International Conference on Dialect and Literature 11th-13th July 2011

full name / name of organization: 
University of Sheffield
contact email: 
j.hodson@sheffield.ac.uk

When an author writes a literary text either wholly or partly in dialect, he or she is making a conscious choice to represent something other than the standard language. This conference invites papers that explore this process. We welcome papers from across different periods, different genres and different geographical locations, including regional, social and world dialects. Questions that might be addressed include, but are not restricted to:

• what purposes does the representation of dialect have in literary texts?
• how do readers respond to the representation of dialect in literature?
• which critical frameworks are appropriate for the interpretation of dialect in literary texts?
• what methodologies can we borrow from linguistics in order to analyse dialect representation?
• how does literary dialect differ from ‘real’ dialect?
• can a distinction be drawn between dialect in literature and dialect literature?
• what are the ideological dimensions of the representation of literary dialect?
• how has the representation of dialect varied across time, place and genre?

We welcome papers that deal with dialect in languages other than English, but would ask that all papers be presented in English.

This conference is being held to mark the concluding stage of our ‘Dialect in British Fiction 1800-1836’ project, which has been funded by the AHRC. As part of the conference we will be offering access to a beta version of the database we have created.

Please submit abstracts of 250 words to j.hodson@sheffield.ac.uk by Friday 4th March 2011.

Plenary speakers: Lisa Minnick (Western Michigan University) and Katie Wales (University of Nottingham)

cfp categories: 
african-american
american
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
eighteenth_century
ethnicity_and_national_identity
interdisciplinary
international_conferences
modernist studies
poetry
postcolonial
renaissance
rhetoric_and_composition
romantic
theory
twentieth_century_and_beyond
victorian