CFP: (Edited Volume): Regal Reels: Hollywood’s Fascination with Royalty (03/15/11; 01 November 2011)

full name / name of organization: 
Scott F. Stoddart, Dean of Liberal Arts Fashion Institute of Technology / SUNY
contact email: 
scott_stoddart@fitnyc.edu

Submissions are sought for a collection of essays titled Regal Reels: Hollywood’s Fascination with Royalty.
Although in its infancy America rejected a monarchy as its form of government, Hollywood cinema has maintained a long fascination with royalty, and American audiences have eagerly patronized foreign films and television series that focus on royal families. The recent success of The King’s Speech (Hopper 2010) attests that the royal family is a subject that continues to fascinate the American movie-going public. These films seem to be more than mere bio-pics; they appear to serve a political purpose that intrigues American audiences.
This collection of essays will serve as a comprehensive discussion of how royalty has been portrayed in Hollywood cinema, how royalty has been exposed by British and foreign cinemas, and how films about royalty have been consumed by the spectator. Essays might consider the way that recorded history has been reconceived as entertainment, or how film biography attempts to use the regal life as a comment on the state of the family and contemporary culture.
Proposals are welcome for critical essays essays of 20 -30 pages that read a variety of films and themes as they relate to the subject, or that offer individual readings of particular films. Subjects might include, but are not limited to the following:
• The Private Life of Henry VIII (Korda 1933)
• The Scarlet Empress (Sternberg 1934)
• Marie Antoinette (Van Dyke 1938)
• The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex (Curtiz 1939)
• Becket (Glenville 1964)
• The Lion in Winter (Harvey 1968)
• Anne of a Thousand Days (Jarrett 1969)
• Nicholas and Alexandra (Schaffner 1971)
• Mary, Queen of Scots (Jarrett 1971)
• Mrs. Brown (Madden 1997)
• The Elizabeth films: Elizabeth and Elizabeth: The Golden Age (Kapur 1998 and 2007)
• Marie Antoinette (Coppola 2006)
• The Queen (Frears 2006)
• The Young Victoria (Valleé 2009)
• The King’s Speech (Hooper 2010)
Some suggested television venues include:
• The Six Wives of Henry the Eighth (1970)
• Elizabeth R (with Glenda Jackson, 1971) and Elizabeth I (with Helen Mirren, 2005)
• The Woman He Loved (Jarrott, 1998)
• The Tudors (2007)
1- 2 abstracts for proposed essays should be sent with a brief biographical sketch by 1 April 2011. Completed essays will be due by 1 November 2011. Please send inquiries and/or completed abstracts to:
Scott F. Stoddart, Dean
School of Liberal Arts, FIT/SUNY
27th Street
New York, NY 10001
scott_stoddart@fitnyc.edu
212.217.4322
Editor Details:
Dr. Scott F. Stoddart is the Dean of the School of Liberal Arts at the Fashion Institute of Technology, SUNY. Prior to this, he was the Provost at Manhattanville College and an Associate Professor of Liberal Arts at Nova Southeastern University, where he instructed courses in American literature, cinema studies, and musical theatre history. He has published on the fiction of Henry James, E. M. Forster, and F. Scott Fitzgerald; the musical plays of Stephen Sondheim; and the films of the Coen Brothers, Jane Campion, Jack Clayton, John Ford, Oliver Stone and Martin Scorsese. He has also published on the image of the president in Hollywood film and television. His latest book, Analyzing Mad Men: Critical Essays on the Series (McFarland), is due out this spring. His first book, The 1980s: American Popular Culture through History is available through Greenwood Press. He continues work on his “Queer Eye” for a “Straight Dick”: the Queer Villains of Film Noir. And on another essay collection: The 9/11 Western: Re-Purposing the Hollywood Genre.

cfp categories: 
american
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
film_and_television
gender_studies_and_sexuality
general_announcements
interdisciplinary
journals_and_collections_of_essays
popular_culture
theatre
theory