[UPDATE] Conference announcement: What Postcolonial Theory Doesn't Say

full name / name of organization: 
Anna Bernard / University of York
contact email: 
ab609@york.ac.uk

WHAT POSTCOLONIAL THEORY DOESN’T SAY
JULY 3-5, 2010
PROGRAMME
BOWLAND AUDITORIUM, BERRICK SAUL BUILDING, UNIVERSITY OF YORK.

DAY 1: JULY 3, 2010

8.30-9.00: Registration

9.00-10.15: PLENARY SESSION I
Anne McClintock (University of Wisconsin, Madison): “Paranoid Empire: The Crisis of Violence and the Visible
in the War on Terror.”

10.15-10:30: Coffee

10.30-12.00: SESSION 1: TRANSATLANTIC MOVEMENTS AND MEMORIES
1. JA Kusaka (University of Warwick): “Reconsidering ‘Transnationality’: A Study of Chimamanda Ngozi
Adichie’s Half of a Yellow Sun.”
2. Leila Kamali (Birkbeck University of London): ‘No Paths in Water’: Rethinking Cosmopolitanism
through Caryl Phillips’s Crossing the River.”
3. Nalini Mohabir (University of Leeds): “Diaspora, Decolonization and Douglarized Space.”

12.00-1.00: Lunch

1.00-2.45: SESSION 2: SOUTH AMERICA
1. Lucy Taylor (Aberystwyth University): “Exploring Postcoloniality in Argentina.”
2. Nasheli Jimenez del Val (University of Stirling): “Whose Postcolonial Theory? Postoccidentalism, the
Argument from Latin America.”
3. Lisa Shaw (University of Liverpool): “Afro-Brazilian Identity on stage in Rio de Janeiro: The Figure of
the Baiana, 1880s to 1939.”
4. Alison Fraunhar (Saint Xavier University): “Performing the postcolonial nation: Cuba and Brazil.”

2.45-3.00: Coffee

3.00-4.00: SESSION 3: THE MIDDLE EAST
1. Smadar Lavie (University of Virginia): “Where is the Mizrahi-Palestinian Borderzone?”
2. Patrick Williams (Nottingham Trent University): “ `I didn't die here...’ : Mahmoud Darwish, Naji Al-Ali
and the Siege of Beirut.”

4.00-5.30: SESSION 4: AFRICA
1. Ashleigh Harris (University of Uppsala): “Scandinavian Exceptionalism and the Land Redistribution
Campaign in Zimbabwe.”
2. Megan Jones (University of the Witwatersrand): “Literary Form and the City— Aestheticizing
Johannesburg.”
3. Susan Andrade (University of Pittsburgh): “Sembène, Zola and Realism.”

5.30-7.00: SESSION 5: POSTCOLONIAL NATURE?
1. Jennifer Wenzel (University of Michigan, Ann Arbour): “Revolutionaries or just bitter men?: Frantz
Fanon in the Niger Delta.”
2. Crystal Bartolovich (University of Syracuse): "If Oil Could Speak, What Would it Say?"
3. Esther Leslie (Birkbeck University of London): “Meltdown and the Metamorphic Aspects of Crisis.”

DAY 2: JULY 4, 2010

8.30-9.00: Registration

9.00-10.15: PLENARY SESSION II
Rob Nixon (University of Wisconsin, Madison): “Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor.”

10.15-10.30: Coffee

10.30-12.00: SESSION 6: AESTHETICS
1. Jo Smith (Victoria University of Wellington, Aotearoa/New Zealand): “Indigenizing Postcolonial
Theory: The case of Maori Television.”
2. Pamela McCallum (University of Calgary): “Representing Globalisation: Dialogues between Art and
Literature.”
3. John C. Hawley (Santa Clara University): “Expanding the Circle: Postcolonial and Globalization Theory,
Listening.”

12.00-1.00: Lunch

1.00-2.45: SESSION 7: THEORY’S FUTURES
1. Simone Drichel (University of Otago): “The Other Other: Postcolonialism and Ethics.”
2. Jennifer Terrell (New School for Social Research): “Moving Towards a Theory of the Postcolonial State
in the Age of Democracy”
3. Sharae Deckard (University College Dublin): “‘Worlding’ Postcolonial Studies: Theorizing the Capitalist
World-System and the Global Environment.”
4. James Graham (Middlesex University): “Cosmopolitanism and the Idea of Community in Postcolonial
Literary Studies.”

2.45-3.00: Coffee

3.00-4.00: SESSION 8: THE INSTITUTIONALISATION OF POSTCOLONIAL STUDIES

1. Pasi Ahonen (Lappeenranta University of Technology) and Mrinalini Greenharry (Laurentian
University): “Managing Postcolonialism: Postcolonial Theory Meets Organization”
2. Claire Feehily (Birkbeck, University of London): “The Educational Politics of Britain, 1988-1992.”

4.00-5.30: SESSION 9: HUMAN RIGHTS I
1. Elizabeth Swanson Goldberg (Babson College): “Rethinking the ‘Grove of Death’: Postcolonialism and
Human Rights in Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness and Ken Saro-Wiwa’s A Month and A Day &
Letters.”
2. Lena Khor (Lawrence University): “Can the Human Rights ‘Victim’ Speak?”
3. Heather Hewett (State University of New York, New Paltz): “Gendering Human Rights Approaches to
Literary Study.”

5.30-7.00: SESSION 10: TERROR
1. Anna Ball (Nottingham Trent University): “Screening the Afghan Subject: Towards a Postcolonial
Feminist Gaze on the ‘War On Terror’”
2. Jane Poyner (University of Exeter): “Postcolonial Studies and an Aesthetic of Terror.”
3. David Farrier (University of Leicester): “The Aesthetics of Detention: Asylum, the Ban and a ‘Step
Beyond’ Postcolonial Discourse.”

DAY 3: JULY 5, 2010

8.30-9.00: Registration

9.00-10.15: PLENARY SESSION III
Neil Lazarus (University of Warwick): “What Postcolonial Theory Doesn’t Say: (Post-)Colonialism and Capitalist
Modernity”

10.15-10.30: Coffee

10.30-12.00: SESSION 11: “NOT US, THE OTHERS TOO”: GERMAN TRANSLOCATIONS OF
POSTCOLONIAL THEORY
1. Eva Bischoff (University of Bonn): “Among the cannibals: Self and Other in Postcolonial Weimar
Germany.”
2. Serhat Karakayali (Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg Hall): “Re-reading Postcolonial Studies
from the Perspective of Migration.”
3. Christine Vogt-William (University of Münster): “‘I’ll be a post-antiracist in a postcolonial world?’
German Feminists and the Concept of Intersectionality – Some Critical Remarks.”

12-1: Lunch

1.00-2.30: SESSION 12: POSTCOLONIAL THEORY AND CRITICISM IN EAST-CENTRAL
EUROPE – INTERSECTIONS, REVISIONS, IDEOLOGICAL DISJUNCTIONS
1. Boguslaw Bakula (Adam Mickiewicz University): “Postcolonial Studies in Central and Eastern Europe:
A Comparative Survey of Problems and Objectives.”
2. Dorota Kołodziejczyk (Wroclaw University): “Post-Allegorical Transition: Denationalizing Literature in
Postcommunism.”
3. Cristina Sandru (University of Sibiu): “Complicities and Resistance: the ‘Overcoded Fictions’ of East-
Central Europe.”

2.30-2.45: Coffee

2.45-3.45: SESSION 13: EAST ASIA
1. Sharanya Jayawickrama (The University of the West Indies, Saint Augustine): “Between Worlds:
Representations of Hong Kong as Postcolonial City.”
2. Simon Obendorf (University of Lincoln): “‘Why They Hate Singapore’: The Outer Limits or New
Possibilities of Postcolonial Theory.”

3.45-4.00: Coffee

4.00-5.00: SESSION 14: HUMAN RIGHTS II
1. Tracy Parkinson (King College): “Colonialism, Mission, and Justice: Mongo Beti and René Philombe.”
2. Sarah Pett (University of York): “Human Rights and Literary Risks: Reading the Human Rights Narrative
Within and Without Apartheid South Africa.”

cfp categories: 
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
general_announcements
interdisciplinary
international_conferences
postcolonial
theory
twentieth_century_and_beyond