Monster Classics

full name / name of organization: 
2011 ACCUTE Conference, May 28-May 31 2011 at the University of New Brunswick
contact email: 
kai.hainer@utoronto.ca and camilla@eckbo.ca

That Pride and Prejudice would inspire a zombie rewriting was perhaps surprising to Austen fans and critics, but "Pride and Prejudice and Zombies" has itself inspired enough monstrous mash-ups from "Alice in Zombieland" to "Jane Slayre" to "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Zombie Jim" constitute a genuine genre: monster classics. Something of a pun on the afterlife of fiction, what, if anything, do these neo-Romantic and neo-Victorian monstrosities suggest about the culture from which they are drawn? About our own culture? This panel welcomes papers that consider any aspect of the monster classic phenomena, from theories of adaptation and mutation to considerations of genre or canon.

Following the instructions on the ACCUTE website for member-organized sessions, send your 700 word proposal (or 8-10 page double-spaced paper), a 100 word abstract, a 50 word biographical statement, and the submitter information form (available at http://www.accute.ca/generalcall.html), to kai.hainer@utoronto.ca and/or camilla@eckbo.ca by 15 December 2010.

The 2011 ACCUTE conference will be held at the University of New Brunswick and St. Thomas University, May 28-May 31, in conjunction with the annual Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences organized by the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences.

**Proposals submitted but not accepted for this panel will be forwarded to a general submission pool for consideration for the "general" sessions at the 2011 conference.

Note: You must be a current ACCUTE member to submit to this session.

For more information on ACCUTE please visit http://www.accute.ca/

cfp categories: 
african-american
american
bibliography_and_history_of_the_book
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
general_announcements
international_conferences
popular_culture
postcolonial
romantic
theory
twentieth_century_and_beyond
victorian