[UPDATE]

full name / name of organization: 
University of Idaho Graduate Literature Conference
contact email: 
glcc@uidaho.edu

Inter/Intra Textuality: An Interdisciplinary Examination of Texts

Conference Synopsis:

The Graduate Students in Literature at the University of Idaho invite submissions for conference presentations on the topic of inter- and intra-textuality. Our keynote speaker will be Dr. Timothy Seiber, from the University of Redlands Johnston Center; he will be presenting a talk entitled “Total Ecology: An Investigation of Bodies, Media, and Texts.”

The primary goal of this conference is to consider how readers interact with texts, and texts with each other. By “Intra-textual” we refer to the relationships within texts themselves. The term “Inter-textual” expands the scope of these relationships to include not only interactions within texts, but among them, and between them and disparate communities as well. Every text, however seemingly specialized or insular, grows from and is interpreted within the context of its unique relationship to other texts, authors, theories, and events. These relationships can act as magnets, attracting myriad other texts and growing a community of ideas bound by common relationships.

We encourage submissions from a wide array of perspectives which address relationships within and between texts and across textual communities. Submissions may include, but are not limited to, an exploration of the following questions:
- In what ways do relationships within texts inform similar relationships in the non-textual world?
- What role do different cultures and environments play in shaping relationships among textual communities?
- How might the relationship between reader and text function as a type of ecology?
- What role does rhetoric play in constructing relationships or mediating interactions with regard to literature?
- What is the relationship between theory and communities of texts?
- Can different genres function as ecosystems or environments? If so, what are the implications of such environments?
- How do interactions between texts and/or readers differ based on varying external components?
- How might an environmental lens affect interpretation of relationships among characters within a text?

Submission Guidelines:
Submit abstracts (including presentation title) of no more than 250 words for a 20 minute presentation to glcc@uidaho.edu by January 14, 2011. Abstracts should be attached as a Word or PDF file. Please include your name, affiliation, e-mail address, and AV requirements.

More info and updates: uiglc.tumblr.com

cfp categories: 
american
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
ecocriticism_and_environmental_studies
ethnicity_and_national_identity
film_and_television
gender_studies_and_sexuality
graduate_conferences
interdisciplinary
rhetoric_and_composition
theory