Masculinities in Women's Studies: Special Issue of Women's Studies an Interdisciplinary Journal

full name / name of organization: 
Daniel Farr, guest editor
contact email: 
dfarr@randolphcollege.edu

Women's studies isn't merely equated with feminism – it is often equated queer studies, body studies, and increasingly gender and men’s studies. Traditionally, women’s studies has appealed to women and queer students predominately, but what is the situation of men and masculinities within the field of women’s studies? This special issue of Women’s Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal seeks to explore the nuanced changes of the field as men and masculinities attain greater presence and status. While the experiences of men students, teachers, and academics within women’s studies offer significant insight to the issues of masculinities in the field, this issue will not be limited to only these experiences and research. The politics of women’s studies programs and organizations in the academe in regards to men and masculinities, historic and contemporary, offer another piece of the story. Further, as more programs are transforming to incorporate masculinities and gender studies, in classes and program title (i.e. “Gender and women’s studies”), the culture and meaning of women’s studies inevitably changes as well.

This special issue invites submissions from a variety of perspectives including theoretical works, empirical research, literary and cultural studies, and ethnography. Suggested topics may include, but are not limited to the following:

*the experience and perspective of men academics/professors/students in the field of women’s studies. How do men negotiate issues of gender/sexuality/identity within women’s studies?
*curriculum issues and transformation over time. Has gender or masculinities studies been incorporated into women’s studies or is it separate?
*the experience of men academics in feminist organizations
*issues of naming. How are academic programs of women’s studies evolving? Is there a trend towards “gender studies”?
*quantitative analyses: How many men are taking women’s studies courses? What roles do men have in feminist organizations, classrooms, and publications?
*socio-historic presence of women’s studies and masculinities
*the experiences of transgendered academics/professors/students within the field
*literature transformation. Are the women’s studies texts and journals evolving to include more “gendered” or masculine content?

Book reviews: We are also interested in receiving book reviews appropriate to this special issue. If you are interested in serving as a reviewer, but do not have a book in mind please contact the guest editor for a list of suggestions.

Submission deadline: August 16, 2010; early submissions and inquiries are welcomed.

Submission Details: Each manuscript must be accompanied by a statement that it has not been
published elsewhere and that it has not been submitted simultaneously for publication elsewhere. All manuscripts should be formatted according to MLA guidelines. Essays should be approximately 25 double-sided pages in length and formatted for blind-review. Authors should also supply a shortened version of the title for a running head, not exceeding 50 character spaces, an abstract of approximately 100 words, and the author's affiliation and location on a single cover sheet. Each submitted article should contain the author's mailing address, telephone number, e-mail, and a short biographical paragraph on a separate page.
Electronic submission is preferred (.pdf or .doc/.docx format) to guest editor, Daniel Farr, at dfarr@randolphcollege.edu.

Paper copies are not required, but may be sent to: Daniel Farr, Sociology, Randolph College, 2500 Rivermont Ave., Lynchburg, VA 24503.

cfp categories: 
gender_studies_and_sexuality
journals_and_collections_of_essays
professional_topics