Lost & Found in Translation: Indian Writers, Translators, Texts, and Contexts [10 April 2011]

full name / name of organization: 
Edited by Jafri S. Abbas and Shafiqul Alam
contact email: 
alamsaficool@gmail.com

Lost & Found in Translation:
Indian Writers, Translators, Texts, and Contexts

Edited by Jafri S. Abbas and Shafiqul Alam

Translation in India presents specific theoretical and practical problems arising from both cultural and linguistic differences. The sheer number of Indian languages and their inter-relationships make for a formidable web of translation. Added to that is the politics of translating into Hindi from other Indian languages on one hand and that of translating into English for, among others, an imagined international readership that is supposed to be completely unfamiliar with anything Indian. The relatively more recent phenomenon of translating acclaimed Indian English texts into various Indian languages has added another dimension to the problematic.

No wonder, dismay over “bad translations” is rampant and ranges from translations taking too many liberties with the original source to mere transliterations so that the essence of the original work is lost in the case of both extremes and everything in-between. At the same time, it cannot be denied that translation has brought to the fore and sometimes even to the international mainstream authors and texts often neglected or considered minor in their original languages, thus opening a whole new world, founding a new readership (including in the original language) and introducing India(s) to Indians. Were it not for the work of translators, most of us would be cut off from these significant writings in Indian languages that have become classics in their own right. In other words, translation in India is a lifeline that connects and creates a continuing dialogue between the manifold literary traditions of India on one hand and the world at large on the other.

Keeping in mind the issues pointed out above we invite articles of 5000-7000 words in MS Word and MLA Style by 10 April 2011.

Please send your articles through email to Shafiqul Alam at alamsaficool@gmail.com

Note:
1. Articles published recently in refereed journals dealing with the theory and pedagogy of translation studies and possible areas of research are also welcome.
2. Please attach a short biographical note (100 words) mentioning your designation, university/institute, area of study, academic interests and relevant publications. Include contact information (your postal and preferred email address, phone and fax numbers).
3. The editors/publisher will provide each contributor with a complimentary contributor’s copy of the book.
4. The book is not funded by any agency or institution.

About the Editors:
Jafri S. Abbas is Associate Professor in the Department of English, Rajdhani College (University of Delhi), New Delhi, India.

Shafiqul Alam is Assistant Professor in the Department of English, Rajdhani College (University of Delhi), New Delhi, India.

cfp categories: 
interdisciplinary
journals_and_collections_of_essays
poetry
postcolonial
theory