Special Issue: Pedagogical Responses to Caring for the Disabled

full name / name of organization: 
Susan Campbell Anderson/Spelman College
contact email: 

Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching
Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture

Special Issue: Pedagogical Responses to Caring for the Disabled

Editor: Susan Campbell Anderson, Spelman College

Recently, we have learned much from the reflections of disabled academics (e.g., L. Davis, K. Fries) about their experiences both inside and outside the academy, while several academic parents of disabled children (J. C. Wilson, M. Berubé) have written in memoir about their experiences as parents, or have written about the way working through a child's disability has affected their careers. This body of writing has developed as a genre distinct from, though clearly not unrelated to the theoretical/ philosophical discipline of disability studies. The present issue seeks to build on the impulses of both theory and praxis by applying the lens of disability studies to the classroom, as have B. Brueggemann, R. Garland-Thomson, S. Snyder, and C. Lewiecki-Wilson in Disability Studies: Enabling the Humanities (MLA: 2002). While a recent issue of Disability Studies Quarterly (28:4(2008)) focuses largely on disabled academics and students, the present project asks scholars to articulate the ways in which caring for others (not just children, but siblings, spouses, parents, clients, etc.) with disabilities informs their own pedagogy, beyond simply making them more sensitive to issues of disability. This focus appears especially timely as scholars like E.F. Kittay in Love's Labor (Routledge: 1998) and The Subject of Care (Rowman & Littlefield: 2002) increasingly interrogate the concepts of care and dependency.

Essays ranging from the theoretical to the practical might address (but need not be limited to) the following topics/questions:

  • How have academic professionals seen their pedagogical methods changed by the reciprocal experience of caring (in its many senses) for a disabled person?
  • How does a personal relationship with a disabled person change our understanding of the academy, learning, modes of intellect, the purpose of college, etc.?
  • Are there professionals who can comment on distinctive team-based learning encounters or service learning encounters uniquely guided by their experiences with a disabled loved one?
  • In keeping with the journal's mission, how might this pedagogy be placed in a uniquely literary context?
  • How does this kind of insight transform one's scholarly, literary-theoretical, and pedagogical-theoretical apparatus?
  • How might what L. Carlson calls the "burgeoning conversation around the gendered nature of care in the context of disability" [The Faces of Intellectual Disability (Bloomington: Indiana UP, 2009), 174] affect the ways we teach writing and literature?
  • In short, what does having a disabled person in our lives teach us about teaching?

  • Building on E.F. Kittay's paradigm of the doulia, a "nested" system in which caregivers need care because they care for others, Robin West argues for a legal "right to care" [The Subject of Care, edited by Eva Feder Kittay and Ellen K. Feder (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2002), 88]. Given recently published AAUP and MLA white papers on parental leave policy, other more institutionally-based questions might be considered: What are/should be the academic professional's legal rights when it comes to caring for a disabled dependent?

    • In a system where, as late as 2005, "one in three academic institutions [had] parental-leave policies that violate[d] federal anti-discrimination law" [Joan C. Williams, "Are Your Parental Leave Policies Legal?" Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 11, 2005, 2], how can those rights most practically be achieved?
    • Can, and if so, how do caregivers for the disabled achieve work/life balance under these circumstances?
    • Can, should, and to what extent should the professional's academic institution aid in providing this balance?

    • Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture is an innovative journal published by Duke University Press that aims to build a new discourse around teaching in English studies. Please submit abstracts with proposed essay length to Susan Campbell Anderson at sanderso@spelman.edu by November 20, 2010. Completed essays will follow the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th ed.

      38043Learning Outcomes and Assessment (11/1/2010, 3/31-4/2/2011)Jerry Alexander / College English Associationjjalexan@presby.edu1282236275general_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetprofessional_topicsfull name / name of organization: Jerry Alexander / College English Associationcontact email: jjalexan@presby.edu

      Call for Papers: Learning Outcomes and Assessment at CEA 2011
      Call for Papers, CEA 2011 | FORTUNES
      42nd Annual Conference | March 31 - April 2, 2011 | St. Petersburg, Florida
      The Hilton St. Petersburg Bayfront, 333 First Street South, St. Petersburg, Florida 33701; (727) 894-5000

      Submission deadline: November 1, 2010 at http://cea-web.org/

      The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations for our 42nd annual conference.

      This year's CEA Special Panel on Learning Outcomes and Assessment invites proposals on Assessing the English Major. Topics might include but are not limited to assessment of course requirements for the major, core requirements, foundational courses, course offerings, student evaluations, research requirements within the major, information literacy, capstone requirements, exit requirements, job and graduate program placement, the evolution of the English major, the future of the major, or any other areas related to the English major.

      Submission: August 15 - November 1, 2010
      Please see the submission instructions at http://cea-web.org/

      Membership
      All presenters at the 2011 CEA conference must become members of CEA by January 1, 2011. To join CEA, please go to http://cea-web.org/

      More information
      * Get short, timely messages from CEA via Twitter: http://twitter.com/CEAtweet
      * Connect with CEA on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CollegeEnglishAssociation
      * Find out more about conference lodging and registration: http://cea-web.org/
      * Contact CEA officers: http://cea-web.org/

      Other questions? Please email cea.english@gmail.com or jjalexan@presby.edu

      Sincerely,
      Jerry Alexander
      English Department
      Presbyterian College
      503 South Broad Street
      Clinton, SC 29325
      864-833-8365
      jjalexan@presby.edu

      cfp categories: general_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetprofessional_topics 38044A People's History of the United States: 1492 to Present (May 28, 2010)Michelle Sharpesharpe.michelle@gmx.com1282245461cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfull name / name of organization: Michelle Sharpecontact email: sharpe.michelle@gmx.com

      Michelle Sharpe
      <?xml:namespace prefix = o />

      History 118-28354

      May 28, 2010

      A People's History of the United States: 1492 to Present

      The book A People's History of the United States: 1492 to Present is a presentation of social history by Howard Zinn. Unlike history from a government or corporate perspective, Zinn presents a history about non-elite Americans. It is the story of constant social struggle throughout U. S. history. In the final chapter of the book, Zinn makes no apology for the social bias in his writing of American history, because he believes that most history books favor the government and the social elite. This essay will highlight just a few of the social struggles of America's lower and working classes that Zinn writes about in the book, from the late 1800s through the present day, specifically labor and living conditions in the late 19th century, civil rights in the 1950s, and social resistance during the Reagan and Bush years.

      During the 1800s, mill owners in the east became powerful and organized, until fifteen Boston families controlled 20% of the cotton industry in 1850. Meanwhile, crowded and filthy conditions in major cities compounded the non-elite groups' frustrations as they dealt with poverty, hunger and ill-equipped housing. From these frustrations, unions and labor movements began to rise. 1877 proved to be particularly difficult for blue-collar families, with a depression in full force, poor families' kids were often sick, and disgruntled railroad workers began to take on the companies they worked for. Low wages were bad enough, but company scheming and work-related death and injury risk became too much for the working men to bear any longer. Strikers and their supporters gathered at depots from Pennsylvania to eastern Missouri. News of the strikes spread overseas. As the "St. Louis Republican reported, in 1877, "Strikes were occurring almost every hour…New Jersey was afflicted by the paralyzing dread…New York was mustering an army of militia…St. Louis had already felt the effect of the premonitory shocks" (Zinn) 240. The railroad working men protested their wages and unsafe working conditions, to which their bosses responded by police force and even National Guard involvement. In 1877 Saint Louis, the Workingman's party started an industrial rebellion. All kinds of workers from the mills, railroads, and factories banded together as various nationalities, from French to Italian. People even disregarded racial prejudices in order to unite for this cause. They encouraged the attitude of "fight or die" at their meeting. Thousands of protestors and their supporters filled the streets, growing violent when police began attacking (Zinn 240-246). Zinn gives an "every man's" view of the social struggle and frustrations of the laborers in the late 1800s, who endured unsafe work conditions while being taken advantage of in their pay.

      The black revolt of the 1950s and 60s should not have been a surprise, but it was for many Americans and the government. Oppressed people remember a lot; and, for blacks in the United States the memories of segregation, lynching, and humiliation were still present. In 1946, President Harry Truman recommended that the Department of Justice's civil rights section be expanded to make a permanent commission on civil rights, and that new laws be passed against lynching and voting discrimination. Although there was a socially responsible reason for Truman's push on these issues, there was an economic reason, too. Discrimination was costly to the country and wasteful to its talent. Truman also had international intentions. The world viewed America's democracy as a joke and Truman wanted to save face. In 1954, the Supreme Court finally overturned the "separate but legal doctrine" established in the 1890s. When the NAACP took a series of cases before the Supreme Court, the Court did not seek immediate action. Then, a year later, it demanded integration as quickly as possible. More than 75% of the schools in the south remained segregated ten years later in 1965. The nation as a whole took the desegregation act as an exhilarating sign of change, but blacks did not sense enough urgency. The blacks, who remembered all of the segregation and lynching and anger toward them, began to revolt. In 1955 Alabama, a seamstress named Rosa Parks sat down in the "white" section of a city bus and refused to move. Later that year, after Parks' personal rebellion and subsequent arrest, there was a mass meeting to boycott all city buses. That was just the beginning. The protest movement swept the south. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a prominent Negro leader and speaker, paving the way for black rights in America. He stressed love and nonviolence and was able to amass a sympathetic following nationwide. Others followed Kings' example and boycotted through sit ins at diners. There was violence against the sit in participants, but the idea of doing something about segregation was catching on with people, including some whites. Freedom Rides followed the next year where blacks and whites shared buses through the south, in efforts to break interstate travel segregation. Two buses en route from Washington, D.C. to New Orleans, in 1961, were set on fire, and Freedom Riders were beaten. Sit in veterans organized another Freedom Ride and asked the DOJ for protection, but the DOJ refused. Instead of becoming defeated in jail, Freedom Riders only continued to resist, protest, sing, and demand their rights. Congress began reacting to the black revolt on an international level after the Mississippi murders of three civil rights workers in 1964. Without getting too involved, the government tried to make good on civil rights law. More outbreaks in 1966 led to three more deaths of black people and the nonviolence stance of the southern movement was not enough to deal with poverty in the ghettos. Martin Luther King was still popular in 1967 but being replaced by more zealous leaders, like Huey Newton of the Black Panthers. The 1967 riots brought the Civil Rights Act of 1968, but King, jr. also became a target of the FBI, who threatened him and tapped his private conversations. In early 1978, the "New York Times" reported that the urban riot areas of the 60s had changed little and that they were still impoverished. Statistics were only part of the story. Racism began to grow in the northern cities and as blacks tried to take their place in desegregated society they were met with hostility and anger. The 1970s brought no great black movement, but a new consciousness was now alive. (Zinn 435-459). Zinn gives an intimate look into the social injustices that black America endured…of how blacks remembered the social prejudice and hate they had endured from 1890 through the 50s and how they were finally ready to unite and stand up for themselves.

      In the 1980s, during Republican, Ronald Reagan's presidency, a small movement, started by Christian pacifists, began to protest nuclear arms and war. The movement grew nationally; and, though the group the "Plowshares Eight" gained sympathy for their convictions, a judge convinced jurors to vote based on what was under the law, which was not nuclear power. Women took the lead in the nuclear arms protest. Doctors and Catholic bishops and scientists were on board with the movement as well. In 1982, Central Park played host to the biggest political rally in history as people supported the antinuclear movement. Within three years sentiment began to reflect in the culture, in books, magazines, plays, and movies, influencing the nation's opinion of nuclear efforts. An antimilitarist mood in the country led to concerns about the draft process. Reagan was not quick to renew draft registration on the suggestion from Secretary of Defense, Casper Weinberger, that it could lead to unrest like that of the 60s and 70s. In an attempt to intimidate such opposition, the administration began prosecuting draft resisters. Protests against the administration's approach sprang up from college campuses and then spread to the streets as demonstrations against Reagan, and his policies, took place around the country. His cuts in social services affected people all the way down to the local level, and he cut federal aid to the arts. Budget cuts prompted more striking. In 1983, Reagan was met by 3000 angry people in Pittsburgh, mainly unemployed steel workers. During that same period of time, Miami police brutality against blacks was being targeted, so Reagan tried to get rid of a section of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, hoping to get votes from the black community. Newspapers reported landslide victories for Reagan in 1980 and 1984, and then another republican, George W. Bush; but only about half of the population who were eligible to vote did so. The Republicans were in charge, but the Democratic and Republican parties through the 80s and 90s limited social programs in order to limit taxes. When higher taxes were proposed in class terms, the American population was largely in favor of more taxes for the wealthy; but, neither political party wanted to go through with that option, for fear of backlash from those in positions of wealth and power. Though not of the same magnitude as the civil rights movement of the 60s, a resurgence of civil rights groups rose up in support of blacks, Latinos, and Native Americans. The gay and lesbian community was also coming forth and demanding recognition for their rights. The women's movement still existed but met with more resistance in the 80s. Despite the overwhelming power of corporate wealth and the government, the spirit of resistance was strong into the 1990s. General disillusionment with the government caused resignations from the government and brought on criticism by former employees. The legacy of the Vietnam War caused the Reagan and Bush administrations a lot of grief. Disgruntled citizens and former government officials lamented about the uselessness of the Vietnam War and what a terrible tragedy it had been. War no longer garnered an overall sense of patriot pride and duty as it once had. As the Gulf War approached under Bush's leadership, hundreds of people denounced the war, even joining as a human chain in one protest in Ann Arbor, which was broken by police swinging clubs at the protestors hands. After the bombing in Iraq, Bush's approval rating went up; but there was still discontent in the masses. From the blacks to women to Native Americans, social groups disputed the claim that America stood for freedom and equality. Freedom and equality has been the constant focus of the average American citizen. And, when the 90s came around, the political system still catered to the rich and powerful, no matter which political party was in charge. The country remained divided, not by political prejudice, but by classes of financial income and influence. One journalist reported a "permanent adversarial culture" refusing to give up on a more equal and humane society. To bring out any real hope for the country, the future of America will lie in the promise of that refusal (Zinn 589-617). As the government forged on with its politics of war and ignoring social injustices, people continued to speak out and resist the changes forced upon them by an elite few in government and corporate power.

      The book A People's History of the United States: 1492 to Present is a presentation of social history by Howard Zinn. Unlike history from a government or corporate perspective, Zinn presents a history about non-elite Americans. It is the story of constant social struggle throughout U. S. history. In the final chapter of the book, Zinn makes no apology for the social bias in his writing of American history, because he believes that most history books favor the government and the social elite. This essay highlighted just a few of the social struggles of America's lower and working classes that Zinn writes about in the book, from the late 1800s through the present day, specifically labor and living conditions in the late 19th century, civil rights in the 1950s, and social resistance during the Reagan and Bush years.

      cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches 38045BWe Special Issue: Multimodal ComposingBarbara Gleasonbgleason@ccny.cuny.edu1282248113general_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetjournals_and_collections_of_essaysprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_compositionfull name / name of organization: Barbara Gleasoncontact email: bgleason@ccny.cuny.edu

      Multimodal Composing:
      Opportunities and Challenges in Basic Writing Contexts

      Basic Writing Electronic (BWe) Journal
      Guest Editor: Barbara Gleason

      Traditional print essays (8-15 pages) and webtexts &
      other multimodal/digital compositions are welcome.

      Submission Deadline: October 15, 2010
      Send inquiries to bgleason@ccny.cuny.edu
      Submit manuscripts to bwespecialissue@gmail.com

      For the upcoming issue of BWe, we seek essays on multimodal writing in college and pre-college composition and rhetoric classes. As Cynthia Selfe argues in the June 2009 issue of College Composition and Communication, our profession's continuing tendency to focus primarily on print literacy limits our understanding of rhetoric, discourages students from "identify[ing] their own communication needs" and needlessly limits individuals who have developed expressive identities in a digital age ("The Movement of Air, The Breath of Meaning: Aurality and Multimodal Composing" in CCC, June 2009, 618). By widening the possibilities for composing in their classrooms, instructors may establish more compelling and inclusive learning environments for students of diverse races and cultures, language backgrounds, ages, and communication interests. Teachers may also create classes that can better serve the needs of students who have learning differences, e.g., in the areas of vision, hearing, or attention.

      Along with the potential advantages of incorporating multiple modes of composing into their curricula, instructors may well experience challenges that can obstruct curricular change or dampen enthusiasm of both instructors and students. Integrating new technologies into classes sometimes creates unwanted hurdles. Access to technology and digital literacies can sometimes encumber students. Instructors may experience new technologies as more burdensome than beneficial, especially when faculty are not rewarded for integrating new communication technologies into their curricula. In addition, educational institutions are increasingly demanding that digital texts and multimodal composing options be integrated into their curricula--sometimes before they have acquired the funds or the staff to support these efforts. We already know that we are experiencing a major transformation in communications that is permeating both our daily lives and our institutional realities. Most of us are struggling to develop our own expertise in multimodal composing while simultaneously teaching others to compose in digital environments.

      We encourage prospective authors to consider both opportunities and challenges associated with teaching/learning multimodal composing. We hope to receive submissions that focus on one (or more than one) of these roles/perspectives: writer, student, teacher, tutor, program administrator. We also welcome reviews of books & web sites that enhance instructors' knowledge of teaching with new technologies OR that facilitate adult learners' expertise in multimodal composing. Finally, since basic writing instruction is moving into new venues (e.g., as test-preparation courses in for-profit companies or in adult education programs), we welcome submissions that explore uses of multimodal composing in a variety of institutional environments.

      All submissions must be submitted electronically.
      Both multimodal texts and traditional print essays are welcome.
      Print essays should be saved in Word or in Rich Text Format before being
      emailed as attachments.

      Citation Style: Submissions should be formatted in MLA style.
      Manuscript Submission Deadline: October 15, 2010
      Email inquiries to Barbara Gleason at bgleason@ccny.cuny.edu.
      Submit manuscripts to bwespecialissue@gmail.com.

      cfp categories: general_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetjournals_and_collections_of_essaysprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_composition 38046Design Research with RMIT University PressRMIT Publishingjoseph.gelfer@rmit.edu.au1282282529cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarytheoryfull name / name of organization: RMIT Publishingcontact email: joseph.gelfer@rmit.edu.au

      Design Research with RMIT University Press: Call for Proposals

      Our aim is to promote the publication of design research. Design is a core activity in many disciplines, yet there are few publishers who specialise in design-driven research. Research can be conducted through designing, and the process of designing also parallels "traditional" research in interesting ways. Designers have a way of thinking and communicating that is different to traditional researchers, but which is equally robust when applied to its own kind of questions.

      This book series is based on the premise that the activity of designing constitutes a crucial mode of research specific to the design disciplines. It primarily aims to publish research embodied within the design of projects, their investigations and outcomes. Accompanying exegeses will contextualise the design research in relation to existing traditional research; these may be text-based, but may also encompass other modes of representation.

      RMIT University Press welcomes the submission of project-based design research undertaken through investigation, speculation, and scholarly reflection upon design research methodologies. Also welcome are essays and critiques addressing significant contemporary design practice and problematics, as well as emerging design strategies and practices.

      For more info see: http://www.rmitpublishing.com.au/books.html

      cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarytheory 38047(UPDATE) Filolog: journal for literary, cultural and language studies - call for papers (DEADLINE 30/10/2010)Faculty of Philology, Banja Lukapetarny@yahoo.com: tbijelic@hotmail.com1282308735americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialtheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Faculty of Philology, Banja Lukacontact email: petarny@yahoo.com: tbijelic@hotmail.com

      Filolog (Philologist) is a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary journal with an international Editorial Board.

      We are calling for papers dealing with contemporary literary, cultural, and language theories and/or their applications to particular works. We would also welcome papers dealing with meta-theories and their significance for the human and social sciences.

      Papers should be a maximum of 5000 words, and use the New Harvard Citation System. Papers must include abstracts and key words in the author's native language. Authors should also provide a short bio (up to 20 lines).

      Papers in Word format, using Times New Roman 12 font, with 1.5 line spacing, should be sent to the following email addresses:
      petarny@yahoo.com; tbijelic@hotmail.com;

      The deadline for the submission of papers is 30/10/2010.

      cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialtheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 38048Meta- and inter-images in art / La méta- et l'inter-image artistiques, Deadline: October 1st 20109th Conference of The International Association of Word and Image Studies / Association Internationale pour l'Etude des Rapports entre Texte et Image, Montreal 22-26 August 2011carla.taban@utoronto.ca1282314005interdisciplinaryinternational_conferencestheoryfull name / name of organization: 9th Conference of The International Association of Word and Image Studies / Association Internationale pour l'Etude des Rapports entre Texte et Image, Montreal 22-26 August 2011contact email: carla.taban@utoronto.ca

      Meta- and inter-images in art / La méta- et l'inter-image artistiques

      Panel at The 9th International Conference on Word and Image Studies
      The Imaginary / L'imaginaire
      Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal
      22-26 August 2011
      http://aierti-iawis-2011.uqam.ca

      ENGLISH
      This session invites theoretical and analytical papers on meta- and inter-images in art. Meta- and inter-images are understood as second order images, i.e. images whose existence depends on other images or on themselves as images. Meta- and inter-images can materialise in a single medium (painting, photography, film, video, etc.) or in different media (painting-photography, photography-film, painting-video, etc.). We will tackle the workings and nature of meta- and inter-images that are either mono- or inter-medial, both in contemporary artistic practices and diachronically. Although the Western world has become since several decades a "civilisation of the image", we keep wanting to comprehend images by putting them into words, i.e. attaching them to verbal language. But images can and indeed do "talk" about other images or about themselves – they have done so since always –, without having to pass necessarily through either speech or writing. What modalities use artistic images to point to other images? How and what precisely does this indexing mean? How is it constitutive of the image? And how does the viewer make sense of it? Meta-images are often an inter-texual/inter-imaging phenomenon, but beyond this mere assertion, we want to investigate in depth meta- and inter-imaging signifying mechanisms.

      FRANÇAIS
      Cette séance réunira des communications théoriques et analytiques sur la méta- et l'inter-image artistiques, entendues comme des images de deuxième ordre dont l'existence dépend d'une autre image ou d'elles-mêmes en tant qu'images. Les méta- et inter-images peuvent être matérialisées dans un seul medium (photographie, peinture, film, vidéo, etc.) ou dans des mediums différents (photographie-peinture, film-photographie, peinture-vidéo, etc.). Nous voulons investiguer le fonctionnement et la nature des méta- et inter-images mono- ou inter-médiales dans les pratiques artistiques contemporaines, mais aussi dans la diachronie. Bien que le monde occidental soit devenu depuis quelques décennies une « civilisation de l'image », nous continuons à vouloir comprendre les images en les mettant en mots, c'est-à-dire en les rattachant au langage verbal. Toutefois, les images peuvent « discourir » et ont depuis toujours « discouru » sur d'autres images ou sur elles-mêmes sans recourir nécessairement à l'intermédiaire de la parole ou de l'écriture. Quelles modalités utilisent les images artistiques pour renvoyer à d'autres images ? Comment et qu'est-ce que signifie au juste ce renvoi ? Comment est-il constitutif de l'image ? Et comment est-il compris par le spectateur ? La méta-image est souvent un phénomène inter-textuel/inter-imageant, mais au-delà de ce simple constat il s'agira de préciser en détail des mécanismes signifiants méta- et inter-imageants.

      SESSION ORGANIZER / RESPONSABLE DE LA SÉANCE
      Carla Taban, Ph.D., Semiotics and Communication Theory Program, Victoria College, University of Toronto

      Write to / Écrire à l'adresse suivante: carla.taban@utoronto.ca

      Please send your submission (300 words maximum) accompanied by a short bio-bibliographical notice (100 words) in the form of a Word document, 12pt Times New Roman (please identify yourself by family name, first name, university and departmental affiliation, and include both session title and the title of your paper) before October 1st 2010 to the session organizer(s) with a copy to iawis2011@gmail.com

      Veuillez envoyer votre proposition de communication de 300 mots maximum accompagnée d'une notice biobibliographique de 100 mots maximum (en format de document Word, police 12, Times roman. Merci de préciser vos nom, prénom, affiliations universitaire et départementale, le titre de la séance ainsi que le titre de votre communication) avant le 1er octobre 2010 au responsable de la session ainsi qu'à iawis2011@gmail.com

      cfp categories: interdisciplinaryinternational_conferencestheory 38049Call for papers: The Use, Misuse, and Abuse of Bodies in Icelandic LiteratureNew England Saga Society (NESS)john.sexton@bridgew.edu1282336196interdisciplinarymedievalfull name / name of organization: New England Saga Society (NESS)contact email: john.sexton@bridgew.edu

      NESS invites papers addressing any aspect of the question of bodies in the literature of medieval Iceland and Scandinavia. The panel will address the conception of the body--the living body or the dead, whole or disfigured, young or old, male or female--as a narrative construction. How was the body constructed narratively, and how did interpretations of bodies change from one period or text to another? As this question necessarily addresses intersections of religion, gender, disability studies, and other critical models, a wide range of papers is hoped for.

      cfp categories: interdisciplinarymedieval 38050Call for Articles-Sequential Art, Graphic Novels, comics and Education Rob Weinerrob.weiner@ttu.edu 1282339060childrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositiontheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Rob Weinercontact email: rob.weiner@ttu.edu

      CFP: Sequential Art, Graphic Novels, and Comics in Education
      Edited by Robert G. Weiner and Carrye Syma Texas Tech University Library
      In recent years the use of graphic novels, comics, and sequential art in education has exploded. This is due not only to the boom in superhero movies that are based on comic book characters, but also to the wide literary range that graphic novels now have. There are now literally hundreds of college and university courses all over the world that are using graphic novels in their curriculum. The days when comics were just seen as children's trash, with no redeeming literary or educational value, are hopefully behind us.
      Contrary to the idea that comics "dumb" down material, it takes both sides of the brain to read and interpret sequential art stories: the right side to interpret the pictures and the left side to understand the narrative text. Our goal with this collection is to provide the educator and scholar with a collection of essays that show how graphic novels and comics are being used in the classroom today, as well as some historical pieces that detail how the educational fields often have and have had a "rocky" relationship with the use of comics in educational settings. We want both theoretical and practical essays showing how sequential art can be and is being used to teach and illustrate concepts and ideas. We are especially keen on pieces related to higher education, military and government uses of comics to educate, but all aspects of comics and education are under consideration. In addition, we would like to have educators from a wide spectrum of the educational fields from K-12, to undergraduate and graduate educational levels. Those using sequential art in adult education and pre-school are encouraged.
      Some possible questions/ideas that could be addressed include:
      The Military's use of comics to teach.
      Graphic Novels and comics in library science education.
      How relationships can be understood through the use of graphic novels in human science education.
      Teaching mathematical concepts using graphic narrative.
      Grade school use of comics.
      Middle school use of comics.
      High school use of sequential art (say something like Maus to teach the Holocaust).
      Comics and Film to teach about blockbuster cinema.
      Philosophical issues raised by graphic novels (The Watchmen in a philosophy class about ethics).
      Biological and scientific concepts using graphic novels.
      The use of mainstream superhero stories in the classroom.
      Superman, Batman, Spider-Man to further understand the concept of the hero Mythology (i.e., Odysseys, Hercules etc.).
      Graphic Novels and history, how effective a tool is the graphic novel in teaching a historical concept?
      Sequential art in teaching foreign language or English as a second language.
      Comics in literacy and adult education programs.
      Graduate courses using graphic novels.
      The History of sequential art in education.
      Please send 200 word abstracts by January 15th 2011 to Rob Weiner Rob.weiner@ttu.edu
      Final papers will be due February 28th 2011. No exceptions. Please note the submission of an essay does NOT necessarily mean publication in the volume. Essays will be going through a rigorous peer review process and we have asked a number of scholars to serve in this capacity. We are striving to put together as an excellent collection with diverse viewpoints covering all aspects of comics and education. Authors are also expected to follow the editor's style guide and be willing to have their work edited.
      Thank you
      Carry Syma
      Texas Tech University Library
      Rob Weiner
      Texas Tech University Library

      cfp categories: childrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositiontheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 38051Research Foundations for Understanding Books and Reading in the Digital AgeNational Library of the Netherlands, The Hague siemens@uvic.ca1282341384bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookhumanities_computing_and_the_internetfull name / name of organization: National Library of the Netherlands, The Hague contact email: siemens@uvic.ca

      Research Foundations for Understanding Books and Reading in the Digital Age:
      Textual Methodologies and Exemplars

      15 December 2010
      Koninklijke Bibliotheek (National Library of the Netherlands), The Hague in conjunction with the conference Text & Literacy (16-17 December)

      Proposals due 30 September 2010

      Digital technology is fundamentally altering the way we relate to writing, reading, and the human record itself. The pace of that change has created a gap between core social/cultural practices that depend on stable reading and writing environments and the new kinds of digital artefacts--electronic books being just one type of many--that must sustain those practices now and into the future.

      This one-day gathering explores research foundations pertinent to understanding those new practices and emerging media, specifically focusing on work in textual method, in itself and via exemplar, leading toward [1] theorizing the transmission of culture in pre- and post-electronic media, [2] documenting the facets of how people experience information as readers and writers, [3] designing new kinds of interfaces and artifacts that afford new reading abilities, [4] conceptualizing the issues necessary to provide information to these new reading and communicative environments, and [5] reflection on interdisciplinary team research strategies pertinent to work in the area.

      The gathering is offered in conjunction with the Text & Literacy conference (16-17 December) and is sponsored by the Koninklijke Bibliotheek (the National Library of the Netherlands), the Book and Digital Media Studies department of Leiden University, and the Implementing New Knowledge Environments research group.

      We invite paper and poster/demonstration proposals that address these and other issues pertinent to research in the area. Proposals should contain a title, an abstract (of approximately 250 words) plus list of works cited, and the names, affiliations, and website URLs of presenters; fuller papers will be solicited after acceptance of the proposal. Please send proposals before 30 September 2010 to siemens@uvic.ca.

      cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookhumanities_computing_and_the_internet 38052[REMINDER] Interrogating Complicities: Postcolonial, Queer and the Threat of the Normative; ABSTRACT DEADLINE SEPT. 5thGender, Women and Sexuality Studies, University of Minnesota, Twin Citiescomplicitiesconf@gmail.com1282369855african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialtheatretheorytravel_writingfull name / name of organization: Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies, University of Minnesota, Twin Citiescontact email: complicitiesconf@gmail.com

      Title: Interrogating Complicities: Postcolonial, Queer and the Threat of the Normative
      Date: November 15th - 16th, 2010
      ABSTRACT DEADLINE: SEPTEMBER 5th

      As verb, noun, adjective, "queer" is a term that acts through two somewhat paradoxical forces. While an avowedly dissenting and critical stance towards the normative mainstream, it flattens and even normalizes myriad sexualities, liminal bodies and critical positions.
      Like "queer", the postcolonial is positioned as a cultural process and reading practice that goes against and even beyond – in this case, the colonial. However, conversations between these ambitious fields of critical inquiry have made their normalizing gestures and the lacunae in their theoretical vision more apparent. With continued allegations of heterosexism within Postcolonial Studies and neocolonialism within Queer Studies, both disciplinary domains find themselves having to answer the charge of their respective complicities with the normative.
      Postcolonial and transnational queer theorists have noted that in reading 'queer' as always resistant to and transgressing the norm, we run the risk of conflating "queer" itself with "modernity" and "progress" in uncritical ways. What kind of political action and scholarship become possible when the postcolonial denaturalizes the function of "queer", and finds it colluding with and implicated in dominant formations? How might the postcolonial's interlacing with dominant structures complicate this reading?
      We invite work that explores these tensions and that interrogates the purported disciplinary complicity with normativities, especially as '"queer" travels and mutates over scale and space to the postcolony.
      Some Questions to Consider:

      1. As they travel to postcolonial contexts, do the terms "Queer" and "LGBT" become co-extensive, or does the postcolonial help bring the two terms into conflict?
      2. What kinds of historical conditions and contemporary discourses allow for 'gay rights' to become the proof of Western "freedoms", and the new guise for Western cultural imperialism?
      3. What are the connections between the emergence of discourses around a queer "identity", like global human rights, agency, development and realization of the self; and the ascendance of neoliberal conceptions of labor efficiency and privatization in postcolonial nations?
      4. What are the implications of the ways in which "gay rights" deploy nationalist discourses to gain equal citizenship, even as they create spatial disparities (rural/urban, modern/traditional, mainstream/ "vernacular", national/regional, progressive/orthodox etc) within the nation?
      5. How does "queer" travel from its historical specificity within local (US) contexts to non-local postcolonial contexts? What is gained or lost within the predominant conception of "queer", as it moves and becomes more widely circulated?
      6. How are 'queer temporalities' calibrated to postcolonial contexts: what are the gains or risks of investing in queer utopias (marriage, property rights, etc.)?
      7. What might be the limits or possibilities of oppositional theorizations of queer temporalities within scholarly or activist work in postcolonial contexts?
      8. In what ways might the discussion around the distinctions, as well as the tensions, between the postcolonial and the transnational inflect queer theory?

      Abstract due: Midnight, September 5th, 2010
      Abstract length: 300 – 350 words
      Please include a one paragraph bio (do not exceed 100 words) with your abstract to complicitiesconf@gmail.com

      cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialtheatretheorytravel_writing 38053[REMINDER] "Surrounded by Bodies": Contact, Corporeality, and the Long Eighteenth CenturyASECS Graduate Student Caucus (2011 Annual Meeting)n.e.miller@go.wustl.edu1282396625americancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centurygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryscience_and_culturetheoryfull name / name of organization: ASECS Graduate Student Caucus (2011 Annual Meeting)contact email: n.e.miller@go.wustl.edu

      Much has been said about bodies, yet the body still remains one of the most contested concepts in fields such as anthropology, art, history, literature, medicine, philosophy, religion, and gender/sexuality. In *An Essay Concerning Human Understanding* (1689), John Locke noted that all "are born into the world, being surrounded by bodies that perpetually and diversely affect them." By conceptualizing the world as one of bodies in contact, his assertion prefaced a growing eighteenth-century preoccupation with corporeality. This panel seeks to explore such investigations of the body by examining how these figures wrote about and experienced bodies, health, illness, contagion, mixture, and death. We welcome interdisciplinary approaches to understanding the eighteenth-century body and invite submissions from graduate students and junior scholars across disciplines. Possible topics include, but are not limited to: the medical body, sentimentality and the emotional body, discourses of corporeality, the legible body, animal bodies, travel narratives and the body in transit, representations of pathology in literature and art, the grotesque, the sciences aesthetically imagined, the body in pain, the politics of contagion, corpses, and theories of embodiment.

      Abstracts should be submitted via e-mail to n.e.miller@go.wustl.edu by September 15.

      cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centurygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryscience_and_culturetheory 38054Textual Materialities: Speaking ObjectsSpecial Session for Kalamazoo 2011bcm2107@columbia.edu1282397821bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalpoetryreligionromantictheatrefull name / name of organization: Special Session for Kalamazoo 2011contact email: bcm2107@columbia.edu

      Call for Papers, Kalamazoo 2011:
      "Textual Materialities: Speaking Objects"

      The cultural materialist work of Raymond Williams and Arjun Appadurai has focused attention on the ways in which objects shape cultural meaning. In medieval studies, the seminal work of scholars such as Michael Clanchy and Mary Carruthers has explored the way in which objects can, like texts, convey meaning and carry memory. This trend has drawn scholars' attention not only to subjects such as relics, the Eucharist, clothing, romance objects and physical books, among others, but more specifically to the ways in which these objects function within texts. A system of complex reciprocity exists between material objects and the texts they inhabit. Inasmuch as objects transmit nexuses of cultural associations and memory, one might even say that objects in texts speak.

      In this panel we hope to explore the symbolic valences of objects within texts (broadly defined). How might the symbolic cultural meanings that objects can carry function when those objects literally speak for themselves? Examples of such objects include: the Anglo-Saxon riddle objects and the rood; runic inscriptions; dead bodies of saints, or pseudo-saints, like that of the Prioress's "little clergeon;" the symbolic objects of Marie de France's Lais, such as the inscribed hazel branch of Chevrefoil; or books that enter texts as objects, such as Jankyn's Booke of Wikked Wives. In short, these are objects that articulate meaning above and beyond the meanings they carry passively.

      In a recent issue of PMLA, Bill Brown notes that "the study of objects in books clearly shares with the new study of books as objects an interest in determining how subjects are formed and transformed by the material world." This panel, concerning objects that speak, explores these connections between materiality and textuality. In conceiving "texts" broadly, we open the discussion to an interdisciplinary range of scholars, including literary scholars, historians, and art historians.

      We welcome proposals of 250-300 words for 15 minute papers. They should be sent along with a completed participant information form (found at http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html) to Brigit McGuire at by September 15, 2010.

      cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalpoetryreligionromantictheatre 38055Literature and Transgression: 3rd International "Literature and..." Graduate Student Conference (May 2-3, 2011) Istanbul University, Department of American Culture and Literatureliteratureand@gmail.com 1282400422african-americanamericanclassical_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypostcolonialrenaissanceromantictheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Istanbul University, Department of American Culture and Literaturecontact email: literatureand@gmail.com

      LITERATURE AND TRANSGRESSION

      THE THIRD INTERNATIONAL "LITERATURE AND …" GRADUATE STUDENT CONFERENCE
      2-3 May, 2011, Istanbul University

      "Because the law worketh wrath: for where no law is, there is no transgression."
      - Romans 4:15

      "Are not laws dangerous which inhibit the passions? Compare the centuries of anarchy with those of the strongest legalism in any country you like and you will see that it is only when the laws are silent that the greatest actions appear."
      - Marquis de Sade

      "The dialectic of Law and its transgression does not reside only in the fact that Law itself solicits its own transgression, that it generates the desire for its own violation; our obedience to the Law itself is not "natural," spontaneous, but always-already mediated by the (repression of the) desire to transgress it."
      - Slavoj Zizek

      Transgression can be defined as an act which violates boundaries and limits imposed by the Law comprising legal, religious and moral norms, and other forms of social conventions. However, the relation of transgression to Law involves more than a unilateral act of infringement as a transgressive act dialectically operates through the subversion and reaffirmation of what it violates. While the Law primarily establishes the boundaries between what is permitted and what is prohibited – legal and illegal, sacred and profane, normal and abnormal, etc. – it inherently harbors the conditions for its own infringement as it simultaneously generates the desire for transgression. The symbiotic relation between Law and transgression manifests itself within the political, economical, social and cultural realms. Positioned at the intersection of these realms, literature is also ingrained in this rule-making and rule-breaking process; literary production both necessitates formal and thematic conventions and seeks the possibilities of their transgression.
      The aim of this conference is to provide an academic platform to explore the poetics and politics of transgression in literature, and to discuss the extent to which literary works engage in subversion and containment. We invite graduate students to present 20-minute papers that address topics such as:

      •transgressive fiction (works by Marquis de Sade, Colette, D.H. Lawrence, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry Miller, William S. Burroughs, J. G. Ballard, Kathy Acker, Chuck Palahniuk, etc.)
      •transgression and intertextuality
      •transgression and genre blurring
      •border writing
      •crime and violence in literature
      •sexuality / sexual perversity / pornography in literature
      •madness in literature
      •linguistic hybridity as violence against language
      •literary representations of post-human subjectivity
      •images of the abject and the uncanny in literature
      •literary manifestations of political resistance / accommodation
      •literary representations of counterculture / subculture
      •carnivalesque literature

      Please send a 300-word abstract and a 50-word biography to literatureand@gmail.com by December 1, 2010.

      cfp categories: african-americanamericanclassical_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypostcolonialrenaissanceromantictheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 38056Call for Papers: Eighteenth Century at CEA 2011 (March 31-April 2), Submission Deadline 1/1/2010.College English Associationbschilace@winona.edu1282407763cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centurygender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencespostcolonialscience_and_culturefull name / name of organization: College English Associationcontact email: bschilace@winona.edu

      CALL FOR PAPERS: EIGHTEENTH CENTURY AT CEA 2011
      42nd Annual Conference | March 31 - April 2, 2011 | St. Petersburg, Florida
      The Hilton St. Petersburg Bayfront, 333 First Street South, St. Petersburg, Florida 33701
      Submission deadline: November 1, 2010 at http://cea-web.org/

      The Eighteenth Century is a period of incredible change, spanning from the late Restoration to the early Victorian period and encompassing the proliferation of the sciences and Enlightenment thought. Referred to as the "age of sensibility," the "age of reason" and even sometimes the "age of melancholy," the period witnessed political and industrial revolutions as well as changes in ideas about the classes, domestic ideology and the "separate spheres." It seems appropriate, then, that this year's CEA general conference theme is "fortunes"—the rise and fall of which helped to shape this period of transformation. The topic may be broadly considered, and as always, we also welcome more general contributions concerning the field of eighteenth-century studies and culture. Some potential questions of interest include, but are not limited to: How were economic fortunes won and lost? How did the political fortunes of Britain challenge and shape national and individual identity? Who is "fortunate" in the eighteenth century? How did this intersect with issues of gender, culture, and race in the period? How did it intersect with burgeoning science and medical discourse? And finally, what are the "fortunes" of eighteenth-century study itself—from classroom technique to the fortunes of job seekers on the market?
      Submissions accepted between August 15 - November 1, 2010—Please see the submission instructions at http://cea-web.org/

      General Conference Theme: Fortunes
      The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes
      proposals for presentations on the Eighteenth Century for our 41st annual conference.
      Money, luck, friendship, health, a warm place to sleep. In a world staggered by economic decline and natural catastrophes, what are the new boundaries of success and misfortune? How do art, literature, and the classroom respond to the Rota Fortunae? For our 2011 meeting, CEA invites papers and panels that explore Fortune as both a daunting challenge and an elusive ideal. For more information, please see the full CFP at http://cea-web.org/

      General Call for Papers
      CEA also welcomes proposals for presentations in any of the areas English departments typically encompass, including literature, creative writing, composition, technical communication, linguistics, and film. We also welcome papers on areas that influence our work as academics, including student demographics, student/instructor accountability and assessment, student advising, academic leadership in departments and programs, and the place of the English department in the university.

      Membership
      All presenters at the 2011 CEA conference must become members of CEA by January 1, 2011. To join CEA, please go to http://cea-web.org/

      More information
      * Get short, timely messages from CEA via Twitter: http://twitter.com/CEAtweet
      * Connect with CEA on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CollegeEnglishAssociation
      * Find out more about conference lodging and registration: http://cea-web.org/
      * Contact CEA officers: http://cea-web.org/

      Other questions? Please email cea.english@gmail.com.

      Sincerely,

      Brandy Schillace
      Special Panel Chair, Eighteenth Century
      Assistant Professor
      English Department, Winona State University
      http://course1.winona.edu/bschillace/08-SchillaceSite/

      cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centurygender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencespostcolonialscience_and_culture 38057Echoes of the past: Myth, Memory, Foundation - Kalamazoo 2011Kristen Aldebol/ Medeival Research Consortium, UC Davisklaldebol@ucdavis.edu1282419145classical_studiesmedievalfull name / name of organization: Kristen Aldebol/ Medeival Research Consortium, UC Daviscontact email: klaldebol@ucdavis.edu

      The Medieval Research Consortium of UC Davis invites submission of proposals for the following panels for the 46th International Congress on Medieval Studies occurring at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Michigan from May 12-15, 2011. Please submit a proposal of 300 words with a completed Participant Information Form (available at http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html#PIF ) for consideration in these panels. You may submit proposals via e-mail or mail a hard copy of your proposal for consideration; all proposals are due by September 15, 2010.

      Kristen Aldebol
      Department of English
      One Shields Avenue
      University of California
      Davis, CA 95616
      klaldebol (at) ucdavis.edu

      Echoes of the past: Myth, Memory, Foundation
      Medieval narratives overflow with recursivity and obsessions with the past. This panel invites papers that consider the ways medieval narratives respond and return to their origins, repeat myths of foundations, consider their own beginnings and endings, perform memory and forgetting, and explore the way the past echoes through the present.

      cfp categories: classical_studiesmedieval 38058Lovers and Go-Betweens - Kalamazoo 2011Kristen Aldebol/ Medieval Research Consortium, UC Davisklaldebol@ucdavis.edu1282419323medievalfull name / name of organization: Kristen Aldebol/ Medieval Research Consortium, UC Daviscontact email: klaldebol@ucdavis.edu

      The Medieval Research Consortium of UC Davis invites submission of proposals for the following panels for the 46th International Congress on Medieval Studies occurring at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Michigan from May 12-15, 2011. Please submit a proposal of 300 words with a completed Participant Information Form (available at http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html#PIF ) for consideration in these panels. You may submit proposals via e-mail or mail a hard copy of your proposal for consideration; all proposals are due by September 15, 2010.

      Kristen Aldebol
      Department of English
      One Shields Avenue
      University of California
      Davis, CA 95616
      klaldebol (at) ucdavis.edu

      Lovers and Go-Betweens
      This panel considers how go-betweens negotiate boundaries, intervene in narratives, and shape relationships. Papers might examine how the go-between character functions; how the relationship between lovers is mediated or problematized by an intermediary; or how texts and narratives function as go-betweens for cultures, languages, traditions, and genres.

      cfp categories: medieval 38059CthulhuroticaDagan Booksinquiries@daganbooks.com1282420388gender_studies_and_sexualityfull name / name of organization: Dagan Bookscontact email: inquiries@daganbooks.com

      Our debut title, Cthulhurotica, is an anthology of weird erotica inspired by H.P. Lovecraft, and will include academic essays as well. The non-fiction portion of the anthology will focus on the modernization of the Cthulhu mythos through the inclusion of women, people of color, LGBT characters, and sexuality. We are seeking short essays on the above subjects (which MUST focus on Lovecraft or his mythos and not simply about sexuality in fiction).

      We are printing a trade paperback, 6"x9" and will also offer an ebook. Our planned publication date is December 1, 2010.

      Please see our website and submission guidelines at http://cthulhurotica.com
      Our Duotrope listing is here: http://www.duotrope.com/market_4858.aspx
      An interview with Writers News Weekly at http://writersnewsweekly.com/cthulhurotica.html
      An interview with Innsmouth Free Press at http://www.innsmouthfreepress.com/?p=7027
      The cover art for the book is posted here: http://daganbooks.com/2010/08/21/cthulhurotica-cover-art/

      The submissions period is currently open, but due to close September 15, 2010. An extension may be possible for essayists which query with a, abstract before September 15.

      Submit essays of no more than 4000 words to submissions@daganbooks.com

      cfp categories: gender_studies_and_sexuality 38060[UPDATE]Memory of Borders, Borders of Memory: Life Writing at a DistanceNortheast MLA, April 7-10, 2011, Rutgers Universityprofgood@hotmail.com1282446948americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespostcolonialtravel_writingfull name / name of organization: Northeast MLA, April 7-10, 2011, Rutgers Universitycontact email: profgood@hotmail.com

      This panel invites papers on "Life Writing at a Distance," broadly defining both life writing and "distance" as spatial/geographical or temporal remove: Topobiography; eco-biography; heroic memoirs; missionary and spiritual autobiography; letters and epistolary life narratives; life narrative of/in place; biography, memoir and autobiography in exile; expatriate memoirs; life narratives in travel and tourism; ethnoautobiography; migrant memoir and testimony. Please submit 300-word abstract and brief cv by September 30, 2010, to Mary Goodwin, National Taiwan Normal University, profgood@hotmail.com.

      cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespostcolonialtravel_writing 38061Literature and War (11/1/2010-3/31-4/2/2011)College English AssociationMWoolbright@siena.edu1282487991americangeneral_announcementsfull name / name of organization: College English Associationcontact email: MWoolbright@siena.edu

      Call for Papers, CEA 2011 | FORTUNES
      42nd Annual Conference | March 31 - April 2, 2011 | St. Petersburg, Florida
      The Hilton St. Petersburg Bayfront, 333 First Street South, St. Petersburg, Florida 33701; (727) 894-5000

      Submission deadline: November 1, 2010 at http://cea-web.org/

      The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations for our 42nd annual conference.

      Literature and War
      War is part of the fabric of American culture, but there is often a gap between the public myth and the private truth of war. This panel will use literature to bridge this gap. Topics may include but are not limited to:
      --the voices of war
      --representations of war in a particular literary text
      --connections between depictions of war and historical context
      --changes in representations of war over time
      --effects of war on individual characters
      --structure of the literary text and relationship to war and its effects
      --trauma theory and its usefulness in interpreting a text
      --pedagogical approaches to teaching literature of war.

      Submission: August 15 - November 1, 2010
      Please see the submission instructions at http://cea-web.org/

      Conference Theme: Fortunes
      Money, luck, friendship, health, a warm place to sleep. In a world staggered by economic decline and natural catastrophes, what are the new boundaries of success and misfortune? How do art, literature, and the classroom respond to the Rota Fortunae? For our 2011 meeting, CEA invites papers and panels that explore Fortune as both a daunting challenge and an elusive ideal. For more information, please see the full CFP at http://cea-web.org/

      General Call for Papers
      CEA also welcomes proposals for presentations in any of the areas English departments typically encompass, including literature, creative writing, composition, technical communication, linguistics, and film. We also welcome papers on areas that influence our work as academics, including student demographics, student/instructor accountability and assessment, student advising, academic leadership in departments and programs, and the place of the English department in the university.

      Membership
      All presenters at the 2011 CEA conference must become members of CEA by January 1, 2011. To join CEA, please go to http://cea-web.org/

      More information
      * Get short, timely messages from CEA via Twitter: http://twitter.com/CEAtweet
      * Connect with CEA on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CollegeEnglishAssociation
      * Find out more about conference lodging and registration: http://cea-web.org/
      * Contact CEA officers: http://cea-web.org/

      Sincerely,
      Meg Woolbright
      MWoolbright@siena.edu

      cfp categories: americangeneral_announcements