(Dis)embodied Feminisms: New Perspectives on Gender, Sexuality, and Identity. May 13-14 2011.

full name / name of organization: 
McGill Graduate Group for Feminist Scholarship
contact email: 
ggfs.symposium@gmail.com

McGill University’s Graduate Group for Feminist Scholarship requests papers for our annual interdisciplinary symposium on May 13 and 14, 2010. This year’s conference theme is: “(Dis)embodied Feminisms: New Perspectives on Gender, Sexuality, and Identity.” We invite papers on this topic from scholars engaged or interested in feminist, gender, LGBTQ, and sexuality studies across disciplines, although proposals on any relevant topic will be considered.

Please send abstracts (less than 250 words) and a brief biography (2-3 sentences) to: ggfs.symposium@gmail.com no later than March 1, 2011.

Topics to consider include, but are not limited to:
- science, health studies
- bodies in labour and at work
- historical perspectives on feminisms
- bodies on stage, screen and in dance; bodies as spectacle
- liminal, marginalized bodies
- defining political bodies
- the body politic, communities
- conflict, war zones, borders that contain bodies
- the senses, perception
- bodies that consume/are consumed
- sign language, gesture, body language
- transforming bodies, trans issues
- bodies on display: fashion, concealment
- bodies in motion, physical acts and activities
- textual bodies, literary canons, translation
- disability studies
- body image, body as image
- incarceration, laws that govern the body
- the market’s relationship to the body, commodities
- cyber, cyborg bodies; theories of embodiment
- affect, emotional responses
- bodies as racialized, gendered, class-identified
- ecosystems, organic bodies
- vegetarianism, veganism
- writing the body
- disease, cancer, pain
- desire, sex, attraction

cfp categories: 
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
ecocriticism_and_environmental_studies
film_and_television
gender_studies_and_sexuality
graduate_conferences
interdisciplinary
popular_culture
postcolonial
theory