Call For Contributions--Crafting Identities, Remapping Nationalities: The English-Speaking World in the Age of Globalization

full name / name of organization: 
GRAAT, Université François Rabelais, France / The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
contact email: 
Cécile Coquet-Mokoko: ngelele@noos.fr

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS--Collection "STUDIES IN INTELLECTUAL HISTORY : CULTURE, POLITICS AND SOCIETY IN THE ENGLISH-SPEAKING WORLD, 1870 TO THE PRESENT" at Cambridge Scholars Publishing, UK.

Crafting an identity implies expectations of consistency, linked not only to the need to prove oneself and disprove stereotypes and statistics, but also to the broader political goal of dis-alienating, or de-Othering, oneself and one's community, whether it be defined as a racial, ethnic, or socio-economic group. How does the interplay between creativity and the commodification of such groups in popular cultures contribute to representing as unpredictable or “loyal” the younger generations, often defined as “mixed-up” in diasporic situations? What part do academic discourses on the ghetto, the barrio, the township or the inner cities, play in the defense strategies of minority groups and mainstream cultures as both strive to maintain their respective ideals of purity versus hybridity? Contributions focusing on the evolutions of the colonial notions of “half-caste” versus “pure-bred”, or on practices such as arranged marriages, would prove particularly fitting from this perspective.

National narratives also require renewed commentary and analysis. Who is entitled to deconstruct the national narratives and in what circumstances? How are national shame or denial represented in the way history is taught and imagined? How are the “undesirable”, “incompatible”, and closeted or “discrete” groups making up the national fabric integrated, empowered, or ignored in national celebrations and commemorations?

Policing the nation, finally, demands that the national fabric should make sense. How do “the powers that be” in each particular society tackle such issues as bilingualism, linguistic subversion of the received codes, conflicting loyalties, popular notions of deviant or nation-threatening identities and the legal implications of minority groups' protests against such definitions of their agendas? How are national identities re-mythologized in a world redefined by globalization, 9/11, and the predictable end of White supremacy as we have known it?

Editors will consider submissions of up to 6,000 words, double-spaced, written in accordance with the MLA style guidelines, with endnotes of reasonable size, and a list of works cited at the end of the paper. Please include word count at the end of your contribution, as well as your name, academic affiliation, contact info, and a bio of 50 words.

Deadline for the submission of abstracts (300 to 500 words): September 1, 2010.
Selection of contributors: October 1, 2010.
Deadline for the reception by editors of the contributions: March 1, 2011.
Texts to be returned to contributors for correction/modification by June 1, 2011.
Deadline for the reception by editors of corrected/revised papers: September 1, 2011.

Contacts:
Prof. Trevor Harris, Director of the collection at Cambridge Scholars Publishing, GRAAT/Université François Rabelais, Tours (France): trevor.harris@univ-tours.fr
Dr. Cécile Coquet, GRAAT/Université François Rabelais, Tours (France) / The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA): ngelele@noos.fr

cfp categories: 
african-american
american
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
ethnicity_and_national_identity
gender_studies_and_sexuality
general_announcements
interdisciplinary
journals_and_collections_of_essays
popular_culture
postcolonial
religion
twentieth_century_and_beyond