email: submissions@lancasterluminary.com

The Luminary
Call for Papers - 'Textual Bodies'
http://www.lancasterluminary.com/contents/cfp1.htm

The Luminary is a postgraduate journal that has been recently set up by a dedicated team of Lancaster University postgraduates, mostly working in the English Literature and Creative Writing department. We are now seeking submissions for the second edition of the journal, and encourage postgraduates of all levels, disciplines and institutions to submit their work for inclusion.

The theme of the second issue is 'Textual Bodies'. We hope this is a broad and stimulating theme, and encourages diverse and distinctive interpretations. The deadline for submissions is 1st April 2010.

Possible papers might include work on:
Medicine and textuality
Representations of the body, or bodies
Representations of gender or sexuality
Writing, reading and bodily functions
Disfigurement, mutilation or sadomasochism
Horror and monstrous bodies
The textual subject
The text as subject
Typography and the materiality of text
History and textuality
The textuality of politics
Politics and representation
Intersections between pictorial and textual representation
The graphic novel
Metafiction and experimentation
Ageing / Childhood
Please note that this list is by no means exhaustive, proscriptive or prohibitive

We are chiefly seeking quality academic articles (4,000-7,000 words) but are also very interested in including interviews, book and event reviews, creative writing, original photography and artwork. Whilst it would be ideal for interviews and reviews to relate to the theme of the issues, this is not a requirement. Unfortunately we are unable to provide copies of books for reviewing, or any funding as we operate on a very small budget. However, please do not hesitate to contact us if this should become a problem - we will do our best to come up with solutions.

As of yet we do not publish paper copies of the journal. All work will be published online. For details of our submission and reviewing policy, or of correct submission format, please see: http://www.lancasterluminary.com/contents/submissions.htm

Submissions should be sent via email to submissions@lancasterluminary.com

http://www.lancasterluminary.com/
editor@lancasterluminary.com

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35876Graduate Student Conference in Transnational American Studies Abstracts March 5Binghamton Universityshiftingborders@gmail.com1265034694african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialtheoryfull name / name of organization: Binghamton Universitycontact email: shiftingborders@gmail.com

Conference Title: Shifting Tides, Anxious Borders: A Graduate Student Conference in American Studies

Conference Dates: April 23-24, 2010

Keynote Speaker: Donald E. Pease, Avalon Foundation Chair of the Humanities, Dartmouth College

Conference Description:

Shifting Tides, Anxious Borders is an interdisciplinary graduate student conference dedicated to exploring the changing contours of the field of American Studies. This year's conference focuses on "American Empire in the Age of Globalization" in an effort to foreground new movements in transnational and hemispheric American Studies. As such, we encourage paper proposals that explore the intersections between US histories of imperialism and colonialism and contemporary forces of globalization and neoliberal capitalism from a wide range of disciplinary perspectives.
Many Transnational Americanist scholars initially viewed globalization as an interpretive framework that could re-configure the object of study in the field of American Studies, shifting focus away from the nationalist paradigm of the Cold War in order to highlight America's embeddedness within transnational and transcultural forces. This year's conference asks scholars in the field of American Studies to engage a series of critical tensions that lie at the heart of this movement. How have the social stratifications ushered in by the age of globalization mirrored, refracted, and/or contested the types of social stratifications produced by US practices of Empire? How have core tenets of the discourse of US exceptionalism saturated cultural and economic processes of globalization? What types of possibilities does a transnational approach to American Studies open up, and what are the limits of such an approach? We invite submissions that engage questions and critiques of American empire across a wide range of historical time periods in an effort to re-think our current global occasion and imagine new futures for the field of American studies.

Possible Topics may include, but are not limited to:

Borderland studies, crossing borders
Exile, Migration, Expatriation and the "Exilic"
Native American Studies and the question of the "postcolonial"
Indigeneity
Heterotopia / reservations / the commons
Critiques of the American "Melting Pot" thesis
Rethinking the frontier myth for the 21st century
Connections/distinctions between The "American" south / The "global south"
The End of American Empire?
Marxist approaches to Globalization Studies
Global Capital, Crisis, and the "End of History" thesis
Global and National Responses to Environmental Destruction
Repressive Geographies
Ecocriticism and New Americanist Studies
The Erotics of American Empire
Comparative Imperialisms/Exceptionalisms
Sovereignty (and Globalization)
States of Exception, Emergency, Crisis
Global Feminism / Decolonial Feminism
Masculinities of Empire
Transnational Religious Identities
The Military Industrial Complex
Empire and Sexual Exploitation
Globalized Racial Formations
Humanitarianism and Its Discontents
Discourses of Human Rights
Geneva Conventions / International Courts
Transnational cosmopolitanisms
Terrorism after 9/11 and Obama's War in Afghanistan

Please Send 250-500 Word Abstracts to: Tom Jordan at shiftingborders@gmail.com

Abstracts Due: March 5, 2010

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialtheory 35877Writing Centers: Unique Institutional ConfigurationsRobert Cedillo/UNR, Al Harahap/SFSUcedillor@unr.nevada.edu, harahap@msn.com1265046707professional_topicsrhetoric_and_compositionfull name / name of organization: Robert Cedillo/UNR, Al Harahap/SFSUcontact email: cedillor@unr.nevada.edu, harahap@msn.com

Please circulate amongst your colleagues and tutors. We are looking for other projects/papers to complete our panel proposal for the IWCA 2010 conference in Baltimore, MD, Nov 4-6, 2010.

In keeping with the IWCA's theme for this year's conference, we acknowledge that writing centers often represent the kinds of safe havens in which students, tutors, and administrators can seek refuge. Likewise, these spaces frequently send students into a diverse world of academic disciplines and intellectual conversations. With this in mind, we recognize that writing centers can often occupy interesting and unique positions that offer scholars the opportunity to facilitate larger conversations about literacy issues within the university.

Our panel seeks to interrogate the roles that writing centers, in unique institutional configurations, can have in the institutional dialogues. By "configuration," we here include factors such as people, practices, services, size, place in the institution, sources of funding, space and time, to name but a few. We are especially interested in the following questions and concerns:

•What is a "conventional" writing center configuration? What is "unconventional"? Do such things even exist? How can we problematize our understandings of these definitions? How do different configurations affect discourse within the institution?

•How and why has your institution's writing center come to be? How is it different from others? Does it purposely set itself apart in this way? Or are there external factors that drive it to be so?

•Even with a high degree of difference in demographic, geographic, and institutional contexts, why do we vouch for "best practice"? How do we negotiate the universal and the contextual in terms of writing center configurations?

•How do the writing center's interactions and collaborations with others in the institution (composition classes, WAC, the English department, central administration, etc.) create unique and interesting configurations? And how do they create dialogue or collaborate?

•…or any other topics that may be pertinent to writing center configurations and institutional discourse.

We welcome other graduate student projects as well as works in progress. Please email your 200-300 page abstract or any questions to both Robert Cedillo (cedillor@unr.nevada.edu) and Al Harahap (harahap@msn.com) with subject line "IWCA 2010 Abstract" by Monday, Feb 15, 2010. We will inform you of our decisions by Mar 1, 2010.

We look forward to hearing about your projects,
Robert Cedillo, University of Nevada, Reno
Al Harahap, San Francisco State University

cfp categories: professional_topicsrhetoric_and_composition 35878Mediating Objects, Remediating Texts: Reading Material Culture in Transition (May 13-15, 2010)University of Victoria's English Graduate Student Societyuvic2010conference@gmail.com1265047032americanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centurygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetmedievalpoetrypopular_cultureprofessional_topicsrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: University of Victoria's English Graduate Student Societycontact email: uvic2010conference@gmail.com

Mediating Objects, Remediating Texts: Reading Material Culture in Transition (Grad)

The University of Victoria's English Graduate Students' Society invites proposals for this year's graduate conference: Mediating Objects, Remediating Texts: Reading Material Culture in Transition. The conference will be held at the University of Victoria from May 13 to 15, 2010.

In Culture is Ordinary (1958), Raymond Williams wrote the following: "Culture is ordinary: that is the first fact. Every human society has its own shape, its own purposes, its own meanings. Every human society expresses these, in institutions, and in arts and learning." We would argue that every society also expresses these purposes and meanings materially. Whether taken to mean the printing of a book, the carving of a sculpture, or the maintaining of an archive, we seek to interrogate the ways in which divergent groups have engaged with material culture in the past, as well as how we, as scholars and academics, do so in the early 21st century.

This conference invites submissions for papers or presentations of approximately 15-20 minutes in length on any aspect of material culture from postgraduate and graduate scholars working in any area; all submissions will be considered on merit rather than from a disciplinary standpoint.

Possible areas of inquiry include, but are not limited to:

• Projects that work with the principles of Digital Humanities and Literary Computing (with an emphasis on new forms of mediating print culture)
• Book history and manuscript studies
• Engagement with non-textual forms of cultural production (i.e. painting, sculpture, mixed media)
• Theorizing the study of material culture
• The preservation of material culture (including, but not limited to, library and government archives, film preservation, museums, etc.)
• The poetics of materiality
• Issues of Adaptation (film, printing new editions of canonical (and non-canonical) texts, graphic novels, etc.)

The above suggestions are starting points, meant to inspire and not to proscribe. We welcome submissions on any aspect of material culture, drawn from all chronological periods. As a goal of this conference is to foster trans-disciplinary and diachronic dialogues, we welcome topics ranging from the Classical to the Postmodern, from the Fine Arts to the "New" Bibliography. We are particularly interested in receiving proposals from the following disciplines/concentrations: Art History, Media Studies, History, Literary Studies, Anthropology, Philosophy, Historic Preservation, Medieval Studies, and Political Science.

Please submit proposals (in docx, .doc, or .rtf format) to the following email address: uvic2010conference@gmail.com

Deadline: 1 March 2010

Please direct all inquires to: uvic2010conference@gmail.com

cfp categories: americanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centurygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetmedievalpoetrypopular_cultureprofessional_topicsrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35879The Politics of Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality in the Television Series House (Collection)Ritch Calvin . SUNY Stony Brookrcalvink@ic.sunysb.edu1265048187ethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturefull name / name of organization: Ritch Calvin . SUNY Stony Brookcontact email: rcalvink@ic.sunysb.edu

CALL FOR PAPERS (Book Collection)
The Politics of Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality in the Television Series House

Essays are invited for a collection of essays on the television series House. The series, starring Hugh Laurie as a skilled but misanthropic doctor, began its run in the fall of 2004. Now in its sixth season (2009-2010), the series was the "most watched" series in 2008. Principally set in Princeton-Plainsboro Teaching Hospital, the series features Gregory House, who heads a team of diagnosticians, who take on the most difficult and perplexing cases. Initially, his diagnostics team was composed of Dr. Allison Cameron (Jennifer Morrison), Dr. Robert Chase (Jesse Spencer), and Dr. Eric Foreman (Omar Epps). In subsequent years, his team shifts to include Dr. Remy Hadley (Olivia Wilde), Dr. Lawrence (Choudray) Kutner (Kal Penn), and Dr. Chris Taub (Peter Jacobson). Two other principal characters are House's best friend, the oncologist Dr. James Wilson (Robert Sean Leonard), and the hospital administrator and Dean of Medicine Dr. Lisa Cuddy (Lisa Edelstein).
As with any television series, a critic might approach House from many perspectives. This volume proposes to examine the House—overall and through close readings of specific episodes—in relation to other medial comedy and dramatic series and the ways in which it treats gender, race, class, and sexuality, in its characters, character interactions, and story lines. Essays might compare and contrast the ways in which House represents questions of racial, gender, and sexual identity, though they may also examine those issues solely in relation to House. Because the series is both critically and popularly successful, what it says about these issues is significant and reveals something about what we as a culture think about them.
The book is under contract; all submitted essays will go through a blind review process before inclusion in the volume.

Final essays should not exceed 7,000 words. They must conform to MLA standards for manuscripts and citations.

Please send submissions via e-mail (as Word .doc, .docx, or .rtf files) or snail-mail (hard copy and CD-R with .doc, .docx, or .rtf file). Deadline for submissions is May 7, 2010. Earlier inquires and abstracts are welcome, but completed manuscripts are due May 7.

E-mail: rcalvink@ic.sunysb.edu
Snail-mail:
Ritch Calvin
Women's and Gender Studies
115 Old Chem.
SUNY Stony Brook
Stony Brook, NY 11794-3456
(631) 632-7607

cfp categories: ethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culture 35880Essay Collection: The Poetics of Song Lyrics (due 4/1/10)C.Pencecpence1@utk.edu1265051320journals_and_collections_of_essayspoetryfull name / name of organization: C.Pencecontact email: cpence1@utk.edu

This essay collection has been accepted for publication in spring 2011 from a university press.

We invite essays (3,000-6,000 words) that analyze the poetics within a song or group of songs by one songwriter. As a whole, the collection will identify the poetics of song lyrics and provide a critical treatment to the lyrics. The purpose is to locate points of synthesis and separation between poetry and song lyrics so as to better understand both genres and to also articulate the poetics employed within song lyrics. The first section of the book will provide a variety of perspectives on the poetics of lyrics such as the use of assonantal rhyme in rap lyrics, and the second section will focus on a few prominent American songwriters. Essays on Bruce Springsteen, Eminem, and indie groups are of particular interest. Submissions should be sent electronically by April 1st. Queries are acceptable. Follow MLA style and keep song quotations to three lines or less per example.

cfp categories: journals_and_collections_of_essayspoetry 35881MLA and SAMLA Convention Presenters Needed: Politics and Literature, Deadline: March 15Anna Faktorovich/ Pennsylvania Literary Journalpennsylvaniajournal@gmail.com1265051955african-americanamericanclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalpopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Anna Faktorovich/ Pennsylvania Literary Journalcontact email: pennsylvaniajournal@gmail.com

MLA and SAMLA Convention Presenters Needed

Special Topic: Politics and Literature

I am looking for 2-3 panelists to join me in each of the two panels at the MLA and the SAMLA Conventions. The theme for both is the same, but the guidelines are a bit different. I recently published the second issue of my peer-reviewed Pennsylvania Literary Journal on the topic of "Politics and Literature." I would like to explore this topic a bit further. You can view the issue of the journal online at http://sites.google.com/site/pennsylvaniajournal, for an idea of what this concept means to me. You can also find the essays in this issue through EBSCO and Amazon Kindle. The next issue of the journal will be on "New and Old Historical Perspectives on Literature." Besides working on the PLJ, I am an English Instructor at the Pennsylvania Highland Community College, and I will finish my Ph.D. in English Literature and Criticism by May 2011. Please send a query for either or both of these opportunities if you are not sure which idea(s) to send. I will describe the opportunities and what I am looking for from you below:

MLA:

I will submit a Special Session proposal to the MLA. These are due to be emailed to the MLA on April 1st. That means that I would need your CV, abstract, and possibly the paper you plan on reading at the convention by March 15th, so that I will be able to arrange the chosen panelists into the proposal. I hope to find some professors to participate as it will strengthen the proposal and will increase the likelihood that we will be accepted. Only approximately 50% of the proposals are accepted. Please email me if you have any questions, comments, or with your abstracts and CVs. The MLA Convention will be held between January 6-9, in 2011, in Los Angeles, CA.

SAMLA:

You have a 100% chance of being accepted through this opportunity, if I accept your submission. I am chairing the Graduate Forum in English session at the SAMLA Convention this fall. I plan on presenting one of the papers. I need 2-3 other people to join me on the panel. In this case, graduate students (rather than professors) are especially encouraged to apply. I am also looking for a Secretary for the panel. If you serve as a Secretary, you will work as the Chair of the panel in the following year. As a Secretary, you will only have to write and read a call for papers for next year's session. I hope that one of the presenters will serve as a Secretary. But, if the presenters are not available, we will need somebody who is not on the panel for the job. Please also send these abstracts and a CV by approximately March 15th. The SAMLA Convention will be held on approximately November 8th, 2010, in Atlanta, GA.

Your school probably sponsors travel to professional conferences, and these two meetings are among the most important in the literature field.

Thank you for your consideration.

Cordially,

Anna Faktorovich, Editor
Pennsylvania Literary Journal, http://sites.google.com/site/pennsylvaniajournal
(724) 541-4444
pennsylvaniajournal@gmail.com
1800 Lisa Dr., #2
Indiana, PA 15701

cfp categories: african-americanamericanclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalpopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35882[UPDATE] Emerson Society Awards 2010Ralph Waldo Emerson Societyleckel@suffolk.edu1265070988americangeneral_announcementsfull name / name of organization: Ralph Waldo Emerson Societycontact email: leckel@suffolk.edu

** Emerson Society Awards 2010 **

The Ralph Waldo Emerson Society announces three awards for projects that foster appreciation for Emerson.

*Research Grant*
Provides up to $500 to support scholarly work on Emerson. Preference given to junior scholars and graduate students. Submit a 1-2-page project description by March 1, 2010.

*Pedagogy or Community Project Award*
Provides up to $500 to support projects designed to bring Emerson to a non-academic audience. Submit a 1-2-page project description by March 1, 2010.

*Subvention Award*
Provides up to $500 to support costs attending the publication of a scholarly book or article on Emerson and his circle. Submit a 1-2-page proposal, including an abstract of the forthcoming work and a description of publication expenses, by March 1, 2010.

Send Research, Pedagogy/Community, and Subvention proposals to:

Leslie Eckel (leckel@suffolk.edu)
and
Daniel Malachuk (ds-malachuk@wiu.edu)

cfp categories: americangeneral_announcements 35883Edited Book: Documentary, Politics and Social Processes in PortugalPatrícia Vieira, Georgetown Universitydpg33@georgetown.edu1265075686cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisionjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicstheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Patrícia Vieira, Georgetown Universitycontact email: dpg33@georgetown.edu

CALL FOR PAPERS FOR EDITED BOOK:

FOUND IMAGES: Documentary, Politics and Social Processes in Portugal

Editors:
Patrícia Vieira (Georgetown University / CEC, University of Lisbon)and Pedro Serra (University of Salamanca).

Documentary films have played a central role in the formation of Portuguese public opinion, in that they both analyze and interpret specific historic events and draw the public's attention to social issues or governmental policies. Starting with the propaganda documentaries from the dictatorial regime of the New State (1933-1974), through movies that documented Portugal's transition to democracy (1974-1976), to documentaries produced during the democratic period (1976-today), this film genre has determined the ways in which Portuguese society faces its socio-political developments, thus becoming a sort of a filter that interprets reality. Further, some documentaries are conceived as an archive of images about key moments in the country's past and, therefore, strive to create a critical awareness of national history.
In Found Images we will select papers that reflect upon the interrelation between documentary and politics in Portugal. Articles can focus on theoretical questions pertaining to the link between documentary and politics, on broader themes in the development of Portuguese documentary film, or perform a more specific analysis of either the work of a filmmaker or a particular film. We encourage interdisciplinary approaches to the topic, including, cross-media studies, visual studies and cultural studies. Some of the topics we would welcome are: documentary and propaganda; documentary and colonialism; documentary and Portuguese history; documentary and pop culture; literature/music/art and documentary; ethnography/anthropology and documentary; theory of the documentary; documentary and fiction film; documentary and performance; documentary and journalism; documentary and meta-documentary/post-documentary.

• Papers are accepted in Portuguese, English, Spanish and French.
• Deadline for sending papers: June 1, 2010.
• Length of papers: 35.000 characters (with spaces).
• Articles should be e-mail to Patrícia Vieira (piv2@georgetown.edu) and Pedro Serra (pedroserra@telefonica.net).

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisionjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicstheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 35884"Aging, Old Age, Memory, and Aesthetics": University of Toronto, March 2011 University of Toronto, Canadaandrea.charise@utoronto.ca1265083045african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinternational_conferencesmedievalpoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: University of Toronto, Canadacontact email: andrea.charise@utoronto.ca

.
.
Complete CFP available here: http://sites.google.com/site/agingoldagememoryaesthetics/.

This conference is interested in theorizations and analyses of literature and the arts that consider how aging is portrayed and experienced in light of social, political, scientific and cultural contexts that support diverse speculations about old age, aging, memory and aesthetics. In using the term aesthetics, we are drawing attention to the arts, aesthetic practices, theories of art, and modes of representation as they pertain to aging and memory. We look forward to presentations that analyze a variety of theoretical, thematic, and disciplinary approaches that remain linked by the consistent placement of old age and aging at the centre of concentrated investigation. Please send your 300-word proposal to andrea.charise@utoronto.ca by Friday October 1, 2010. This event is supported by the Graduate Department of English and the Institute for Life Course and Aging, Faculty of Medicine, at The University of Toronto.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinternational_conferencesmedievalpoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 358853rd Global Conference: Madness - Probing the Boundaries (September 2010: Oxford, United Kingdom)Dr Rob Fisher/Inter-Disciplinary.Netmad3@inter-disciplinary.net1265104747african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicstheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Dr Rob Fisher/Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: mad3@inter-disciplinary.net

3rd Global Conference
Madness: Probing the Boundaries

Tuesday 14th September – Thursday 16th September 2010
Oriel College, Oxford

Call for Papers
This inter-disciplinary research conference seeks to explore issues of madness across historical periods and within cultural, political and social contexts. We are also interested in exploring the place of madness in persons and interpersonal relationships and across a range of critical perspectives. Seeking to encourage innovative inter, multi and post disciplinary dialogues, we warmly welcome papers from all disciplines, professions and vocations which struggle to understand the place of madness in the constitution of persons, relationships and the complex interlacing of self and other.

In particular papers, workshops, presentations and pre-formed panel proposals are invited on any of the following themes:

1. The Value of Madness or Why is it that We Need Madness?
~ Critical explorations: beyond madness/sanity/insanity
~ Continuity and difference: always with us yet never quite the same
~ Repetition and novelty: the incessant emergence and re-emergence of madness
~ Profound attraction and desire; fear of the abyss and the radical unknown
~ Naming, defining and understanding the elusive

2. The Passion of Madness or Madness and the Emotions
~ Love as madness; uncontrollable passion; unrestrainable love
~ Passion and love as a remaking of life and self
~ Gender and madness; the feminine and the masculine
~ Anger, resentment, revenge, hate, evil
~ I would rather vomit, thank you; revulsion, badness and refusing to comply

3. The Boundaries of Madness or Resisting Normality
~ Madness, sanity and the insane
~ Being out of your mind, crazy, deranged … yet, perfectly sane
~ Deviating from the normal; defining the self against the normal
~ Control, self-control and the pull of the abyss
~ When the insane becomes normal; when evil reins social life

4. Lunatics and the Asylum or Power and the Politics of Madness
~ The social allure and fear of madness; the institutions of confining mad people
~ Servicing normality by castigating the insane and marginalizing lunatics
~ Medicine, psychiatry, psychology, law and the constructions of madness; madness as illness
~ Contributions of the social sciences to the making and the critique of the making of madness
~ Representations, explanations and the critique of madness from the humanities and the arts

5. Creativity, Critique and Cutting Edge
~ Madness as genius, outstanding, out of the ordinary, spectacularly brilliant
~ The art of madness; the science of madness
~ Music, painting, dance, theatre: it is crazy to think of art without madness
~ The language and communication of madness: who can translate?
~ Creation as an unfolding of madness

6. Unrestrained and Boundless or The Liberating Promise of Madness
~ Metaphors of feeling free, unrestrained, capable, lifted from reality
~ Madness as clear-sightedness, as opening up possibilities, as re-visioning of the world
~ The future, the prophetic, the unknown; the epic, the heroic and the tragic
~ The unreachable and untouchable knowledge of madness
~ The insanity of not loving madness

7. Lessons for Self and Other or Lessons for Life about and from Madness
~ Cultural and social constructions of madness; images of the mad, crazy, insane, lunatic, abnormal
~ What is real? Who defines reality? Learning from madness how to cope with reality
~ Recognising madness in oneself; relativising madness in others
~ Love, intimacy, care and the small spaces of madness
~ Critical and ethical implosions of normality and normalness; sane in insane places and insane in sane places

Papers will be accepted which deal with related areas and themes.

The 2010 meeting of Madness will run alongside our project on Villains and Villainy and we anticipate holding sessions in common between the two projects. We welcome any papers considering the problems or addressing issues of Mad Villains, Madness and Villainy and related themes.

Papers will be considered on any related theme. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 26th March 2010. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 13th August 2010.

300 word abstracts should be submitted to the Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats, following this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract
E-mails should be entitled: Madness Abstract Submission

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Organising Chairs

* Gonzalo Araoz
University of Cumbria, Cumbria, United Kingdom
E-mail: Gonzalo.Araoz@cumbria.ac.uk
.
* Maria Vaccarella
Hub Leader, Making Sense Of: and Marie Curie Research Fellow, King's College, London
E-mail: maria.vaccarella@inter-disciplinary.net
.
* Rob Fisher
Network Founder and Network Leader, Inter-Disciplinary.Net, Freeland, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
E-mail: mad3@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the 'Making Sense Of:' series of research projects. The aim of the conference is to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and exciting. All papers accepted for and presented at this conference are eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be invited to go forward for development into a themed ISBN hard copy volume.

For further details about the project please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/making-sense-of...

For further details about the conference please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/making-sense-of...

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicstheatretwentieth_century_and_beyond 358868th Global Conference: Monsters and the Monstrous (September 2010: Oxford, United Kingdom)Dr Rob Fisher/Inter-Disciplinary.Netm8@inter-disciplinary.net1265107400african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinternational_conferencesmedievalpoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissancetheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr Rob Fisher/Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: m8@inter-disciplinary.net

8th Global Conference
Monsters and the Monstrous

Sunday 19th September – Wednesday 22nd September 2010
Oriel College, Oxford

Call for Papers
This inter-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary project seeks to investigate and explore the enduring influence and imagery of monsters and the monstrous on human culture throughout history. In particular, the project will have a dual focus with the intention of examining specific 'monsters' as well as assessing the role, function and consequences of persons, actions or events identified as 'monstrous'. The history and contemporary cultural influences of monsters and monstrous metaphors will also be examined.

Papers, reports, work-in-progress, workshops and pre-formed panels are invited on issues related to any of the following themes:

* The "monster" through history
* Civilization, monsters and the monstrous
* Children, childhood, stories and monsters
* Comedy: funny monsters and/or making fun of monsters (e.g. Monsters Inc, the Addams Family)
* Making monsters; monstrous births, childhood
* Mutants and mutations and freaks
* Technologies of the monstrous (including RPG)
* Horror, fear and scare
* Do monsters kill because they are monstrous or are they monstrous because they kill?
* How critical to the definition of "monster" is death or the threat of death?
* Human 'monsters' and 'monstrous' acts? e.g, perverts, paedophiles and serial killers
* Revolution and monsters
* Enemies (political/social/military) and monsters
* Iconography of the monstrous
* The popularity of the modern monsters; the Mummy, Dracula, Frankenstein, Vampires, Cannibals
* The monster in literature
* The monster in media (television, cinema, radio, internet)
* Religious depictions of the monstrous
* Metaphors and the monstrous
* The problematic attraction and admiration of monsters
* Gothic Monsters
* Critical Theories on the Monstrous

Papers will be accepted which deal solely with specific monsters. This project will run concurrently with our project on Strangers, Aliens and Foreigners – we welcome any papers considering the problems or addressing issues on Monsters and Strangers, Aliens and Foreigners for a cross-over panel.

300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 26th March 2010. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 13th August 2010.

300 word abstracts should be submitted to the Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats, following this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract
E-mails should be entitled: Monsters Abstract Submission

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Organising Chairs

* Sorcha Ni Fhlainn
Hub Leader, Evil Hub, Inter-Disciplinary.Net
School of English, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland
E-mail: snf@inter-disciplinary.net
.
* Rob Fisher
Network Founder & Leader, Inter-Disciplinary.Net
Freeland, Oxfordshire
United Kingdom
E-mail: m8@inter-disciplinary.net
.
* Stephen Morris
Hub Leader
Independent Scholar
New York, USA
USA
E-mail: smmorris58@yahoo.com

The aim of the conference is to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and exciting. All papers accepted for and presented at this conference are eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be invited to go forward for development into a themed ISBN hard copy volume. Some papers may also be invited for inclusion in the soon to be launched Journal of Monsters and the Monstrous.

For further details about the project please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/at-the-interface/evil/monsters-and-the...

For further details about the conference please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/at-the-interface/evil/monsters-and-the...

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinternational_conferencesmedievalpoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissancetheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 358872010 International Conference on Active Media TechnologyWeb Intelligence Consortium (WIC) and IEEE Task Force on Brain Informatics (IEEE TF-BI)pawan@cs.smu.ca1265110624humanities_computing_and_the_internetinternational_conferencesfull name / name of organization: Web Intelligence Consortium (WIC) and IEEE Task Force on Brain Informatics (IEEE TF-BI)contact email: pawan@cs.smu.ca

[Apologies if you receive this more than once]

####################################################################
Active Media Technology 2010

CALL FOR PAPERS
####################################################################

2010 International Conference on Active Media Technology (AMT 2010)

August 28-30, 2010, Toronto, Canada

Homepage: http://www.wici-lab.org/amtbi10/
Mirror page: http://www.cs.uregina.ca/~amtbi10

Co-organized by Web Intelligence Consortium (WIC)
IEEE Task Force on Brain Informatics (IEEE TF-BI)
Co-sponsored by York University, Toronto, Canada
University of Regina, Regina, Canada
Springer Lecture Notes in Computer Science

##################################################################
# Papers Due: *** 31 March 2010 ***
# Accepted papers will be published by Springer as a volume of
# the series of LNCS/LNAI.
# Extensions of selected papers from the proceedings will be
# considered for publication in special issues of journals,
##################################################################

In the great digital era, we are witnessing many rapid
scientific and technological developments in human-centred,
seamless computing environments, interfaces, devices, and
systems with applications ranging from business and communication
to entertainment and learning. These developments are collectively
best characterized as Active Media Technology (AMT), a new area
of intelligent information technology and computer science that
emphasizes the proactive, seamless roles of interfaces and systems
as well as new media in all aspects of digital life. An AMT based
system offers services to enable the rapid design, implementation
and support of customized solutions.

The first International Conference on Active Media Technology
(AMT01) was held in Hong Kong in 2001, the second International
Conference on Active Media Technology (AMT04) was held in Chongqing,
China in May 29-31 of 2004, the third International Conference on
Active Media Technology (AMT05) was held in Kagawa, Japan in May
2005, the fourth International Conference on Active Media
Technology (AMT06) was held in Brisbane, Australia in June 7-9,
2006, and the fifth International Conference on Active Media
Technology (AMT09) was jointly held with the 2009
International Conference on Brain Informatics (BI 2009).
Following the success of AMT01, AMT04, AMT05, AMT06 and AMT09,
the Sixth International Conference on Active Media Technology
(AMT10) will be held in Toronto, Canada from August 28-30, 2010.

Active Media Technology 2010 will be jointly held with the 2010
International Conference on Brain Informatics (BI 2010). The two
conferences will have a joint opening, keynote, reception, and
banquet. Attendees only need to register for one conference and can
attend workshops, sessions, exhibits and demonstrations across the
two conferences.

+++++++++++++++++++
Topics of Interest
+++++++++++++++++++

CONFERENCE TOPICS AND AREAS INCLUDE, BUT NOT LIMITED TO

* Active Computer Systems and Intelligent Interfaces
* Adaptive Web Systems and Information Foraging Agents
* Agent-Based Software Engineering and Multi-Agent Systems
* AMT for Semantic Web and Web2.0
* Cognitive Foundations for AMT
* Conversational Informatics
* Data Mining, Ontology Mining and Web Reasoning
* Digital City and Digital Interactivity
* E-Commerce and Web Services
* E-learning
* Entertainment and Social Applications of Active Media
* Evaluation of Active Media and AMT Based Systems
* Human-Web Interaction
* Human Factors in AMT
* Information Retrieval
* Machine Learning and Human-Centred Robotics
* Multi-Modal Processing, Detection, Recognition, and
Expression Analysis
* Network, Mobile and Wireless Security
* Personalized, Pervasive, and Ubiquitous Systems and their
Interfaces
* Semantic Computing for Active Media and AMT Based Systems
* Sensing Web
* Smart Digital Media
* Trust on Web Information Systems
* Web Based Social Networks
* Web Mining, Wisdom Web and Web Intelligence

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
On-Line Submissions and Publication
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

High-quality papers in all AMT related areas are solicited. Papers
exploring new directions will receive a careful and supportive
review. All submitted papers will be reviewed on the basis of
technical quality, relevance, significance, and clarity.

The proceeding of the conference will be published by Springer as a
volume of the series of Lecture Notes in Computer Science/Lecture
Notes in Artificial Intelligence (LNCS/LNAI).
Extensions of selected papers from the proceedings will be
considered for publication in special issues of international journals,
including Journal of Intelligent Information Systems (Springer,
http://www.editorialmanager.com/jiis/).

Authors are strongly encouraged to use Springer LNCS/LNAI manuscript
submission guidelines (available at
http://www.springer.de/comp/lncs/authors.html) for their initial
submissions (a maximum of 12 pages in Springer LNCS/LNAI style file).
All papers must be submitted electronically in PDF format
only, using the conference management tool.

We will also have poster, demonstration, and late breaking result
paper sessions. Detailed instructions and a paper submission form
can be found the AMT'10 Web page at http://www.wici-lab.org/amtbi10/

++++++++++++++
Special Issues
++++++++++++++

A selected number of BI 2010 accepted papers will be expanded and
revised for inclusion in several international journals.

+++++++
Awards
+++++++

AMT 2010 best paper awards and student paper awards will be
conferred on the authors at the conference.

++++++++++++++++
Important Dates
++++++++++++++++

Electronic submission of full papers
(12 pages in Springer LNAI/LNCS style file):
*** 31 March 2010 ***

Notification of paper acceptance: June 1, 2010
Camera-ready of accepted papers: June 24, 2010
Conference: August 28-30, 2010

++++++++++++++++++++++++
Conference Organization
++++++++++++++++++++++++

Conference General Chairs:
* Sheela Petty, University of Regina, Canada
* Runhe Huang, Hosei University, Japan

Program Chairs:
* Pawan Lingras, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, Canada
* Aijun An, York University, Toronto, Canada

Organizing Chair:
* Jimmy Huang, York University, Toronto, Canada

Publicity Chairs:
* Daniel Tao, Queensland University of Technology, Australia
* Jian Yang, International WIC Institute/BJUT, China

IEEE-CIS-TFBI Chair
* Ning Zhong, Maebashi Institute of Technology, Japan

WIC Co-Chairs/Directors:
* Ning Zhong, Maebashi Institute of Technology, Japan
* Jiming Liu, Hong Kong Baptist University, HK

WIC Advisory Board:
* Edward A. Feigenbaum, Stanford University, USA
* Setsuo Ohsuga, University of Tokyo, Japan
* Benjamin Wah, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA
* Philip Yu, University of Illinois, Chicago, USA
* L.A. Zadeh, University of California, Berkeley, USA

WIC Tech. Committee & WI/IAT Steering Committee:
* Jeffrey Bradshaw, UWF/Institute for Human and Machine Cognition, USA
* Nick Cercone, York University, Canada
* Dieter Fensel, University of Innsbruck, Austria
* Georg Gottlob, Oxford University, UK
* Lakhmi Jain, University of South Australia, Australia
* Jianchang Mao, Yahoo! Inc., USA
* Pierre Morizet-Mahoudeaux, Compiegne University of Technology, France
* Hiroshi Motoda, Osaka University, Japan
* Toyoaki Nishida, Kyoto University, Japan
* Andrzej Skowron, Warsaw University, Poland
* Jinglong Wu, Okayama University, Japan
* Xindong Wu, University of Vermont, USA
* Yiyu Yao, University of Regina, Canada

*** Contact Information ***

Email: Pawan Lingras pawan@cs.smu.ca
Aijun An aan@cse.yorku.ca

cfp categories: humanities_computing_and_the_internetinternational_conferences 358882010 International Conference on Brain Informatics (BI 2010)Web Intelligence Consortium (WIC) and IEEE Task Force on Brain Informatics (IEEE TF-BI)yyao@cs.uregina.cabvg1265110757humanities_computing_and_the_internetinternational_conferencesfull name / name of organization: Web Intelligence Consortium (WIC) and IEEE Task Force on Brain Informatics (IEEE TF-BI)contact email: yyao@cs.uregina.cabvg

[Apologies if you receive this more than once]

###############################################################
Brain Informatics 2010

CALL FOR PAPERS
###############################################################

2010 International Conference on Brain Informatics (BI 2010)

August 28-30, 2010, Toronto, Canada

Homepage: http://www.wici-lab.org/amtbi10
Mirror page: http://www.cs.uregina.ca/~amtbi10

Co-organized by Web Intelligence Consortium (WIC)
IEEE Task Force on Brain Informatics (IEEE TF-BI)
Co-sponsored by York University, Toronto, Canada
University of Regina, Regina, Canada
Springer Lecture Notes in Computer Science

##################################################################
# Papers Due: *** 31 March 2010 ***
# Accepted papers will be published by Springer as a volume of
# the series of LNCS/LNAI.
# Extensions of selected papers from the proceedings will be
# considered for publication in special issues of journals,
##################################################################

Brain Informatics (BI) is an emerging interdisciplinary and
multi-disciplinary research field that focuses on studying the
mechanisms underlying the human information processing system (HIPS).
BI investigates the essential functions of the brain, ranging from
perception to thinking, and encompassing such areas as multi-
perception, attention, memory, language, computation, heuristic
search, reasoning, planning, decision-making, problem-solving,
learning, discovery, and creativity. One goal of BI research is to
develop and demonstrate a systematic approach to an integrated
understanding of macroscopic and microscopic level working principles
of the brain, by means of experimental, computational, and cognitive
neuroscience studies, as well as utilizing advanced Web Intelligence
(WI) centric information technologies. Another goal is to promote
new forms of collaborative and interdisciplinary work. New kinds
of BI methods and global research communities will emerge, through
infrastructure on the wisdom Web and knowledge grids that enables high
speed and distributed, large-scale analysis and computations, and
radically new ways of data/knowledge sharing.

The series of Brain Informatics Conferences started with
The First WICI International Workshop on Web Intelligence meets
Brain Informatics (WImBI'06), held at Beijing, China, December
15-16, 2006. The second conference, Brain Informatics 2009, was
held again in Beijing, China, October 22-24, 2009. The Brain
Informatics Conferences provide a leading international forum to bring
together researchers and practitioners from diverse fields, such as
computer science, information technology, artificial intelligence, Web
intelligence, cognitive science, neuroscience, medical science, life
science, economics, data mining, data and knowledge engineering,
intelligent agent technology, human computer interaction, complex
systems, and system science, to explore the main research problems in
BI lie in the interplay between the studies of human brain and the
research of informatics. On the one hand, one models and
characterizes the functions of the human brain based on the notions of
information processing systems. WI centric information technologies
are applied to support brain science studies. For instance, the
wisdom Web and knowledge grids enable high-speed, large-scale
analysis, simulation, and computation as well as new ways of sharing
research data and scientific discoveries. On the other hand,
informatics-enabled brain studies, e.g., based on fMRI, EEG, MEG
significantly broaden the spectrum of theories and models of brain
sciences and offer new insights into the development of human-level
intelligence on the wisdom Web and knowledge grids.

Brain Informatics 2010 will be jointly held with the 2010
International Conference on Active Media Technology (AMT 2010).
The two conferences will have a joint opening, keynote, reception, and
banquet. Attendees only need to register for one conference and can
attend workshops, sessions, exhibits and demonstrations across the two
conferences.

+++++++++++++++++++
Topics of Interest
+++++++++++++++++++

CONFERENCE TOPICS AND AREAS INCLUDE, BUT NOT LIMITED TO

- Thinking and perception-centric investigations of HIPS:

* Human reasoning mechanisms
(e.g., principles of human deductive/inductive reasoning,
common-sense reasoning, decision making, and problem solving)
* Human learning mechanisms
(e.g., stability, personalized user/student models)
* Emotion, heuristic search, information granularity, and autonomy
related issues in human reasoning and problem solving
* Human higher cognitive functions and their relationships
* Human multi-perception mechanisms and visual, auditory,
and tactile information processing
* Methodologies for systematic design of cognitive experiments
* Investigating spatiotemporal characteristics and flow in HIPS and
the related neural structures and neurobiological process
* Cognitive architectures
* ACT-R meets fMRI/EEG/MEG
* HIPS meets complex systems
* Modeling brain information processing mechanisms
(e.g., neuro-mechanism, mathematical, cognitive and computational models
of HIPS).

- Information technologies for the management and use of brain data:

* Human brain data collection, pre-processing, management, and analysis
* Databasing the brain and constructing data brain models
* Data brain modeling and formal conceptual models of human brain data
* Multi-media brain data mining and reasoning
* Multi-aspect analysis in fMRI/EEG/MEG activations
* Simulating spatiotemporal characteristics and flow in HIPS
* Developing brain data grids and brain research support portals
* Knowledge representation and discovery in neuroimaging
* Multimodal information fusion for brain image interpretation
* Statistical analysis and pattern recognition in neuroimaging

- Applications

* Neuro-economics and neuro-marketing
* Brain-Computer-Interface (BCI)
* Brain/Cognition inspired artifical systems
* Wisdom Web systems based on new cognitive and computational models
* MCI and AD diagnosis
* e-Science and e-Medicine

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
On-Line Submissions and Publication
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

High-quality papers in all BI related areas are solicited. Papers
exploring new directions will receive a careful and supportive review.
All submitted papers will be reviewed on the basis of technical
quality, relevance, significance, and clarity.

The proceeding of the conference will be published by Springer as a
volume of the series of Lecture Notes in Computer Science/Lecture
Notes in Artificial Intelligence (LNCS/LNAI). (Pending for approval.)

Authors are strongly encouraged to use Springer LNCS/LNAI
manuscript submission guidelines (available at
http://www.springer.de/comp/lncs/authors.html)
for their initial submissions (a maximum of 12 pages in Springer
LNCS/LNAI style file). All papers must be submitted electronically
in PDF format only, using the conference management tool.

We will also have poster, demonstration, and late breaking result
paper sessions. More detailed instructions and a paper submission
form can be found the BI'10 Web page at
http://www.wici-lab.org/amtbi10/

++++++++++++++
Special Issues
++++++++++++++

A selected number of BI 2010 accepted papers will be expanded and
revised for inclusion in several international journals.

+++++++
Awards
+++++++

BI 2009 best paper awards and student paper awards will be conferred
on the authors at the conference.

++++++++++++++++
Important Dates
++++++++++++++++

Electronic submission of full papers
(12 pages in Springer LNAI/LNCS style file):
*** 31 March 2010 ***

Notification of paper acceptance: June 1, 2010
Camera-ready of accepted papers: June 24, 2010
Conference: August 28-30, 2010

++++++++++++++++++++++++
Conference Organization
++++++++++++++++++++++++

Conference General Chairs:
* Tomaso Poggio, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
* Jiming Liu, Hong Kong Baptist University, HK

Program Chairs:
* Yiyu Yao, University of Regina, Canada
* Ron Sun, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA

Organizing Chair:
* Jimmy Huang, York University, Toronto, Canada

Publicity Chairs:
* Jian Yang, International WIC Institute/BJUT, China
* Daniel Tao, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

IEEE-CIS-TFBI Chair
* Ning Zhong, Maebashi Institute of Technology, Japan

WIC Co-Chairs/Directors:
* Ning Zhong, Maebashi Institute of Technology, Japan
* Jiming Liu, Hong Kong Baptist University, HK

WIC Advisory Board:
* Edward A. Feigenbaum, Stanford University, USA
* Setsuo Ohsuga, University of Tokyo, Japan
* Benjamin Wah, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA
* Philip Yu, University of Illinois, Chicago, USA
* L.A. Zadeh, University of California, Berkeley, USA

WIC Tech. Committee & WI/IAT Steering Committee:
* Jeffrey Bradshaw, UWF/Institute for Human and Machine Cognition, USA
* Nick Cercone, York University, Canada
* Dieter Fensel, University of Innsbruck, Austria
* Georg Gottlob, Oxford University, UK
* Lakhmi Jain, University of South Australia, Australia
* Jianchang Mao, Yahoo! Inc., USA
* Pierre Morizet-Mahoudeaux, Compiegne University of Technology, France
* Hiroshi Motoda, Osaka University, Japan
* Toyoaki Nishida, Kyoto University, Japan
* Andrzej Skowron, Warsaw University, Poland
* Jinglong Wu, Okayama University, Japan
* Xindong Wu, University of Vermont, USA
* Yiyu Yao, University of Regina, Canada

*** Contact Information ***

Email: Yiyu Yao
Jimmy Huang

cfp categories: humanities_computing_and_the_internetinternational_conferences 35889Shakespeare in the media: old and newAnglistica. An Interdisciplinary Journalanglistica@unior.it1265126664cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisionhumanities_computing_and_the_internetrenaissancetheatrefull name / name of organization: Anglistica. An Interdisciplinary Journalcontact email: anglistica@unior.it

Editors:
Anna Maria Cimitile, Università degli Studi di Napoli 'L'Orientale', Italy
Katherine Rowe, Bryn Mawr College, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.

Deadline: 30 June 2010

We especially welcome articles on less known, more radical or experimental Shakespearean re-visions in the fields of cinema, new media and the visual arts. Issues for analysis might include: The old and the new, fixed categories? Is cinema, whose essence was montage for Eisenstein, image-time and image-movement for Deleuze, a new or old medium? / From painting to stage photography and the fragments of footage material from the plays' mises en scène, what is the cultural politics of representing representations of Shakespeare? / The long history of media convergence and intermedial effects: plays within the film, videos within the play, etc. / Between 'deep attention' and 'hyperattention', how do the transformative possibilities of new media affect the way we process Shakespearean texts? / Shakespeare, new media and philosophy. New media and new subjectivities. Intercultural Shakespeare in new media. Shakespeare and diagrammatic knowledge. GIS, mapping and topological Shakespeare.

Articles should be sent to the editors of the issue, A. M. Cimitile (amcimitile@unior.it) and K. Rowe (krowe@brynmawr.edu), in compliance with the guidelines of the journal (available in .pdf at www.anglistica.unior.it).

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisionhumanities_computing_and_the_internetrenaissancetheatre 35890Aesthetics of New Literatures in EnglishRupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanitieseditor@rupkatha.com1265130383general_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetjournals_and_collections_of_essayspostcolonialrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanitiescontact email: editor@rupkatha.com

Rupkatha journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities (ISSN 0975-2935) invites articles, creative works and book reviewes on New Literatures English for Volume 2, Issue 2. Articles should focus specifically on the aesthetic aspects of the genres, author/s or/and particular works and should not hold on to the political theories unnecessarily.

For submission of critical writings, please send:
• Completed article (3000-5000 words)
• Abstract (100-200 words)
• 3 to 5 Keywords
• Brief/detailed CV

For submission of creative works, please send:
• Analytical Description of Works (2000-3000 words)
• Maximum 5 images in JPG format, at least 800 pixels wide or tall.
• Abstract (100 words)
• 3 to 5 Keywords
• Brief CV

We may be also contacted for Book Review. However, it is essential that we are sent a copy of the book by the publisher or author.

Website address: www.rupkatha.com
Visit to know more about the journal and the submission process: http://www.rupkatha.com/submissionguidelines.php
Please send submissions and queries to: editor@rupkatha.com
DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS: March 5, 2010.

cfp categories: general_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetjournals_and_collections_of_essayspostcolonialrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 35891Retroactive Listening: Perspectives on Music and TechnologyPopMatters.comeditor@popmatters.com1265132292americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementspopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: PopMatters.comcontact email: editor@popmatters.com

Retroactive Listening: Perspectives on Music & Technology

Pitch Deadline: 20 February 2010

Final Deadline: 15 March 2010

Contact: Sarah Zupko and Louis J. Battaglia

Email: editor@popmatters.com">editor@popmatters.com AND battaglia@popmatters.com

+ + +

There was a time when passive listening was impossible, when the only way to hear a song was to watch it live or to play it yourself, but nowadays even the shortest train ride is interminable without an iPod. Vinyl records have become products for enthusiasts, that group of people for whom a piece of music has value as a physical object in addition to the stream of data representing those sad, sweet longitudinal waves. What does it mean for a song to be a "B-side" in 2009? What use is a single when almost all songs are available a la carte? What role has technology played in changing the ways we think about the music we create?

We are looking for smart, focused essays on the inflection points of musical history, those moments in time when the acts of listening, performing, and experiencing music became something new entirely. An evolutionary biologist might call it mutation; we'll go with progress. Some benchmarks were bound to be crossed eventually: if the Beatles didn't play Shea Stadium, surely someone else would have. But there's always a story in the specificity of the event. Why then? Why there? And as much as we're looking for stories of the innovations themselves, we're interested in hearing about the wider impact of technology's persistent meddling in music history.

The scope of this series is intentionally broad, and you are free to cover topics unbound by space and time, as long as music and technology are central to your paper. Speculate! Explicate! Ruminate! Depth, not breadth, is the operative dimension here. And we want essays that are written like something is at stake, because we believe that there is a universe of difference between listening to Pearl Jam at the Garden and listening to Dan Bejar in a dive bar, and the simple matter of whether a person is playing guitar through racks upon racks of amps or scraping a güiro has implications on perception and identity that stretch far beyond the sounds emanating from the instrument. There are powerful forces at work here, people. We'll be satisfied to get the briefest of glimpses at the heart of the matter.

Pitches will be due by 20 February 2010, and we'll need your pieces in no later than 15 March 2010. Typically, features on our site are between 1,000-3,500 words, but take it longer if the mood strikes you.

Any questions or complaints should be directed to Sarah Zupko and Louis J. Battaglia, the editors for this special feature, at editor@popmatters.com AND battaglia@popmatters.com

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementspopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 35892[UPDATE] Deadline Extended: Collection of Critical Essays on MACBETHROMAN Bookssuman.chakraborty@yahoo.co.uk1265132399journals_and_collections_of_essaysrenaissancefull name / name of organization: ROMAN Bookscontact email: suman.chakraborty@yahoo.co.uk



Please note that we have extended our deadline for the collection of critical essays on MACBETH and the new deadline is 31st March 2010. For more details please see the full CfP here or from our website: http://www.romanbooks.co.in/macbethcfp.php.

ROMAN Books, a leading publisher of literature and literary criticism, is planning to publish a collection of critical essays on William Shakespeare's MACBETH. We are presently seeking articles on any topic related to MACBETH for possible publication in this critical anthology. The collection will be edited by Suman Chakraborty.

--------------------------------
SUBMISSION PROCEDURE
--------------------------------

1. The article should be electronically typed and printed on one side of an A4 sized paper with 1.5 line spacing, 12 pt Palatino Linotype font and a minimum of 1" margin on each side.

2. The article MUST strictly follow the house style of ROMAN Books which can be downloaded from http://www.romanbooks.co.in/housestyle.pdf.

3. The author MUST follow the Arden edition of the text of MACBETH, edited by Kenneth Muir, for textual referencing.

4. The maximum word limit permissible for each article is 3000. Longer articles or articles with less than 1500 words may also be accepted with prior arrangements with the editor.

5. The article MUST be directly related to MACBETH. The author may, if necessary, include discussions on any other related texts written by Shakespeare. But the predominant discussion MUST be linked to Macbeth.

6. Previously published articles are welcome if the contributor owns the copyright of the article. Please mention in your covering e-mail where the article was first published.

7. Please use endnotes and NOT footnotes.

8. Please use UK English spellings.

9. Please send your articles as an MS Word attachment with a covering e-mail to the editor suman.chakraborty@yahoo.co.uk.

10. In your covering e-mail please mention clearly your name, contact details and your institutional affiliation (if any).

--------------------------------
SUBMISSION DEADLINE
--------------------------------

31st March 2010. Early submission appreciated.

--------------------------------
RIGHTS
--------------------------------

In accordance with the requirement of the publisher, the author has to transfer the copyright of his / her contribution to the appropriate authority. However, if requested, the author will be given necessary UNRESTRICTED PERMISSION to copy / publish / reproduce his / her article anywhere. The Copyright Assignment Form will be sent to the author after the acceptance of his / her article.

--------------------------------
HONORARIUM
--------------------------------

The author will be given two copies of the book as honorarium. Special discounts will be given if he / she wishes to buy more copies.

--------------------------------
ABOUT THE EDITOR
--------------------------------

Suman Chakraborty studied English at the Universities of Calcutta and Glasgow. He is the author of "Creative Writing: A Practical Approach", editor of "Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest", and co-editor of "C.U. English Honours Questions: An Essential Companion". His articles, monographs and academic contributions have appeared in a number of publications of international repute including The Dictionary of Literary Characters, Indian Review of World Literature in English and IACLALS Newsletter. He presented his research papers in London and Scotland and is an advisory editor of "Parnassus: An Innovative Journal of Literary Criticism" (ISSN 0975-0266) and "The Journal of Contemporary Literature" (ISSN 0975-1637).

--------------------------------
CONTACT
--------------------------------

For any assistance and / or article submission, please contact the editor of the anthology Mr Suman Chakraborty at suman.chakraborty@yahoo.co.uk.

cfp categories: journals_and_collections_of_essaysrenaissance 35893Workshop on 3D Visualisation of Natural LanguageCardiff University, U.K.m.ma@derby.ac.uk1265132422humanities_computing_and_the_internetinternational_conferencesfull name / name of organization: Cardiff University, U.K.contact email: m.ma@derby.ac.uk

===== Call for Papers =======

Workshop on 3D Visualisation of Natural Language

to be held as part of KES2010: 14th International Conference on Knowledge-Based and Intelligent Information & Engineering Systems. http://kes2010.kesinternational.org

8-10 September 2010, Cardiff University, UK

Aims and Scope

Natural language understanding usually involves transforming language from one representation into another, for example, from one language into another language in machine translation, or from language to action in natural language interfaces where natural language commands are performed by a machine, or from language to visual representations in natural language visualisation. A language visualisation system understands natural language by transforming it from a linguistic form into a visual medium, such as a 3D scene or animation. The vital issues of natural language visualisation include representation of common sense knowledge, disambiguation, lexicons and ontology, spatial reasoning, animation generation, just to name a few. Currently, it is a quite new interdisciplinary subject emerging from the areas of natural language processing and computer graphics.

This workshop aims to provide a platform for researchers from around the globe to share their ideas, experience and research outcomes in natural language processing and 3D visualisation and to nurture interdisciplinary research on the new subject of language visualisation. Authors are invited to submit papers based upon academically rigorous research in both theoretical development and applied research. Papers should present original work that has not been published. Papers with real-world applications are especially welcome.

Subject Coverage

The main topic of the workshop is 3D visualisation of natural language. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

1. 3D visualisation
• Computer animation
• Physically-based simulation
• Automatic 3D scene and animation generation
• Embodied Agents, Virtual Humans

2. Natural Language Processing, computational linguistics
• Natural language understanding
• Computational semantics
• Word sense disambiguation
• Knowledge representation, common sense knowledge representation
• Lexical semantics
• Ontology, lexicons

Instructions for Prospective Authors

The published papers are expected to present high quality material that illustrates the broad range of exciting work being carried out across the work in natural language visualisation. Accepted papers for oral presentation in the workshop will be included in the main conference proceedings, which will be published by Springer LNCS/LNAI. Extended versions of selected papers will be considered for publication in the KES Journal (International Journal of Knowledge-Based and Intelligent Engineering Systems) published by IOS Press, http://www.kesinternational.org/journal/

All papers must be original and of approximately 6–8 pages in length at the publication stage. All papers will be peer-reviewed by the international program committee, and may be accepted for oral presentation. A guide for authors, templates, and other relevant information for submitting papers are available on the Springer Information for LNCS Authors webpage (http://www.springer.com/computer/lncs?SGWID=0-164-7-72376-0).

Papers should be submitted online through the PROSE system. Detailed instructions on paper submission are provided at http://kes2010.kesinternational.org/prose.php

Important Dates
Manuscript due: 1 March 2010
Notification of acceptance: 1 April 2010
Final paper due: 1 May 2010

Registration deadline for presenting authors: 1 May 2010
At least one author of an accepted paper must register for the main conference KES2010. If the registration fees are not received by 1 May 2010 the paper will not be published in the Springer LNCS/LNAI conference proceedings.

Co-Chairs:
Dr. Minhua Ma, University of Derby, UK
Bob Coyne, Columbia University, USA
Prof. Nikolaos Antonopoulos, University of Derby, UK

cfp categories: humanities_computing_and_the_internetinternational_conferences 35894Pop Past – It's 'Past', But It's Never 'Over'PopMatters.comzarker@popmatters.com1265132657african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsmedievalpopular_culturerenaissanceromantictwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: PopMatters.comcontact email: zarker@popmatters.com

There was a time, late 19th/early 20th century or thereabouts, when people, many of them the fashionable French, ventured out to public establishments to imbibe in, among other things, an herbal/licorice/mind-bending brew distilled from the essence of the inelegantly named 'wormwood' plant, which resulted in the poetically named 'absinthe' cocktail. Deep within absinthe's perplexing, complex concoction the "Green Fairy" resided. She is named the "Green Fairy" due to her glowing color and the muse-like inspirations she cast upon some suggestible minds (many quite famous minds, at that). Indeed, absinthe was a fashionable drink among the Parisian artist and intellectual class. You know; those Bohemian-types that so raise the ire of the uptight, fuddy duddy social conservatives and prohibitionists that exist in all societies throughout the world, throughout all time.

A presumably less toxic, less Van Gogh-hysteria-inspiring form of absinthe has regained a toehold in some fancier bars in parts of Europe and America these days, and that's the link between the present and the past in this story. But what's past in popular culture needn't have a modern-day counterpart. Our "Green Fairies", whatever form they take, are the muses that inspire all range of expressions in human behavior otherwise known as the Arts. The behaviors may change (so too, the 'ingredients' which inspire them), but they're all human behaviors, and elevated to the level of Art (or lowered to that level, as the case may be) we can all relate. Even if we haven't imbibed thus.

Pop Past is an ongoing column at PopMatters that welcomes writers to imbibe. We're looking for cultural historians that take delight in looking at human behaviors and expressions past and the Art such musings generate, and then write about such things in irresistibly engaging fashion. Such writers know that they, too, occupy but a temporary spot on the historical timeline, and their point of view is not gleaned from the center, or most elevated point of observation. But it is awfully fun, from wherever they stand, to look back at from whence some members of their species came. The past is a vast, swirling landscape of liquor, literature, art, music, film, fashion...! It's a world rich with passions of so many persuasions.

Such writers pen their pop history essays with a style that is grounded in a deep respect for and knowledge of history; and they lure and entrance curious readers of all stripes to their subject matter just as seductively as that swirling emerald green concoction did its delighted followers, years past.

Note: An element of a writer's life may serve as a thread running through such an essay, thereby lending the piece a personal perspective, but the writer's experience should not be the central focus of a Pop Past essay. Personal pieces tend toward sentimentalism, which can be confused with historical understanding. I am wary of pitches wherein the writer's life takes center stage.

Lure me with your pitch on an interesting aspect of pop culture history at zarker@popmatters.com. Be sure to put PopMatters / Pop Past: (Topic) in your email subject line, or your email may be lost amid the hundreds I receive daily. Your accepted essay will be a minimum of 1,000 words. If it's longer, it may publish across multiple pages, and may even publish over multiple installments of the Pop Past column. The subject matter and your approach will determine that.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsmedievalpopular_culturerenaissanceromantictwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35895[UPDATE] Deadline Extended: Collection of Critical Essays on RIDERS TO THE SEAROMAN Bookssuman.chakraborty@yahoo.co.uk1265133437journals_and_collections_of_essaystwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: ROMAN Bookscontact email: suman.chakraborty@yahoo.co.uk


Please note that we have extended the deadline for the collection of critical essays on J.M. Synge's RIDERS TO THE SEA and the new deadline is 31st March 2010. Please see the full CfP here or from: http://www.romanbooks.co.in/riderscfp.php

ROMAN Books, a leading publisher of literature and literary criticism, is planning to publish a collection of critical essays on J. M. Synge's RIDERS TO THE SEA. We are presently seeking articles on any topic related to RIDERS TO THE SEA for possible publication in this critical anthology. The collection will be edited by Suman Chakraborty.

--------------------------------------
SUBMISSION PROCEDURE:
--------------------------------------

1. The article should be electronically typed and printed on one side of an A4 sized paper with 1.5 line spacing, 12 pt Palatino Linotype font and a minimum of 1" margin on each side.

2. The article MUST strictly follow the house style of ROMAN Books which can be downloaded from http://www.romanbooks.co.in/housestyle.pdf.

3. The author MUST follow the Oxford World Classic edition of the text of RIDERS TO THE SEA, edited by Ann Saddlemyer, for textual referencing. The details of the book is available here: http://books.google.com/books?id=7bcwOAAACAAJ&dq=9780199538058. This book is normally available in any good academic library.

4. The maximum word limit permissible for each article is 3000. Longer articles or articles with less than 1500 words may also be accepted with prior arrangements with the editor.

5. The article MUST be directly related to RIDERS TO THE SEA. The author may, if necessary, include discussions on any other related texts written by Synge. But the predominant discussion MUST be linked to RIDERS TO THE SEA.

6. Previously published articles are welcome if the contributor owns the copyright of the article. Please mention in your covering e-mail where the article was first published.

7. Please use endnotes and NOT footnotes.

8. Please use UK English spellings.

9. Please send your articles as an MS Word attachment with a covering e-mail to the editor suman.chakraborty@yahoo.co.uk.

10. In your covering e-mail please mention clearly your name, contact details and your institutional affiliation (if any).

--------------------------------------
SUBMISSION DEADLINE:
--------------------------------------

31st March 2010. Early submission appreciated.

--------------------------------------
RIGHTS:
--------------------------------------

In accordance with the requirement of the publisher, the author has to transfer the copyright of his / her contribution to the appropriate authority. However, if requested, the author will be given necessary UNRESTRICTED PERMISSION to copy / publish / reproduce his / her article anywhere. The Copyright Assignment Form will be sent to the author after the acceptance of his / her article.

--------------------------------------
HONORARIUM:
--------------------------------------

The author will be given two copies of the book as honorarium. Special discounts will be given if he / she wishes to buy more copies.

--------------------------------------
ABOUT THE EDITOR:
--------------------------------------

Suman Chakraborty studied English at the Universities of Calcutta and Glasgow. He is the author of CREATIVE WRITING: A PRACTICAL APPROACH, editor of OSCAR WILDE'S THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST, and co-editor of C.U. ENGLISH HONOURS QUESTIONS: AN ESSENTIAL COMPANION. His articles, monographs and academic contributions have appeared in a number of publications of international repute including THE DICTIONARY OF LITERARY CHARACTERS, INDIAN REVIEW OF WORLD LITERATURE IN ENGLISH and IACLALS NEWSLETTER. He presented his research papers in London and Scotland and is an advisory editor of PARNASSUS: AN INNOVATIVE JOURNAL OF LITERARY CRITICISM (ISSN 0975-0266) and THE JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE (ISSN 0975- 1637).

--------------------------------------
CONTACT:
--------------------------------------

For any assistance and / or article submission, please contact the editor of the anthology Mr Suman Chakraborty at suman.chakraborty@yahoo.co.uk.

cfp categories: journals_and_collections_of_essaystwentieth_century_and_beyond 35896Collection of Critical Essays on TWELFTH NIGHTROMAN Bookssuman.chakraborty@yahoo.co.uk1265133984journals_and_collections_of_essaysrenaissancefull name / name of organization: ROMAN Bookscontact email: suman.chakraborty@yahoo.co.uk



ROMAN Books, a leading publisher of literature and literary criticism, is planning to publish a collection of critical essays on William Shakespeare's TWELFTH NIGHT. We are presently seeking articles on any topic related to TWELFTH NIGHT for possible publication in this critical anthology. The collection will be edited by Suman Chakraborty.

This CfP is also available at http://www.romanbooks.co.in/riderscfp.php

--------------------------------
SUBMISSION PROCEDURE
--------------------------------

1. The article should be electronically typed and printed on one side of an A4 sized paper with 1.5 line spacing, 12 pt Palatino Linotype font and a minimum of 1" margin on each side.

2. The article MUST strictly follow the house style of ROMAN Books which can be downloaded from http://www.romanbooks.co.in/housestyle.pdf.

3. The author MUST follow the Arden edition of the text of TWELFTH NIGHT, edited by Kenneth Muir, for textual referencing.

4. The maximum word limit permissible for each article is 3000. Longer articles or articles with less than 1500 words may also be accepted with prior arrangements with the editor.

5. The article MUST be directly related to TWELFTH NIGHT. The author may, if necessary, include discussions on any other related texts written by Shakespeare. But the predominant discussion MUST be linked to Macbeth.

6. Previously published articles are welcome if the contributor owns the copyright of the article. Please mention in your covering e-mail where the article was first published.

7. Please use endnotes and NOT footnotes.

8. Please use UK English spellings.

9. Please send your articles as an MS Word attachment with a covering e-mail to the editor suman.chakraborty@yahoo.co.uk.

10. In your covering e-mail please mention clearly your name, contact details and your institutional affiliation (if any).

--------------------------------
SUBMISSION DEADLINE
--------------------------------

31st March 2010. Early submission appreciated.

--------------------------------
RIGHTS
--------------------------------

In accordance with the requirement of the publisher, the author has to transfer the copyright of his / her contribution to the appropriate authority. However, if requested, the author will be given necessary UNRESTRICTED PERMISSION to copy / publish / reproduce his / her article anywhere. The Copyright Assignment Form will be sent to the author after the acceptance of his / her article.

--------------------------------
HONORARIUM
--------------------------------

The author will be given two copies of the book as honorarium. Special discounts will be given if he / she wishes to buy more copies.

--------------------------------
ABOUT THE EDITOR
--------------------------------

Suman Chakraborty studied English at the Universities of Calcutta and Glasgow. He is the author of "Creative Writing: A Practical Approach", editor of "Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest", and co-editor of "C.U. English Honours Questions: An Essential Companion". His articles, monographs and academic contributions have appeared in a number of publications of international repute including The Dictionary of Literary Characters, Indian Review of World Literature in English and IACLALS Newsletter. He presented his research papers in London and Scotland and is an advisory editor of "Parnassus: An Innovative Journal of Literary Criticism" (ISSN 0975-0266) and "The Journal of Contemporary Literature" (ISSN 0975-1637).

--------------------------------
CONTACT
--------------------------------

For any assistance and / or article submission, please contact the editor of the anthology Mr Suman Chakraborty at suman.chakraborty@yahoo.co.uk.

cfp categories: journals_and_collections_of_essaysrenaissance 35897Collection of Critical Essays on TWELFTH NIGHTSuman Chakrabortysuman.chakraborty@yahoo.co.uk1265134222journals_and_collections_of_essaysrenaissancefull name / name of organization: Suman Chakrabortycontact email: suman.chakraborty@yahoo.co.uk



ROMAN Books, a leading publisher of literature and literary criticism, is planning to publish a collection of critical essays on William Shakespeare's TWELFTH NIGHT. We are presently seeking articles on any topic related to TWELFTH NIGHT for possible publication in this critical anthology. The collection will be edited by Suman Chakraborty.


This CfP is also available at http://www.romanbooks.co.in/twelfthcfp.php

--------------------------------
SUBMISSION PROCEDURE
--------------------------------

1. The article should be electronically typed and printed on one side of an A4 sized paper with 1.5 line spacing, 12 pt Palatino Linotype font and a minimum of 1" margin on each side.

2. The article MUST strictly follow the house style of ROMAN Books which can be downloaded from http://www.romanbooks.co.in/housestyle.pdf.

3. The author MUST follow the Arden edition of the text of TWELFTH NIGHT, edited by Kenneth Muir, for textual referencing.

4. The maximum word limit permissible for each article is 3000. Longer articles or articles with less than 1500 words may also be accepted with prior arrangements with the editor.

5. The article MUST be directly related to TWELFTH NIGHT. The author may, if necessary, include discussions on any other related texts written by Shakespeare. But the predominant discussion MUST be linked to Macbeth.

6. Previously published articles are welcome if the contributor owns the copyright of the article. Please mention in your covering e-mail where the article was first published.

7. Please use endnotes and NOT footnotes.

8. Please use UK English spellings.

9. Please send your articles as an MS Word attachment with a covering e-mail to the editor suman.chakraborty@yahoo.co.uk.

10. In your covering e-mail please mention clearly your name, contact details and your institutional affiliation (if any).

--------------------------------
SUBMISSION DEADLINE
--------------------------------

31st March 2010. Early submission appreciated.

--------------------------------
RIGHTS
--------------------------------

In accordance with the requirement of the publisher, the author has to transfer the copyright of his / her contribution to the appropriate authority. However, if requested, the author will be given necessary UNRESTRICTED PERMISSION to copy / publish / reproduce his / her article anywhere. The Copyright Assignment Form will be sent to the author after the acceptance of his / her article.

--------------------------------
HONORARIUM
--------------------------------

The author will be given two copies of the book as honorarium. Special discounts will be given if he / she wishes to buy more copies.

--------------------------------
ABOUT THE EDITOR
--------------------------------

Suman Chakraborty studied English at the Universities of Calcutta and Glasgow. He is the author of "Creative Writing: A Practical Approach", editor of "Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest", and co-editor of "C.U. English Honours Questions: An Essential Companion". His articles, monographs and academic contributions have appeared in a number of publications of international repute including The Dictionary of Literary Characters, Indian Review of World Literature in English and IACLALS Newsletter. He presented his research papers in London and Scotland and is an advisory editor of "Parnassus: An Innovative Journal of Literary Criticism" (ISSN 0975-0266) and "The Journal of Contemporary Literature" (ISSN 0975-1637).

--------------------------------
CONTACT
--------------------------------

For any assistance and / or article submission, please contact the editor of the anthology Mr Suman Chakraborty at suman.chakraborty@yahoo.co.uk.

cfp categories: journals_and_collections_of_essaysrenaissance 35898Bridges and Borders: Exploring the Confluence of Languages, Disciplines, and CulturesJournal of South Texas English Studiessouthtexasenglishstudies@gmail.com1265138046african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalpoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Journal of South Texas English Studiescontact email: southtexasenglishstudies@gmail.com

The Journal of South Texas English Studies is now welcoming submissions until March 5 for its second issue, themed "Bridges and Borders: Exploring the Confluence of Languages, Disciplines, and Cultures."

Bridges are frequently built up and torn down, and borders often change. The boundaries between people, places and things blur and break. This happens with governments, but it is equally true in literature and rhetoric. Authors frequently challenge our notions of what is acceptable, they point out our close-mindedness, and they show us new paths.

The biannual journal, which is a collaboration between University of Texas at Brownsville graduate English students and the UTB English Department, also accepts a small number of poetry and creative prose submissions. Papers not connected to the theme will be considered, but those that follow the theme have the best chance to be published.

Scholarly papers can include topics in literature written in English, rhetoric and composition, and literary theory. These should not exceed 8,000 words and should be formatted according to the latest MLA style guide. There is no limit to the number of poems that may be submitted, but the total number of lines cannot exceed 100. We accept short fiction up to 1,500 words, flash fiction up to 800 words, and creative non-fiction up to 2,000 words.

Deadline for submissions is March 5. If you have any other questions or wish to make a submission (as a Microsoft Word attachment), please e-mail Editor Andrew Keese at SouthTexasEnglishStudies@gmail.com. For more information and for submission guidelines, please visit the journal's website at www.southtexasenglish.blogspot.com.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalpoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35899Controlling Birth: The Politics of Pregnancy in American Culture--Proposed Special Session (2011 MLA)Ginny Engholmginnyengholm@gmail.com1265142209americancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Ginny Engholmcontact email: ginnyengholm@gmail.com

The term "birth control" typically refers to the various technological and behavioral mechanisms intimate couples use to prevent or limit progeny. This panel seeks papers that broaden this term to encompass the myriad ways that society engages in controlling birth. Despite the prevalent view of reproduction as an intensely intimate and personal decision, how and when couples have been able to limit or prevent reproduction have been greatly influenced by larger political concerns—debates over women's roles in society, sexual agency, and sexual desire; eugenically-motivated historical narratives of "excess" reproduction and "race suicide;" and conflicts within the scientific and biomedical discourses of the body, pregnancy, childbirth and the professionalization of obstetrics.

Please send a 250-500 word abstract and a brief C.V. to Ginny Engholm (ginnyengholm@gmail.com) by 1 March 2010.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35900"The Difficult History of Creativity" NWSA Nov 11-14, 2010 Denver, CONational Women's Studies Associationkslatta@gmail.com1265144849eighteenth_centurygender_studies_and_sexualityfull name / name of organization: National Women's Studies Associationcontact email: kslatta@gmail.com

Please send abstracts to Kimberly Latta at kslatta@gmail.com by Feb. 25.

Call for papers for a panel entitled: "The Difficult History of Creativity" for the NWSA Conference
DIFFICULT DIALOGUES II
November 11-14, 2010  Denver, CO

This panel will fall under the rubric of the fifth topic, "The Critical and the Creative." Under this topic heading, the conference organizers ask the following questions: "How might the creative allow us to intervene in dominant/hegemonic stories and histories? How do more traditional art forms (i.e., painting, music, literature, dance) and newer genres (i.e.,digital technologies) offer an important archive of memory and site of resistance? How do marginalized groups plumb history's silences in the creative realm?"

The panel I am organizing will broach one of the "difficult conversations" that feminists need to hold by suggesting that, before we can fully accommodate "creativity" and "creative expression" to feminist politics, we need to historicize the concept of creativity itself. The idea of the individual human being as a "creative" agent, empowered to imagine and produce things never before envisioned in the world, is relatively recent and profoundly masculinist, steeped as it is in ancient myths that ascribe active, shaping power to men alone. It may have first emerged in England in the middle of the seventeenth-century. Since then many women writers have challenged its masculinist bias through theoretical and practical contributions, but very often their work reinforces that bias, either because it perpetuates the myth of a patriarchal Creator from whom and towards whom all action runs, or because it endorses essentialist notions of femininity that dehistoricize and naturalize the social construction of sex and gender. It is also not surprising to find that nearly every scholarly history of the idea of creativity completely ignores women's theoretical and practical participation in the autonomous production of the New. The organizer of this panel invites papers that address alterative histories of the concept of creativity in diverse cultures across time and geography, and is particularly interested in essays that address the following, broad questions:

• What durable, gendered schemes of perception and appreciation structure the way that women and men have approached and evaluated creative, symbolic action?
• What kind of creative action would reveal and disarm the androcentric, cultural unconscious that continues to foster the characterization of women's creativity as less "productive," less serious and less valuable than men's?
• What kind of symbolic/economic production can durably resist the durable effects of living in a relentlessly androcentric society, in which the means of production both economic and symbolic continue to be dominated by white, male, and heteronormative powers?
• What different kinds of questions about the history of creativity and women need to be asked in cultures that are not dominated by white men, but rather by men of different racial and ethnic groups?

Please send abstracts to Kimberly Latta at kslatta@gmail.com by Feb. 25.

cfp categories: eighteenth_centurygender_studies_and_sexuality 35901Mission in Action Symposium (deadline 3/30/10, conference 10/7-9/10)Mount Mary College (Milwaukee, WI)sym2010@mtmary.edu1265150338general_announcementsprofessional_topicsreligionfull name / name of organization: Mount Mary College (Milwaukee, WI)contact email: sym2010@mtmary.edu

MILWAUKEE, WI – Mount Mary College is issuing a Call for Papers for its national "Mission in Action" Symposium to be held at the College October 7-9, 2010. Presentations and panels from all fields of study (academic and administrative) are invited to explore and share ways of integrating a college's mission statement into the college more creatively and effectively in both curricular and co-curricular programming. Practical and theoretical applications are welcome. Author, activist, and founder of Volunteer Missionary Movement, Edwina Gateley (edwinagateley.com), will give the Symposium's keynote address.
Especially welcome are papers and panels that connect their institution's mission statement to current concerns in their fields: ethics, globalization, social justice, cultural ideals, or sustainability, to name a few. Proposals for 15-20 minute presentations are now being accepted for consideration.
Submit one-page, double spaced abstracts by March 30, 2010 to:
Wendy A. Weaver
Mission in Action Symposium
Mount Mary College
2900 North Menomonee River Parkway
Milwaukee, WI 53222-4597 or, to sym2010@mtmary.edu

For more information about the Mission in Action Symposium, contact Dr. Wendy A. Weaver at sym2010@mtmary.edu, or visit http://www.mtmary.edu/sym2010.htm.

cfp categories: general_announcementsprofessional_topicsreligion 35902New Media Discourse Communities (MLA 2011 special session)Al Harahap/SFSU, Robert Cedillo/UNRharahap@msn.com, cedillor@unr.nevada.edu1265151143cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetpopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheoryfull name / name of organization: Al Harahap/SFSU, Robert Cedillo/UNRcontact email: harahap@msn.com, cedillor@unr.nevada.edu

CFP: New Media Discourse Communities

We are looking for other projects to complete our roundtable special session proposal for the MLA 2011 conference in Los Angeles, CA, Jan 6-9, 2011. We are not looking to read our papers to a passive audience, but to have a roundtable discussion, as well as engage the audience (with or without new media demonstrations).

With the growing presence of new media in our lives and those of our students, its emergence in the classroom has been all but predetermined. Moreover, because new media represents wide-ranging and heterogeneous discourse communities, it's important to recognize its reason—some may say necessity—to be a part of classroom pedagogy. Just like our "real life" physical society, however, our digital one includes a panoply of different discourse communities. The dilemma then becomes: Can they all be effective in the language classroom? If so, how? If not, which ones are and aren't?

Our interactive roundtable seeks to include analyses of various new media discourse communities from both the public mainstream (Facebook, Twitter, iPhone users, etc.) and the social margins (4chan, geocaching, etc.) throughout the various language and literature disciplines, with the following concerns:

•How do certain discourse communities define "text" differently from any traditional definitions? How do particular discourse communities complicate our understandings of "text"? How then must the pedagogy of certain disciplines adapt to accommodate these new forms of text?

•What are some behaviors and practices of these discourse communities? And do they have any analogies to non-digital communities? How are they similar or different in comparison?

•How might certain new media discourse communities inform the teaching of: Reading? Expository writing? Creative writing? ESL/EFL? Literary criticism? The teaching of foreign languages and literatures ? How might we incorporate particular discourse communities into our pedagogies?

•What are some of acknowledging and validating these discourse communities as part of academic scholarship? As part of the classroom? What are some implications of rejecting them?

•…or any other topics that may be pertinent to the examination of new media communities.

We welcome other graduate student projects as well as works in progress. Please email your 200-300 words abstract or any questions to both Al Harahap (harahap@msn.com) and Robert Cedillo (cedillor@unr.nevada.edu) with subject line "MLA 2010 Abstract" by Monday, Feb 15, 2010. We will inform you of our decisions by Mar 1, 2010.

We look forward to hearing about your projects,
Al Harahap, San Francisco State University
Robert Cedillo, University of Nevada, Reno

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetpopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheory 35903CFP on Michael Haneke's Das Weiße Band Jgcinema.org - Cinema and globalizationjuri26@libero.it1265154671cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisionfull name / name of organization: Jgcinema.org - Cinema and globalizationcontact email: juri26@libero.it

With his last film, Das weiße Band, the Austrian director Michael Haneke gets to the core of his reflection on Evil and its representation. After such films as Funny Games, in which violence, although always present, is never showed, or Caché, in which violence remains a mere threat, Das weiße Band constitutes a very complex work, in which the relationship between victim and executioner is not clear, in which acted violence and suffered violence are confused, and in which the director interweaves realism with abstraction, creating a film that can be read in different layers.

The papers presented deal with these topics, trying to develop, from different points of view, the notions of violence and realism in the recent work of Michael Haneke.

The journal Jura Gentium Cinema (www.jgcinema.org) seeks submissions for an online volume entitled "Violence and Realism - Michael Haneke's Das Weiße Band"

Articles should be 3,000 - 8,000 words in length.

Please contact Gabriele De Luca for proposals (juri26@libero.it) by February 2, 2010. Final drafts will be due by February 20, 2010.

Jura Gentium Cinema
www.jgcinema.org

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_television 35904CFP Fat Studies (NWSA Conference, Nov 11-14; Abstracts Due 2/20)Joelle Ruby Ryan / Michaela NullJoelle.Ryan@unh.edu / mnull@purdue.edu 1265155428african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementspopular_culturetheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Joelle Ruby Ryan / Michaela Nullcontact email: Joelle.Ryan@unh.edu / mnull@purdue.edu

Please forward to anyone with an interest in Fat Studies. Thank You.

2 CFPs from the Fat Studies Interest Group; NWSA Conference Nov. 11-14, 2010 in Denver (Proposal Due Feb 20)

#1: Fatness, Gender and Popular Culture: Critical Interventions, Creative Resistances

This session seeks to utilize the conference sub-theme "the critical and the creative" to examine fat feminisms and their important work to challenge weightism, fatphobia and sizeism in dominant society and popular culture. This work, comprised of multiple activist strategies, seeks to utilize fat-positive feminisms to dislodge patriarchal notions of bodily "perfection" and thin-supremacy. In this session, we invite papers and speakers which speak about the work of the fat liberation movement, particularly social, political, artistic, performative, media and literary strategies of resistance to hegemonic ideologies of gender and weight. Topics might include:
* Fat positive performance troupes: burlesque, cheerleaders, dance squads, performance art, theatre etc.
* Fat positive media and new media, such as film, digital video, blogs, vlogs, zines, YouTube, websites etc.
* Fat Positive political activism, demonstrations, picketing, street theatre, conferences, e-activism etc.
* Fat positive creative writing and fat affirming literature
* Critical and creative pro-fat challenges to the hegemonic medical conceptualizations of "obesity"
* Creative/critical Fat Activist work as it intersects with race, ethnicity, sexuality, nation, queer/transgender, disability, age and religion

#2: Advancing Fat Feminisms

Fatness continues to be a contentious issue among feminists. Although Women's and Gender Studies scholars are comfortable critiquing the "cult of thinness," few are comfortable talking about fatness rather than "obesity." This is puzzling considering the longstanding feminist tradition which rejects the medicalization of women's bodies. Fat feminist scholarship is increasingly legitimized, yet seldomly recognized, integrated into texts and coursework, or utilized in scholarly conversation. Fatness within feminism remains largely invisible. We are currently seeking papers that address any of the following questions/topics:
* Why does fat feminism remain an "outsider" feminism?
* Why are feminists still so uncomfortable with fatness?
* How can we advance fat feminisms? What hurdles lay before us?
* Can fat feminists learn from and/or work with other outsider feminists?
* How do we teach feminist scholars and teachers to engage with and utilize critical discourses on fatness?
* The history/herstory of fat feminisms or the progress of fat feminisms within feminism.
* Analysis of fatness as treated in Women's and/or Gender Studies textbooks.

If you are interested in taking part in either of both of these sessions, please send the following info by February 20, 2010 to NWSA Fat Studies Interest Group Co-Chairs Joelle Ruby Ryan and Michaela Null: (Joelle.Ryan@unh.edu) AND (mnull@purdue.edu)
Name, Institutional Affiliation, Snail Mail, Email, Phone, Title for your talk, a one-page, double-spaced abstract in which you lay out your topic and its relevance to this session. Each person will speak for around 15 minutes, and we will leave time for Q&A.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementspopular_culturetheatretwentieth_century_and_beyond 35905After the Wire (MLA, 6-9 Jan 2011 in Los Angeles - Deadline 2 March 2010)MLA 2011afterthewire@gmail.com1265157978african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: MLA 2011contact email: afterthewire@gmail.com

This panel will discuss the cultural and intellectual legacy of 'The Wire,' organized around its critique of neoliberal institutions and its place in the social-realist tradition. Please submit 250–500-word abstracts by 2 March 2010 to Gerry Canavan (afterthewire@gmail.com) and Lisa Klarr (afterthewire@gmail.com).

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 35906Mamma Mia! edited collectionLouise FitzGerald, University of East Anglia, UKlouise.fitzgerald@uea.ac.uk1265193017cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitypopular_culturefull name / name of organization: Louise FitzGerald, University of East Anglia, UKcontact email: louise.fitzgerald@uea.ac.uk

'Diggin' Dancing Queens and Wedding Scenes: The Phenomenon of Mamma Mia!

Call for abstracts deadline: 19th April 2010
Full name: Louise FitzGerald

Contact email: louise.fitzgerald@uea.ac.uk

This cfp invites submissions for a proposed collection exploring the 2008 film Mamma Mia! and the cultural phenomenon that surrounded it. To date, the film is positioned as the 42nd highest grossing film of all time, the most successful musical of all time, and the 5th highest grossing film of 2008. In Britain, the box office success of Mamma Mia surpassed the phenomenal success of Cameron's 1997 film Titanic and it has been estimated that at least one in four British households owns a DVD copy of Mamma Mia. Indeed, on the day of the film's DVD release, Amazon reported that it had become the fastest selling product. Reports from America, Sweden, Finland, Japan, Australia, Germany, France and Greece have also testified to the phenomenal success of the film.

Critics debating the film's outstanding success have suggested that its popularity resulted from the dire economic recession that was enveloping so many countries in 2008 ( the idea of the musical functioning in terms of escapism has been debated since at least the classical Hollywood period). The film offered relatively cheap, escapist entertainment that, as many have argued, raised the spirits of audiences dealing with higher mortgage payments, bankruptcy and the threat of unemployment. Despite Mamma Mia's outstanding international success amongst filmgoers, film critics have lauded the musical as a "cumulative weight of terribleness" and warned that those who loved the film would have to "prove their intelligence". Such sentiments reflect an established tension that functions to polarize films as either 'high' or 'low' brow entertainment, and the audiences as either critically engaged or an uneducated mass of consumers. These sentiments are often couched in gendered terms and serve to reinforce the idea that films addressed to a male audience have more cultural capital than those addressed to women.

This edited collection aims to study Mamma Mia! in terms of its success, and how this success can also be contextualised within the film's cultural politics. Indeed, the film has often incited debate at the level of gender politics, and can variously be read as empowering 'mature' woman, as rejecting marriage as the pinnacle of young women's lives and as foregrounding a more positive representation of cinema's lone mother figure. However others have commented on its apparent infantilization of Greek characters, and have pointed to Mamma Mia as an example of the cultural reiteration of regressive post-feminist gender politics. As such, this collection will explore the ways in which issues of class, gender and popular culture are articulated in Mamma Mia and debates about it. Topics might also include (but are not restricted to);

The mother and daughter relationship
Portrayals of the 'older' woman
The music and cultural status of ABBA
Spectacle and the liminality of the film's Greek location
The film's representation of homosexuality
Mamma Mia! and the contemporary musical
Critical reception
Audience reception/fan culture
Adaptation
Female authorship
Stardom

Contributor guidelines:
Please provide a chapter abstract (maximum 500 words) and a brief biography (250 words). These should be submitted by e-mail to Louise.Fitzgerald@uea.ac.uk by 19th April, 2010

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitypopular_culture 35907Pacifism in World Poetry; Book / Anthology; 31 July 2010Editorhyphenworld@ymail.com1265208308general_announcementsjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Editorcontact email: hyphenworld@ymail.com

Scolarly papers are invited for an anthology of essays on the theme - 'Pacifism in World Poetry' to be published from New Delhi, India.

The papers should be typeset according to the latest MLA Stylesheet. An abstract of the paper in about 200 words must reach the editor of the anthology possibly by 30 June 2010. The complete paper must be submitted by July 31, 2010. For more details contact Editor through email: hyphenworld@ymail.com

Deadline for submission: 31 July 2010

cfp categories: general_announcementsjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrytwentieth_century_and_beyond 35908Recent Animated Films Jura Gentium Cinemasmrybin@comcast.net1265226560americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturepostcolonialtheoryfull name / name of organization: Jura Gentium Cinemacontact email: smrybin@comcast.net

The journal "Jura Gentium Cinema" (www.jgcinema.com) is seeking articles (between 4000 and 5000 words) for a special dossier on recent animated films. The overarching goal of the dossier will be to analyze recent animated films through the lens of the following themes: the relationship between the individual self and a global society ("Up"; "WALL-E"; "The Incredibles"; "Fantastic Mr. Fox"); environmentalism ("WALL-E"; "Cars"; "Up"); gender and the structuring presence/absence of female protagonists, and/or the quality and kind of female protagonists, in animated films ("Coraline" and/or the absence of female characters as central protagonists in Pixar films); representation of war and inter-cultural conflict in animation ("9"; "Fantastic Mr. Fox"); or another topic on recent animated features that is closely related to the above.

The article should be informative and evaluative, without being dismissive; that is, the writer should find some value in the work, even if themes in the film prove problematic.

Please contact Steven Rybin (smrybin@comcast.net) with a 150-word abstract.

Deadline for abstracts: March 1, 2010. Deadline for final submissions: April 15, 2010.

Jura Gentium Cinema
www.jgcinema.com

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturepostcolonialtheory 35909Representation and the Problem of Democracy (3/15/10; MLA '11)Dan Colson, MLA Graduate Student Caucusdmcolson@illinois.edu1265228073african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsmedievalpoetrypostcolonialrenaissanceromantictheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dan Colson, MLA Graduate Student Caucuscontact email: dmcolson@illinois.edu

CFP: "Representation and the Problem of Democracy"
A Panel of the Graduate Student Caucus, MLA 2011

The Graduate Student Caucus, an affiliate organization of the MLA, invites current graduate students to submit proposals for a panel discussion tentatively entitled "Representation and the Problem of Democracy" at the 2011 MLA annual meeting from January 6 through January 9 in Los Angeles.

A concern with "representation" is central to literature, democracy, and the intersection of the two–in "literary" texts and in "scholarly" efforts to make sense of them. Both democratic theory and practical strategies for implementing democratic politics revolve around representing individual and collective interests, even when a given instantiation of democratic governance is exclusionary. In fact, many texts that represent democracies focus on their failures adequately to represent. The same can be said of literary scholarship that for the last several decades has strived to democratize the field (by making the body of texts we study more representative) and that in many cases imagines itself as a democratizing force (through progressive politics and equal opportunities for education).

This panel explores the possibilities and limitations of literary representation and literary scholarship. Using democracy as a nodal point, we focus on the overlapping valances of "representation": as goal, as strategy, as modality. Our aim is to provide a forum for those engaged with the fractured constructions of democracy around which our nation and our profession frequently circulate.

We invite graduate students from various disciplines, fields, and periods to submit proposals. We are interested especially in work that critically analyzes "representation" as a field of contestation rather than as an assumption underlying our approach to literature and "democracy" as a problem (a rupture, a formation) rather than as an ideal. Self-reflexively viewing your work as content (the study of literary representation, democracy, and the literature of democracy) and practice (scholarship as a form of representation in literary-political field largely defined by competing visions of democracy), we ask that you consider the following questions: How does the literature you study claim to represent democracy? How are these claims complicated by a work's historical moment and the ways in which it has been studied over a period of years? How does the relative centrality of contemporaneous democratic discourse shape a text's representationality and the ways in which it represents within literary studies? What theoretical or ethical orientations to literature can help us conceptualize representation and its relationship to democracy? What alternatives to representation and to democracy do texts and our discipline offer? How do intersecting registers of representation (e.g., political representation, fictional representation, legal representation) challenge democratic ideology? What is your role as one who represents both representation and democracy in print or in the classroom? These questions offer only a glimpse of this topic's possibilities, so we ask that you not view them an exhaustive list: we will consider a wide variety of approaches to the session's theme.

Presentations should be approximately fifteen minutes in length. Please submit an abstract of 300 to 500 words by March 15 to dmcolson@illinois.edu with "MLA Panel Submission" in the subject heading.

For further information please contact:
Dan Colson
Department of English
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
dmcolson@illinois.edu

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsmedievalpoetrypostcolonialrenaissanceromantictheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35910Rorschach's Masculine Mask and The Moral Vigilante: Analyzing Masculinity in Alan Moore's WatchmenLaura McGrathlaura.mcgrath.06@cnu.edu1265231474gender_studies_and_sexualitypopular_culturefull name / name of organization: Laura McGrathcontact email: laura.mcgrath.06@cnu.edu

Alan Moore's graphic novel Watchmen depicts five leading men, each performing masculinity differently. Through the eyes of media criticism scholars, there are five traits to hegemonic masculinity: power in physical force, occupational success, daring romantic/adventurous outdoorsman, patriarchy, and heterosexuality. Through this lens, the five leading men in Watchmen can have their masculine performance dissected and analyzed to the end of determining positive/heroic and negative/destructive attributes about masculinity in America.
While each of the characters share in performing traits of hegemonic masculinity, one character—Rorschach—depicts traits that are admirable, as well as tendencies that are destructive, when masculinity performed wholly. It is important to view Rorschach in the context of his environment and other characters to show why he in particular demonstrates masculinity in a way that can be admired.
The admiration for characters like Rorschach stem from an American affection for vigilante tradition: an authority that is subversive, powerful, yet uncorrupted. America still has affection for masked vigilante heroes, as seen in comics, and their depictions of masculinity reflect mediated norms.
Looking at how these vigilante men in Watchmen perform their masculinity, it becomes apparent that the same action can be performed with two different ends in mind and the action becomes definitively moral or amoral. Watchmen characters reveal that performed masculinity is more like a mask or role, but there is a specific morality that must drive performance in order to make masculinity either heroic or destructive.

cfp categories: gender_studies_and_sexualitypopular_culture 35911CFP: "Narrating Lives after Death" (3/1/10; MLA 2011)Jessica C. Murphy, The University of Texas at Dallasjessica.c.murphy@gmail.com1265233709cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryrenaissancefull name / name of organization: Jessica C. Murphy, The University of Texas at Dallascontact email: jessica.c.murphy@gmail.com

"Narrating Lives after Death"

Proposed Special Session for MLA 2011 in Los Angeles

When Katherine Stubbes "bequeaths" their newborn son to Phillip Stubbes, she asks her husband to "bring up this childe in good letters, in learning and discipline, and above all things, see that he be brought up and instructed in the exercise of true religion." The late sixteenth and early seventeenth century in England saw the print publication of several parental advice manuals. This proposed special session will explore how these advice manuals "narrate the lives" (in keeping with the MLA 2011 theme) of the children to whom they are left and, by extension, the consumers of the printed objects. I invite proposals for papers that consider the influence of advice manuals in Early Modern England.

Please send an abstract of no more than 250 words in the body of an email to jessica.c.murphy@gmail.com by March 1, 2010. All panel participants must be members of the MLA http://www.mla.org before April 1, 2010.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryrenaissance 35912The Human Condition Series: 3rd Biennial International, Multidisciplinary Conference: "EROS 2010"Toivo KoivukoskiEROSabstracts@libraryofsocialscience.com1265235075african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturereligionromantictheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Toivo Koivukoskicontact email: EROSabstracts@libraryofsocialscience.com

THE HUMAN CONDITION SERIES: 3rd Biennial International,
Multidisciplinary Conference: "EROS 2010"
May 21-22, 2010
Nipissing University Muskoka Campus, Bracebridge, Ontario, Canada

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Featured Speaker: Luce Irigaray

We are delighted to have Luce Irigaray deliver an original presentation for the EROS Conference via satellite from Paris. In Thinking the Difference, she writes "Poor Eros!…What has become of us, that we are so poor in love?" inviting reconsideration of the Freudian position that relationships must be broken for civilization to exist. In her view, relations must be restored if we are to save ourselves and the earth from total annihilation. Irigaray's ideas challenge the necessity of breaking the bonds of love, for it is human ties that are the "missing pillars of our culture".

Special Plenary Talk: Shannon Bell

Shannon Bell is a fast feminist immersion philosopher who lives and writes philosophy in action. Her books include "Reading, Writing and Rewriting the Prostitute Body," "Whore Carnival," and "Fast Feminism." Bell is an associate professor in the York University Political Science Department where she teaches on psychology and politics, post contemporary theory, and identity/post identity politics.

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Description of the Series and Conference Theme

"On the face of it at least, our civilization possesses no ars erotica. In return, it is undoubtedly the only civilization to practice a scientia sexualis..." --Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality, Volume 1: An Introduction

This conference is part of a larger series of ongoing, international, multidisciplinary conferences--run under the banner of The Human Condition Series--that brings together people from a variety of disciplines to assess a singular topic from artistic, cinematic, literary, ethical, social, political, philosophical, psychological and religious perspectives. We encourage you to share innovative ideas and new ways of thinking and acting. Proposals will be considered on any related theme and we especially welcome papers, reports, works-in-progress, workshops and sessions. This year's theme is EROS.

Though a human nature may not exist, there is comfort in the notion that a unifying force should subsist within all humankind: the will to live. Sigmund Freud named the driving impulse Eros. If humankind does possess, as a matter of our continuance as a species, an impulse for life-- a drive to overcome all adversity in order to reproduce itself--what does this say of the human condition? How can desire, pleasure and love lead to social bonds that ensure the perpetuation of the species in healthy abundance? What types of relations cultivate worth and esteem in the individual, and how can destructive elements of these same tropes damage the psyche and dissolve the very relations that lead to a healthy self-concept? How does pathos reveal itself in minds and in societies and how can we know when there is satisfaction in love or if an alternative object has been found through sublimation?

The Human Condition Series invites you to consider the concept of Eros, and to share original and revisited thoughts that transcend traditional disciplinary boundaries. We encourage expressions about how culture, habit, language, science and art, embody, remedy or fail Eros. Without prescription, we urge theorizations and analyses which seek to look beyond the here and now towards the possibilities to come.

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Please submit a working title, a ONE-PAGE ABSTRACT (300-400 words) as an email attachment, and a short biography before March 1, 2010 to Professor Toivo Koivukoski at EROSabstracts@libraryofsocialscience.com

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF ABSTRACT: MARCH 1, 2010.

NOTIFICATION OF ACCEPTANCE: MARCH 15, 2010.

PRESENTERS ARE REQUIRED TO SUBMIT A 10-15 page summary paper by APRIL 15 and to register for the conference.

Presenters will have until June 25, 2010 to prepare their manuscripts for submission to the double-blind review process for possible publication.

For information about the HUMAN CONDITION SERIES please go to: http://www.humanconditionseries.com/

For information on the 2008 conference (including the conference program) please go to: http://www.humanconditionseries.com/conf08/

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Possible topics include but are not limited to:

- The concept of Eros in the work and scholarship of Luce Irigaray.
- Heroines and Heroes of Eros
- The Eros of War
- The Eros of Motherhood.
- Representation, construction, reproduction or analysis of Eros.
- Subject/Identity formation and constructions of gender, sex and
sexuality
- Eros and parthenogenesis in history and literature
- Categories of normativity, disorder, pathology or deviance in desire
- Eros as nature, power, cosmology, mythology, and society
- Eros and the transformation of consciousness, near-death and dreamlike
states.
- Sacred marriage, immortal/mortal love
- Sex tourism, sex trafficking
- From Eros as mythos to Eros as logos
- The sensuous in the human world
- Eros and Gaia in the marketing of holistic healing
- Contemporary Families and Eros
- Eros in women's literature as a distinct tradition
- The role of Eros in different religious and spiritual traditions
- Semiotic approaches to Eros and culture, place, space, time

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Film Feature

"Eros" is the collection of three short films exploring the subjects of love, sexuality, and desire: "Il filo pericoloso delle cose", directed by Michelangelo Antonioni; "Equilibrium", directed by Steven Soderbergh; and "The Hand", directed by Kar Wai Wong.

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Bracebridge, Ontario, Canada

For information on Nipissing University, please go to: http://www.nipissingu.ca/muskoka/

Bracebridge is north of Toronto. Shuttle service and other transportation are available.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturereligionromantictheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35913Health in Women's Writing (proposed special session MLA 2011): abstracts by March 4Stacey Donohue/Modern Language Association--Special Session sdonohue@cocc.edu1265237100americanfull name / name of organization: Stacey Donohue/Modern Language Association--Special Session contact email: sdonohue@cocc.edu

Representations of Health and Well-Being in 19th- and Early-20th-Century American Women's Writing. Exploring the cultural discourse of health and well-being, illness, and disease in 19th- and early-20th-century American literature by women. 250-word abstracts by 4 March 2010; Stacey Lee Donohue (sdonohue@cocc.edu).

cfp categories: american 35914Midwest Conference on British Studies 56th Annual MeetingMidwest Conference on British Studiesrincorvati@wittenberg.edu1265240312cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centurygeneral_announcementsrenaissanceromantictwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Midwest Conference on British Studiescontact email: rincorvati@wittenberg.edu

CALL FOR PAPERS
Midwest Conference on British Studies 56th Annual Meeting
October 8-10, 2010, Cleveland

The Midwest Conference on British Studies is proud to announce that its fifty-sixth annual meeting will be hosted by Baldwin-Wallace College at the Renaissance Cleveland Hotel.

The MWCBS seeks papers from scholars in all fields of British Studies, broadly defined to include those who study England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland, and Britain's empire. We welcome scholars from the broad spectrum of disciplines, including but not limited to history, literature, political science, gender studies and art history. Proposals for complete sessions are preferred, although proposals for individual papers will be considered. Especially welcome are roundtables and panels that:

• offer cross-disciplinary perspectives on topics in British Studies
• discuss collaborative or innovative learning techniques in the British Studies classroom
• situate the arts, letters, and sciences in a British cultural context
• examine representations of British and imperial/Commonwealth national identities
• consider Anglo-American relations, past and present
• examine new trends in British Studies
• assess a major work or body of work by a scholar

The MWCBS welcomes papers presented by advanced graduate students and will award the Walter L. Arnstein Prize at its plenary luncheon for the best graduate student paper(s) given at the conference.

Proposals should include a 200-word abstract for each paper and a brief, 1-page c.v. for each participant, including chairs and commentators. For full panels, please include a brief 200-word preview of the panel as a whole. In addition, please place the panel proposal, and its accompanying paper proposals and vitas in one file. Please make certain that all contact information, particularly email addresses are correct and current. All proposals should be submitted online by April 15, 2010, to the Program Committee Chair, Rick Incorvati, at rincorvati@wittenberg.edu.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centurygeneral_announcementsrenaissanceromantictwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35915New England Women's Studies Conference (April 30th-May 1st)New England Women's Studies Associationjen.riley@umassd.edu1265247104african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsprofessional_topicsfull name / name of organization: New England Women's Studies Associationcontact email: jen.riley@umassd.edu

UPDATED CFP for the New England Women's Studies Conference

Filmmaker and Activist Rory Kennedy (keynote speaker)

Feminist Writers and Activists Jennifer Baumgardner and Amy Richards
(facilitators for workshop on activism)

Confirmed for the
New England Women's Studies Conference
UMass Dartmouth, April 30th-May 1st, 2010

Teaching Activism: Women's Studies in the 21st Century

The New England Women's Studies Association is pleased to announce that Rory Kennedy, well-known activist and documentary filmmaker, will be the keynote speaker at our upcoming conference. The keynote event will include the showing of a documentary by Kennedy that is open to all conference attendees on the evening of April 30th.

In addition, all conference attendees are invited to a workshop with Jennifer Baumgardner and Amy Richards, who are celebrating the 10th anniversary of Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism and the Future, on the afternoon of April 30th. Baumgardner and Richards' workshop will focus on activism and ways to integrate activism into our teaching, our learning, and our lives. The workshop is included in the conference registration fee, which will not exceed $50 for faculty and $25 for graduate and undergraduate students.

Conference sessions will run on Saturday, May 1st, from 8:30am-3:30pm.

The CFP deadline has been extended to February 22nd due to these new developments. See http://newsa.nwsa.org/ for full details.

We hope you join us!

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsprofessional_topics 35916[UPDATE] Carried Across: Translations, Temporalities, and Trajectories; Keynote Speaker: Dr. Rey Chow; Abstracts Due 3/1/10Department of English at University of Rhode Islanduriconference2010@gmail.com 1265248382african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesmedievalpoetrypostcolonialrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromantictheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Department of English at University of Rhode Islandcontact email: uriconference2010@gmail.com


"Carried Across: Translations, Temporalities, and Trajectories"
A Graduate Conference hosted by the Department of English at University of Rhode Island
Saturday, April 24th, 2010 (Abstract Due: March 1st, 2010)

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Rey Chow, Anne Firor Scott Professor of Literature in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences, Duke University, and author of several books, including Woman and Chinese Modernity (1991), Writing Diaspora (1993), Ethics After Idealism (1998), and Sentimental Fabulations, Contemporary Chinese Films (2007)

Translatus (Latin root of "translation"): transferred, handed over, conveyed, carried across

We emphasize these definitions of translatus in order to reframe the concept of "translation" and to draw it into constellation with two other words that also evoke images of something (or someone) being carried across: "temporality" and "trajectory." The phrase "carried across" constructs a picture that requires several elements: the Act of transference, conveyance, or carriage itself; the Agent of this action (the carrier); the Subject or Object of this action (the carried); and the Medium or Threshold across which this act occurs, succeeds, or fails. How might consideration of "translations," "temporalities," and "trajectories" aid in investigating these interactive elements? How might this assemblage of concepts help us plot our own courses and our own researches of and across time, languages, texts, nations, races, genders, and lives? What might we discover, invent, and/or carry along our way? We invite graduate students to submit paper or panel proposals that seek to pursue these (or related) questions. In addition, we encourage submissions from a variety of fields—history, film, cultural studies, philosophy, literature, political science, rhetoric/composition, languages, visual studies, and creative writing (though not limited to these fields).

Possible topics and areas of interest include, but are not limited to:

• Etymological or other comparative language studies
• Definitions of or challenges to literary, philosophical, and/or historical periodizations or canonizations
• Politics or aesthetics of representation (states of emergency, simulacra, mimesis, etc.)
• Development of and within a writer or thinker's oeuvre
• Philosophies of the trace (Levinas, Derrida, etc.)
• Difficulties of biography and/or memoir-writing
• Authorial intention and/or textual meaning
• Science fiction and/or time travel narratives
• Literacy studies
• Archival research (as a literal going-out and bringing-back)
• Rhetorics of/and reproduction
• Competing translations of various texts
• Philosophies of temporality (Bergson, Heidegger, Deleuze, etc.)
• Hegemony, ideology, and power relations
• Film and/or adaptation studies
• Colonialism, postcolonialism, nationalism
• War, migration, displacement, dispersion, diaspora

Submit abstracts of 250 words (for individual proposals) or 400 words (for panel proposals) to uriconference2010@gmail.com by March 1st, 2010. Please include your full name, contact information, and institutional affiliation.

Individual presentations should be no longer than 15 minutes.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesmedievalpoetrypostcolonialrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromantictheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35917Justice, Law, and Literature March-MayChanging Lives Through Literaturecltl@umassd.edu1265248502african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryhumanities_computing_and_the_internetjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalpopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositiontheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Changing Lives Through Literaturecontact email: cltl@umassd.edu

Changing Lives Through Literature is an alternative sentencing program founded in 1991 on the power of literature to transform lives.

In 2008 we launched a blog, Changing Lives, Changing Minds: http://cltlblog.wordpress.com.

We feature essays from professors, graduate students, judges, lawyers, and other scholars. Topics range from literature and its impact on people to alternative sentencing and issues in our justice system.

We would like to invite you to submit a 500-800 word piece to be featured on the site. Any topic that deals with literature or writing and the way in which they affect individuals (now or historically) is fair game. You might consider using one or more of the questions below as a jumping off point for an entry or bring ideas of your own to the blog.

* Is there a book that has profoundly impacted your life or way of thinking? Tell us about how you, yourself, have been transformed by a piece of literature.

* How does the act of "reading" change as our society grows more technologically advanced and dependent? Will there continue to be a place for the printed book or are we destined for a future where reading is limited to computer and Kindle screens? How does reading in an electronic medium differ from the experience of reading a book?

* How do individuals or groups of people create identity through reading and writing (either historically or currently)?

* How important is it for students to be able to see themselves in the texts they read in classes? What role should one's personal connections with the text play in classroom discussions?

* How have your writing experiences changed you? Is there a particular writing endeavor (such as a book, an essay, or a creative piece) that made you understand something about yourself or others?

These are just a few ideas. If your interests include criminal justice, politics, law, etc. we encourage you to bring those to the table as well.

If you are interested in submitting an essay, email us and we'll give you a list of available dates. No technical expertise required. Just send us your essay as an attachment to cltl@umassd.edu.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryhumanities_computing_and_the_internetjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalpopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositiontheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35919Hungarian Studies RMMLA Albuquerque, NM, October 14-16Utah State Universitysusan.nyikos@usu.edu1265250066cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Utah State Universitycontact email: susan.nyikos@usu.edu

Call for submissions to the Hungarian Studies Session at the Rocky Mountain MLA in Albuquerque, NM, October 14-16. We are especially interested in submissions that pursue a study of the Hungarian literary contribution to World Culture, but also ones that explore literary and linguistic themes pertaining specifically to the Hungarian culture. Panelists will have 15-20 minutes to present their papers. Some possible themes but not restricted to:

-Hungarian film studies and their place in the world movie culture
-race and identity in Hungary before and after WWII
-the Hungarian novel in the European context
-Shakespeare on the Hungarian stage
-gender studies: history and context in post-Communism
- 21st c. directions in the Hungarian literary scene
-Hungarian studies and culture beyond the border

Kindly send proposals (250 words) or complete papers by March 1, 2010 to susan.nyikos@usu.edu as an MS Word attachment or in the body of the e-mail; or mail hard copies to

Susan Nyikos
Utah State University
Department of English
3200 Old Main Hill
Logan, UT 84322

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitytwentieth_century_and_beyond 35920[UPDATE] Anti: Revisions, Reconstructions, Refutations, University of Louisville, April 16, 2010 (Abstract deadline: Feb 15th)University of Louisville Graduate Conference in Humanitiesahalouisville.com1265261091african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinternational_conferencesmedievalpoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: University of Louisville Graduate Conference in Humanitiescontact email: ahalouisville.com

The PhD in Humanities Program (http://louisville.edu/humanities) and the Association of Humanities Academics (http://ahalouisville.com) at the University of Louisville announces the annual University of Louisville Graduate Conference in Humanities, April 16, 2010.

The theme for this year's conference is "Anti: Revisions, Reconstructions, Refutations." This conference will encourage a multi-disciplinary approach to examining issues central to the study of the Humanities. As interdisciplinary scholars, we seek to investigate how we are informed by the scholarship that precedes us and how we ratify and revise that dialogue. We welcome papers that consider issues of cultural, political, social, and institutional significance beyond the traditional disciplinary boundaries as well as those that fortify existing connections within and across them. The papers may address, but are not limited to the following themes and concepts: commercialization of/and art, embodiment, fourth-wave feminism, lexical change, liminality, millennial technologies, multi-modal representation, second modernisms, and contemporary reconceptions of ekphrasis.

The conference organizers invite abstracts for individual 15-20 minute presentations/papers or panel proposals on interdisciplinary considerations of literature, theory, history, philosophy, the creative arts, language and linguistics, religious studies, women's & gender studies, ethno-musicology, pop culture studies, ethnic studies, and LGBT studies. Abstracts for creative submissions are also enthusiastically encouraged. Presenters should submit abstracts of 300 words by February 15, 2010 to ahalouisville@gmail.com . Please include your name, affiliation, mailing address, and paper title in your email, and please attach an abstract with title only for blind review. Notification of acceptance will be issued by March 1, 2010. Early registration for the conference opens on March 1st; the cost is $10.00. Late registration ($20.00) begins April 1st and will be accepted through April 16th. All presentations are eligible for consideration for the Association of Humanities Academics Prize, which includes $100.00 and possible publication.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinternational_conferencesmedievalpoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35921(inter)disciplinarities: The "New Relationality"? (April 24-25, 2010)University of Victoria's Cultural, Social, and Political Thought Graduate Conferencesaggcster@gmail.com1265270704african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: University of Victoria's Cultural, Social, and Political Thought Graduate Conferencecontact email: saggcster@gmail.com

***

The University of Victoria's interdisciplinary program in Cultural, Social, and Political Thought and Peninsula: A Journal of Relational Politics are pleased to present you with a joint call for papers. Click HERE to see the conference's poster or see below for its description.

CONFERENCE CALL FOR PAPERS

(inter)disciplinarities: The "New Relationality"?
April 24-25, 2010

The interdisciplinary program in Cultural, Social, and Political Thought at the University of Victoria is proud to announce its 2nd annual conference on the contemporary debates concerning relationality.

Claims about relationality have driven debates in ontology, ethics, and politics over at least the last century. The critique of the modern subject, the problem of power and resistance, and debates about structure and agency, alterity, recognition, ecologies and systems have all been shaped by ambitions for relational solutions to problems arising from practices of separation and principles of autonomy. Acknowledging that attempts to affirm principles of relationality have such an extensive lineage, we invite proposals for papers that engage with this problematic in provocative ways. Recognizing both the diverse ways that relational problems have been posed and the commonalities across (apparently) distinct debates, we especially invite proposals addressing four broad, yet exemplary, contexts:

Postcolonialism
Network Theory
Translation
Transversality

Applicants are invited to submit a 250-350 word proposals for a paper, panel, performance, or video presentation by February 25th, 2010. Proposals will be blind- reviewed. Presentations should take no longer than 20 minutes. Admission is $15. Lunch will be provided. Send all proposals and inquiries via email, fax or mail to:

(inter)disciplinarities: The "New Relationality"?
c/o Sagi Cohen saggcster@gmail.com
Department of Political Science
University of Victoria
PO Box 3060 STN CSC
Victoria, BC V8W 3R4
Email: c/o Sagi Cohen
Fax: +1 (250) 721-7485

* * *

JOURNAL CALL FOR PAPERS

Peninsula: A Journal of Relational Politics

Call for Papers: Politics as Relationality

The University of Victoria's graduate journal in political theory, Peninsula, welcomes submissions for papers from various methodological approaches that interpret the theme of relationality in politics. If political thought takes place within unacknowledged and often totalizing theoretical frames – those

The University of Victoria's graduate journal in political theory, Peninsula, welcomes submissions for papers from various methodological approaches that interpret the theme of relationality in politics.

If political thought takes place within unacknowledged and often totalizing theoretical frames – those ontological/epistemological frames which include and exclude, objectify and subjectify, and so on – then uncovering frames is a kind of academic activism. Thinking in terms of relationality might therefore constitute a critical-ethical approach to Western political thought and its foundational assumptions about (the relations between) self, other, and community.

Focusing on the relational dimension of politics means emphasizing understandings of politics as a shared and common reality – as something that concerns plurality and multiplicity, but also communality, mutability and openness. Hence, reflections on relationality might involve re-interpreting classic and modern texts, re-examining overlooked arguments, disrupting consensual assumptions in the "canon", inquiring into the interstices of traditional conceptual divisions, or imagining other ways of being together. Hopefully, then, these modes of reflection will not only be "critical": they will also evoke the friendship inherent in the history of ideas.

Submissions

Peninsula will publish peer-reviewed articles or artworks, reviews, and reflections, in French and English. One thematic issue per year will include reflections on the thematic, and more general articles, reviews, and reflections will be published on an ongoing basis. The journal's first issue will appear in September, 2010, and will be partly devoted to the question of relationality. Submissions are due on June 1, 2010.

For detailed information on the submission process, please visit uvic.ca/peninsula or contact the editor, Liam Mitchell liamm@uvic.ca.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 35922Architectural Objects. Discussing Spatial Form Across Art HistoriesAssociation of Art Historians b.sliwinska@lboro.ac.uk1265274042cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesreligionrenaissancetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Association of Art Historians contact email: b.sliwinska@lboro.ac.uk

Association of Art Historians Student Summer Symposium
Henry Moore Institute, Leeds, 24 - 25 June 2010
Call for Student Papers

Architectural Objects
Discussing Spatial Form Across Art Histories

The 'spatial turn' in the history of art has had a significant impact on the understanding of artistic practice and the built environment, and the formal and political complexities of space in a broader sense. This symposium explores the role of architectural theory and practice within multiple art histories, working across theoretical and aesthetic categories to redefine notions of space and form. From Tatlin's Monument to the Third International, to the spatial environments of LeCorbusier and Robert Morris, this interrelationship has challenged and reconfigured canonic divisions between architecture, ornament, sculpture and performance. Within a global perspective, the 'architectural object' can be traced throughout many histories of cultural production, demonstrated within the sculpted interiors of temples and mosques, the conceptual forms of the stupa or reliquary, or the use of decorative 'architectura' within ornamental schemes.

Exploring the 'architectural object' as a recurring and ever-changing phenomenon, a two-day symposium will consider a diverse range of papers that discuss this theme across cultural and temporal divides. Topics might include but are not restricted to:

• Sculptural practice and architectural ornament
• Anthropological and cross-cultural studies of the architectural object
• Monumental buildings as public sculpture
• Performing architecture; the social production of space
• Interior design and sculpture; the structural/decorative divide
• The architectural maquette as art object; history of the conceptual model
• The church and the miniature; religious contexts

Keynote speakers include former Leverhulme Fellow Dr. Richard Checketts and former Henry Moore Foundation Fellow Dr. David Hulks. Architectural Objects is hosted in collaboration with the Henry Moore Institute's Hermann Obrist exhibition, marking the wide-ranging 'spatial' production of the prolific architect, sculptor and designer.

Deadline for Paper Proposals: extended to 28 February 2010
To submit a proposal for this session please send a paper abstract no longer than 300 words, along with CV to:

Session Conveners:
Lara Eggleton, University of Leeds: laraeve8@gmail.com
Rosalind McKever, Kingston University: rosalind.mckever@gmail.com

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesreligionrenaissancetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 35924Culture Code Nature Machine: Interdisciplinary Conference on Semiotics, UM-Ann Arbor, March 12-13, 2010Semiotics Rackham Interdisciplinary Work Group, University of Michigan, Ann Arborsemiotics2010@gmail.com1265276575americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetpopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrhetoric_and_compositiontheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Semiotics Rackham Interdisciplinary Work Group, University of Michigan, Ann Arborcontact email: semiotics2010@gmail.com

**INAUGURAL INTERDISCIPLINARY CONFERENCE ON SEMIOTICS**

The Semiotics Rackham Interdisciplinary Work Group at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, is excited to place a call for papers, media, and performance for our inaugural conference on Peircean semiotics. We invite contributions of multidisciplinary work that addresses or challenges the theme of sign activity as constitutive and constructive of nature and culture. In addition to scholarly papers, we invite submissions by artists, musicians, filmmakers, performers, and others whose work interrogates the processes and possibilities of sign activity and the making of meaning.

Confirmed participants include E. Valentine Daniel (Columbia U.), Terrence Deacon (U.C. Berkeley), Paul Bouissac (U. Toronto), and Lenore Malen (Parsons/New School).

Please submit abstracts of no more than 200 words to semiotics2010@gmail.com by February 28, 2010. Additional information about the conference can be found at http://sitemaker.umich.edu/peirciansemeiotics.riw/home.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetpopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrhetoric_and_compositiontheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 35925Update "Green Thoughts in the Medieval and Early Modern Worlds"; EES Journal Submission Feb.15, 2010Early English Studies Journalearlyenglishstudies@gmail.com1265291136cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalpoetryrenaissancescience_and_culturetheatrefull name / name of organization: Early English Studies Journalcontact email: earlyenglishstudies@gmail.com

Early English Studies Journal is accepting articles that are concerned with any aspect of medieval or early modern green/environmental topics for the 2010 issue, "Green Thoughts in the Medieval and Early Modern Worlds." We welcome articles between 20 and 30 pages (including notes) that interrogate ecological or environmental questions that arise in literary and historical texts approximately between the years 1400 and 1700. We are looking for a wide variety of theoretical and historical approaches to the idea of the "green," which could include but is not limited to investigations of interior and exterior landscapes, the conception of the pastoral, gardens in literature, the effects of pollution, literary celebration of country-house poems, scientific writings and treatises, and journals that record weather or other effects on the land and sea.
Early English Studies (EES) is an online journal under the auspices of the University of Texas, Arlington English Department and is devoted to literary and cultural topics of study in the medieval and early modern periods. EES is published annually, peer-reviewed, and is open to general submission. Please include a brief bio and 200-word abstract with your electronic submission, all in Word documents (.doc not .docx). Please visit the website at http://www.uta.edu/english/ees/ for more specific submission guidelines and to read past issues.
Send submissions to: Amy L. Tigner, earlyenglishstudies@gmail.com

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalpoetryrenaissancescience_and_culturetheatre 35926Bridges and Borders: Exploring the Confluence of Languages, Disciplines, and CulturesAndrew Keese / Journal of South Texas English Studiessouthtexasenglishstudies@gmail.com1265293610african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalpoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Andrew Keese / Journal of South Texas English Studiescontact email: southtexasenglishstudies@gmail.com

The Journal of South Texas English Studies is now welcoming submissions until March 5 for its second issue, themed "Bridges and Borders: Exploring the Confluence of Languages, Disciplines, and Cultures."

Bridges are frequently built up and torn down, and borders often change. The boundaries between people, places and things blur and break. This happens with governments, but it is equally true in literature and rhetoric. Authors frequently challenge our notions of what is acceptable, they point out our close-mindedness, and they show us new paths.

The biannual journal, which is a collaboration between University of Texas at Brownsville graduate English students and the UTB English Department, also accepts a small number of poetry and creative prose submissions. Papers not connected to the theme will be considered, but those that follow the theme have the best chance to be published.

Scholarly papers can include topics in literature written in English, rhetoric and composition, and literary theory. These should not exceed 8,000 words and should be formatted according to the latest MLA style guide. There is no limit to the number of poems that may be submitted, but the total number of lines cannot exceed 100. We accept short fiction up to 1,500 words, flash fiction up to 800 words, and creative non-fiction up to 2,000 words.

Deadline for submissions is March 5. If you have any other questions or wish to make a submission (as a Microsoft Word attachment), please e-mail Editor Andrew Keese at SouthTexasEnglishStudies@gmail.com. For more information and for submission guidelines, please visit the journal's website at www.southtexasenglish.blogspot.com.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalpoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35927[UPDATE] Alan Moore and AdaptationImageText: Interdisciplinary Comics Studies / University of Florida rkrueger@ufl.edu1265294483americanchildrens_literaturejournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: ImageText: Interdisciplinary Comics Studies / University of Florida contact email: rkrueger@ufl.edu

ImageTexT is still accepting submissions for an upcoming special issue on the work of Alan Moore and adaptation.

Throughout his career, Moore has displayed a willingness to adapt and appropriate the plots, characters, settings, and themes from traditional narratives and the works of other authors into his own writing. Additionally, Moore's work itself continues to be the focus of adaptation, typically in the form of big-budget Hollywood films. We are seeking articles that deal with the work of Alan Moore and adaptation in any and every sense, whether that means analyzing the transitions of comics like Watchmen and V for Vendetta into film or analyzing the incorporation of folk tale and literature elements in works like Lost Girls and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.

Possible topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Problems in adaptation and appropriation of existing characters and elements
  • Formal analysis of comics as the medium for adaptation
  • Issues concerning film adaptations where the author is not involved (which Moore rarely is)
  • Concern with (or disdain for) historical fidelity when dealing with stories from a specific era
  • Moore's collaborations with various artists and their effect on adaptation
  • Characters and narratives supposedly reserved for children which are adapted into explicitly adult stories

As ImageTexT is concerned with the formal study of image/text relations, we are most interested in submissions that give significant attention to how images function in relationship to text. We strongly prefer to receive submissions that make reference to specific images and include high-resolution artwork along with text. Throughout his career, Moore's work has been resolutely bold and we encourage prospective contributors to be similarly daring with their ideas and analysis.

All submissions for this special issue are due April 1st, 2010. Send all submissions to Rex Krueger at rkrueger@ufl.edu and CC them to Katherine Shaeffer at KHShaeffer@gmail.com.

Submissions will be peer-reviewed and returned by June 1, 2010.

This issue is slated for publication in the Spring of 2011.

ImageTexT is a web-based journal published by the University of Florida, committed to advancing the academic study of comic books, comic strips, and animated cartoons. Under the guidance of an editorial board of scholars from a variety of disciplines, ImageTexT publishes solicited and peer-reviewed papers that investigate the material, historical, theoretical, and cultural implications of visual textuality. ImageTexT welcomes essays emphasizing (but not limited to) the aesthetics, cognition, production, reception, distribution and dissemination of comics and other media as they relate to comics, along with translations of previously existing research on comics as dimensions of visual culture.

cfp categories: americanchildrens_literaturejournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35928The Politics of Exile in Restoration Autobiography (3/4/10; MLA 2011)Sara Murphy, Columbia Universitysam2142@columbia.edu1265297423cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryinternational_conferencesreligionrenaissancefull name / name of organization: Sara Murphy, Columbia Universitycontact email: sam2142@columbia.edu

Proposed Special Session for MLA 2011 in Los Angeles

I invite papers discussing exile as lived experience and as thematic device in late-17th-century autobiographies. Both theoretical and historical approaches are welcome.

Please send abstracts of no more than 250 words to sam2142@columbia.edu by March 4th, 2010.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryinternational_conferencesreligionrenaissance 35929Sexology in Pre-World War II British Literature (3/15/10)Special Sesssion proposed for MLA 2011laynecraig@mail.utexas.edu1265297827cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualitypopular_culturescience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Special Sesssion proposed for MLA 2011contact email: laynecraig@mail.utexas.edu

This special session being proposed for MLA 2011 held in Los Angeles seeks papers addressing the influence of British sexological writers—Havelock Ellis, Edward Carpenter, Marie Stopes, etc.—on the work of British and Irish writers from 1900-1940. Papers could address a literary author's entrance into "sexological" debates, over LGBT rights, reproductive freedoms, the functions of marriage, women's sexual pleasure,etc., or could examine the role of the work/ style of a particular sexologist in British and Irish literature of the early twentieth century. We are also interested in papers that take into consideration the role of eugenics and "the British race" in scientific studies of sexuality, or address the peculiar interactions between sexology discourse and Irish Catholicism. 500 word abstracts by March 15 to Layne Craig, laynecraig@mail.utexas.edu

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualitypopular_culturescience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 35930ACIS Mid-Atlandtic Regional Conference: Re-Viewing Ireland Irish Culture in Words, Music, and Images 1 and 2 October 2010Drew Universityjchurch@drew.edu1265298106cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencespoetrypostcolonialreligiontheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Drew Universitycontact email: jchurch@drew.edu

RE-VIEWING IRELAND. Irish Culture in Words, Music and Images. 1 and 2 October 2010 Caspersen Graduate School, Drew University, Madison, New Jersey, USA Irish culture is known throughout the world. But what is it that makes Irish culture both distinctive and recognizable? At the beginning of the twenty-first century, is there a consensus on what constitutes Irish culture? This conference will explore, re-view and re-evaluate Irish culture in its multiple manifestations. Suggested topics include: sheela-na-gigs and standing stones; the legacy of Joyce, Wilde, Yeats Shaw and Beckett; from the Clancys to Clannad; art and identity; Riverdancing around the world; political messages in banners and murals; churches and censorship; pubs as purveyors of culture; writers in exile; plays and playwrights; Arran sweaters to Kilkenny Design; depictions of the Troubles; images of Irish women; children's literature; Ireland through colonial eyes. Professors Christine Kinealy and Bill Rogers Conference Chairs Proposals should be c. 350 words and submitted by 1 July 2010, to: jchurch@drew.edu

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencespoetrypostcolonialreligiontheatretwentieth_century_and_beyond 35931CFP: Women of Color in Critical Animal StudiesAnastasia Yarbroughayarbrou AT ymail.com1265299753ethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityjournals_and_collections_of_essaysrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturefull name / name of organization: Anastasia Yarbroughcontact email: ayarbrou AT ymail.com

The Journal for Critical Animal Studies (JCAS) seeks essays from women of color scholars and activists across a variety of disciplines and social justice initiatives to develop understandings on the issues of race, gender, and animality in critical animal studies. Since the term "critical animal studies" was introduced by the Institute for Critical Animal Studies, there has been a void of people of color contributions to the new and developing field. Particularly absent have been the thoughts, concerns, and activism of women of color. For critical animal studies to engage a holistic politics for total liberation, women of color must play a role in the field's development. The goals of this issue are (1) to vitalize the intellectual participation of women of color in critical animal studies, (2) to examine overlapping concerns that are central to critical animal studies, feminist theory, and critical race theory, and (3) to promote avenues of thought and ideas for action that can move us beyond pernicious forms of "othering" that undergird nonhuman and human animal suffering. Topics may include:

*addressing racism, sexism, and gender oppression in critical animal studies
*the role of white privilege in the animal rights movement
*domestication and the decolonization of mind and body
*semiotics of animality in racial discourse
*traditional ecological knowledge of animal relationships
*being an ally to nonhuman animals: animal activism from a woman of color's perspective
*interlocking oppressions of animality, race, and gender
*racialization of the other
*invasive species and invasive races
*veganism, raw foods, and food justice
*the social construction of overpopulation and female reproductive control
*women of color ecofeminism and an ethic of care
*racism, sexism, and gender oppression in the animal rights movement
*addressing violence against women of color and nonhuman animals
*imperialism, colonialism, and the oppression of native peoples
*the future of critical animal studies for women of color
*the role of women of color in the total liberation movement

Papers Due: April 12, 2010 at 5pm EST

Visit http://www.criticalanimalstudies.org/?page_id=389 for submission guidelines (but forward all submission for this issue to the contact below)

Send papers to:

Anastasia Yarbrough
Executive Director, Institute for Critical Animal Studies
ayarbrou AT ymail dot com
http://www.criticalanimalstudies.org

cfp categories: ethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityjournals_and_collections_of_essaysrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culture 35932EXTENDED DEADLINELynne Brucknerlbruckner@chatham.edu1265301353ecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgeneral_announcementsrenaissancefull name / name of organization: Lynne Brucknercontact email: lbruckner@chatham.edu

Seeking for submissions for a collection of essays on teaching early modern literature, and Shakespeare in particular, from an ecocritical perspective.

The volume encourages essays that show how teaching early modern texts ecocritically can be a matter of engaging in political struggle on behalf of the environment. Presentist approaches and essays that look at Shakespeare in different historical moments (including contemporary performances/films) are particularly welcome. Those who are ecocritics who happen to teach Shakespeare or other early modern texts, in addition to those who would describe themselves as Shakespeare or early modern scholars, are equally welcome to submit.

Innovative, interdisciplinary, transgressive, and relevant approaches are encouraged. Please submit 300 word abstracts by April 15, 2010 to bruckner@chatham.edu

cfp categories: ecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgeneral_announcementsrenaissance 35933History, Memory, and Haunting: Ghosts in American Literature - Abstracts due March 15MLA 2011 Convention (January 6-9, 2011)Naomi.Edwards@stonybrook.edu1265301360african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionromantictwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: MLA 2011 Convention (January 6-9, 2011)contact email: Naomi.Edwards@stonybrook.edu

This special session will explore the role of ghosts and haunting in American literature and how they reveal, challenge, and remake narratives of the nation. Please send abstracts (250 words) to Naomi Edwards by March 15 - Naomi.Edwards@stonybrook.edu

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionromantictwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35934MLA 2011--Pedagogy, Ecocriticism, and Early Modern TextsLynne Bruckner, Chatham Universitylbruckner@chatham.edu1265302344ecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgeneral_announcementsrenaissancefull name / name of organization: Lynne Bruckner, Chatham Universitycontact email: lbruckner@chatham.edu

Special Session on teaching early Modern literature, and Shakespeare in particular, from an ecocritical perspective. Submit 250 words abstracts to lbruckner@chatham.edu by March 3, 2010.

cfp categories: ecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgeneral_announcementsrenaissance 35935Anglo-American Literary Relationships 1870-1910Keridiana Chezkerychez@gmail.com1265302965americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualitytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Keridiana Chezcontact email: kerychez@gmail.com

I am putting together a panel exploring relations between England and the U.S. during 1870-1910 for the Midwest Conference on British Studies 56th Annual Meeting (October 8-10, 2010, Cleveland), given their stated strong preference for completed panels.

Any papers relating to Anglo-American literary relations during the last third of the 19th-century, and trickling into the 20th-century, will be most welcome.

I am particularly interested in questions of how transatlantic literature of the period influenced

- transatlantic imperial competition between England, fresh from carving up Africa, and the U.S., rising world power and former English colony,

- millennial discourses of utopia or dystopia,

- race, colonialism,

- gender, changing concepts of masculinity, and/or New Women, and

- views of non-human animals.

Please send a 200-word abstract and a brief, 1-page CV to Keridiana Chez (kerychez at gmail.com) by April 1, 2010.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualitytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35937Future / NO Future: Graduate Student Conference, Gender and Sexuality Studies - University of Pennsylvania, Sept. 16-17, 2010 University of Pennsylvaniafuturenofuture2010@gmail.com1265306238cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencestheoryfull name / name of organization: University of Pennsylvaniacontact email: futurenofuture2010@gmail.com

Future / NO Future

An Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference on the Future of Gender and Sexuality Studies

Keynote Address: Lisa Duggan (New York University)

16th and 17th of September 2010, University of Pennsylvania

We are interested in the future of gender and sexuality studies as an interdisciplinary field. We envision this field as a generative methodology for the broad study of identity, subjectivity, kinship, and power. This fall, we would like to rethink the political, social and intellectual developments that are shaping the roles of gender and sexuality in academic work, as well as ask how the study of gender and sexuality deals with futurity.

Why futurity? There is an ongoing debate in queer theory which has concerned itself with the political and strategic potential of positive or negative affect, and pessimistic, optimistic, or utopian modes of imagining the future. We hope to encourage debate across a wide range of disciplines: How does futurity relate to the political commitments of academics? What are the pros and cons of envisioning a specific future? How do political pessimism, and the pleasures of cynicism, encounter the rhetoric of hope and change? Can passivity and hopelessness, or an optimism that is tailored in specific ways, be effective political strategies? What is attractive about these rallying cries—"The Future!" vs. "No Future!"—and what is meant by future in each case?

As graduate students working on gender and sexuality, we are interested in the future of this field. What do we, the future of this field, do? What methodologies and theories inform our work? Might the future of the field be a consolidation across the tracks of individual departments and methodologies? What are the limits or problems of interdisciplinarity? What discipline-specific lexicons are used to define gendered and sexualized selves, bodies, or structures, and whose future do they serve?

We invite submission of abstracts from the sciences, social sciences and humanities. Potential topics include, but are by no means limited to:

* Gendered and racialized bodies
* Gender dynamics of optimism and pessimism
* Sexual subcultures
* Spaces and geographies
* Medical practice
* Global gender
* Transgender rights
* Institutional structuring of Gender and Sexuality Studies
* Qualitative and quantitative modes of prediction
* Futurity and history
* Theology and optimism/pessimism
* Family and kinship
* Critical race studies
* Feminisms
* Queer theory
* Affect studies
* Performativity
* Gender and sexuality as studied in ALL fields

Submit abstracts (ca 500 words) to futurenofuture2010@gmail.com

Submission deadline: 31 March 2010

Please visit http://futurenofuture.wordpress.com/ for (no)future updates

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencestheory 35938Narrating Lives and Creating Communities in Early Modern Writing (Special session, 2011 MLA, Jan 6-9) Adele Wilsonadele.wilson@utoronto.ca1265307247cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitypoetryreligionrenaissancetheorytravel_writingfull name / name of organization: Adele Wilsoncontact email: adele.wilson@utoronto.ca

In accordance with the 2011 MLA Presidential Theme, "Narrating Lives," papers are invited that consider how reflections on one's life (self, body, consciousness) act to create, maintain, or disrupt communities (local, family, confessional, national, international, etc.).

Possible areas of interest include, but are not limited to:
-Paradigms of exclusion and exclusion
-Modes of intersubjectivity
-Expressions of socio-political affinity via corporeal metaphors, medical discourse, narratives of health and disease
-Politics of representation
-Literary production and community
-Narrative and phenomenology
-Representing violence
-Narrating historical change
-Devotional writing
-Gender and community
-Utopian visions
-Competing translations
-Religion and imagined communities
-Narrating persecution
-Travel writing

Email papers or 1 page abstracts by March 1st, 2010.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitypoetryreligionrenaissancetheorytravel_writing 35940"Visual Interpretations: Aesthetics, Methods & Critiques Of Information Visualization in the Humanities, Arts & Social Sciences"Kurt Fendt, Executive Director / HyperStudio for Digital Humanities at MITh.digital@mit.edu1265311395cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheshumanities_computing_and_the_internetfull name / name of organization: Kurt Fendt, Executive Director / HyperStudio for Digital Humanities at MITcontact email: h.digital@mit.edu

"Visual Interpretations: Aesthetics, Methods, and Critiques
Of Information Visualization in the Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences"

May 20-22, 2010 at Massachusetts Institute of Technology/HyperStudio

http://hyperstudio.mit.edu/h-digital/

How do visual representations of complex data help humanities scholars ask new questions? How does visual rhetoric shape the way we relate to documents and artifacts? And, can we recompose the field of digital humanities to integrate more dynamic analytical methods into humanities research?

HyperStudio's Visual Interpretations conference will bring digital practitioners and humanities scholars together with experts in art and design to consider the past, present, and future of visual epistemology in digital humanities. The goal is to get beyond the notion that information exists independently of visual presentation, and to rethink visualization as an integrated analytical
method in humanities scholarship. By fostering dialogue and critical engagement, this conference aims to explore new ways to design data and metadata structures so that their visual embodiments function as "humanities tools in digital environments." (Johanna Drucker)

We welcome submissions from practitioners and theorists of digital humanities as well as such connected disciplines as art, design, visual culture, museum studies, and computer science.

Topics include:
· Expressive and artistic dimensions of visualizations
· Subjectivity and objectivity in information visualization
· Dynamic/multidimensional visualizations and user collaboration
· Social media and contextualized visualization
· Cultural history of visual epistemology
· Limits and affordances of the translation from data to visualization
· 2D and 3D visualizations of historical/social/political data
· Visualization across media and the archive
· Digital visual literacy & accessibility
· Relationships between database and interface
· Alternative modes of data representation.

Submissions:
We are inviting submissions for the following conference formats:
· Papers with 15 minutes of presentation and short discussions (12 slots)
· Short presentations, so called "6/4s" with 6 minutes of presentation and 4 minutes of discussion (18 slots available)
· Mini-Workshops, 30 minutes each (6 slots)
· Demos and Posters (30 slots)

Deadline for submissions: March 31, 2010

Organizers:

MIT HyperStudio for Digital Humanities (http://hyperstudio.mit.edu)

MIT Communications Forum (http://web.mit.edu/comm-forum/)

For more information: http://hyperstudio.mit.edu/h-digital/
or contact: h.digital@mit.edu

Conference Director:

Dr. Kurt E. Fendt
Executive Director, HyperStudio - Digital Humanities at MIT
Research Director, Comparative Media Studies/Foreign Languages and Literatures
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Mail: Room 14N-305 (Office: 16-635)
77 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
Phone: (617) 253-4312, Fax: (267) 224-6814
HyperStudio: http://hyperstudio.mit.edu/

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheshumanities_computing_and_the_internet 35941Document/Anti-Document in Asian/American Photography (Special Session proposal, 2011 MLA; 3/2/10)Joseph Jonghyun Jeon, U of San Diego; Warren Liu, Scripps Collegejjeon@sandiego.edu; warren.liu@scrippscollege.edu1265316419americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitypopular_culturepostcolonialscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Joseph Jonghyun Jeon, U of San Diego; Warren Liu, Scripps Collegecontact email: jjeon@sandiego.edu; warren.liu@scrippscollege.edu

We seek papers about Asian/American art photography that explore the documentary function, which has all but defined photography from its inception, and interrogate the photograph's long-established function as a document of the "real" in the context of Asian American politics. Accordingly, for artists such as An-My Lê, Dinh Q. Lê, Nikki S. Lee, and Patrick Nagatani, photographic images are more made than found, and photography becomes a dynamic artistic medium rather than an act of recording the object world. In such artists, we are interested in the ways in which photographic aesthetics intersects with Asian American social issues, and in how photography becomes a mode of critical interrogation, beyond the paces of documentary social realism. Our definition of photography is broad to include over overlapping artistic forms, such as literature, performance, film, and theatre so long as photography functions centrally in these other media. Papers might consider some of the following questions: how do photographic images reflect and comment upon the ways in which race is visualized? How do they shape or re-shape racial form? How do the more recent images come into conversation with the documentary tradition of Asian American photographic history (e.g. Japanese interment photography, images of Asian American railroad laborers, picture brides, etc.)? How do these images figure acts of looking and witnessing, what it means to see? How do these images imagine themselves in archival terms? In historical terms?

Please email 250-word abstracts by 2 March 2010 to:
Joseph Jonghyun Jeon (jjeon@sandiego.edu) or Warren Liu (Warren.Liu@Scrippscollege.edu).

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitypopular_culturepostcolonialscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 35942Climate Change Across the DisciplinesUnit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaignmverder2@illinois.edu1265317760cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgraduate_conferencesscience_and_culturetheoryfull name / name of organization: Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaigncontact email: mverder2@illinois.edu

Graduate Student Panel on CLIMATE CHANGE ACROSS THE DISCIPLINES
Sponsored by the Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
March 15, 2010

Submission Deadline: February 22, 2010

As part of its Spring 2010 colloquium series on Bios: Life, Death, Politics, the Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory is sponsoring a graduate student panel on CLIMATE CHANGE ACROSS THE DISCIPLINES, to be held on March 15, 2010.

We are seeking presentations from graduate students in the humanities, social sciences, and arts, engaging the question of climate change from a variety of disciplinary and theoretical perspectives.

Possible topics might include (but are not limited to) climate change in literature and popular culture; past historic episodes of climate change and human adaptation; climate change and economic justice; ecological politics; climate change and (or as) biopolitics; and climate change from an international/comparative perspective.

Please send proposals of no more than 250 words to Michael Verderame (mverder2@illinois.edu) by February 22, 2010.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgraduate_conferencesscience_and_culturetheory 35943Death in Early Modern LiteratureThe St. John's University Humanities Reviewsjuhumanities@gmail.com1265343073americanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalpoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: The St. John's University Humanities Reviewcontact email: sjuhumanities@gmail.com

Death in Early Modern Europe

The Humanities Review, a literary journal published by the St. John's University English Department in New York, seeks scholarly compositions for the Spring 2010 edition. This issue will focus on the political, social and aesthetic machinery of death in Early Modern literature. Possible topics of interest include:

• The Functions of Textual Death
• Theatrical Death
• Death and the Human Body
• Death and the Supernatural
• Memento mori in period art
• The Plague / Executions

Submissions should be 10 pages single spaced. MLA style only. Endnotes preferred.

Deadline: Saturday, April 10, 2010. Please submit via email to: sjuhumanities@gmail.com or via mail to:

The Humanities Review
St. Augustine Hall 150
8000 Utopia Parkway
Jamaica, NY
11439

Addendum: Call for Cover Art

We also desire cover art for the aforementioned theme. Artistic submissions in painting, photography, CG, & drawing are welcome. Monochrome, or the ability to be printed in black & white, is a must. Please submit via email attachment as a .TIFF file to sjuhumanities@gmail.com.

Deadline: Thursday, April 1, 2010.

John V. Nance and Christianne Cain, Edtors.

cfp categories: americanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalpoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35944New Approaches to Richard YatesLeif Bull/Goldsmiths College, University of Londonl.bull@gold.ac.uk1265371012americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinternational_conferencespopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Leif Bull/Goldsmiths College, University of Londoncontact email: l.bull@gold.ac.uk

5th June 2010

Recent years have seen a rediscovery of American novelist and short story writer Richard Yates (1926-1992), both within academia and among the reading public. His books are back in print, Blake Bailey has written an acclaimed biography of the author, and a Hollywood adaptation of Yates' first novel, Revolutionary Road, starring Kate Winslet and Leonardo DiCaprio, have raised his profile.

The critical consensus during Yates' lifetime largely cast him as an anachronism, an old-fashioned realist operating during a time of radical experimentation in American literature. This one-day conference seeks to expand the field of critical engagement with Yates, to look beyond a limiting realist framework while acknowledging the strong representational impulse governing his work.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

Yates and (post-)modernism
Yates in/and Hollywood
Yates and gender
The creative writing industry and the workshop system
Adapting Yates for the screen
Fiction as/and autobiography
Yates and work
Intertextuality and representation
Yates and the social
Yates and his contemporaries

Abstracts of no more than 300 words for papers not exceeding 20 minutes should be submitted by 15th March 2010 to the organisers at l.bull@gold.ac.uk . Please include the title of your paper, your name, e-mail address, institutional affiliation, and any AV requirements. Attendance and participation are free.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinternational_conferencespopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 35945[UPDATE] CFP: Creating Friction: An Interdisciplinary Creative-Practice Postgraduate Conference 22/04/2010Newcastle Universityvictoria.adams@newcastle.ac.uk1265371429childrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_compositiontheatretravel_writingfull name / name of organization: Newcastle Universitycontact email: victoria.adams@newcastle.ac.uk

With the expansion of creative possibilities for study within University settings, it is increasingly imperative that we question the borders between the creative and critical components of postgraduate study. How do the different modes of creative practice intersect with the world of traditional academia? How does a creative practitioner function as a PhD candidate? What methods can be used for assessment? What role does the accompanying critical thesis play in the context of the creative work produced? How does creative practice differ from fieldwork? What frictions are created by interdisciplinary work?

This one-day seminar aims to provide a space for creative practitioner PhD students to come together and discuss the relationship between their practice and research.

Keynote Speaker: Sharon Kivland, Sheffield Hallam.

Presentations must discuss both the creative and the critical aspects of your PhD research and should last no longer than 20 minutes maximum. We are keen to encourage diverse methods of presentation, and exhibition space will be available on the day. For installation based presentations, please e-mail us in the first instance to check we can meet your spatial and technical requirements.

We invite 300 word abstracts (including up to 10 low res images or up to 2 minutes video where relevant) from those who consider themselves to be creative practitioner PhD students; this includes (but is not limited to) students working within the areas of creative writing, digital media, fine art, music, and the performing arts.

Please email abstracts to: victoria.adams@newcastle.ac.uk
Deadline * EXTENDED* to February 18th 2010

cfp categories: childrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_compositiontheatretravel_writing 35946Poverty 2010: An Interdisciplinary & Community-based Graduate ConferenceQueen's Universitypovertyconference2010@gmail.com1265374456cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencespopular_cultureprofessional_topicstheoryfull name / name of organization: Queen's Universitycontact email: povertyconference2010@gmail.com

Poverty 2010:
An Interdisciplinary & Community-based Graduate Conference

Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario
October 14-16, 2010

"Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services, and the right to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond his control." (Article 25(1) of The Universal Declaration of Human Rights)

Call For Abstracts:
In the wake of the recent economic crisis, questions about the causes of poverty and propositions regarding its eradication have intensified in Canadian political and cultural discourse—yet so too have the stigmatization and criminalization of the poor. This conference intends to seize this moment of inquiry and crisis by bringing together graduate students across all disciplines, anti-poverty activists, outreach and poverty advocates, front line workers, and those who experience poverty firsthand with three central objectives:

1) Inquiry & Awareness:
To address disconnections between academics, activists, and impoverished communities and to create dialogue across disciplines and social boundaries in order to challenge existing institutions that reproduce inequality and marginalization. To explore the intersections between poverty and racism, public health, criminalization, food security, education, housing, substance abuse, stigmatization, sexuality, etc.

2) Resistance:
Participants in panels, workshops, and artistic media will share information on anti-poverty initiatives, such as cooperatives, education, outreach, legal rights awareness, and direct action.

3) Ongoing Initiatives:
To identify, incorporate, and support other anti-poverty initiatives in Kingston, including the establishment of a networking hub at Queen's University for activists, advocates, social justice organizations, and academics to share information on poverty issues, research, and anti-poverty initiatives in Kingston Ontario.

Although this conference is particularly interested in addressing issues of poverty in Kingston, its overarching ambition is community-building around poverty issues that can be applied to the Kingston community and communities across Canada. Kingston is a small city of great disparity.It has the distinctive trait of having the highest concentration of academics and federal prisons in all of Canada. It is also the urban centre for a region characterized by rural and Aboriginal poverty. Furthermore, impoverished Kingstonians receive inadequate welfare rate and are forced to live a life of close surveillance by welfare administrators, neighbours, friends, and families. Rural and urban communities nationwide face similar circumstances. How can we envision and share strategies to combat the underlying issues that shape, create, and sustain such disparity and suffering?

Deadline for abstract submissions: March 31, 2010

Submissions:
This conference is committed to providing a safe space for people living in poverty and those committed to combating its root causes and alleviating its attendant social suffering to share ideas, experiences, resources, and strategies. Participants can present in any manner in which they feel most comfortable, whether that be a traditional panel or through workshops, roundtable discussions, artistic media, etc. We want to stress that the conference encourages alternative presentation styles and that participants will share panels with non-academics. We welcome proposals on topics including, but not limited to:

Health, Food Security, Gender & Sexuality, Criminalization, Racialization, History of Anti-Poverty Activism, First Nations & Poverty, Culture & Representation, Labour, Cooperatives, Unions, Housing, Welfare, Environment, Resistance, Education, Stigmatization & Poor-bashing, Surveillance.

Abstracts must be between 200-300 words in length, plus title, author affiliation, and specification of presentation format (with particular comment on accessibility of information to the general public). Please send submissions to povertyconference2010@gmail.com by March 31, 2010.

Conference Format:

October 14: Opening reception and keynote address by Dr. Margaret Little, Department of Women's Studies and Sociology, Queen's University; concurrent panels and social justice trade show throughout the day, anti-oppression workshop, and evening poetry slam.

October 15: Community-based workshops: skills sharing, information sessions, walking-tours, social justice radio programming workshop, feast, movie night.

October 16: Day of Reflection and Action: Roundtable discussion, Anti-poverty festival.

Cost and Accommodation:
There is no fee for participation in this conference. Unfortunately, we are not able to offer funding for participants' costs. We are also happy to provide information about affordable local accommodation and limited billeting options. Inquiries can be sent to povertyconference2010@gmail.com.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencespopular_cultureprofessional_topicstheory 35947Storytelling and Fortune-Telling : Abstracts due March 1st MLA 2011 Conventionsophie.letourneau@mcgill.ca1265381515americanfilm_and_televisionpopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: MLA 2011 Conventioncontact email: sophie.letourneau@mcgill.ca

Please submit 200-word abstracts addressing the narrative conflict between foreseers and other characters in film, television, and contemporary literature for a special session to be held at the MLA 2011 Convention in Los Angeles.

cfp categories: americanfilm_and_televisionpopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 35948Chuck Palahniuk: Fight Club and BeyondDr. Billy J. Stratton, Bowling Green State Universitystrattb@bgsu.edu1265382397americanfilm_and_televisionpopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Dr. Billy J. Stratton, Bowling Green State Universitycontact email: strattb@bgsu.edu

Call For Papers—Chuck Palahniuk: Fight Club and Beyond
October 14-16, 2010
Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association Annual Convention, Albuquerque, New Mexico.
Following the popular success of the 1999 cinematic adaption of his novel Fight Club (1996), Chuck Palahniuk emerged as a major figure in the American literary scene. Despite his popular success, Palahniuk's work eschews easy categorization, and pushes the boundaries of liminal experience. In a series of novels including Lullaby (2002), Diary (2003), and Haunted (2005), for instance, Palahniuk extends the boundaries of transgressive discourse and problematizes notions of narration, genre, and form. In other works such as Survivor (1999), Invisible Monsters (1999), Choke (2001), Snuff (2008), and Pygmy (2009), he seems to amplify the critique of contemporary American consumer and political culture initiated with Fight Club. While embracing the popularity and literary significance of Fight Club, this panel is interested in proposals on any of Palahniuk's subsequent works. Proposals that approach Palahniuk's novels and cinematic adaptations in relation to the following topics are particularly welcome:

Discourses on the Body and Psychic Trauma
Inscription and Textuality
Nomadology and Indigenous Culture
Ecocriticism and Radical Environmentalism
Dystopia, Apocalypse, and Millennial Movements
Anarchism and Revolution
Colonialism and Globalization
Disability Studies
Cinematic Adaptations and Popular Culture
Economies of Desire and Fetishism
Beauty and Aesthetics
Manifestations of Postmodernism/Posthumanism

This list is certainly not intended to be comprehensive and I encourage proposals that address Palahniuk's work in innovative and insightful ways. Send abstracts of 250 words by March 1, along with your name, educational affiliation, address, and email to:
Dr. Billy J. Stratton, Bowling Green State University, strattb@bgsu.edu

cfp categories: americanfilm_and_televisionpopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 35949"Playing Doctor: Performance, Trauma, and the Ethics of Psychoanalysis" - May 21, 2010Literature and Psychoanalysis Graduate Student Symposium, Department of English, University of Toronto2010splrg@gmail.com1265385370african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Literature and Psychoanalysis Graduate Student Symposium, Department of English, University of Torontocontact email: 2010splrg@gmail.com

Keynote Speaker: Professor Naomi Morgenstern, University of Toronto.
"The University in Crisis: Teaching, Transference and Tenure in David Mamet's Oleanna."

In their exploration of the intersections between literature and psychoanalysis entitled Testimony, Shoshana Felman and Dori Laub turn to the classroom experience, asking, "[i]n a post-traumatic century, a century that has survived unthinkable historical catastrophes, is there anything that we have learned or that we should learn about education, that we did not know before?" Indeed, both trauma and pedagogy confront their subjects – doctors, teachers, patients, victims – with the difficulties of communication: not just of putting history into words, but of making past events present enough to do them justice without ignoring the contingencies of memory and hindsight. Meanwhile, performance, in all its outward spectacle, seems at first to contradict the difficulties of traumatic and pedagogical processes; tragedy in particular ostensibly promises a cathartic experience, centering around those very aspects of recognition and expression that often elude the traumatized victim in the context of psychoanalysis. And yet participants in both educational and therapeutic settings often find themselves troubling the boundaries between fact and narrative, memory and story, authenticity and theatricality – distinctions whose surprising fineness can cast ethical questions harshly into the spotlight.

The Literature and Psychoanalysis Reading Group invites proposals for papers that explore the convergences and divergences of trauma theory, literature, psychoanalysis, pedagogy, and/or performance. We welcome submissions from a range of disciplines within the humanities and Social Sciences.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

the relationship between teaching and psychoanalysis ("impossible professions")
trauma theory
ethics and psychoanalysis
transference (Freudian and post-Freudian theories)
literary representations of education and psychoanalysis
gender theory and psychoanalysis
speech acts and violence
borders and thresholds
identification and desire
masculinity, sovereignty, and the symbolic order
theatre and psychoanalysis

Please send abstracts of 300 words in .doc format to 2010splrg@gmail.com. Please include your full name, contact information, and institutional and departmental affiliation. Accepted papers should be no longer than 8-10 pages or 20 minutes. The deadline for submission is March 12.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35950Washington Irving and New Frontiers (2/14/10; SCMLA, 10/28/10-10/30/10)Washington Irving SocietyTracy_Hoffman@baylor.edu1265389871americanchildrens_literaturegeneral_announcementsromantictravel_writingfull name / name of organization: Washington Irving Societycontact email: Tracy_Hoffman@baylor.edu

The Washington Irving Society invites proposals on any Irving topic. Please send a shortened CV and 200-word abstract to tracy_hoffman@baylor.edu by February 14, 2010. Discussions which include "New Frontiers," the theme of the Fort Worth conference, are encouraged. For more information about the Washington Irving Society, please visit http://irvingsociety.wordpress.com.

cfp categories: americanchildrens_literaturegeneral_announcementsromantictravel_writing 35951CFP: SANE journal volume 1:1 and 1:2: "Comics in the Contact Zone" and "Teaching the Works of Alan Moore"SANE journal: sequential art narrative in educationjbcarter2@utep.edu1265389924americanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualityjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_cultureprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_compositiontheoryfull name / name of organization: SANE journal: sequential art narrative in educationcontact email: jbcarter2@utep.edu

SANE journal is now seeking submissions for works of research, practitioner-based articles, reviews, and rationales regarding its first two themed issues. Information about this new peer-reviewed, open access interdisciplinary journal covering all things comics-and-education-related, from pre-k to doctorate, can be obtained by visiting http://www.sanejournal.net/. For more information, e-mail James Bucky Carter: jbcarter2 at utep dot edu.

V1.1 (late 2010 release or per article as considered ready by review board): "Comics in the Contact Zone."

Mary Louise Pratt defines the contact zone as "social spaces where cultures meet, clash and grapple with each other, often in the contexts of highly asymmetrical relations of power, such as colonialism, slavery, or their aftermaths as they are lived out in many parts of the world today" and where those involved in the educational experience may "reconsider the models of community that many of us rely on in teaching and theorizing and that are under challenge today." Texts are social spaces, of course, and the comic book may be the best indicator of this fact. How do you see comics as meeting, clashing, and grappling with social issues in your classrooms when you teach them? How do comics illustrate contact zone precepts such as speech acts, transculturation, unsolicited oppositional discourse, autoethnography, and safe houses? How does the integration of comics themselves set up contact zones in the classroom? Which texts do you teach to get at notions associated with contact zone pedagogy? How does teaching a comics course set up a contact zone with professional colleagues, departments, university officials, etc? Articles should make explicit mention to contact zone theory and its component concepts. Deadline July 2010.

V1.2 (planned 2011 released or per article as considered ready by the review board): "Teaching the Works of Alan Moore."

Alan Moore may be the most influential and controversial comics writer of the 20th and 21st centuries. How do you teach his complex, multilayered works in your high schools classrooms, your college courses, etc? What are the challenges associated with teaching his texts or specific texts and how do you and your students address them? Can they be addressed? How does his output "fit" with notions of literature, literary, canon, etc. as you teach them in your courses? Articles may cover several of Moore's texts or focus specifically on one. Deadline October 2010

cfp categories: americanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualityjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_cultureprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_compositiontheory 35952American Literature I: Literature before 1900 (03/26/10; SCMLA, 10/28/10-10/30/10)Tracy HoffmanTracy_Hoffman@baylor.edu1265390507african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementspoetryreligionromantictheatretravel_writingfull name / name of organization: Tracy Hoffmancontact email: Tracy_Hoffman@baylor.edu

The topic is open to any pre-1900 American discourse, but discussions which include "New Frontiers," the theme of the conference, are encouraged. Please send a shortened CV and 200-word abstract to tracy_hoffman@baylor.edu. For more information about SCMLA and the Fort Worth conference, visit www.ou.edu/scmla.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementspoetryreligionromantictheatretravel_writing 35953"Narrating Lives behind Bars" MLA 2011 Los Angeles January 6-9, 2011. Modern Language Associationjonathan.abel@psu.edu1265400941african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinternational_conferencesmedievalpopular_culturepostcolonialromanticscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Modern Language Associationcontact email: jonathan.abel@psu.edu

Narrating Lives behind Bars

Special Session at MLA 2011
in Los Angeles January 6-9, 2011.

Why write from or about prison? How do narratives of incarceration and torture inform notions of justice, liberty, and rights?

Especially welcome would be theoretical analyses of prison literature , of the conditions for writing prison narratives, and of the rhetoric of prisons writing.

Send all queries to Jonathan Abel at jonathan.abel@psu.edu. Abstracts of 500 words by March 1st.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinternational_conferencesmedievalpopular_culturepostcolonialromanticscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35954Ohio Festival of the Short Story / Friday & Saturday, May 7 & 8, 2010 The Cincinnati Review / University of Cincinnatigrimespe@email.uc.edu1265402675graduate_conferencestheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: The Cincinnati Review / University of Cincinnaticontact email: grimespe@email.uc.edu

Theory of the short story has a long history, from writers and thinkers such as Edgar Allan Poe, Anton Chekov, and B. M. Ejxenbaum to contemporary theorists such as Susan Lohafer, Mary Louise Pratt, and Charles E. May. In recent years, critical anthologies and monographs such as The Postmodern Short Story: Forms and Issues (2001), The Supernatural in Short Fiction of the Americas (2003), and Reading for Storyness (2003) indicate continued and diverse interests in the field. How is the short story best defined? Should it be regarded as merely an "apprentice genre" for creative writers and literature students? What are its pedagogical advantages? What would a poetics or rhetoric of the short story look like? How does the short story function differently across cultures?

The Cincinnati Review invites participants to present papers and break-out sessions focused on the short story. Readings and a public interview will feature Lee K. Abbott (Ohio State University, author of seven short-story collections), Nancy Zafris (University of Georgia Press, editor of the Flannery O'Connor Award in Short Fiction), Margaret Luongo (Miami University of Ohio, author of If The Heart Is Lean), and Donald Ray Pollock (author of Knockemstiff).

Papers
We seek critical presentations of approximately 20 minutes from scholars of diverse interests and backgrounds. Possible presentation topics include (but are not limited to): historical perspectives on the short story; closure in the short story; electronic publication of short fiction; performing the short story; the short story across cultures; short stories in the classroom; the lyric short story; the nonfiction story/narrative essay; short-story cycles or sequences; cognitive approaches to the short story; the short story and metaphor; reading the short story; and short-story retellings.

Break-out Sessions
We seek proposals for hands-on, small-group discussions and/or exercises of approximately 45 minutes. For example, a session called "Postmodern Narrative Strategies in the Short Story" might open with the leader's introduction to the topic, move to an examination of an exemplary text, and end with a short exercise in one strategy. Possible session foci include (but are not limited to): research and the short story; narrative framing in the short story; revising the short story; the gothic story; misreadings; short stories into film; the anti-story; the minimalist short story; and short-story collaborations.

To participate in either category, or both, submit a proposal of no more than 300 words to Peter Grimes at grimespe@email.uc.edu by March 15, 2010. Please include your name and affiliation. Feel free to propose entire panels or break-out sessions as a team.

cfp categories: graduate_conferencestheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 35955"Shakespeare and Sport"; Shakespeare Journal Submission Mar.15, 2010Shakespeare/ Journal of the British Shakespeare AssociationJohn J. Norton, john.norton@cui.edu1265404380cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturerenaissancetheatrefull name / name of organization: Shakespeare/ Journal of the British Shakespeare Associationcontact email: John J. Norton, john.norton@cui.edu

Shakespeare Journal is accepting articles that are concerned with any aspect of Shakespeare and sports, athletics, or exercise for the 2011 issue, "Shakespeare and Sport." We welcome articles of 6,000 words (including notes) that examine the presence and nature of sport in Shakespeare's works. We are looking for a wide variety of theoretical and historical approaches to Shakespeare and sport, which could include but is not limited to investigations of Shakespeare's use of sport, physical exercise, sporting events, physical fitness, and competitive games.

Shakespeare is a major peer-reviewed journal, publishing articles drawn from the best of current international scholarship on the most recent developments in Shakespearean criticism. Its principal aim is to bridge the gap between the disciplines of Shakespeare in Performance Studies and Shakespeare in English Literature and Language. The journal builds on the existing aim of the British Shakespeare Association, to exploit the synergies between academics and performers of Shakespeare. Please include a brief bio and 200-word abstract with your electronic submission, all in Word documents (.doc not .docx). Please visit the website at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/17450918.asp/ for more specific submission guidelines and to read past issues.
Send submissions to the guest editor: John J. Norton, john.norton@cui.edu

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturerenaissancetheatre 35956CFP-Textual GirlsGirlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journaljxr67@psu.edu 1265405490african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturepostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Girlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journalcontact email: jxr67@psu.edu

Textual girls

The lives of girls are mediated in large part by the plethora of texts that surround them. Though adults often attempt to intercede, manipulate, or otherwise circumvent these texts, still the abundance of media and materials surrounding girls leaves them both vulnerable and savvy as they engage with texts that are either meant to address them directly or not.

We are soliciting essays, articles, and reviews for a themed issue of the Journal of Girlhood Studies to be published in 2011. This will be devoted to the fictive representation of girls, girl cultures and girlhoods in literature, art, media, and new media. Essays are invited from all arts and humanities disciplines depicting girls in any period and in any geographical location in both canonical and popular genres. Essays may take any theoretical perspective.

Types of texts to be analyzed include children's literature, young adult literature, adult novels, drama, cartoons, graphic novels, television, film and art as well as web sites and computer games. Methodological approaches are welcomed from a variety of angles as well, such as memory studies, literary studies, media studies, and archival studies.

Specific information about length, style, and submission procedures are available at the Girlhood Studies link at the Berghahn Journals website: http://journals.berghahnbooks.com/ghs/

Co-Editors Claudia Mitchell and Jacqueline Reid-Walsh, Guest Co-Editor Kirstin Bratt

Article Submissions
If you have any inquiries please email one or the both of Jacqueline Reid-Walsh, jxr67@psu.edu or Kirstin Bratt, krbratt@gmail.com, Penn State University, Pennsylvania.
Manuscripts due: August 31, 2010.

Articles should be no longer than 7,000 words (including references) and should be prefaced by a 150 word abstract and use Chicago Style as outlined on the journal website given above. Authors should also provide a cover page containing brief biographical details, institutional affiliations and full contact information, including an email address.

Girlhood Studies is published and distributed in print and online by Berghahn Journals.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturepostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35957Credit and Crisisfor 7th Pan-European International Relations Conference 'Politics in Hard Times: International Relations Responses to the Financial Crisisnina@prio.no1265407225americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsinternational_conferencespopular_culturescience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: for 7th Pan-European International Relations Conference 'Politics in Hard Times: International Relations Responses to the Financial Crisiscontact email: nina@prio.no

Central to an understanding of the global financial crisis 2007-2009 are both economic and epistemic forms of credit. Economic credit, on the one hand, has taken both new dimensions and forms: high levels of economic credit and debt are both a cause and consequence of the crisis – from the credit expansion through sub-prime mortgages, to highly leveraged banks and hedge funds, to the international credit imbalances and large fiscal deficits due to wide-spread state intervention. New forms of economic credit through securitisation and credit derivatives such as Collateral Debt Obligations (CDOs) and Credit Default Swaps (CDSs) also played a critical part. The importance of epistemic credit, on the other hand, is evident from the central role played by credit rating agencies, whose ratings proved to be a false security for investors. The credit of rating agencies has been called into question, as have the feasibility of the monetarist edifice behind central bank governance and the risk management of modern finance theory. At the same time both risk models and credit ratings persist, and the effect on their credibility is ambiguous. This section aims to investigate how the different aspects and dynamics of economic and epistemic credit relate to one another, and what particular modes of governance they represent. The crisis of credit has already brought about a peculiar reconfiguration of the private and public domains, with a large section of private debt now underwritten by the state. The section welcomes both established and young researchers and seeks to explore different manifestations of credit and credibility and their role in the crisis in the following 5 panels:

• Keynesianism/ monetarism – the credit of economic theory
• Public debt – the credit of the state
• Central bank credibility – the governance of expectation
• Epistemic security – the credit of facts
• Roundtable on credit and crisis

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsinternational_conferencespopular_culturescience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 35958Call for Papers for Fall 2010 Special Issue ON MODERNISMS (MAY 15,2010 deadline)Society for Philosophy and Literary Studiesphilitsociety@gmail.com1265408279cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetpoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialromantictheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Society for Philosophy and Literary Studiescontact email: philitsociety@gmail.com

Society for Philosophy and Literary Studies, Kathmandu, Nepal, and its reviewed "Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry," looks for articles for its Fall 2010 Special Issue on MODERNISMS. We are looking for articles, which examine the historical and material conditions and philosophical or theoretical/experimental perspectives that influenced the forms and contents of the modernist (contemporary and past) arts and literature.

Submission Guidelines
1. The submissions must be in CMS (if you are not sure about Chicago format; just submit in whatever format you have. If your essay is selected, we will guide you to convert your format into our requirement) documentation style.
2. The length of the essays should preferably be between 4000 to 5000 words (more or less is acceptable).
4. All submissions should be sent at the following email address: philitsociety@gmail.com.
5. The submissions will be sent for peer-review.
6. The published essays can be reproduced either in print or electronic form.

Special Issue Editors
Professor Peter Nicholls, New York University
Yubraj Aryal, Purdue University

Deadline for article submissions is May 15, 2010.
Contact: philitsociety@gmail.com

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetpoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialromantictheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35959Transforming Violence: Cult, Culture, and Acculturation, June 30 - July 4, 2010Ann Astell and Margaret Pfeil / Colloquium on Violence and Religion, University of Notre Damempfeil1@nd.edu1265420393ethnicity_and_national_identityinternational_conferencesreligionfull name / name of organization: Ann Astell and Margaret Pfeil / Colloquium on Violence and Religion, University of Notre Damecontact email: mpfeil1@nd.edu

Violence transforms persons and communities. Violence is also transformed by those same, affected persons and communities, as they struggle to live in its wake or under its continued threat. René Girard's mimetic theory obviously applies to the sociology of assimilation, whereby members of a vulnerable minority group seek (often in vain) to become like the majority, sharing its values and blending into its culture so as to be lost (and thus protectively hidden) in it.

Assimilation is, however, only one of several patterns of acculturation, each of which retains a violent potential. Marginalized, the minority group may be refused avenues of assimilation. Alternatively, the minority group may refuse to assimilate, defining its communal existence as a prophetic counter-culture. Mimetic relations vary across a spectrum. Whether the minority group assimilates to, separates visibly from, haunts and troubles from within, or provokes the majority at its cultural margins, it dynamically affects the dominant culture — so much so that, in a pluralist scenario, the dominant culture imagines itself to be a colorful aggregate of minority cultures, a Girardian "interdividuality" writ large. What was formerly marginal can become symbolically central to the dominant culture's self-definition—a hopeful proof of its "rags to riches" opportunities, a humble badge of its acknowledged shame, a trophy of its religious (in)tolerance, an icon of its scandalous transgression, a memorial of past strife, perhaps also a symptom of its own perceived vulnerability.

For Girard, "culture always develops as a tomb" (Things Hidden since the Foundation of the World, p. 83), a monument erected over the victims of mimetic rivalry. The apocalyptic end of a fundamentally sacrificial culture can only be projected, therefore, against the horizon of a "new heaven and new earth" (Rev. 21:1) of unconditional nonviolence, already revealed in Christ's Passion, death, and resurrection. What sort of cultural formations, then, result from the experience of social violence? How do they give and conceal evidence of their violent genesis? What determines whether or not a cultural form puts violence to rest, keeps it at bay, perpetuates it, or awakens its reappearance in yet another, related form? Can the "art" of violence become the "work" of peace? If so, how and under what conditions?

The Colloquium of Violence and Religion seeks to further its exploration of the transformation of violence into a myriad of cultural forms—religious, legal, political, economic, medical, artistic, literary, philosophical, and professional—at its annual meeting, held in 2010 on the campus of the University of Notre Dame (USA). Proposals for papers, panels, and seminar sessions on any aspect of mimetic theory are welcome. Of particular interest to the organizers of COV&R 2010 are studies of the complex role of religion in the lives of members of minority groups who have suffered and continue to suffer social violence—immigrants, refugees, convicts, conscientious objectors, the poor, the disabled, the indigenous, the Amish, African-Americans, Catholics, Jews, Hispanics, Asian-Americans.

Proposals for papers and panels are due March 19, 2010. They should be sent via e-mail attachment to Margaret Pfeil at mpfeil1@nd.edu

cfp categories: ethnicity_and_national_identityinternational_conferencesreligion 35960Derrida and Queer Theory? (MLA, 6-9 Jan 2011 in Los Angeles - Deadline 2 March 2010)MLA 2011christianhite@gmail.com1265434723gender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencespostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: MLA 2011contact email: christianhite@gmail.com

Seeking papers that address some aspect of this (im)possible articulation in celebration (anticipation) of Michael O'Rourke's upcoming book, DERRIDA AND QUEER THEORY. Please submit 250-word abstracts to Christian Hite (christianhite@gmail.com).

cfp categories: gender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencespostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 35961[UPDATE] Gender & Difference 20-23 May 2010Centre for Critical and Cultural Theory, Cardiff University and tbe Englisches Seminar at the University of CologneGD@cardiff.ac.uk1265457412african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalpoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Centre for Critical and Cultural Theory, Cardiff University and tbe Englisches Seminar at the University of Colognecontact email: GD@cardiff.ac.uk

GENDER & DIFFERENCE, 20-23 May 2010
Call for Papers

This interdiciplinary conference is organised by the Centre for Critical and Cultural Theory, Cardiff University and tbe Englisches Seminar at the University of Cologne.

It will be held at Gregynog Hall. This is the University of Wales residential conference centre, which is situated near Newtown in Mid Wales. It is set in beautiful landscaped gardens and extensive grounds. http://www.wales.ac.uk/en/UniversityConferenceCentre/GregynogHall.aspx

Confirmed Keynote Speakers: CLAIRE COLEBROOK AND MANDY MERCK

CLAIRE COLEBROOK holds a first degree in philosophy from the University of Melbourne, a Bachelor of Letters from Australian National University and a doctorate from the University of Edinburgh. She was Professor of Modern Literary Theory at the University of Edinburgh from 2000-2008. She has published articles on contemporary European philosophy, feminist theory, literary theory, contemporary music, dance, visual culture and political theory. Her books include New Literary Histories (Manchester UP 1997), Ethics and Representation (Edinburgh UP 1999), Gilles Deleuze (Routledge 2002), Understanding Deleuze (Allen and Unwin 2003), Irony in the Work of Philosophy (Nebraska 2002), Irony: The New Critical Idiom (Routledge 2003), Gender (Palgrave 2004), Deleuze: A Guide for the Perplexed (Continuum 2006) and Milton, Evil and Literary History (Continuum 2008). She is currently completing two book-length studies, one on vitalism and another on William Blake and aesthetics.

MANDY MERCK is Professor of Media Arts. She is a former editor of the film and television journal Screen and series editor of Channel 4's pioneering lesbian and gay programme Out on Tuesday. Her books include Hollywood's American Tragedies (Berg, 2007), America First: Naming the Nation in US Film (Routledge, 2007), The Art of Tracey Emin (co-edited with Chris Townsend, Thames & Hudson, 2007), In Your Face: Nine Sexual Studies (New York University Press, 2000), Coming Out of Feminism? (co-edited with Naomi Segal and Elizabeth Wright, Blackwell, 1998), After Diana (Verso, 1998) and Perversions: Deviant Readings (Virago/ Routledge, 1993). Her next book, co-edited with Stella Sandford, is Further Adventures of The Dialectic of Sex: The Work of Shulamith Firestone (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010).

The conference will bring together scholars working in the broad area of gender and difference, across a wide range of social and cultural texts and practices. It will feature research by faculty and graduate students working in critical and cultural theory, literature, film studies, sociology and other relevant fields. We will discuss cuttting edge research that addresses the various ways in which differences of all kinds — ranging from ethnic, racialised and religious differences to location, time period, class and sexual orientation — complexify the analysis of gender and gender politics. Proposals are welcome from all relevant academic disciplines and theoretical frameworks, covering any historical period.

A selection of papers from the conference will be published in the on-line journals Gender Forum and Assuming Gender

Prospective speakers are invited to submit a 500 word proposal along with a short CV to the conference organizers at: gd@cf.ac.uk by 28 February 2010.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalpoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35962Buddhisms in Motion (November 2010 AAA) Deadline: 2/19/10Robert Y. Chang (NYU)robert.chang[AT]nyu.edu1265471105ethnicity_and_national_identityreligiontwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Robert Y. Chang (NYU)contact email: robert.chang[AT]nyu.edu

Buddhisms in Motion Panel Details: The general aim of this panel is to explore the circulation of religion, with specific attention to Buddhist styles of contemporary world-making that are enmeshed within and responding to political economic structures. Do Buddhist accounts of movement and transformation complicate the trope of circulation in use by anthropologists? Additionally, contemporary Buddhists, like anthropologists, actively theorize and investigate habituated action, structural processes, and socially constructed meaning. How might anthropological inquiry into particular Buddhist understandings of these issues challenge prevailing concepts of "culture?"

We're especially interested in papers that provide ethnographic accounts of how and why the circulation of Buddhist persons, objects, institutions, and meanings affect existing regimes of value in the global cultural economy. Some probable topics include: friction and flow; bodies in motion across space and time; politics of place; markets and moralities; Buddhist media-making; or Buddhist rituals and ceremonies that make or cross boundaries.

Call for Abstracts for Session Proposal (2010 American Anthropological Association).

Co-organizers:
Anya Bernstein & Robert Y. Chang (New York University).

Submission Details:
Those wishing to present a paper as part of this panel are invited to submit a paper proposal via email to robert.chang[AT]nyu.edu and ab1223[AT]nyu.edu. Proposals must include a title, a 250-300 word abstract, and a CV by February 19th, 2010. Authors of accepted paper proposals will be notified via email prior to March 1st, 2010.

cfp categories: ethnicity_and_national_identityreligiontwentieth_century_and_beyond 35963UPDATE: Creative Prose for book, Common Boundary. 30 March or sooner.Editions BibliotekosEBibliotekos@gmail.com1265471247journals_and_collections_of_essaystravel_writingfull name / name of organization: Editions Bibliotekoscontact email: EBibliotekos@gmail.com

We are getting closer to completion of our second anthology, Common Boundary, but are still looking for some prose pieces to round out the collection. The general theme is immigration (including international adoption that leans to the immigration theme). We have so far received (and have accepted) some wonderful submissions by accomplished and award-winning authors. Main hub (to information and guidelines): www.ebibliotekos.blogspot.com

cfp categories: journals_and_collections_of_essaystravel_writing 35964Theorizing Jewish American Life Writing - MLA 2011 (Deadline 3/15/10)Jewish American Literature Discussion GroupDerek_Royal@tamu-commerce.edu1265473294americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementspopular_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Jewish American Literature Discussion Groupcontact email: Derek_Royal@tamu-commerce.edu

CFP - Theorizing Jewish American Life Writing

The Jewish American Literature Discussion Group will be holding a panel at the 2011 MLA Convention devoted to Jewish American life writing. The Group welcomes papers concerning the representation, as well as the theorizing, of the Jewish American experience in such genres as autobiography, memoir, biography, journaling, blogging, and autobiographic fiction. Papers may concern these expressions in a variety of narrative forms such as traditional literature, film, comics, and new media.

Please send an abstract of 250 words to Derek_Royal@tamu-commerce.edu. Deadline for submissions is 15 March 2010.

For more information about the 2011 MLA Convention, please visit http://www.mla.org/convention.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementspopular_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 35965Negotiating (Jewish) American Ethnic Crossroads - MLA 2011 (Deadline 3/15/10)MELUS & Jewish American Literature Discussion Groupliw@sunysuffolk.edu, Derek_Royal@tamu-commerce.edu1265475169african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsinternational_conferencespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: MELUS & Jewish American Literature Discussion Groupcontact email: liw@sunysuffolk.edu, Derek_Royal@tamu-commerce.edu

CFP - Negotiating (Jewish) American Ethnic Crossroads

MELUS and the Jewish American Literature Discussion Group are proposing a jointly sponsored panel to be held at the 2011 MLA Convention in Los Angeles. The focus of the panel will be on the confluence of Jewish writers and those from other American ethnic communities. Papers could include comparative literary analyses of specific texts as well as studies theorizing Jewishness within American ethnic studies as a whole.

Please send an abstract of 250 words to Wenxin Li at liw@sunysuffolk.edu and to Derek Parker Royal at Derek_Royal@tamu-commerce.edu. Deadline for submissions is 15 March 2010.

For more information about the 2011 MLA Convention, please visit http://www.mla.org/convention. For more information on MELUS go to http://www.melus.org.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsinternational_conferencespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 35966Text and Image in the Renaissance (SAMLA 10/10)Lynne M. Simpson, Southeastern Renaissance Conferencelsimpson@presby.edu1265476877renaissancefull name / name of organization: Lynne M. Simpson, Southeastern Renaissance Conferencecontact email: lsimpson@presby.edu

Text and Image in the Renaissance

This panel seeks papers that explore the interplay of text and image in Renaissance works. Topics might include (but are not limited to) film adaptations or appropriations of Renaissance drama; emblem literature; masques; the visuality of Early Modern theatre performance or contemporary re-stagings; neo-iconoclasm; depictions of women or race or gender; the sermon or religious service as performance; staging power; visual representations (ie. paintings, sketches, etc.) of Early Modern texts; or book covers, book making, and printing. Please send abstracts of no more than 500 words to Lynne Simpson at lsimpson@presby.edu by April 23.

cfp categories: renaissance 35967Conference on 'Cultures of Correspondence in Early Modern Britain, 1550-1640', Uni of Plymouth, 14-16 April 2011James Daybell, University of Plymouthjames.daybell@plymouth.ac.uk1265487220bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookgender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsjournals_and_collections_of_essaysrenaissancefull name / name of organization: James Daybell, University of Plymouthcontact email: james.daybell@plymouth.ac.uk

'Cultures of Correspondence in Early Modern Britain, 1550-1640'

A Joint Conference organised by the Centre for Humanities, Music and Performing Arts at the University of Plymouth and the Centre for Early Modern Studies at the University of Aberdeen

To be held at the University of Plymouth, 14-16 April 2011

CALL FOR PAPERS

This conference investigates the cultural uses of the letter, and the related practises of correspondence in early modern culture. Concentrating on the years 1550-1640, it examines a crucial period in the development of the English vernacular letter that saw a significant extension of letter-writing skills throughout society and an expansion in the uses to which letters were put. The conference aims to enhance our understanding of epistolary culture and to challenge accepted models of epistolarity through the study of letter-writing practices in all their nuanced complexity, ranging from the textual production of letters, their subsequent delivery and circulation, to the various ways in which letters were read and preserved for posterity. The transmission and reception of correspondence is a major theme for exploration, from the various processes by which letters were delivered in an age before the post office, to their copying and dissemination in manuscript form, and publication in print, as well as the oral divulgation of letters through group and public reading. Study of the early modern letter in its material and cultural forms can reveal the complex interplay of material practices of letter-writing with rhetorical strategies of the letter text. Contemporary literary appropriations of the letter on page and stage demonstrate the cultural significance of the letter and its potential resonances.
Proposals are invited for papers that treat the following key areas:

• The materiality of the letter: the physicality of correspondence (paper, ink, seals, folding) as well as the social context of epistolarity (composition, delivery, reading, archiving)
• Correspondence networks; the circulation of letters; postal systems and modes of delivery
• Letters, news and intelligence
• Authenticity, deception and surveillance: forgeries, secrecy, ciphers and codes
• Women's letters and the gendered nature of letter-writing
• Epistolary literacies, social hierarchies and the acquisition and diffusion of letter-writing skills
• Manuscript letters and letters in print
• The letter as a cultural genre and the rhetorics of letter-writing
• Humanistic letter-writing practices and the familiar letter; letter-writing manuals and models; education, pedagogy and learning to write letters
• Categories or types of letters: suitors' letters, letters of petition, love letters, letters of condolence
• Genres of printed letters: prefatory letters, dedicatory letters, address to the readers
• Staging the letter: letters and letter-writing in drama
• Editing and the digitization of correspondence

Proposals for papers, including titles and abstracts (of no more than 300 words) should be sent to James Daybell (james.daybell@plymouth.ac.uk) and Andrew Gordon (a.gordon@abdn.ac.uk) before 1st July 2010.

Confirmed Speakers Include

Alan Stewart (Columbia University)
Lynne Magnusson (University of Toronto)
Gary Schneider (University of Texas, Pan American)

The Organisers

James Daybell is Reader in Early Modern British History at the University of Plymouth. His publications include Women Letter-Writers in Tudor England (Oxford, 2006), three collections of essays, Women and Politics in Early Modern England, 1450-1700 (Ashgate, 2004), Early Modern Women's Letter Writing, 1450-1700 (Palgrave, 2001) and Material Readings of Early Modern Culture: Texts and Social Practices, 1580-1730 (Palgrave, 2010) and more than twenty articles and essays in journals and edited collections. Dr Daybell is currently completing a monograph entitled, The Material Letter: The Practices and Culture of Letters and Letter-Writing in Early Modern England (Palgrave 2011)

Andrew Gordon is Co-Director of the Centre for Early Modern Studies at the University of Aberdeen, and Programme Co-ordinator of the Department of English. He has published articles on various aspects of urban culture in the renaissance from city mapping to the urban signboard, and co-edited (with Bernhard Klein) Literature, Mapping and the Politics of Space in Early Modern Britain (Cambridge, 2001) and (with Trevor Stack) a special issue of Citizenship Studies (2007) devoted to early modern concepts of citizenship. A monograph entitled Writing the City is forthcoming. His work on manuscript culture has focused principally on letter-writing and included articles on Francis Bacon, the earl of Essex, John Donne, and early modern libels.

For further details please email: james.daybell@plymouth.ac.uk, or a.gordon@abdn.ac.uk.

cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookgender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsjournals_and_collections_of_essaysrenaissance 35968Inhabited by Stories: Critical Essays on Tales Retold Deadline May 1, 2010nancy Barta-Smith Ph.D. and Danette DiMarco Ph.D., Slippery Rock Universitynancy.barta-smith@sru.edu; danette.dimarco@sru.edu1265497741ecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgeneral_announcementsjournals_and_collections_of_essaysromanticscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: nancy Barta-Smith Ph.D. and Danette DiMarco Ph.D., Slippery Rock Universitycontact email: nancy.barta-smith@sru.edu; danette.dimarco@sru.edu

Inhabited by Stories: Critical Essays on Tales Retold

We seek critical essays of approximately 5,000 – 8,000 words from emerging and established scholars for possible inclusion in the proposed edited volume Inhabited by Stories: Critical Essays on Tales Retold. We are especially interested in the ethical implications for why a story may be worth retelling. We are open to all types of theoretical frameworks that embrace discussions of either explicit or implicit literary revision and that are interested in why such literature-to-literature reshaping matters. Some possible approaches to intertextuality include (but are not limited to) tracing the appropriation or adaptation of a literary work in another writer's single work, as a key text across an author's opus, or as informing multiple literary works by different writers. We are also interested in discussions of the pedagogy of teaching literary intertexts.

Discourse on the future of English studies frequently reflects a revolutionary dimension: the "death" (of theory), "return" (to aesthetics), or "new" (directions). In contrast, Inhabited by Stories wishes to turn attention to the enduring critical idiom of intertextuality to recognize the complexity of interpretation beyond such language. It hopes to demonstrate the evolving, allusive, and intertextual insights of professing "English."

Please send complete essays (in rich text format and double-spaced) and a 250 word abstract indicating the main line of argument by May 1, 2010 to nancy.barta-smith@sru.edu and danette.dimarco@sru.edu.

cfp categories: ecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgeneral_announcementsjournals_and_collections_of_essaysromanticscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35969[UPDATE] Deadline FEB 26, 2010Wiregrass Conference in English Studieskmurphy@valdosta.edu1265499772general_announcementsgraduate_conferencesfull name / name of organization: Wiregrass Conference in English Studiescontact email: kmurphy@valdosta.edu

WIREGRASS CONFERENCE
IN ENGLISH STUDIES
Sponsored by VSU's English Graduate Student Association

SEEKING COMMONALITIES:
WRITING, LITERATURE, AND CRITICISM

Valdosta State University

Saturday, March 27, 2010

Bailey Science Center

Opening Speaker: Dr. Niles Reddick (Ph.D FSU), VP of Academic Affairs at ABAC and author of the short story collection Road Kill Art and Other Oddities and the novel Lead Me Home.

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Dr. Brigitte Byrd, (Ph.D FSU) professor at Clayton State University, poet and author of 3 collections of poetry: Song of a Living Room (Ahsahta, 2009), The Dazzling Land (Black Zinnias, 2008), and Fence Above the Sea (Ahsahta, 2005).

The complexities of literature and language studies can fragment graduate students to the degree that they lose sight of the commonalities among the components of their discipline. This conference seeks to reconnect us to the common allure of language, literature, and the contingent sub-disciplines that likely drew us to this multi-faceted field. We encourage submissions, especially from graduate
students, on topics related to the conference theme. Some selected categories include

Technology
Media Studies
Popular Culture
World Literature
Genre Literature
Pedagogy in Creative Writing, Literature, and Rhetoric and Composition
British Literature
American Literature
Creative Writing

Send your 300-word abstracts to Kristy Singletary at kmurphy@valdosta.edu by Friday, February 26, 2010. Selections will be announced via e-mail by Tuesday, March 2, 2010 (if not before). Direct other inquiries to Darcy Fallon, Conference Coordinator, dmfallon@valdosta.edu .

Access the conference website at http://www.valdosta.edu/english

cfp categories: general_announcementsgraduate_conferences 35970Aesthetic Narration in Nineteenth-Century America (3/01/10; MLA '11)Dan Colsondmcolson@illinois.edu1265503870african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementspoetryromantictheatretravel_writingfull name / name of organization: Dan Colsoncontact email: dmcolson@illinois.edu

CFP: "Aesthetic Narration in Nineteenth-Century America"

In 1849, Elizabeth Peabody writes in her Aesthetic Papers that the "'aesthetic element'...is in our view neither a theory of the beautiful, nor a philosophy of art, but a component and indivisible part in all human creations." Thus implicated in the everyday landscape of nineteenth-century American lives and in their "human creations," Peabody's definition of the "aesthetic element" becomes a crucial part in understanding how nineteenth-century Americans narrated their lives. Following both Peabody's definition and the more recent trend to emphasize the aesthetic's position not as an idealized theory or philosophy somehow separate from the world that creates it but as an aesthetic "experience" rooted in material reality, this panel explores the use of aesthetic "experience" in the narration of nineteenth-century American lives.

The Graduate Student Caucus, an affiliate organization of the MLA, invites papers from graduate students that seek to explore the connections between aesthetic production and narration. Such papers could consider the wider meanings of aesthetic "experience," asking, for example, how narration changes with readership or with performance. We especially encourage submissions that examine interdisciplinary aesthetic forms, aesthetic texts that have been re-narrated (in parodies, adaptations, etc), or texts that seek alternative forms of narration. Some questions you may consider include, but are not limited to, the following: How do nineteenth-century American texts address the role of narration? How is the aesthetic used to narrate American lives and/or bodies? How does the aesthetic narrate class, gender, or racial differences? How are various aesthetic forms limited in their attempts to narrate these stories?

Presentations should be around fifteen minutes in length. Please submit an abstract of 300 to 500 words by March 1st to dmcolson@illinois.edu with "Aesthetic Narration Panel Submission" in the subject heading.

For further information please contact:
Dan Colson
Department of English
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
dmcolson@illinois.edu

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementspoetryromantictheatretravel_writing 35971Resistance & OutcastsFrench and Italian Graduate Students Associationosu.figsa@gmail.com1265507004eighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetmedievalrenaissancetheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: French and Italian Graduate Students Associationcontact email: osu.figsa@gmail.com

The Conference of the French and Italian Graduate Student Association at the Ohio State University is an opportunity to converse about research regarding current questions and debate important to the French and Italian academic worlds.
This year's topic will treat Resistance and Outcasts in Italy, France and francophone countries. We want to take a closer look at those artists, writers, and directors who have made themselves stand apart throughout French and Italian traditions. Our goal is to discuss how various individuals and movements stand as outcasts and resist tradition or genre, as well as political, religious and cultural currents, with an approach from different time periods.
Relevant themes and topics may include but are not limited to:
• Outcasts with respect to one's literary circle, one's genre, one's
culture
• Outcasts with respect to one's country: ie. exile
• Resistance to a political , religious, literary, cultural current
• The so-called "failed" outcasts, an individual or a movement that did
not necessarily bring a significant change in tradition but that stood apart for its resistance
• Outcast characters from the novel and cinema traditions

We welcome submissions and proposals for papers in English, French and Italian. Presentations will be limited to a reading time of 20 minutes (8-10 pages). Abstracts should follow the MLA style and be between 300-500 words; they must include a cover letter indicating the title, author's name, affiliation, address, telephone number and e-mail address.

cfp categories: eighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetmedievalrenaissancetheatretwentieth_century_and_beyond 35972Harriet Beecher Stowe's Bicentennial of Her Birth 2011; 5/1/2010Philip J. Kowalski/Wake Forest Univeristykowalspj@wfu.edu1265515067african-americanamericanjournals_and_collections_of_essaysvictorianfull name / name of organization: Philip J. Kowalski/Wake Forest Univeristycontact email: kowalspj@wfu.edu

I am searching for anyone who is interested in contributing to, as well as editing, a collection of essays that spans Harriet Beecher Stowe's writing career. I am supposing that since 2011 is the bicentennial of her birth, interest might be garnered among presses. All approaches, suggestions, and topics are welcome.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanjournals_and_collections_of_essaysvictorian 359732010 IEEE/WIC/ACM International Conference on Intelligent Agent Technology Web Intelligence Consortium (WIC)iiat10@yorku.ca1265522146humanities_computing_and_the_internetinternational_conferencesfull name / name of organization: Web Intelligence Consortium (WIC)contact email: iiat10@yorku.ca

[Apologies if you receive this more than once]

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IEEE/WIC/ACM Intelligent Agent Technology 2010
CALL FOR PAPERS
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2010 IEEE/WIC/ACM International Conference on Intelligent Agent Technology (IAT-10)

August 31 - September 3, 2010, York University, Toronto, Canada

http://www.yorku.ca/wiiat10

Sponsored By
IEEE Computer Society
Web Intelligence Consortium (WIC)
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)

##################################################################
# Papers Due: *** March 26, 2010 ***
# Accepted papers will be published in the conference proceedings
# by the IEEE Computer Society Press.
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IAT 2010 will provide a leading international forum to bring together
researchers and practitioners from diverse fields, such as computer
science, information technology, business, education, systems
engineering, and robotics, to (1) examine the design principles and
performance characteristics of various approaches in intelligent agent
technology, and (2) increase the cross-fertilization of ideas on the
development of autonomous agents and multi-agent systems among
different domains. By encouraging idea-sharing and discussions on the
underlying logical, cognitive, physical, and sociological foundations
as well as the enabling technologies of intelligent agents, IAT 2010
will foster the development of novel paradigms and advanced solutions
in agent-based computing.

IAT 2010 will be jointly held with the 2010 IEEE/WIC/ACM International
Conference on Web Intelligence (WI-10). The two conferences will have
a joint opening, keynote, reception, and banquet. Attendees only need
to register for one conference and can attend workshops, sessions,
tutorials, panels, exhibits and demonstrations across the two
conferences. We are also planning a joint panel, joint paper sessions,
and a doctoral mentoring program to discuss
common problems in the two areas.

+++++++++++++++++++
Topics of Interest
+++++++++++++++++++

We invite submissions in all IAT related areas. Areas of interest include,
but are not limited to:

* Autonomy-Oriented Computing (AOC)

- Autonomy-Oriented Modeling and Computing Methods
- Complex Behavior Characterization
- Complex Systems Modeling and Simulation
- Emergent Behavior
- Hard Computational Problem Solving
- Large-Scale Systems Applications (e.g., Social, Policy, Sustainability,
Brain Informatics (BI), and Web Intelligence (WI) Applications)
- Nature-Inspired Computing
- Regularities and Models of AOC
- Self-Organization in Multi-Agent Systems
- Self-Organized Complex Networks
- Swarm or Collective Intelligence
- Unconventional, Self-Organized Computing Paradigms

* Autonomous Knowledge and Information Agents

- Agent-Based Knowledge Discovery and Sharing
- Autonomous Information Services
- Distributed Data Mining
- Distributed Knowledge Systems
- Evolution of Topics, Trends, Knowledge Networks and Communities
- Human-Agent Interaction
- Information Filtering Agents
- Knowledge Aggregation
- Ontology-Based Services
- Recommender Systems

* Agent Systems Modeling and Methodology

- Agent Interaction Protocols
- Cognitive Architectures
- Cognitive Modeling of Agents
- Emotional Modeling
- Fault-Tolerance in Multi-Agent Systems
- Formal Framework for Multi-Agent Systems
- Information Exchanges in Multi-Agent Systems
- Learning and Self-Adaptation in Multi-Agent Systems
- Mobile Agent Languages and Protocols
- Multi-Agent Autonomic Architectures
- Multi-Agent Coordination Techniques
- Multi-Agent Planning
- Neuroeconomics
- Peer-to-Peer Models for Multi-Agent Systems
- Social Interactions in Multi-Agent Systems
- Task-Based Agent Context
- Task-Oriented Agents

* Distributed Problem Solving

- Agent-Based Cloud Computing
- Agent Networks in Distributed Problem Solving
- Collective Group Behavior
- Coordination and Cooperation
- Distributed Intelligence
- Distributed Search
- Dynamics of Agent Groups and Populations
- Efficiency and Complexity Issues
- Market-Based Computing
- Problem-Solving in Dynamic Environments

* Autonomous Auctions and Negotiation

- Agent-Based Marketplaces
- Auction Markets
- Combinatorial Auctions
- Hybrid Negotiation
- Integrative Negotiation
- Mediating Agents
- Pricing Agents

* Applications

- Agent-Based Assistants
- Agent-Based Virtual Enterprise
- Embodied Agents and Agent-Based Systems Applications
- Games
- Interface Agents
- Knowledge and Data Intensive Systems
- Perceptive Animated Interfaces
- Scalability
- Social Simulation (e.g., Social Behavior, Social Inference, Social
Networks, and Social Norms)
- Socially Situated Planning
- Software and Pervasive Agents
- Tools and Standards
- Ubiquitous Systems and e-Technology Agents
- Virtual Humans
- XML-Based Agent Systems

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
On-Line Submissions and Publication
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

High-quality papers in all WI related areas are solicited.
Paper submissions should be limited to a maximum of 8 pages in
the IEEE 2-column format.
The same format will be used for final camera-ready papers
(see the Author Guidelines at
http://www.ieeeconfpublishing.org/cpir/AuthorKit.asp?Community=CPS&Facil...).
All submitted papers will be reviewed by the Program Committee
on the basis of technical quality, relevance, significance, and clarity.

Note that IAT'10 will accept ONLY on-line submissions in
PDF format. Please use the Submission Form on the WI'10
website to submit your paper. Accepted papers will be published in the
conference proceedings by the IEEE Computer Society Press that is
indexed by EI.

Submissions accepted as regular papers will be allocated 8 pages in the
proceedings and accorded oral presentation times in the main conference.
Submissions accepted as short papers will be allocated 4
pages in the proceedings and will have a shorter presentation time at
the conference than regular papers.

All co-authors will be notified at all time, for the submission,
notification, and confirmation on the attendance. Submitting a paper
to the conference and workshops means that, if the paper is accepted,
at least one author should attend the conference to present the
paper. The acceptance list and no-show list will be openly published
on-line. For no-show authors, their affiliations will receive a
notification.

Papers receiving outstanding review scores from IAT'10 will be
invited for possible inclusion, in an expanded/revised form,
in Web Intelligence and Agent Systems: An International Journal
(http://wi-consortium.org/journal.html). Those that are recommended by
reviewer(s) to the Journal will also be considered.

The best paper awards will be conferred at the conference on the
authors of (1) the best research paper and (2) the best application
paper. Application-oriented submissions will be considered for the
best application paper award.

More detailed instructions and the On-Line Submission Form will be
found on the IAT'10 homepage:
http://www.yorku.ca/wiiat10/contributors.php

++++++++++
Workshops
++++++++++

An important part of the conference is the workshop program which will
focus on new research challenges and initiatives. All papers accepted
for workshops will be included in the Workshop Proceedings published
by the IEEE Computer Society Press that are indexed by EI, and will be
available at the workshops. Detailed information is available at the
conference homepage.

Note: we will not have a separate workshop registration fee
(i.e., conference registration covers everything).

++++++++++
Tutorials
++++++++++

IAT'10 also welcomes Tutorial proposals. IAT'10 will include tutorials
providing in-depth background on subjects that are of broad interest
to the Web intelligence community. Both short (2 hours) and long (half
day) tutorials will be considered. The tutorials will be part of the
main conference technical program. Detailed information is available
at the conference homepage.

Note: we will not have a separate tutorials registration fee
(i.e., only one conference registration covers everything).

++++++++++++++++++++
Industry/Demo-Track
++++++++++++++++++++

We solicit Industry/Demo-Track papers by the following methods.

(1) Industry papers of 4 pages can be submitted on the same schedule as
the research track.
(2) Separate 2 page demo proposals can submitted at a later schedule.
(3) Full regular paper submissions can include a demo option.
That is, a full paper submissions will be asked to
specify if they would like to give a demonstration; choice of
demonstrations (while utilizing information from the regular reviewing
process) will be selected based on value as a demonstration.

For options (1) and (2), more detailed instructions will be found at
the homepage: http://www.yorku.ca/wiiat10/participants.php

++++++++++++++++
Important Dates
++++++++++++++++

* Workshop proposal submission: January 20, 2010
* Electronic paper submission (8 pages): March 26, 2010
* Tutorial proposal submission: March 26, 2010
* Workshop paper submission: April 16, 2010
* Author notification: May 28, 2010
* Conference dates: August 31-September 3, 2010

++++++++++++++++++++++++
Conference Organization
++++++++++++++++++++++++

Conference General Chair:
* Nick Cercone, York University, Toronto, Canada

Program Chair:
* Jimmy Huang, York University, Toronto, Canada

IAT Program Co-Chairs:
* Takahira Yamaguchi, Keio University, Japan
* Ali A. Ghorbani, University of New Brunswick, Canada
* Mohand-Said Hacid, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, France

WI Program Co-Chairs:
* Vijay Raghavan, University of Louisiana, USA
* Irwin King, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
* Gareth Jones, Dublin City University, Ireland

Organizing Co-Chairs:
* Aijun An, York University, Toronto, Canada
* Thomas Lynam, York University, Toronto, Canada
* Marshall Walker, York University, Toronto, Canada

Workshop Co-Chairs:
* Orland Hoeber, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada
* Yuefeng Li, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

Industry-Demo Co-Chairs:
* Dominik Slezak, Infobright Inc., Canada
* Tony Abou-Assaleh, GenieKnows.com, Canada

Tutorial Co-Chairs:
* Sourav Saha Bhowmick, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
* Mounia Lalmas, University of Glasgow, UK

Publicity Co-Chairs:
* Vlado Keselj, Dalhousie University, Canada
* Markus Kirchberg, Institute for Infocomm Research, A*STAR, Singapore
* Jianhan Zhu, University College London, UK

IEEE-CS-TCII Chair:
* Ning Zhong, Maebashi Institute of Technology, Japan

ACM-SIGART Chair
* Maria Gini, University of Minnesota, USA

WIC Co-Chairs/Directors:
* Ning Zhong, Maebashi Institute of Technology, Japan
* Jiming Liu, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong

WIC Advisory Board:
* Edward A. Feigenbaum, Stanford University, USA
* Setsuo Ohsuga, University of Tokyo, Japan
* Benjamin Wah, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA
* Philip Yu, University of Illinois, Chicago, USA
* L.A. Zadeh, University of California, Berkeley, USA

WIC Tech. Committee & WI/IAT Steering Committee:
* Jeffrey Bradshaw, UWF/Institute for Human and Machine Cognition, USA
* Nick Cercone, York University, Canada
* Dieter Fensel, University of Innsbruck, Austria
* Georg Gottlob, Oxford University, UK
* Lakhmi Jain, University of South Australia, Australia
* Jianchang Mao, Yahoo! Inc., USA
* Pierre Morizet-Mahoudeaux, Compiegne University of Technology, France
* Hiroshi Motoda, Osaka University, Japan
* Toyoaki Nishida, Kyoto University, Japan
* Andrzej Skowron, Warsaw University, Poland
* Jinglong Wu, Okayama University, Japan
* Xindong Wu, University of Vermont, USA
* Yiyu Yao, University of Regina, Canada

*** Contact Information ***

Jimmy Huang (Conference General Program Chair)
Email: wiiat10@yorku.ca

The WIC Office
Email: wi10@wi-consortium.org

cfp categories: humanities_computing_and_the_internetinternational_conferences 359742010 IEEE/WIC/ACM International Conference on Web Intelligence Web Intelligence Consortium (WIC)wiiat10@yorku.ca 1265522195humanities_computing_and_the_internetinternational_conferencesfull name / name of organization: Web Intelligence Consortium (WIC)contact email: wiiat10@yorku.ca

[Apologies if you receive this more than once]

#####################################################################
IEEE/WIC/ACM WEB INTELLIGENCE 2010
CALL FOR PAPERS
#####################################################################

2010 IEEE/WIC/ACM International Conference on Web Intelligence (WI-10)

August 31 - September 3, 2010, York University, Toronto, Canada

http://www.yorku.ca/wiiat10

Sponsored By
IEEE Computer Society
Web Intelligence Consortium (WIC)
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)

##################################################################
# Papers Due: *** March 26, 2010 ***
# Accepted papers will be published in the conference proceedings
# by the IEEE Computer Society Press.
##################################################################

WI 2010 will provide a leading international forum of scientific
research and development to explore the fundamental interactions
between AI-engineering and Advanced Information Technology
(e.g., wireless networks, ubiquitous devices, social networks, and
data/knowledge grids), and their role on the next generation of
Web-empowered products, Web systems and services. AI-engineering
refers to a new area, slightly beyond traditional AI, which encompasses:
brain informatics, human level AI, intelligent agents, social network
intelligence, knowledge engineering, representation, planning, data
mining and discovery.

WI 2010 will be jointly held with the 2010 IEEE/WIC/ACM International
Conference on Intelligent Agent Technology (IAT-10). The two
conferences will have a joint opening, keynote, reception, and
banquet. Attendees only need to register for one conference and can
attend workshops, sessions, tutorials, panels, exhibits and
demonstrations across the two conferences. We are also planning a
joint panel, joint paper sessions, and a doctoral mentoring program to
discuss common problems in the two areas.

+++++++++++++++++++
Topics of Interest
+++++++++++++++++++

We invite submissions in all WI related areas. Areas of interest include,
but are not limited to:

* WI Foundations
- Brain Informatics for WI
- Human Level WI
- New Cognitive Models and Computational Models for WI
- Granular Computing (GrC) for WI
- Soft Computing for WI
- Autonomy-Oriented Computing (AOC) for WI
- Human-Inspired WI Computing

* World Wide Wisdom Web (W4)
- Meta-Knowledge Discovery and Representation
- Problem Solver Markup Language (PSML)
- Search of Best Means and Ends
- Goal-Directed Services Support
- Distributed Resources Optimization
- Service Self-Aggregation
- Web Inference Engine
- Information and Knowledge Markets
- New Social Interaction Paradigms
- Social and Psychological Contexts Regularities and Laws of W4

* Web Information Retrieval and Filtering
- Web Information Retrieval in context
- Multimedia Indexing
- Personalization
- Location-based Information Retrieval
- Geographic information retrieval
- Content-based Information Filtering
- Collaborative Filtering and Recommendation
- Hybrid Recommendation
- Clustering-Based Recommender Systems
- Information Retrieval Models and Evaluations
- Web Information Categorization
- Ranking Techniques
- Proxy and Cache Techniques
- Web Prediction and Pre-fetching
- Distributed Web Search
- Specifications for Web Information Extraction Process
- Web Crawling Systems
- Search Engines and Meta-search Engines

* Semantics and Ontology Engineering
- Semantic Web
- Ontology-Based Information Extraction and Retrieval
- Ontology-Based Web Mining
- Web-Based Ontology Learning
- Web Scale Reasoning
- Commonsense Knowledge Processing on the Web
- Unifying Search and Reasoning

* Web Mining and Farming
- Text Mining
- Data Stream Mining
- Multimedia Data Mining
- Web Content Mining
- Web Log and Usage Mining
- Context Sensitive Web Mining
- Web Information Clustering
- Web Page Clustering and Mining
- Data Warehousing
- Web Farming and Warehousing

* Social Networks and Ubiquitous Intelligence
- Social Networks Theory, Models, and Mining
- Web Site Clustering
- Web 2.0
- Link Topology and Link Analysis
- Theories of Small-World Web
- Virtual and Web Communities
- Web-Based Cooperative Work
- Knowledge Community Formation and Support
- Ubiquitous and Social Computing
- Intelligent Wireless Web
- Entertainment
- Social Media
- Human Computation and Social Games
- Opinion Mining and Sentiment Analysis
- Social Monetization and Computational Advertising

* Knowledge Grids and Grid Intelligence
- Semantic Grids
- Knowledge Resources and Services Discovery
- On-Demand Planning and Routing
- Brokering and Scheduling
- Middleware Architectures and Tools

* Web Agents
- Global Information Foraging
- Distributed Problem Solving
- Coordination
- Resource Intermediary and Coordination Mechanisms
- Self-Organization and Reproduction
- Agent Networks and Topologies
- Mobile Agents
- Macroscopic Behavior Modeling
- Trust Models for Web Agents

* Web Services
- Service-Oriented Computing
- Matchmaking
- Web Service Reconfiguration
- Web Service Workflow Composition
- Middleware-Based Ubiquitous Services
- Grid Services

* Intelligent Human-Web Interaction
- Adaptive Web Interfaces
- Context-Aware Computing
- Emotional Factor
- Learning User Profiles
- Multimedia Representation
- Personalized Interfaces
- Personalized Websites
- Remembrance Agents
- Smart Digital Media
- Cyberpsychology for HCI
- User Interests and User Modeling
- Visualization of Information and Knowledge
- Social and Psychological Issues

* Web Support Systems
- Information Retrieval Support Systems
- Web Site Navigation Support Systems
- Recommender Support Systems
- Web-Based Decision Support Systems
- Soft Computing (including neural networks, fuzzy logic,
evolutionary computation, rough sets, and granular computing)
and Uncertainty Management for WI

* Intelligent e-Technology
- Business Intelligence
- Intelligent Enterprise Portals
- Web-Based Direct Marketing and CRM
- Web-Based EDI
- Digital Libraries
- e-Publishing
- e-Business and e-Commerce
- e-Things and e-Activities
- e-Finance
- e-Learning
- e-Medicine
- e-Science
- e-Government
- e-Community Decentralized Community Communication Techniques
- Web Security, Integrity, Privacy and Trust

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
On-Line Submissions and Publication
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

High-quality papers in all WI related areas are solicited.
Paper submissions should be limited to a maximum of 8 pages in
the IEEE 2-column format.
The same format will be used for final camera-ready papers
(see the Author Guidelines at
http://www.ieeeconfpublishing.org/cpir/AuthorKit.asp?Community=CPS&Facil...).
All submitted papers will be reviewed by the Program Committee
on the basis of technical quality, relevance, significance, and clarity.

Note that WI'10 will accept ONLY on-line submissions in
PDF format. Please use the Submission Form on the WI'10
website to submit your paper. Accepted papers will be published in the
conference proceedings by the IEEE Computer Society Press that is
indexed by EI.

Submissions accepted as regular papers will be allocated 8 pages in the
proceedings and accorded oral presentation in the main conference.
Submissions accepted as short papers will be allocated 4
pages in the proceedings and will have a shorter presentation time at
the conference than regular papers.

All co-authors will be notified for the submission,
notification, and confirmation on the attendance. Submitting a paper
to the conference and workshops means that, if the paper is accepted,
at least one author should attend the conference to present the
paper. The acceptance list and no-show list will be openly published
on-line. For no-show authors, their affiliations will receive a notification.

Papers receiving outstanding review scores from WI'10 will be
invited for possible inclusion, in an expanded/revised form,
in Web Intelligence and Agent Systems: An International Journal
(http://wi-consortium.org/journal.html). Those that are recommended by
reviewer(s) to the Journal will also be considered.

The best paper awards will be conferred at the conference on the
authors of (1) the best research paper and (2) the best application
paper. Application-oriented submissions will be considered for the
best application paper award.

More detailed instructions and the On-Line Submission Form will be
found on the WI'10 homepage:
http://www.yorku.ca/wiiat10/contributors.php

++++++++++
Workshops
++++++++++

An important part of the conference is the workshop program which will
focus on new research challenges and initiatives. All papers accepted
for workshops will be included in the Workshop Proceedings published
by the IEEE Computer Society Press that are indexed by EI, and will be
available at the workshops. Detailed information is available at the
conference homepage.

Note: we will not have a separate workshop registration fee
(i.e., conference registration covers everything).

++++++++++
Tutorials
++++++++++

WI'10 also welcomes Tutorial proposals. WI'10 will include tutorials
providing in-depth background on subjects that are of broad interest
to the Web intelligence community. Both short (2 hours) and long (half
day) tutorials will be considered. The tutorials will be part of the
main conference technical program. Detailed information is available
at the conference homepage.

Note: we will not have a separate tutorials registration fee
(i.e., only one conference registration covers everything).

++++++++++++++++++++
Industry/Demo-Track
++++++++++++++++++++

We solicit Industry/Demo-Track papers by the following methods.

(1) Industry papers of 4 pages can be submitted on the same schedule as
the research track.
(2) Separate 2 page demo proposals can submitted at a later schedule.
(3) Full regular paper submissions can include a demo option.
That is, a full paper submissions will be asked to
specify if they would like to give a demonstration; choice of
demonstrations (while utilizing information from the regular reviewing
process) will be selected based on value as a demonstration.

For options (1) and (2), more detailed instructions will be found at
the homepage: http://www.yorku.ca/wiiat10/participants.php

++++++++++++++++
Important Dates
++++++++++++++++

* Workshop proposal submission: January 20, 2010
* Electronic paper submission (8 pages): March 26, 2010
* Tutorial proposal submission: March 26, 2010
* Workshop paper submission: April 16, 2010
* Author notification: May 28, 2010
* Conference dates: August 31-September 3, 2010

++++++++++++++++++++++++
Conference Organization
++++++++++++++++++++++++

Conference General Chair:
* Nick Cercone, York University, Toronto, Canada

Program Chair:
* Jimmy Huang, York University, Toronto, Canada

WI Program Co-Chairs:
* Vijay Raghavan, University of Louisiana, USA
* Irwin King, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
* Gareth Jones, Dublin City University, Ireland

IAT Program Co-Chairs:
* Takahira Yamaguchi, Keio University, Japan
* Ali A. Ghorbani, University of New Brunswick, Canada
* Mohand-Said Hacid, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, France

Organizing Co-Chairs:
* Aijun An, York University, Toronto, Canada
* Thomas Lynam, York University, Toronto, Canada
* Marshall Walker, York University, Toronto, Canada

Workshop Co-Chairs:
* Orland Hoeber, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada
* Yuefeng Li, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

Industry-Demo Co-Chairs:
* Dominik Slezak, Infobright Inc., Canada
* Tony Abou-Assaleh, GenieKnows.com, Canada

Tutorial Co-Chairs:
* Sourav Saha Bhowmick, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
* Mounia Lalmas, University of Glasgow, UK

Publicity Co-Chairs:
* Vlado Keselj, Dalhousie University, Canada
* Markus Kirchberg, Institute for Infocomm Research, A*STAR, Singapore
* Jianhan Zhu, University College London, UK

IEEE-CS-TCII Chair:
* Ning Zhong, Maebashi Institute of Technology, Japan

ACM-SIGART Chair
* Maria Gini, University of Minnesota, USA

WIC Co-Chairs/Directors:
* Ning Zhong, Maebashi Institute of Technology, Japan
* Jiming Liu, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong

WIC Advisory Board:
* Edward A. Feigenbaum, Stanford University, USA
* Setsuo Ohsuga, University of Tokyo, Japan
* Benjamin Wah, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA
* Philip Yu, University of Illinois, Chicago, USA
* L.A. Zadeh, University of California, Berkeley, USA

WIC Tech. Committee & WI/IAT Steering Committee:
* Jeffrey Bradshaw, UWF/Institute for Human and Machine Cognition, USA
* Nick Cercone, York University, Canada
* Dieter Fensel, University of Innsbruck, Austria
* Georg Gottlob, Oxford University, UK
* Lakhmi Jain, University of South Australia, Australia
* Jianchang Mao, Yahoo! Inc., USA
* Pierre Morizet-Mahoudeaux, Compiegne University of Technology, France
* Hiroshi Motoda, Osaka University, Japan
* Toyoaki Nishida, Kyoto University, Japan
* Andrzej Skowron, Warsaw University, Poland
* Jinglong Wu, Okayama University, Japan
* Xindong Wu, University of Vermont, USA
* Yiyu Yao, University of Regina, Canada

*** Contact Information ***

Jimmy Huang (Conference General Program Chair)
Email: wiiat10@yorku.ca

The WIC Office
Email: wi10@wi-consortium.org

cfp categories: humanities_computing_and_the_internetinternational_conferences 35975Form and Genesis, April 22-24Theory Reading Group at Cornell Universitytheory@cornell.edu1265558901theoryfull name / name of organization: Theory Reading Group at Cornell Universitycontact email: theory@cornell.edu

The Theory Reading Group at Cornell University invites submissions for its sixth annual interdisciplinary spring conference:

"Form and Genesis"

Featuring keynote speakers Adrian Johnston (University of New Mexico) and Robert Kaufman (University of California, Berkeley)

Cornell University
Ithaca, New York
April 22-24, 2010

Increasingly it seems that contemporary thought is confronted with two ways of explaining its objects. On the one hand, a formal approach seeks to analyze the necessary structures or defining qualities that make something what it is. On the other hand, a genetic or historical method aims to uncover the forces that give rise to form or structure in the first place. Do these modes of explanation disqualify one another, or are there compelling prospects for their integration? For example, is it possible to understand how thought or rationality can grasp its own determining processes? Or, on the contrary, is thought structurally unable to access a domain that is by nature exterior to reason, sense, or order?

Broadly understood, the formal approach tends to seek logical explanations, while the genetic approach looks to materialist or genealogical accounts. The relation between these two orders of explanation has wide implications. What is the connection between logical or normative form and its temporal, material, or historical genesis? Conversely, what might an analysis of the structure of genealogy or critique tell us about the latter? Does the political critique of form as an arbitrary convention mitigate its powers of normativity? What is the relationship between form and history, or form and materiality in literary and aesthetic theory? What is the status of formalism, whether literary or logical-mathematical, in contemporary theory?

Suggested topics:

Speculation and critique
Formalisms and historicisms
The transcendental and the empirical
Limits of philosophy/limits of science
Form of the political
Originality
Events of reason
Condition and cause
Sense and nonsense
Form and genre
History and form in aesthetics
Breaking form: the sublime, the unrepresentable, the iconoclastic
Formation and deformation
The finite and the infinite
Forms of the event
Structure and drive (Freud, Lacan, Deleuze, Guattari)
Form and interpretation (New Critics, Deconstruction)
History, genealogy, critique (Nietzsche, Foucault)
Marxism and form (Benjamin, Adorno, Jameson)
Forms of life (Wittgenstein, Arendt, Agamben)

Please limit the length of abstracts to no more than 250 words. The deadline for submission of 250-word abstracts for 20-minute_presentations is March 1, 2010.
Please include your name, e-mail address, and phone number. Abstracts should be e-mailed to theory@cornell.edu. Notices of acceptance will be sent no later than March 6, 2010. For more information about the Cornell Theory Reading Group, visit_http://www.arts.cornell.edu/trg.

cfp categories: theory 35976[Update] Urban Gothic: Haunted Cities, Spectral Traces (24 April 2010)Ben Brabon, Edge Hill Universitygothic@edgehill.ac.uk1265564852eighteenth_centuryfilm_and_televisioninternational_conferencestheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Ben Brabon, Edge Hill Universitycontact email: gothic@edgehill.ac.uk

DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS EXTENDED UNTIL 1 MARCH 2010

Urban Gothic: Haunted Cities, Spectral Traces
A one-day conference at
Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK
24 April 2010

Keynote speakers include Professor Sue Zlosnik (MMU), Dr Ben Highmore (Sussex) and the artist Gerry Gapinski.

This conference takes the specificity of urban 'phantasmogenetic centres' as an organizing principle, aiming to explore particular representations of urban gothic in literature, film, television and graphic novels. We invite abstracts for 20-minute papers focusing on identifying, untangling or savouring gothic elements in literary, cinematic and graphic representations of particular cities, both past and present.

Proposals are welcomed on, but not limited to, the following topics:

- Globalised cities, global Gothic
- Urban underworlds
- The labyrinthine city
- Gothic cartographies
- Gothic flâneurs/flâneuses
- Regional cities, regional Gothic
- Nineteenth-century urban Gothic
- The city as prison
- Paranoia in urban environments
- Haunted cities
- Monstrous cities
- Urban vampires
- Urban temporalities and nostalgia
- Vidler's architecture of the uncanny
- Tortured narrative and tangled streets
- Uncanny repetition in urban space
- Political subversion in urban gothic

Please send your abstracts to Ben Brabon and Sara Wasson at
gothic@edgehill.ac.uk by 1 March 2010

cfp categories: eighteenth_centuryfilm_and_televisioninternational_conferencestheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35977Utopian AnimalsKeridiana Chezkerychez@gmail.com1265568440americanchildrens_literatureecocriticism_and_environmental_studiestwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Keridiana Chezcontact email: kerychez@gmail.com

In H.G. Wells's A Modern Utopia (1905), the narrator holds a remarkable conversation between the narrator and a dog-loving botanist who declares that the stated purposes of purging contagious diseases would never, for him, justify the mass extermination of pet dogs. The botanist staunchly concludes, "I do not like your utopia, if there are to be no dogs."

As evidenced by the March 2009 PMLA's special section and the October 2009 Chronicle of Higher Education's coverage on the emerging field of animal studies, the question of the animal has risen to mainstream prominence as scholars increasingly heed Claude Levi-Strauss' advice to think with the animal. I am putting together a panel exploring the figure of the animal in English and American utopian literature for the 2010 Society for Utopian Studies Annual Meeting (http://www.utoronto.ca/utopia/meetings.html) in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, October 28-31, 2010. What function do non-human animals play in these imagined communities? How do animal metaphors serve to establish—or unravel—a utopia? What do utopian texts teach us about human-animal relationships?

Any papers in any time period relating to animals in English and American utopian literature will be most welcome, with special preference for 19th- and 20th-century texts. Please send a 300-word abstract and a brief bio to kerychez@gmail.com by May 1, 2010.

cfp categories: americanchildrens_literatureecocriticism_and_environmental_studiestwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 35978Form and GenesisCornell University Theory Reading Grouptheory@cornell.edu1265568824theoryfull name / name of organization: Cornell University Theory Reading Groupcontact email: theory@cornell.edu

The Theory Reading Group at Cornell University invites submissions for its sixth annual interdisciplinary spring conference:

Form and Genesis

Featuring keynote speakers Adrian Johnston (University of New Mexico) and Robert Kaufman (University of California, Berkeley)

Cornell University
Ithaca, New York
April 22-24, 2010

Increasingly it seems that contemporary thought is confronted with two ways of explaining its objects. On the one hand, a formal approach seeks to analyze the necessary structures or defining qualities that make something what it is. On the other hand, a genetic or historical method aims to uncover the forces that give rise to form or structure in the first place. Do these modes of explanation disqualify one another, or are there compelling prospects for their integration? For example, is it possible to understand how thought or rationality can grasp its own determining processes? Or, on the contrary, is thought structurally unable to access a domain that is by nature exterior to reason, sense, or order?

Broadly understood, the formal approach tends to seek logical explanations, while the genetic approach looks to materialist or genealogical accounts. The relation between these two orders of explanation has wide implications. What is the connection between logical or normative form and its temporal, material, or historical genesis? Conversely, what might an analysis of the structure of genealogy or critique tell us about the latter? Does the political critique of form as an arbitrary convention mitigate its powers of normativity? What is the relationship between form and history, or form and materiality in literary and aesthetic theory? What is the status of formalism, whether literary or logical-mathematical, in contemporary theory?

Suggested topics:

Speculation and critique
Formalisms and historicisms
The transcendental and the empirical
Limits of philosophy/limits of science
Form of the political
Originality
Events of reason
Condition and cause
Sense and nonsense
Form and genre
History and form in aesthetics
Breaking form: the sublime, the unrepresentable, the iconoclastic
Formation and deformation
The finite and the infinite
Forms of the event
Structure and drive (Freud, Lacan, Deleuze, Guattari)
Form and interpretation (New Critics, Deconstruction)
History, genealogy, critique (Nietzsche, Foucault)
Marxism and form (Benjamin, Adorno, Jameson)
Forms of life (Wittgenstein, Arendt, Agamben)

Please limit the length of abstracts to no more than 250 words. The deadline for submission of 250-word abstracts for 20-minute presentations is March 1, 2010. Please include your name, e-mail address, and phone number. Abstracts should be e-mailed to theory@cornell.edu. Notices of acceptance will be sent no later than March 6, 2009. For more information about the Cornell Theory Reading Group, visit http://www.arts.cornell.edu/trg .

cfp categories: theory 35979CFP: International Education, Transnational Identities (NWSA Panel)Abbie Boggs, Cultural Studies, UC Davis ahboggs@ucdavis.edu1265569816americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitypostcolonialreligiontheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Abbie Boggs, Cultural Studies, UC Davis contact email: ahboggs@ucdavis.edu

A Panel Proposed for the Annual National Women's Studies Association (NWSA) Conference; November 11-14, 2010; Denver, CO

This panel will feature papers that investigate contemporary practices of international educational exchange with the aim of interrogating the gender and sexual politics of the modern nation-state. Bringing together the fields of transnational feminist studies, queer cultural studies, and postcolonial studies, we seek to understand the role western educational institutions play in reproducing colonial narratives of rescue and supporting global identity politics (such as "global feminism" or "global gay movements"). We recognize the ways in which education has historically functioned as a key political technology for western liberal regimes, and we wish to understand how these disciplinary practices have continued and are reconfigured with the rise of neoliberalism and transnationalism. In what ways does international education perpetuate uneven exchanges of knowledge and capital and the circulation of western logics of development and democratization? How does the incorporation of "human rights" talk into the mission statements of educational institutions work to construct western-educated scholars and students as conduits for tolerance and progress? Does the humanitarian practice of educational exchange contribute to the depiction of "nonwestern" nation-states as sites of ethnic, religious, and hetero/sexist violence possibly in need of military intervention? In what ways does the production of cosmopolitan citizen-students not only support western projects of national security but also open space for waging critiques against the nation-state? We especially encourage papers that examine international educational exchanges in relation to the intersections of gender and sexual identities, structures of class, racial and religious formations, and hierarchies of dis/ability.

Please send a 250-500 word abstract and a brief CV to Abbie Boggs at ahboggs@ucdavis.edu by February 21st. Decisions will be made by February 23rd.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitypostcolonialreligiontheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 35980Women's Memoirs and the World of the Sixties (MLA Special Session, Los Angeles, 6-9 January 2011)Donna S. Parsonsdonna-parsons@uiowa.edu1265572473cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualitypopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Donna S. Parsonscontact email: donna-parsons@uiowa.edu

Many women have written memoirs about their lives in the 1960s. How have they characterized these times? Was it a decade of optimism, hope, accomplishment, regret, anger, betrayal, or confusion? Papers analyzing women's memoirs from diverse perspectives especially welcome. 300 word abstracts by 12 March 2010; Donna S. Parsons (donna-parsons@uiowa.edu).

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualitypopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 35981New Perspectives on John HeywoodMaura Giles-Watsonmauragiles@post.harvard.edu1265573391bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesmedievalpoetryreligionrenaissancetheatrefull name / name of organization: Maura Giles-Watsoncontact email: mauragiles@post.harvard.edu

'New Perspectives on John Heywood'--a Panel Proposed for the MLA Annual Convention,
Los Angeles, CA, 6-9 January 2011.
Abstract Deadline: 15 March 2010
Seeking 300-word abstracts of 20-minute papers on John Heywood and the dramatic, musical, religious, literary, political, and/or print cultures of the More-Rastell-Heywood Circle, including John Heywood, Thomas More, John Rastell, Jasper Heywood, and Thomas Whythorne, among others.

cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesmedievalpoetryreligionrenaissancetheatre 35982Special Issue, Journal of Boyhood Studies (3/1/10)Jeffery P. Dennisdennisjp@oneonta.edu1265574547film_and_televisionjournals_and_collections_of_essaysfull name / name of organization: Jeffery P. Denniscontact email: dennisjp@oneonta.edu

Papers wanted for a special issue of Thymos: Journal of Boyhood Studies, "Boyhood on Film." We are not interested in reviews of specific films per se, but in historical, cultural, literary, and sociological analyses of how boys, both preteen and adolescent, have been portrayed in film. Scholars from all disciplines are welcome. We are particularly interested in papers that acknowledge and address differences in race, class, nationality, and sexual orientation. Papers should be between 3500 and 4000 words and use APA style. Possible topics might include:
Boys and their Fathers in Film
Race, Class, and Boyhood
The Schoolboy's Tale
Boys and Aliens
Civilizing the Feral Child
The Demonic Child
The Gay Bildungsroman
The Disneyfication of Boyhood
The Boy-Man
Submit an abstract and a cv or the complete manuscript to Dr. Jeffery Dennis, dennisjp@oneonta.edu. The submission deadline is March 1, 2010. Final versions of accepted manuscripts will be due by August 1, 2010.

cfp categories: film_and_televisionjournals_and_collections_of_essays