[UPDATE] New England Women's Studies Conference

full name / name of organization: 
New England Women's Studies
contact email: 

Due to inquiries from faculty who would like to engage students in this conference, the proposal deadline has been extended to February 20th to accommodate schools just back in session for the spring semester.

Please consider joining us at UMass Dartmouth for the NEWSA conference. Conference fees are low ($50 faculty; $25 students) and includes dinner on April 29th before the keynote event.

New England Women's Studies Association Conference
UMass Dartmouth, April 29th-30th, 2011

Privilege 2011: Theories and Perspectives Inside/Outside the Classroom

The New England Women's Studies Association is pleased to announce that Peggy McIntosh, Associate Director of the Wellesley College Center for Research on Women, will be the keynote speaker at our 2011 conference. The keynote will include the showing of the new documentary film Mirrors of Privilege: Making Whiteness Visible.

NEWSA invites presentations theorizing privilege inside and outside the classroom. Possible topics include:

Sexual privilege -- White privilege -- Heterosexual privilege -- Class privilege --Age privilege

  • How do we think about privilege in the 21st century?
  • How does privilege operate in our world?
  • How do we educate people about different types of privilege?
  • How do different privileges continue to be a barrier in our work?
  • What is our role as educators in dismantling systems of privilege ?
  • How do different systems of privilege intersect and/or mutually reinforce one another?
  • How can we betray our privilege(s)?
  • How do we deal with resistance in the classroom to recognizing privilege?

    We encourage papers that examine issues of privilege in tandem or from an interdisciplinary perspective. The conference also includes an embedded undergraduate student conference for presentations of undergraduate research and experiences in the discipline of Women's Studies. Like the 2010 conference, we plan to embed undergraduate presentations throughout the program. We encourage proposals from undergraduate students; faculty and undergraduate panels are especially welcome.

    500-word abstracts due by February 20th. Panel submissions welcome.

    Submit electronically as .RTF, .DOC, or PDF attachment to: newsa@umassd.edu

    40084Terror and Media - CFP for a A Special Issue of Journal of South Asian Popular Culture Journal of South Asian Popular Culturejournalsapc@gmail.com 1296155407cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturepostcolonialtheoryfull name / name of organization: Journal of South Asian Popular Culturecontact email: journalsapc@gmail.com

    Special Issue – Call for Papers

    A Special Issue of South Asian Popular Culture will be published in July 2013 on:

    Terror and Media

    Guest Editors: Ritu G. Khanduri and Ronie Parciack

    The spectacular 26/11/2008 attacks on Mumbai brought South Asia to the forefront of (western) discourse on terrorism. International and internal media coverage consociated the Mumbai calamity with the spectacular 9/11 attacks by terming the Mumbai tragedy "India's 9/11." Several assessments denied The South-Asian context and subordinated it to Western history and conceptualizations. Public resentment of such analysis was articulated by Amitav Ghosh and Arundhati Roy among others, who called for decolonizing the media coverage, in other words to contextualizing the issue of terrorism within specific South Asian frameworks.

    This special issue aims at exploring pivotal theoretical and socio-political concepts related to representations of terror in contemporary South Asian visual cultures. Our aim is to lay the groundwork for a critical reexamination of terror and media in the South Asian context, and contribute to three interconnected areas of analytical import: 1. the theoretical debate on terrorism within South Asian conceptualizations and contexts; 2. a reconsideration of identity formations, cultural constructs and nationalism; and 3. the mass mediation of terror.

    South Asian Popular Culture invites paper proposals critically converging around terror and media across South Asia. Though not limited to these questions, we anticipate paper proposals to address:

    • What is Terror in the South-Asian context? Does the South Asian media provide a background for alternative definitions - or theorization - of terror?
    • How does the South Asian context challenge or negotiate the dominant readings of terror offered by Western theorists such as Slavoj Žižek, Alain Badiou and Jean Baudrillard? Can the South-Asian context provide us with a different orientation than the dominant psychoanalytical prism of Western cultural studies?
    • How is terror represented in South Asian contexts, and how do South Asian societies visually redefine themselves in the era of terror?
    • How does the era of terror challenge or recontextualize identity formations across South Asia?
    • How does the era of terror recontextualize concepts such as nationalism, sovereignty, nonviolence, youth, gender, body, order/disorder, the dynamics of East/West, local/global and notions of exchange?
    • Historically, does the South Asian mass media provide a framework for conceptualizing the sensations and spectacles associated with terror?

    We are looking for critical essays, which should be 5,000-6,000 words, and pieces for the "Working Notes," which could be interviews with artists, reviews of works and photo essays, ranging from 1,000 - 3,000 words each.

    Please email a 300 word proposal and a 150 word bio in a MS word attachment to journalsapc@gmail.com by 30 April, 2011.

    Initial review decision will be notified by 15 August, 2011.

    Selected proposals should be submitted as complete Manuscripts no later than 15 January, 2012.

    All manuscripts will undergo peer review, based on initial editor screening.

    Manuscripts should not be under consideration by another publication at the time of submission.

    For additional information about South Asian Popular Culture, please visit: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/journal.asp?issn=1474-6689&linktype=1

    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturepostcolonialtheory 40085The Next Great Wave? Disruptive Technology, Innovation, Business, & Culture Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT)nextgreatwave@nait.ca; jeninec@nait.ca1296157385ecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_cultureprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturetheoryfull name / name of organization: Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT)contact email: nextgreatwave@nait.ca; jeninec@nait.ca

    Defined very loosely as relatively untested technologies that emerge into mainstream culture without a framing business model, disruptive technologies generate sudden and great appeal among users. Thought of another way, disruptive technologies blindside traditional market structures, capturing the attention (and creative energies) of users so dramatically as to leave individual companies, industry sectors, and regulatory bodies scrambling to catch up.

    novaNAIT & the Bachelor of Technology Management program at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT) invite submissions of proposals (maximum 250 words) for an upcoming conference that explores the implications of disruptive technology (as concept and practice) on business and culture, past or present.

    Submissions are encouraged from a wide array of perspectives, which might include but are by no means limited to explorations of:

    • The implications of specific disruptive technologies (from moveable print to peer-to-peer interactions, as examples)
    • Case studies
    • Disruptive technology and risk/change management
    • Disruptive technology and creativity
    • Disruptive technology and organizational assessment and (re)structuring
    • Regulating disruption

    Submissions should be submitted electronically to nextgreatwave@nait.ca, attached as either a word or pdf file. Please include the following in the body of your email: proposed title of your presentation in addition to your name, affiliation, email address, and AV requirements

    • Deadline for proposals: March 15, 2011
    • Letters of acceptance: March 22, 2011
    • Confirmation of attendance: April 1, 2011

    cfp categories: ecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_cultureprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturetheory 40086Special Issue on: "Organisational Sustainable Development and Accountability"Macquarie Universityzoe.wong@mq.edu.au1296157899general_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturetheoryfull name / name of organization: Macquarie Universitycontact email: zoe.wong@mq.edu.au

    International Journal of Organisational Design and Engineering (IJODE)

    Call for Papers

    Special Issue on: "Organisational Sustainable Development and Accountability"

    Guest Editors:
    Zoe Wong
    Lorne Cummings
    Macquarie University, Australia

    Sustainable development has evolved into one of the most important strategic issues facing organisations worldwide. Incorporating principles of sustainable development within organisational policies and processes is a critical factor in addressing global environmental problems. Sustainable development projects and sustainable business markets are forecasted to double during the period 2010 to 2014 whilst business expenditure on sustainability projects is estimated to reach $US 60 billion in the United States over this same period (Verdantix, 2010). Over the period 2009 to 2014, the compound annual growth rate in business spending on sustainability projects will be approximately 19% across all OECD countries. The ongoing industrialization and urbanisation of both the developed and developing world, and the environmental, social and economic impacts that ensue, have led to a greater awareness of the need to re-engineer organisational policies processes and systems in order to facilitate sustainable development.

    The aims of this special issue are to explore sustainable development as it relates to organisation design and engineering, current trends and associated issues.

    Subject Coverage

    Within the scope of the special issue, papers, including industry case studies, on the following topics are encouraged, but not limited to:

    Organisational, corporate governance, policy and leadership issues arising from sustainable development
    The role of sustainable development in technology innovation and adoption
    The role of sustainable development in overall organisational and enterprise information systems design
    Improving quality control and risk management through sustainability mechanisms
    Business process re-engineering incorporating sustainable development
    Use of sustainable development concepts in project management and organisational restructure
    Accountability, measurement, performance and reporting of sustainability issues

    Notes for Prospective Authors

    Submitted papers should not have been previously published nor be currently under consideration for publication elsewhere. (N.B. Conference papers may only be submitted if the paper was not originally copyrighted and if it has been completely re-written).

    All papers are refereed through a peer review process. A guide for authors, sample copies and other relevant information for submitting papers are available on the Author Guidelines page

    Important Dates

    Paper Submission: 15 August, 2011

    First Round Review Complete and Notification: 15 November, 2011

    Second Round Submission: 15 January, 2012

    Final Submission: 15 February, 2012

    Editors and Notes

    You may send one copy in the form of an MS Word file attached to an e-mail (details in Author Guidelines) to the following:

    Zoe Wong
    Macquarie University
    Faculty of Business and Economics
    North Ryde, Sydney 2113
    Australia
    Email: zoe.wong@mq.edu.au

    Lorne Cummings
    Macquarie University
    Faculty of Business and Economics
    North Ryde, Sydney 2113
    Australia
    Email: lorne.cummings@mq.edu.au

    Please include in your submission the title of the Special Issue, the title of the Journal and the name of the Guest Editor

    cfp categories: general_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturetheory 40087[UPDATE] Mike Leigh's Politics and Poetics. Anthology. Polished essay due August 15, 2011.Bryan Cardinale-Powell and Marc DiPaolo, both Assistant Professors at Oklahoma City University's Department of Moving Image Artscaptainblackadder@hotmail.com and cardinale.powell@gmail.com1296170405cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturereligiontheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Bryan Cardinale-Powell and Marc DiPaolo, both Assistant Professors at Oklahoma City University's Department of Moving Image Artscontact email: captainblackadder@hotmail.com and cardinale.powell@gmail.com

    -
    Length/Style: 6,000-8,500 words (including notes), MLA citations.

    Subject: This edited collection seeks to publish recent scholarship that examines various aspects of Mike Leigh's life and career as a writer-director by scholars from a variety of disciplines employing a range of critical methodologies. These essays will cover all phases of the BAFTA-award-winning director's career, from his early television work to his theatrical films, including Life is Sweet (1990), Naked (1993), Secrets & Lies (1996), Career Girls (1997), Topsy-Turvy (1999), All or Nothing (2002), Vera Drake (2004), Happy-Go-Lucky (2008), and Another Year (2010). We are interested in receiving abstracts over the next few months, and completed papers in the summertime. Feel free to send what you have now and give an idea of what the final submission will look like.

    Topics may include but are not limited to:

    · close-readings of individual Leigh films (especially welcome at this point would be papers on Another Year, Naked, and Secrets and Lies).
    · analysis of recurring themes and motifs in several Leigh films
    · David Cameron, the British film industry, and the future of Leigh's career.
    · Portrayals of the Irish "Troubles" in Four Days in July.
    · comparisons of Leigh to other writers and directors and their body of work (ie: other British creators such as Jimmy McGovern, Ken Loach, Joseph Losey, Tony Richardson, Basil Dearden, and Lindsay Anderson, Hollywood directors dealing with similar subjects, etc.)
    · how Leigh's films reflect the changing cultural and political landscape of Great Britain.
    · representations of politics, class, race, gender, etc. in the Leigh filmography.
    · how Leigh's real life informs his work and the extent to which his personality traits (do or don't) find their way into his characters.
    · the Leigh "troupe" of actors: their performances and role in shaping the plot and script through improvisational performances.
    · how Leigh gets these movies funded and made when they are so "not commercial."
    · Leigh's political activism (domestic politics, Arab-Israeli conflict, etc.)
    · Leigh's theatre work.
    · Leigh's "England" compared to EastEnders, Michael Apted's Up Documentaries, etc.
    · a survey of Leigh's critical reception, Box Office success, and the existing academic scholarship on his work, as well as his treatment in sophisticated periodicals such as Cineaste.

    Contacts and editors: Bryan Cardinale-Powell and Marc DiPaolo, both Assistant Professors at Oklahoma City University's Department of Moving Image Arts.

    BCP e-mail: cardinale.powell@gmail.com,
    MD e-mail: captainblackadder@hotmail.com.

    Please contact both of us with your ideas before beginning significant work on the chapter so we can ensure that the contributors do not duplicate one another's submissions. Ideally, we would like you to contact us with ideas as soon as possible. Final submissions are due August 15, 2011. Please send abstracts and/or final submissions, along with a brief biographical sketch, directly to captainblackadder@hotmail.com and cardinale.powell@gmail.com.

    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturereligiontheatretwentieth_century_and_beyond 40088[UPDATE] Mike Leigh's Politics and Poetics. Anthology. Polished essay due August 15, 2011.Bryan Cardinale-Powell and Marc DiPaolo, both Assistant Professors at Oklahoma City University's Department of Moving Image Artscaptainblackadder@hotmail.com and cardinale.powell@gmail.com1296170490cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturereligiontheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Bryan Cardinale-Powell and Marc DiPaolo, both Assistant Professors at Oklahoma City University's Department of Moving Image Artscontact email: captainblackadder@hotmail.com and cardinale.powell@gmail.com

    -
    Length/Style: 6,000-8,500 words (including notes), MLA citations.

    Subject: This edited collection seeks to publish recent scholarship that examines various aspects of Mike Leigh's life and career as a writer-director by scholars from a variety of disciplines employing a range of critical methodologies. These essays will cover all phases of the BAFTA-award-winning director's career, from his early television work to his theatrical films, including Life is Sweet (1990), Naked (1993), Secrets & Lies (1996), Career Girls (1997), Topsy-Turvy (1999), All or Nothing (2002), Vera Drake (2004), Happy-Go-Lucky (2008), and Another Year (2010). We are interested in receiving abstracts over the next few months, and completed papers in the summertime. Feel free to send what you have now and give an idea of what the final submission will look like.

    Topics may include but are not limited to:

    · close-readings of individual Leigh films (especially welcome at this point would be papers on Another Year, Naked, and Secrets and Lies).
    · analysis of recurring themes and motifs in several Leigh films
    · David Cameron, the British film industry, and the future of Leigh's career.
    · Portrayals of the Irish "Troubles" in Four Days in July.
    · comparisons of Leigh to other writers and directors and their body of work (ie: other British creators such as Jimmy McGovern, Ken Loach, Joseph Losey, Tony Richardson, Basil Dearden, and Lindsay Anderson, Hollywood directors dealing with similar subjects, etc.)
    · how Leigh's films reflect the changing cultural and political landscape of Great Britain.
    · representations of politics, class, race, gender, etc. in the Leigh filmography.
    · how Leigh's real life informs his work and the extent to which his personality traits (do or don't) find their way into his characters.
    · the Leigh "troupe" of actors: their performances and role in shaping the plot and script through improvisational performances.
    · how Leigh gets these movies funded and made when they are so "not commercial."
    · Leigh's political activism (domestic politics, Arab-Israeli conflict, etc.)
    · Leigh's theatre work.
    · Leigh's "England" compared to EastEnders, Michael Apted's Up Documentaries, etc.
    · a survey of Leigh's critical reception, Box Office success, and the existing academic scholarship on his work, as well as his treatment in sophisticated periodicals such as Cineaste.

    Contacts and editors: Bryan Cardinale-Powell and Marc DiPaolo, both Assistant Professors at Oklahoma City University's Department of Moving Image Arts.

    BCP e-mail: cardinale.powell@gmail.com,
    MD e-mail: captainblackadder@hotmail.com.

    Please contact both of us with your ideas before beginning significant work on the chapter so we can ensure that the contributors do not duplicate one another's submissions. Ideally, we would like you to contact us with ideas as soon as possible. Final submissions are due August 15, 2011. Please send abstracts and/or final submissions, along with a brief biographical sketch, directly to captainblackadder@hotmail.com and cardinale.powell@gmail.com.

    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturereligiontheatretwentieth_century_and_beyond 40089[UPDATE] Mike Leigh's Politics and Poetics. Anthology. Polished essay due August 15, 2011.Bryan Cardinale-Powell and Marc DiPaolo, both Assistant Professors at Oklahoma City University's Department of Moving Image Artscaptainblackadder@hotmail.com and cardinale.powell@gmail.com1296170513cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturereligiontheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Bryan Cardinale-Powell and Marc DiPaolo, both Assistant Professors at Oklahoma City University's Department of Moving Image Artscontact email: captainblackadder@hotmail.com and cardinale.powell@gmail.com

    -
    Length/Style: 6,000-8,500 words (including notes), MLA citations.

    Subject: This edited collection seeks to publish recent scholarship that examines various aspects of Mike Leigh's life and career as a writer-director by scholars from a variety of disciplines employing a range of critical methodologies. These essays will cover all phases of the BAFTA-award-winning director's career, from his early television work to his theatrical films, including Life is Sweet (1990), Naked (1993), Secrets & Lies (1996), Career Girls (1997), Topsy-Turvy (1999), All or Nothing (2002), Vera Drake (2004), Happy-Go-Lucky (2008), and Another Year (2010). We are interested in receiving abstracts over the next few months, and completed papers in the summertime. Feel free to send what you have now and give an idea of what the final submission will look like.

    Topics may include but are not limited to:

    · close-readings of individual Leigh films (especially welcome at this point would be papers on Another Year, Naked, and Secrets and Lies).
    · analysis of recurring themes and motifs in several Leigh films
    · David Cameron, the British film industry, and the future of Leigh's career.
    · Portrayals of the Irish "Troubles" in Four Days in July.
    · comparisons of Leigh to other writers and directors and their body of work (ie: other British creators such as Jimmy McGovern, Ken Loach, Joseph Losey, Tony Richardson, Basil Dearden, and Lindsay Anderson, Hollywood directors dealing with similar subjects, etc.)
    · how Leigh's films reflect the changing cultural and political landscape of Great Britain.
    · representations of politics, class, race, gender, etc. in the Leigh filmography.
    · how Leigh's real life informs his work and the extent to which his personality traits (do or don't) find their way into his characters.
    · the Leigh "troupe" of actors: their performances and role in shaping the plot and script through improvisational performances.
    · how Leigh gets these movies funded and made when they are so "not commercial."
    · Leigh's political activism (domestic politics, Arab-Israeli conflict, etc.)
    · Leigh's theatre work.
    · Leigh's "England" compared to EastEnders, Michael Apted's Up Documentaries, etc.
    · a survey of Leigh's critical reception, Box Office success, and the existing academic scholarship on his work, as well as his treatment in sophisticated periodicals such as Cineaste.

    Contacts and editors: Bryan Cardinale-Powell and Marc DiPaolo, both Assistant Professors at Oklahoma City University's Department of Moving Image Arts.

    BCP e-mail: cardinale.powell@gmail.com,
    MD e-mail: captainblackadder@hotmail.com.

    Please contact both of us with your ideas before beginning significant work on the chapter so we can ensure that the contributors do not duplicate one another's submissions. Ideally, we would like you to contact us with ideas as soon as possible. Final submissions are due August 15, 2011. Please send abstracts and/or final submissions, along with a brief biographical sketch, directly to captainblackadder@hotmail.com and cardinale.powell@gmail.com.

    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturereligiontheatretwentieth_century_and_beyond 40090Rema(r)king German Literature: Revision, Revaluation and the Editorial ProcessSecond International Graduate Conference Dept. of Central, Eastern and Northern European Studies, University of British Columbiaediting2011@gmail.com1296172585eighteenth_centurygraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesmedievalfull name / name of organization: Second International Graduate Conference Dept. of Central, Eastern and Northern European Studies, University of British Columbiacontact email: editing2011@gmail.com

    Second International Graduate Student Conference
    Hosted by the Department of CENES
    University of British Columbia
    http://editing2011.wordpress.com/
    September 16-17, 2011

    To take the editorial process as an object of study, John Bryant asserts in his book The Fluid Text: a Theory of Revision and Editing for Book and Screen, is to reject the popular assumption "that the job of textual scholarship ... is to sift through corruption and otherness and establish an authoritative or definitive text for common use." He holds that in the illumination and investigation of editorial changes, "we find more than just the accidents of
    textual transmission; we begin to envision a fuller phenomenon, tied to historical moments but always changing and always manifesting one set of interests or another" (2002, 2). The literary edition is a fascinating site of negotiation between the interests (and perceived interests) of reader, editor, and author. These categories of reader, editor and author can further coexist in various combinations within one individual as in the case, for example, of self-censorship. We are seeking presentations that approach textual changes as evidence of these negotiations in order to gain insight into the editorial process and the cultural moments underlying them in German-language literature.

    We invite proposals on the topic of Rema(r)king German Literature: Revision, Revaluation and the Editorial Process. Areas of interest include, but are not limited to:

    The Role of the Editor in the Editorial Process

    - electronic editions
    - revising the bibliographic code
    - the editor's preface
    - history of the editor
    - editions in translation
    - orthographic modernization

    The Role of the Author in the Editorial Process

    - author as editor
    - self-censorship and self-editing
    - autobiography
    - awareness of editorial process
    - the author and the co-created literary text

    Editing Texts not Composed for Publication

    - posthumous editions
    - editing diaries
    - editing personal correspondence
    - ethics of editing

    The Editorial Process and Canon Building

    - kinds of editions
    - selection of texts and the economics of culture
    - critical reception of editions
    - editing and the material history of the book
    - minority authors and the editorial process
    - editing and the category of "literary"
    - the "definitive" edition

    Keynote Speakers:

    Dr. Bodo Platchta,
    Vreije Universiteit Amsterdam

    Dr. Ulrike Leuschner,
    Technische Universitaet Darmstadt

    Dr. Eva-Maria Kroeller,
    University of British Columbia

    Dr. Sian Echard,
    University of British Columbia

    This conference will also feature a roundtable discussion with experts in the field. Details are forthcoming on the conference website: http://editing2011.wordpress.com/

    Presentations are limited to 20 minutes in length, in English, French or German. Please submit a title and 300-word abstract by March 1, 2011 via the web-based form on our website:
    http://editing2011.wordpress.com/propose-a-paper/

    cfp categories: eighteenth_centurygraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesmedieval 40092Everything & More: Theorizing the Encyclopedic Novel... MLA 2012 Seattle Brendan Beirne, New York University Dept. of English & American Literaturebrendan.beirne@nyu.edu1296174220african-americanamericaneighteenth_centuryhumanities_computing_and_the_internetmodernist studiespostcolonialrenaissancescience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Brendan Beirne, New York University Dept. of English & American Literaturecontact email: brendan.beirne@nyu.edu

    This panel seeks to consolidate and refine our understanding of the encyclopedic novel as a distinct (sub)genre within the broader field of novel studies / narratology.

    What conventions mark texts as encyclopedic, and how have these conventions developed over time? How does a text's encyclopedism influence its reception by literary critics and narrative theorists? And how does the increasing ubiquity and accessibility of information in our culture effect the way we interpret 'data-saturated' novels of the past and present? These and other questions will inform our discussion.

    Participants may focus on texts from any period or national literature, and are encouraged to consider works that have not already been canonized as one of the usual encyclopedic suspects (e.g. Moby-Dick, Gravity's Rainbow, etc.). We hope to also include discussion of non-fiction works such as The Diary of Samuel Pepys, The Anatomy of Melancholy by Burton, and Imperial by William T. Vollmann.

    Ideally, papers would situate themselves in relation to contemporary theorizations / discussions of the encyclopedic novel (examples include Kevin Attell [2004], Antonio Barrenechea [2005], Leo Bersani [1988, 1989], Wilfredo H. Corral [2001, Edward Mendelson [1976], Jed Rasula [1999], et al).

    SUBMIT 300-500 WORD ABSTRACT + C.V. TO BRENDAN.BEIRNE@NYU.EDU by FRIDAY, MARCH 4th, 2011.

    --------------------------------------------------

    Rabelais
    Miguel de Cervantes
    Laurence Sterne
    Samuel Pepys
    Don DeLillo
    John Barth
    Thomas Pynchon
    Leslie Marmon Silko
    David Foster Wallace
    Gustave Flaubert
    James Joyce
    Joris-Karl Huysmans
    Richard Powers
    Ralph Ellison
    Joseph McElroy
    William T. Vollmann
    Evan Dara
    William Gaddis
    Mark Z. Danielewski
    Herman Melville
    Robert Musil
    Thomas Mann
    Julio Cortázar
    Roberto Bolaño
    Annie Proulx
    Karen Tei Yamashita

    cfp categories: african-americanamericaneighteenth_centuryhumanities_computing_and_the_internetmodernist studiespostcolonialrenaissancescience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 40093Oxford Brookes Symposium on Music and Publishing, April 11th 201Dr Jan Butler, Popular Music Research Unit, Oxford Brookes Universityjan.butler@brookes.ac.uk1296223310cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesfull name / name of organization: Dr Jan Butler, Popular Music Research Unit, Oxford Brookes Universitycontact email: jan.butler@brookes.ac.uk

    The Oxford Brookes Popular Music Research Unit, in association with The Royal Musical Association and The Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies, is holding a one-day symposium exploring links between music and publishing in its broadest sense on April 11th, 2011. This event is intended to bring together academics, journalists and publishers to explore this previously neglected area which offers exciting opportunities to tap into current concerns about the effects of the internet on the dissemination of music, to explore how our experience of music is shaped by publications relating to it, and to explore more broadly the important issue of the relationship between music and commerce, both in a historical context and in the present. The day will feature themed paper sessions, a keynote presentation from the Music Publishing Association, a discussion panel of journalists including Fiona Maddocks and Alyn Shipton focusing on writing about classical, jazz and popular music and will end with a round table discussion featuring Dr Dai Griffiths (Brookes), Dr Lee Marshall (Bristol) and Dr Simon Warner (Leeds) to consider future directions of research in this area.

    We invite contributions from a wide range of disciplines and backgrounds to explore links between music and publishing, both current and historical, and are looking for twenty minute papers. The focus of the day will roughly fall into two main themes: an exploration of the publishing of music in all its forms, and an exploration of publishing about music. Please indicate which theme you feel your paper would best fall into. Topics for papers may include (but are not limited to):

    · Music criticism and journalism
    · Online lyric and tablature sites
    · The sales, marketing and distribution of music
    · Fan sites and music blogs
    · Synergies between music and other forms of publishing
    · Reception studies
    · Printed Music Publishing
    · Case studies and histories

    How to submit:

    Please submit an abstract of no more than 250 words and a short biography outlining your research or professional experience in this field. Please also include your contact details, including email address, and your institution or company affiliation, if you have one.

    Submissions should be emailed, with a subject heading of 'Brookes symposium' to:

    jan.butler@brookes.ac.uk

    The closing date for submissions is the 1st March 2011, 5pm. The chosen participants with successful submissions will be notified by the end of 11th March 2011.

    To express an interest in attending the event, please contact Jan Butler as above. Further details of the day will be advertised closer to the date and can be found here: http://ah.brookes.ac.uk/research/project/shifting_ground/

    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferences 40094[UPDATE] Lost and Found: Nostalgia in Media - February 25th and 26th, 2011New York University - Department of Cinema Studiescinecon2011@gmail.com1296227633cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarypopular_culturetheoryfull name / name of organization: New York University - Department of Cinema Studiescontact email: cinecon2011@gmail.com

    Call for Papers: LOST AND FOUND: Nostalgia in Media

    NYU Cinema Studies Student Conference, Spring 2011

    February 25-26, 2011 -- New York University, New York, NY

    The New York University Cinema Studies department is excited to announce the 2011 Student Conference. Each year, our goal is to bring together scholars from a variety of departments and disciplines in order to address the transformations currently shaping the field of cinema studies. We look forward to providing students at both the undergraduate and graduate levels with an opportunity to present their ideas to their peers. Organized by and for students, the conference offers a unique forum for intellectual dialogue and stands as a valuable learning experience.

    -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

    "To look backward for a while is to refresh the eye, to restore it,
    and to render it the more fit for its prime function of looking forward."
    - Margaret Fairless Barber

    This year's conference aims to explore, embrace, commemorate, and/or critique the concept of nostalgia as it relates to cinema and other forms of media. In examining this relationship, our goal is not only to reminisce on what is "lost" but also to discover what might be "found" in our consideration of this concept. Submissions might address, but are not limited to, the following topic areas:

    *Structures of Cinephilia: What role does nostalgia play in our love of moving images? Papers in this category might cover issues surrounding cinephiliac audiences (including fan, cult, critical, and scholarly groups) or theoretical, historical, and technological perspectives on the affective desire for images.

    *Politics of Nostalgia: Submissions in this area might consider the political implications, both conservative and radical, in the nostalgic appropriation of old media (texts, styles, genres, etc.) for new political and cultural statements. Additionally, participants could discuss how these acts of appropriation, ranging from censorship to subversion, alter the 'original' meaning of the material.

    *The Digital Threat: As digital recording technologies become more prevalent, obsolete practices of capturing and reliving memory come under increasing threat of extinction. What impact does the ubiquity of these technologies have on collective and individual nostalgia?
    Conversely, how are these new technologies influenced by and remain in dialogue with traditional methods of recording?

    *Future/Past: Discussions in this category may include analyses of reflexive filmmaking practices (adaptation, pastiche, remake, etc.) or reflective collection methods (archive, memorabilia, ephemera) as they relate to conceptions of nostalgia and media.

    -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

    This list is by no means exhaustive, and we invite students who have differing perspectives or their own critical responses to contribute their work. Students are also encouraged to form and propose full panels dealing with conceptual angles not listed here.

    Guidelines – Please submit a proposal of 250 words or less and your bibliographic references to cinecon2011@gmail.com by February 2nd, 2011. Presentations will be no more than 20 minutes, including audio-visual materials (approximately 7-10 pages, double spaced). Please include your name, presentation title, institution, major or department affiliation, and student level (BA, MA, PhD, etc.) with your submission.

    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarypopular_culturetheory 40095Evelyn Waugh Undergraduate Essay Contest, 31 Dec. 2011John H. Wilson / Evelyn Waugh Societyjwilson3@lhup.edu1296229483general_announcementsmodernist studiespostcolonialreligiontravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: John H. Wilson / Evelyn Waugh Societycontact email: jwilson3@lhup.edu

    Subject: any aspect of the life or work of Evelyn Waugh. Prize: $250. Judged by editorial board of _Evelyn Waugh Newsletter and Studies_. Deadline: 31 December 2011. Submit to: Dr. John H. Wilson, Dept of English, Lock Haven Univ, Lock Haven PA 17745 (USA), or jwilson3@lhup.edu

    cfp categories: general_announcementsmodernist studiespostcolonialreligiontravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 40096"Isms and Ologies: Reading, Teaching, Theorizing, Writing": Graduate English Conference, April 16, 2011Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CTfluhrn1@southernct.edu1296236738graduate_conferencesfull name / name of organization: Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CTcontact email: fluhrn1@southernct.edu

    The twelfth annual Graduate English Conference at Southern Connecticut State University seeks submissions for "Isms and Ologies: Reading, Teaching, Theorizing, Writing."

    An "Ism" is kind of doctrine, philosophy, or belief systems that strives to organize and thus make sense of the world. "Ology" comes from the Greek logos, meaning the "study of" something. Isms, then, might be said to put the frame or the lens first, while ologies privilege the object of study.

    We invite papers that explore isms, ologies, or the productive tension between these two ways of seeing from the perspective of English Studies, Rhetoric and Composition, Creative Writing, Teacher Certification programs, Women's Studies, Comparative Literature, American Studies, History, Art History, and Cultural Studies. We are also interested to hear how teachers—in universities, community colleges, and Middle and High Schools—engage with or combat isms and ologies in their classrooms.

    For individual papers, please submit a 250-word abstract and a brief (1-3 sentence) biography. For panels, please submit a 250-word description of the panel topic in addition to the individual paper submissions, which should be submitted directly to you.

    Submissions should be sent to Nicole Fluhr at fluhrn1@southernct.edu by March 7, 2011. Please include the title of your paper, school affiliation (if any), and e-mail address along with your submission.

    Our keynote speaker will be Dr. Stephanie Wade of Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ.

    cfp categories: graduate_conferences 40097New Approaches to Civil War Poetry (MLA 2012)Melville Society and Dickinson International Societyjf284@georgetown.edu or epetrino@fairfield.edu1296239153americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfull name / name of organization: Melville Society and Dickinson International Societycontact email: jf284@georgetown.edu or epetrino@fairfield.edu

    New Approaches to Civil War Poetry | MLA 2012

    A Collaborative Panel Organized by the Melville Society and Emily Dickinson International Society

    As the most cataclysmic event in American history, the Civil War produced a vast amount of poetry about the war effort. New approaches to Civil War poetry by Dickinson, Whitman, and Melville have investigated the influence print media, reportage, graphic design, and photography on their poems and developed new theories on the relationship between text and print. Abstracts of 250-500 words and a 2-page CV should be sent by March 10, 2011 to epetrino@fairfield.edu and jf284@georgetown.edu.

    cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approaches 40098Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature Session-SCMLA-27-29 October 2011South Central Modern Language Associationchappell@tarleton.edu1296239358bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitypoetrytravel_writingfull name / name of organization: South Central Modern Language Associationcontact email: chappell@tarleton.edu

    Abstracts are invited for consideration in the Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature Regular Session at the 68th Annual SCMLA convention in Hot Springs, Arkansas, 27-29 October 2011. This session welcomes papers that address any topic in British Literature of the Long Eighteenth Century. Please send 250-300 word abstracts with full contact information to chappell@tarleton.edu no later than 26 March 2011. Please include on your abstract full contact information (name, affiliation, address, email). Presentation time is limited to 20 minutes. Please be aware that membership is required for participation in the annual conference and must be in place by 23 May 2011. More information on the organization and this conference is available at http://www.southcentralmla.org/

    cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitypoetrytravel_writing 40099[UPDATE] Special Topics Session: "Productive Silences" (Annual RMMLA Conference October 6-8, 2011) Pamela J. Rader/ RMMLA 2011 in Scottsdale, AZ pamela_rader@hotmail.com /or/ raderp@georgian.edu1296245052african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Pamela J. Rader/ RMMLA 2011 in Scottsdale, AZ contact email: pamela_rader@hotmail.com /or/ raderp@georgian.edu

    Special Topics Panel: Productive Silences
    History and the history-making process, while seeking to remember, often call attention to singularity of perspective, which results in silencing the memories of survivors. Literature then steps in to fill the gaps or the lacuna of silence. In this imaginative, fictional realm, silence and those silenced by historians, dictators, and forgetfulness find agency. Understood as a form of resistance, silence becomes a literary ruse: a voice or a perspective that once lacked agency now finds a place on the page.
    Narratives that use ruses of hidden or lost documents (such as letters, journals, and oral testimonies) are particularly interesting.
    Consider the trope of silence in the following literary works:
    * Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (the silences within, Shelley's novel before Percy's revisions…)
    * Louise Erdrich's Tracks or The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse
    *Nicole Krauss's The History of Love
    * Relationships between novels and refiguring silenced characters (Jane Eyre and Rhys's Wide Sargasso Sea; Robinson Crusoe and Tournier's Friday; and others)
    * The stories of survivors
    * Literature that emerges inspite of/ out of dictatorships
    I am particularly interested in papers that examine extended metaphors for and various tropes of silence in twentieth and twenty-first century fiction, plays, and poetry.
    Please submit your abstract of 350 words to:
    Pamela J. Rader, Ph.D.
    raderp@georgian.edu
    Abstracts due February 28, 2011
    Presenters will need to be/become RMMLA members by April 1, 2011
    For membership and other information:
    http://rmmla.wsu.edu/default.asp

    cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 40100Practical Approaches to Teaching Southern Writers Outside the South [Deadline March 1, 2011]Rocky Mountain Modern Language Associaitontfpowell@gmail.com1296251612african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisioninterdisciplinarypoetrytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Rocky Mountain Modern Language Associaitoncontact email: tfpowell@gmail.com

    PRACTICAL APPROACHES TO TEACHING SOUTHERN WRITERS OUTSIDE OF THE SOUTH
    A Society for the Study of Southern Literature Roundtable

    Rocky Mountain MLA 2011
    Scottsdale, AZ
    October 6-8

    CALL FOR PAPERS
    Deadline: March 1, 2011

    The Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association invites submissions to
    an SSSL roundtable session on teaching southern literature outside the
    South for its 2011 convention. Submit descriptions of proposed
    remarks and a brief CV to Tara Powell at tfpowell@gmail.com by March
    1.

    RMMLA features a number of additional sessions of interest to scholars
    of southern literature, including a regular session on southern
    literature and a regular session on Flannery O'Connor, among others.
    For more information about RMMLA or calls for papers in other areas,
    see www.rmmla.org.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisioninterdisciplinarypoetrytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 40101Evidence--Victorian Division panel for MLA 2112 (Seattle)MLA Division on the Victorian Periodeg48@columbia.edu1296258931international_conferencesvictorianfull name / name of organization: MLA Division on the Victorian Periodcontact email: eg48@columbia.edu

    In the sciences, in the humanities, and in everyday life, evidence differs among (and is contested within) different disciplines, historical moments, and epistemologies. We seek papers that take up the question of evidence in the Victorian Period and that reflect upon our own evidentiary practices.

    What counts in the nineteenth century as a demonstration of a claim in the fields of law, science, history, religion, literature, the arts, sociology, ethnography, medicine, psychology, and so forth? And what might count as a persuasive demonstration of the claims that we make in our scholarship on the period? By what technical and rhetorical means is evidence displayed to any given audience, and how is that audience--whether it be a jury, a religious group, a community of scholars or professionals, a body of citizens--meant to make its judgments? How does an object, image, number, a fragment of language, or a "fact" gain and lose its evidentiary status as it moves between places or between disciplines? To what material, formal, and social constraints is evidence subject? What happens when evidence physically decays? How do categories of evidence gain authority or fall under suspicion? Whose testimony matters? How do representational forms affect the persuasiveness of evidence? How do new kinds of evidence--photography, for example--change existing regimes of knowledge? And what is the history of the suspicion of evidence itself? Is there anxiety that exposure to evidence will entail unappealing or proscribed changes in beliefs?

    250-350 word proposals by 15 March 2011 to Eileen Gillooly (eg48@columbia.edu)

    cfp categories: international_conferencesvictorian 40102Young Hemingway / 2012 MLA Convention, SeattleThe Ernest Hemingway Societyskosiba@troy.edu1296275350americanmodernist studiestwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: The Ernest Hemingway Societycontact email: skosiba@troy.edu

    The Ernest Hemingway Society will sponsor one panel at the Modern Language Association Conference in Seattle, WA, January 5-8, 2012.

    With the publication of volume one of The Cambridge Edition of the Letters of Ernest Hemingway (covering Hemingway's correspondence through 1922) scheduled for the fall of 2011 and the location of the next International Hemingway Conference in Petoskey, Michigan in the summer of 2012, this seems an appropriate time to revisit our understanding of Hemingway's early life and work. This panel invites papers that reassess or examine early aspects of Hemingway's life and career, with particular emphasis on the years prior to 1925. Suggested topics may include a re-examination of early family dynamics or social connections, Hemingway's training and early career as a journalist, his early stories and publications or any other topic relevant to those formative years.

    Please submit a 250 word proposal and brief CV to Sara Kosiba (skosiba@troy.edu) by 1 March 2011. Keep in mind that all presenters, once accepted, must be MLA members by 7 April 2011 in order to participate in the 2012 MLA Convention. Information about MLA membership can be found at www.mla.org.

    cfp categories: americanmodernist studiestwentieth_century_and_beyond 40103The Journal of Muslim-American Literature (JML) seeks original scholarship and cultural production for its pilot issue.Dr. Joseph Regajournaljml@gmail.com1296298697african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionfull name / name of organization: Dr. Joseph Regacontact email: journaljml@gmail.com

    The Journal of Muslim-American Literature (JML) is a pilot project made possible by a United States Department of State grant. Its main purpose is to help establish the critical terms and parameters of Muslim-American literature/cultural production, clearly distinguishing it from any ethnic, racial or cultural identifier.
    The critic Frederick J. Hoffman wrote: "If literature is important to history, it is not because it serves as a social document or as a footnote to political or intellectual history, but primarily because it is a culmination, a genuine means of realizing the major issues of its time". This is the starting point for this journal, which is concerned with Muslim-American literature before and after September 11th 2001, certainly the most significant moment of the 21st century thus far, an event which has led to numerous military and political conflicts between the United States and the Islamic world.
    Those conflicts have been accompanied by scores of non-fiction appraisals of what separates America and Islam, an opposition that remains as evident as it is hard to define. Whatever their starting point, the authors of these books invariably call on Muslims to liberate themselves from the apparent reactionary obtuseness of Islam. Calls to modernize, adapt, Westernize, Americanize, enter the 21st century, leave the 7th, abandon tradition, grasp the present, look to the future, enter modernity and forge ahead inform nearly all of these efforts. Many go further, purporting to be windows into the mind of the 'Muslim' – the chosen battleground for all that Islam ever was and is and the forces of the West, led by the United States.
    How then do Muslim-Americans 'realize' this most significant event? What are the poetics of Muslim-American literature? To what extent is it 'saturated' with identifiable themes and preoccupations? Where are the fault lines between American and Muslim identity, and how are they expressed in cultural production?
    The Journal of Muslim-American Literature welcomes scholarly considerations of these and similar questions, as well as poetry, essays and short fiction by Muslim-American writers.

    Please send a 300 word proposal/abstract and a short bio to: journaljml@gmail.com by 1 April 2011. Publication is planned for Fall 2011. Accepted proposals will receive notification by 1 May 2011, with completed papers expected by 1 October 2011.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligion 40104New Horizons: Crossing the Borderlands of the Humanities - May 11-13The Aberystwyth University English and Creative Writing Postgraduate Conference Committeepostgradconference@aber.ac.uk1296306936african-americanamericanclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: The Aberystwyth University English and Creative Writing Postgraduate Conference Committeecontact email: postgradconference@aber.ac.uk

    The Aberystwyth University English and Creative Writing Postgraduate Conference is accepting abstracts for New Horizons: Crossing the Borderlands of the Humanities, the annual conference to be held 11 May to 13 May 2011.
    Have literature and the arts stagnated due to outdated concepts, irrelevant theories and unnecessary traditions? Do we idolise the critic's choice of established writers even when they refuse to explore uncharted territories of originality and creativity? Are we failing to unify all areas of academia – however apparently alien – into functional and symbiotic components of the arts? Is this necessarily a bad thing? Should o ur ambition be to re-read the past in a way that helps to shape the future, by creating visionary works in studies and creative writing?
    With the rise of interdisciplinary criticisms, new and exciting light has been shed on the humanities, whether new avenues into past or contemporary literature, art or history, new forms of fiction and poetry, or blended methodologies and criticisms. This conference will discuss various ways that the humanities might approach this new and open territory. Possible areas of discussion: The Postgraduate Conference Committee will consider ab stracts from any of the humanities including – but not limited to – literary studies, creative writing, art and art history, philosophy, history, rhetoric and composition studies, film and television studies, communications, or education.
    Blended critical approaches to a subject in the humanities.
    How does contemporary theory enhance and enlighten the way in which we see traditional forms of literature and art?
    Dealing with cultural innovations and/or societal limitations with contemporary art.
    Using new ideas to re-examine old works and canonical texts.
    "Different aspects of the humanities perceive events in society and history in different ways". How valuable is this statement to contemporary scholarship and what new perspectives can be drawn from the effects of this idea.
    New, untapped areas of study in the humanities.
    Examining the changing face of the humanities in light of technological and social revolutions.
    To what extent have new advances and discoveries in disciplines of science, medicine and the technologies shaped and moulded literature and art?
    Old ends, new beginnings.
    Besides panels from graduate students, the conference will feature plenary talks from Professor Peter Barry (Aberystwyth University, author of Beginning Theory, and Literature in Context), Professor Mark Willhardt (Monmouth College; Monmouth, IL, USA; editor of The Routledge Who's Who in 20th Century World Poetry), Dr Tiffany Atkinson (Aberystwyth University, author of Kink and Particle) and Tyler Keevil (Writer of the Year, Writers Inc of London).

    Please send 300-word abstracts to postgradconference@aber.ac.uk by no later than Friday March 4th. If you are interested in giving your presentation in Welsh, please indicate on the abstract. Notice of final decisions will be sent no later than Friday March 25th 2011.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 40105Theorizing Wikileaks: Destabilizing the HegemonPublic School NYCnaxalbelt@gmail.com1296311059americancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryrhetoric_and_compositiontheoryfull name / name of organization: Public School NYCcontact email: naxalbelt@gmail.com

    Wikileaks: Destabilizing Hegemonic Discourse

    "The notion of "heterology" refers to the ways in which the meaningful fabric of the sensible is disturbed: a spectacle does not fit within the sensible framework defined by a network of meanings, an expression does not find its place in the system of the visible coordinates where it appears. The dream of a suitable political work of art is in fact the dream of disrupting the relationship between the visible, the sayable and the thinkable without having to use the terms of a message or a vehicle. It is the dream of an art that would transmit meanings in the form of a rupture with the very logic of meaningful situations. As a matter of fact, political art cannot work in the simple form of a meaningful spectacle that would lead to an "awareness" of the state of the world. Suitable political art would have a double effect: the readability of a political signification and a sensible or perceptual shock caused, conversely, by the uncanny, that which resists signification."

    -Ranciere, The Politics of Aesthetics/The Distribution of the Sensible

    Julian Assange describes a "corrosive servility" that has come to infuse present day life and our resignation towards the established political order. Wikileaks fills a gaping chasm where civil society has failed: academia, media, constitutional law, representative democracy, the "intelligentsia," theory, protest culture. In Ranciere's terms, it has ruptured or "reconfigured the territory of the visible, the thinkable, and the sayable" in an arena in which the stakes could not be more fraught: the rhetoric, practice, and implementation of American global hegemony. It has whittled away the edifice upon which power takes for granted that it can operate; with comparatively minuscule resources it has found the chink in the armor through which it can untether a whole superstructure of acting, speaking and governing; it has imbued platitudes like "social justice" or a Mr. Smith Goes to Washington-like fantasy of populist democracy with an exhilaratingly unexpected palpable reality.

    How can we theorize Wikileaks, transparency activism, and leaking itself as speech? Austin's notion of the "speech act" is based on the notion of the "illocutionary act" in which language is not merely descriptive, but performs an action within a social context. Given this, is the "action" Wikileaks' speech performs a form of civil disobedience? Anarchic guerilla resistance? An art intervention? The Institute of Applied Autonomy describes, "Interventions change the behavior of a system in a way that the system is not prepared to deal with." Alex Villar says, "An art intervention is a diagonal force that bursts through a power field. It can cause a disruption, shaking up, a rearrangement of plateaus."

    Seeking a wide range of 10-25 minute presentations, papers, performances, debate arguments, interventions, art, etc. addressing Wikileaks at the Public School, a school-as-artist-project founded by Sean Dockray consisting of visual artists, performers, writers, thinkers, and theorists funded by Telic Arts Exchange. Please send 200-500 word proposal on Wikileaks with a brief bio (max 200 words) by February 11, 2011 to naxalbelt@gmail.com to be presented at the Public School's "Theorizing Wikileaks: Destabilizing the Hegemon" from March through May. Questions or comments contact naxalbelt@gmail.com. Also welcome are proposals opposed to stances stated here.

    For More Information:

    TELIC Arts Exchange: http://telic.info/the-public-school
    The New York Public School: http://nyc.thepublicschool.org/class/3128
    Naxal Belt: http://naxalbelt.blogspot.com

    Possible Wikileaks Issues:

    Wikileaks and Ranciere
    Wikileaks and Speech Act Theory
    Wikileaks Antagonistic and Symbiotic Relationship to Traditional Media
    Wikileaks as 'Direct Action'
    Wikileaks: The Second Skin, Alter-Ego, Bete Noire, and Cause Celebre of Traditional Media
    Reflections on Cold War and Execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg
    Drawing Parameters of Constitutionality and Criminality: First Amendment, Treason, and New Media
    Wikileaks as Radical Citizenship
    Diplomacy as Literature
    Information Guerilla War
    Anarchism, 'Propaganda of the Deed,' and Wikileaks

    "WikiLeaks cannot be seen in the same way. There has been, from the outset, something about its activities that goes way beyond liberal conceptions of the free flow of information. We shouldn't look for this excess at the level of content. [...] The real disturbance was at the level of appearances: we can no longer pretend we don't know what everyone knows we know. This is the paradox of public space: even if everyone knows an unpleasant fact, saying it in public changes everything."

    -Slavoj Zizek, London Review of Books

    "Indeed he (Assange) appears to have an enunciated philosophical/political position, which is basically that through mass breakthroughs of raw information the 'conspiracies' that governments routinely enact to protect the interests of a certain few will be undermined. He appears to be acting on the basis of a mathematical formula, worked out by him, whereby the conspiratorial cabals, which he conceives as relating to each other in terms of information exchanges via a pattern of networks, can be chopped up and incapacitated (through breakouts across established links) such that real parity in knowledge and power might, in theory at least, be enacted."
    -Alison Caddick, Arena Magazine

    cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryrhetoric_and_compositiontheory 40106The Basic Categories of Fantastic Literature Revisited - Lodz, Poland: 21-23 October 2012Department of Studies in Drama and Pre-1800 English Literature; University of Lodz, Polandlodz.fantastic.lit@gmail.com 1296313053childrens_literaturefilm_and_televisionmedievalrenaissancetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Department of Studies in Drama and Pre-1800 English Literature; University of Lodz, Polandcontact email: lodz.fantastic.lit@gmail.com

    The Basic Categories of Fantastic Literature Revisited

    21-23 October 2012

    It seems the time has come to revisit and reconsider the familiar, or perhaps not so familiar, terms and categories with the help of which such genres as fantasy, science fiction, Gothic, horror fiction, cyberpunk, and related ones, are being described. The names of those genres belong of course themselves to such problematic terms, which is also true of the very distinction between the so-called mainstream literature, and what might be called the ugly duckling of fantasy and science fiction that seems doomed to remain in this incurably immature condition and stands no chance of becoming a beautiful (and adult) swan. The categories that are meant here may include such general notions like "imagination", "the supernatural", "the sublime", or "the abject", whose validity goes far beyond the limits of fantastic literature, or they may be more directly relevant to the literature that is sometimes defined as based on 'cognitive estrangement', and sometimes as 'encounter with the other'. In particular, we may mention the famous Freudian definition of the uncanny, as something that is familiar and profoundly unfamiliar at the same time, producing an uncomfortable 'cognitive dissonance' particularly useful when discussing the time-honoured distinction between "terror Gothic" and "horror Gothic"; or Tzvetan Todorov's distinction between "the marvellous" and "the uncanny", leading to his conception of "the fantastic", which implies an unresolved, but artistically fruitful, conflict between the supernatural explanations of "the marvellous", and the natural ones of "the uncanny". Another striking aporia is the complex relationship between the words "science" and "fiction" which sit uncomfortably together in the term "science fiction", whereas the fans of fantastic literature include those who are fascinated with technological gadgets and "artificial intelligence", and those who follow J.R.R. Tolkien in his disgust with "the Robot Age", and who are therefore often branded as "reactionary" or "escapist". It might seem then that the "ugly duckling" of SF has spawned a number of "yet uglier ducklings", such as the post-Tolkienian "sword and sorcery". We would like to invite any contributions that, in one way or another, take part in a debate around the issues sketched above, and are prepared to consider the possibility that some of the above-mentioned terms and distinctions are already obsolete, or have never been particularly adequate, or need to be thoroughly revised in view of the recent developments in literature, or in the culture of which this literature is a part.
    The contributions in question need not be very theoretical, and may deal principally with individual works, but they should, in one way or another, touch upon the questions and categories delineated above. They may also concern film adaptations based on fantastic literature. The papers to be delivered at the conference are going to be selected on the basis of the titles and abstracts that we hope to receive.

    We suggest the following workshop list:

    • theoretical issues connected with fantastic literature
    • individual genres, such as: sword and sorcery, science-fiction, cyberpunk, horror
    • children's and young adults' literature
    • the appropriation of medieval and Renaissance themes in fantastic literature
    • science-fiction and fantasy as a political and ideological allegory
    • film adaptations of fantastic literature
    • participatory and convergence studies (cultural phenomena related to the field of the fantastic: fan communities, fan fiction, role-playing games, etc.).

    Please note that the list is open and we welcome all contributions related to the field of the fantastic.

    Submissions of topics and abstracts (300-400 words) should reach the organisers no later than December 31st, 2011.

    Conference fee:
    300 PLN (participants from Poland)
    100 EURO (participants from other EU countries)
    150 PLN (doctoral students and participants from non-EU countries)
    The fee includes conference materials, snack refreshments and publication costs (in the case of papers selected for publication after the conference). It does not include accommodation or meals. The language of the conference is English. The conference will be held in Lodz, Poland. Additional information about accommodation and plenary speakers will be included in subsequent circulars.

    Organising Committee:

    Professor Andrzej Wicher, Ph.D.

    Jacek Rozga, M.A.
    Anna Ruszczynska-Bujnowicz, M.A.
    Piotr Spyra, M.A.
    Anna Standowicz, M.A.
    Ewa Wisniewska, M.A.

    For submissions and enquiries please contact the organisers at:
    lodz.fantastic.lit@gmail.com

    For updated conference information please see:
    www.filolog.uni.lodz.pl/engdrama/fantastic

    cfp categories: childrens_literaturefilm_and_televisionmedievalrenaissancetwentieth_century_and_beyond 40107The Caterpillar Chronicles - Spring Issue - Call for SubmissionsThe Caterpillar Chronicleseditors@thecaterpillarchronicles.com1296317236interdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturefull name / name of organization: The Caterpillar Chroniclescontact email: editors@thecaterpillarchronicles.com

    We are currently accepting submissions for the Spring issue of our literary & arts magazine, which will be published on our website in April 2011.

    The deadline for these submissions is MARCH 25.

    Our second issue will not be themed, so we are open to many types of submissions. However, we are looking for specific types of texts and images for each section as detailed below.

    IMAGE & TEXT
    For the next issue, we have selected Andrew Abbott's painting "Killer Quaker" as a starting point for texts of fiction or poetry (please check our website to view the image). We accept submissions of poetry or short poetic fiction (~ 500 words) based on the proposed image.

    THE FIRST LINE
    We accept short stories (1500-2000 words) that begin with the following first line and continue in an appropriate tone and style. The quote selected for the next issue is:

    "He went into the living room, swinging the bottle like a dinner bell, turned on the television. He came slightly unstuck in time, saw the late movie backwards, then forwards again."
    (Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five)

    FEATURED ARTIST
    We are happy to publish artists' portfolios on any topics. Please include an artist's statement (~500 words) and a short biography (~ 200 words) along with the images.

    CRITICISM
    We are looking for critical theory texts of up to a maximum of 5.000 words that approach matters related to literature or the visual arts from an interdisciplinary perspective. Be inventive, divagate, suggest brand new topics and quote your sources properly. We accept submissions written in the MLA style (double-spaced; no footnotes, we prefer endnotes; properly formatted bibliography).

    REVIEWS
    We accept short reviews (~500 words) of books, films, music albums, plays, exhibitions, etc.

    EXQUISITE CORPSE
    Every issue, the contributors and editors of the magazine will put together a free exquisite corpse text built around the topic of the issue. We will all gain access to an online document where we will each drop a line and add to a composite text meant as an experimental exercise in collective creative writing.

    PHOTO-ESSAYS
    We are looking for submissions of images from artists who are able to put their photographs in a fictional context. A photo-essay should normally consist of a photographic narrative accompanied by a spontaneous text inspire by the images.

    IMAGINARY LETTERS
    We're interested in the art of letter-writing and we would love to read your letters (1500-2000 words) addressed to real or imaginary people, dead presidents, historical figures, fictional characters, inanimate objects, etc. Be as imaginative as possible and do attach photographs to your letters if you feel it adequate.

    THE ART OF LYING
    We'd love to publish your fictional auto/biographies in this section. We're interested in textual or visual auto/biographies that are preoccupied with proving their own historical accuracy, while being, in fact, fully manufactured realities.

    VIDEOS
    If you want to share your videos or short films with us, do send us a YouTube or Vimeo link to your work and an artist statement or a description of your submission (~500 words). The videos will be published on our website.

    Please submit your texts, images or videos to the following email address:
    submissions@thecaterpillarchronicles.com

    Also please check our website for more information:
    http://www.thecaterpillarchronicles.com/

    cfp categories: interdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culture 40108Authority, Sovereignty, Postcoloniality (MLA 2012, proposal deadline 3/10/11)Jini Kim Watson, New York Universityjkw1@nyu.edu1296331319postcolonialtheoryfull name / name of organization: Jini Kim Watson, New York Universitycontact email: jkw1@nyu.edu

    A proposed MLA special session on questions of the state and modes of authority and sovereignty within postcolonial studies. How do literary or theoretical works narrate or theorize alternative political modernities; how do we go beyond both the putative celebration of cultural difference (such as "Asian Values") and a reductive "failed states" discourse? Literary and theoretical/historical papers welcome; any field and area of postcolonial studies welcome.

    300 word abstracts and 1-page cv by 10 March 2011

    Jini Kim Watson
    English & Comparative Literature, New York University

    cfp categories: postcolonialtheory 40109Composing Spaces: An Interdisciplinary Graduate ConferenceUniversity of Cincinnati, Department of English & Comparative LiteratureComposingSpaces@gmail.com1296333427cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centurygender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromantictheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: University of Cincinnati, Department of English & Comparative Literaturecontact email: ComposingSpaces@gmail.com

    The purpose of this conference is to examine meanings of space in a time of cyberspace, non-space, third space, queer space, and other emerging formulations of space that challenge predominantly physical, material constructs. How do we understand our art, our craft, our work, our relationships, and ourselves in spaces that have been transformed in a digital age? To what extent do classic dichotomies such as city-rural, urban-suburban, and public-private hold up in contemporary life? As we create places in our reshaped settings and lives, what are viable ways to examine the meanings of space? We are interested in efforts at composing—creating, producing, mapping, arranging, writing, developing, shaping, designing—and in the various ways that space can be understood through these practices.

    With relevance to literature, composition, rhetoric, and cultural studies, the composition of space can be understood as a significant and unifying concept across (and beyond) English Studies. Respecting this diversity of research interests, we encourage projects of all kinds, including (but not limited to) pedagogical experiments and practices; explorations of academic or graduate life; theoretical, spatial, rhetorical, or critical readings of texts and places; and poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, or any hybrid thereof that addresses conference themes.

    We encourage presenters to experiment with the genre of their presentations. In addition to delivering a paper in the traditional manner, presenters should feel welcome to take advantage of multimodal delivery. Presentations might take the form of a PowerPoint project, a short film, an interactive discussion or workshop, some combination of these, or other possibilities.

    Proposals for individual and panel presentations might address the following issues/considerations:

      • How space is composed in literature/how literature composes spaces
      • Technology, cyberspace, and social networking
      • Postmodern and cultural geography
      • Spaces of resistance
      • The cultural significance of cities, rural areas, and frontiers
      • Map making and the mapping of meaning
      • Public space and counterpublics
      • Queer space
      • Theories of space, place, and non-space (freeways, malls, television, etc.)
      • Travel writing
      • Third space and cultural hybridity in postcolonialism
      • Public and private spheres, domesticity, and gender
      • Pedagogical uses of places and/or cyberspaces

    All proposals should include your name, presentation title, university affiliation, mailing address, e-mail address, phone number, details of any technology you may require, and the anticipated format of presentation (paper, multimodal, interactive, etc.). Additionally:

      • Individual critical proposals should include a 300 word abstract.
      • Panel proposals should include a 300 word abstract for each individual presentation (3 to 4), and a 300 word abstract for the panel as a whole.
      • Creative submissions should include the full text of a work suitable for a 20-minute reading.

    Proposals should be submitted electronically in .doc or .rtf format by Friday, March 18, to ComposingSpaces@gmail.com. Please send inquiries to the same address.


    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centurygender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromantictheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 40110"East/West Cultural Passage Annual Conference: Contact Zones in the Global World", Sibiu, Romania, 6-7 May 2011Lucian Blaga University, Sibiu, RomaniaAnca Iancu <ancaian@yahoo.com>; Ana Blanca Ciocoi-Pop <ana_blanca1006@yahoo.com>1296333762african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespostcolonialtheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Lucian Blaga University, Sibiu, Romaniacontact email: Anca Iancu <ancaian@yahoo.com>; Ana Blanca Ciocoi-Pop <ana_blanca1006@yahoo.com>

    The Department of British and American Studies at Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu and the C. Peter Magrath Research Center for Cross-Cultural Studies invite you to the CONTACT ZONES IN THE GLOBAL WORLD international conference, to be held in Sibiu.

    Keynote Speech: "Planetary Novels?: Cosmopolitanism and Globality in and out of a national literature," by Peter Childs, University of Gloucestershire.

    In the changing social, political, economic, and cultural global landscape, such terms as the national, the international, cosmopolitanism, globalization, and otherness, to name only a few, need to be constantly reinvented, redefined, reinterpreted, and reorganized. In this context, Ulrich Beck's unpicking of globalization and cosmopolitanism clarifies the implications of "the pluralization of borders" and "globalization from within." The latter concept, a synonym for the "cosmopolitanization of nation-state societies" (Beck 2002: 18), stands for the "dissonance in drawing of borderlines," as "borders are no longer predeterminate, they can be chosen (and interpreted), but simultaneously also have to be redrawn and legitimated anew" (Beck 2002: 19). As a result, "when cultural, political, economic and legal borders are no longer congruent, contradictions open up between the various principles of exclusion" (Beck 2002: 19).

    The spaces where identities are negotiated, fraught as they are with these social, economic, political, religious, and cultural conflicts/contradictions, are also culturally fertile contact zones.

    We invite you to explore these contact zones from theoretical and/or text-based interdisciplinary perspectives in individual presentations, panels, and/or workshops.

    Topics might include (but are not limited to):

    ▪ global perceptions in literature, language, art, and popular culture
    ▪ interdisciplinary perspectives on history, politics, anthropology, and religion
    ▪ the global impact of media and technology on education and sociology
    ▪ changing perspectives on global migration and cultural identity

    Presentations should be 20 minutes long, allowing for 10 minutes of discussion. Please send an abstract (no more than 200 words), a list of 5-7 keywords, and a short biographical note in word format. Proposals should include titles of papers/ panels, name and institutional affiliation, mailing address, phone, fax, and e-mail address.

    A selection of the papers presented will be published in East/West Cultural Passage.

    Deadline for submission of proposals: 1 March 2011

    Conference venue:

    Lucian Blaga University, Sibiu
    Faculty of Letters and Arts
    Department of British and American Studies
    5-7 Victoriei Bvd.
    Sibiu, 550024
    Romania

    Participation/Conference fee: 40 Euros (to be paid upon arrival).

    (The participation/conference fee covers coffee-breaks, lunches and conference portfolios.)

    We look forward to welcoming you in Sibiu!

    cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespostcolonialtheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 40111Hitchcock's Lesser Hollywood Films - Nov 5-6, 2011 (Abstracts due Mar 20)PAMLA (Pacific Ancient/Modern Languages Association)ahowe@lasierra.edu1296333897americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitypopular_culturefull name / name of organization: PAMLA (Pacific Ancient/Modern Languages Association)contact email: ahowe@lasierra.edu

    Alfred Hitchcock has been the focus of intense critical scrutiny; however, this focus has, to a large extent, anointed a select group of films (Vertigo, North by Northwest, Psycho, etc). This panel will explore some of the lesser-known Hitchcock films from his Hollywood period. Abstracts via email attachment due by March 20; PAMLA meetings to be held in Claremont, California (Scripps College), on November 5 & 6, 2011.

    cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitypopular_culture 40112SCMLA Technical Writing session (Proposals 3/28/11, Conference 10/27-29/11)South Central Modern Language Associationsuanna.davis@hccs.edu1296337984humanities_computing_and_the_internetprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_compositionfull name / name of organization: South Central Modern Language Associationcontact email: suanna.davis@hccs.edu

    Deadline: March 28, 2011

    The topic is open. We are, however, particularly interested in presentations that address the integration of new media into the technical writing classroom.

    Submissions from newer scholars are welcome.

    Please email 500-word abstracts to Dr. Suanna H. Davis at suanna.davis@hccs.edu before March 28, 2011.

    The 2011 SCMLA conference will take place in Hot Springs, Arkansas October 27-29, 2011.

    cfp categories: humanities_computing_and_the_internetprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_composition 40113Critical Code Studies: Reading Digital ObjectsMark C Marinomarkcmarino at gmail dot com1296363733humanities_computing_and_the_internetscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Mark C Marinocontact email: markcmarino at gmail dot com

    2012 Modern Language Association Conference in Seattle (Jan. 5-8)
    Send 250-word abstracts and a brief bio. by 15 March 2011 to mark c marino at gmail)

    Critical Code Studies applies hermeneutics to the interpretation of computer source code. This special session seeks papers that perform readings of digital objects with an emphasis on source code and related issues. At MLA 2011, CCS played a central role in the panel "Close Reading the Digital." This panel will build on that discussion as well as the recent developments and conversations online (see below).

    For more information on Critical Code Studies, see

    cfp categories: humanities_computing_and_the_internetscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 40114Call for papers - Dance and Film Conference 14-16 October 2011European Association of Dance Historians/Film Studies at London Metropolitan Universityeadhconference@gmail.com1296384107film_and_televisioninterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesfull name / name of organization: European Association of Dance Historians/Film Studies at London Metropolitan Universitycontact email: eadhconference@gmail.com

    NOT JUST FRED AND GINGER:
    CAMARADERIE, COLLUSION AND COLLISIONS BETWEEN DANCE AND FILM

    The Annual Conference of the European Association of Dance Historians in collaboration with Film Studies at London Metropolitan University.

    14-16 October 2011
    London, United Kingdom

    The relationship between dance and film has produced some of the most respected and popular stars, directors, films and genres in screen history. At the same time, these well-established links have frequently revealed essential tensions between two distinct art forms and their often contrasting approaches and perspectives. The aim of the conference is to investigate the histories, processes, techniques, values and discourses inherent in the complex interactions between dance and film and to cast a renewed historical, critical and analytical light on the same.

    Proposals for both individual twenty-minute papers and panels of three speakers are invited on any topic related to dance and film, including but not limited to the following:

    • Choreography and film
    • Film and dance history
    • Dance as cinematic narrative
    • Cinema as choreographic narrative
    • Transnational exchanges between dance and cinema
    • Music, dance and film
    • Genre boundaries and transgressions
    • The dancing body on film
    • Dance stars on and of the screen
    • Representations of national identity
    • Images of gender and sexuality
    • Ethnic and racial interventions
    • Directors of the film musical

    Deadline for the submissions of proposals: Friday, 29 April 2011. Presenters will be notified of acceptance by Monday, 16 May 2011.
    Please e-mail a proposal of no more than 300 words in either MsWord or PDF format to the conference organisers Dr Giannandrea Poesio, Principal Lecturer and Media/Performance Coordinator, London Metropolitan University, and Dr Karen McNally, Senior Lecturer and Course Leader, Film Studies, London Metropolitan University at eadhconference@gmail.com
    Contact/affiliation details for each presenter must be provided on a separate sheet, to ensure blind reading.

    cfp categories: film_and_televisioninterdisciplinaryinternational_conferences 40115[Update] American Identities on Stage: 20th Century American Drama International ConferenceUniversity of East Anglia, School of American Studiesf.costa@uea.ac.uk1296398649african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturetheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: University of East Anglia, School of American Studiescontact email: f.costa@uea.ac.uk

    Celebrating 100 Years of Tennessee Williams (1911-2011)

    Location: School of American Studies, University of East Anglia, Norwich, U.K. (Arts 2, Room 3.26/3.27)
    Date: Saturday, 26 Mar 2011
    Keynote Speaker: Professor Stephen Bottoms, Wole Soyinka Professor of Drama and Theatre Studies at the University of Leeds Leeds, U.K.
    Organisers: Dr Nick Selby and Mr Francisco Costa
    Institution: University of East Anglia

    American Identities on Stage:
    20th Century American Drama International Postgraduate Conference

    To commemorate the Tennessee Williams' centennial, the School of American Studies at the University of East Anglia will host a one-day international conference on 26 March 2011 (the actual centenary of Williams' birth), focusing on theatrical representations of American identities, with the support of the British Association for American Studies. The keynote will be Professor Stephen Bottoms, Wole Soyinka Professor of Drama and Theatre Studies at the University of Leeds, Leeds, U.K..

    Stressing the importance of Tennessee Williams as a key playwright of 20th century American literature, the conference will be an international point of intersection for all those interested in Williams' work and 20th century American drama in general. The call for papers invited individual talks or collective panel discussions on a number of related themes including identity authenticity, representation, construction, and performativity; private versus public identity; notions of the "other"; dissidence; selfhood; identity now and then; aspects of/informing identity, such as age, class, culture, gender, politics, race, religion, and sexuality; and contesting/subverting prescribed identity constructions.

    The conference will commence with a plenary speech, followed by the different panels which include paper presentations by postgraduate students from Germany, Poland, France, Iran and the U.K, and will conclude with a round-table discussion, which will consider themes arising from the day, with the participation of Professor Stephen Bottoms, Wole Soyinka Professor of Drama and Theatre Studies at the University of Leeds Leeds, U.K., and Prof. Dr. Johan Callens, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.

    This is currently the only conference in the U.K. celebrating the Williams Centenary, and as such it will have significant importance for postgraduates working on Williams and also those whose work focuses on American Drama and Theatre Studies more generally. For more information on the conference, please visit http://100yearsoftennesseewilliams.wordpress.com or http://www.uea.ac.uk/ams/eventsnews/amsevents/tenwilliamsconf .

    cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturetheatretwentieth_century_and_beyond 40116[UPDATE] Counterfeiting or Teaching? Using English Renaissance Poetry to Teach Non-Literary Skills [SAMLA, Atlanta, Nov. 4-6]Daniel Mills, Southeastern Renaissance Conference engsdm@langate.gsu.edu1296411457poetryprofessional_topicsrenaissancefull name / name of organization: Daniel Mills, Southeastern Renaissance Conference contact email: engsdm@langate.gsu.edu

    "Counterfeiting or Teaching? Using English Renaissance Poetry to Teach Non-Literary Skills"

    Sir Philip Sidney wrote that poetry "is an art of imitation; for so Aristotle termeth it in the word [Greek text]; that is to say, a representing, counterfeiting, or figuring forth: to speak metaphorically, a speaking picture, with this end, to teach and delight." With the humanities under siege and humanities faculty being asked to justify their role in higher education, how might we rethink teaching English Renaissance poetry to make it more relevant to the 21st century college student? For instance, what approaches to teaching poetry can we use to teach the ever-elusive critical thinking? Can we still allow poetry to delight while we teach more marketable skills?

    Possible topics may include:
    How to use poetry to teach critical thinking
    How to use poetry to teach ethics
    How to use poetry to teach reading skills
    How to use poetry to teach writing

    Please send abstracts of no more than 500 words to Dan Mills at engsdm@langate.gsu.edu by May 1, 2011.

    cfp categories: poetryprofessional_topicsrenaissance 40117[UPDATE] Renaissance Verse [SAMLA, Atlanta, Nov. 4-6] Lynne M. Simpson, Southeastern Renaissance Conference lsimpson@presby.edu1296411694poetryrenaissancefull name / name of organization: Lynne M. Simpson, Southeastern Renaissance Conference contact email: lsimpson@presby.edu

    Renaissance Verse

    Sir Philip Sidney wrote that poetry "is an art of imitation; for so Aristotle termeth it in the word [Greek text]; that is to say, a representing, counterfeiting, or figuring forth: to speak metaphorically, a speaking picture, with this end, to teach and delight." What, then does poetry teach us? How does it continue to delight us? This panel seeks papers that explore or even celebrate the triumph of poetry in English during the 16th and 17th centuries. From sonnets to soliloquies, how do Early Modern poets and playwrights utilize verse? Please send abstracts of no more than 500 words to Lynne Simpson at lsimpson@presby.edu by May 1.

    cfp categories: poetryrenaissance 40118Words on Words and Dictionaries - Special Issue of Revista Alicantina de Estudios Ingleses (Deadline: 20th May 2011)Department of English, University of AlicanteRAEI@ua.es1296412752americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsjournals_and_collections_of_essaysfull name / name of organization: Department of English, University of Alicantecontact email: RAEI@ua.es

    Words on Words and Dictionaries

    Special Issue of Revista Alicantina de Estudios Ingleses

    ○ Important dates

    * Submission of manuscripts for peer review: 20th May 2011
    * Final submission of accepted manuscripts: 15th October 2011
    * Publication expected: December 2011

    Revista Alicantina de Estudios Ingleses (RAEI) is an international journal of English Studies published annually since 1988 by the University of Alicante, Spain. The journal is indexed in Linguistic Bibliography (BL), Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts (LLBA), Modern Language Association (MLA), Periodical Index Online (PIO), Linguistics Abstracts Online (LAO) and Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades (ISOC).

    RAEI is currently preparing a special issue entitled Words on Words and Dictionaries, edited by Dr Antonio Lillo from the University of Alicante. The editor would like to invite scholars who are doing research in the fields of lexicology and lexicography to participate in this volume, which is due out in December 2011.

    ○ Scope

    Any applied and theoretical approaches to the study of English lexis, word meaning and dictionaries are welcome (historical linguistics, cognitive linguistics, corpus linguistics, sociolinguistics, pragmatics, dialectology, contrastive linguistics, etc.). Contributions should deal with aspects of English lexicology and lexicography, but articles dealing with the study of lexis in other languages will also be welcome, provided that they are written in English.

    The scope of Words on Words and Dictionaries includes, but is not limited to:

    ▪ Lexicology and lexical semantics
    ▪ Word-formation, phraseology and collocation
    ▪ Etymology
    ▪ Lexical variation and change
    ▪ Computational lexicology and lexicography
    ▪ Historical lexicology and lexicography
    ▪ Theory and methods of dictionary-making
    ▪ Dictionary use

    The editor hopes this special issue will serve as a useful reference and will stimulate further research into lexicology and lexicography.

    ○ Submissions

    Manuscripts should be written in English, not exceed 12,000 words, and be submitted by 20th May 2011.

    Submissions should be original, unpublished work and not under consideration for publication elsewhere.

    All submissions should conform to the general RAEI guidelines, which may be accessed at

    http://www.ua.es/dpto/dfing/publicaciones/instructions.html

    The editor will select the most relevant articles for inclusion in the volume. He will also notify authors on the suitability of their submission once the reviewers' reports are received. Articles provisionally accepted for publication may be returned to the author(s) for additions, clarifications or alterations, in response to suggestions by the editor and reviewers, prior to final acceptance.

    Manuscripts should be submitted in hard copy form (2 copies) to the address below by 20th May 2011.

    Antonio Lillo
    Revista Alicantina de Estudios Ingleses
    Universidad de Alicante
    Depto. de Filologia Inglesa
    Ap. de correos 99
    E-03080, Alicante (Spain)

    For any other queries regarding this special issue, please contact the editor at RAEI@ua.es

    cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsjournals_and_collections_of_essays 40119Sirens (women in fantasy) - 10/6/2011-10/7/2011 - 5/7/2011Hallie Tibbetts / Narrate Conferencesprogramming at sirensconference.org1296422600americanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarymedievalpopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissancetwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Hallie Tibbetts / Narrate Conferencescontact email: programming at sirensconference.org



    CALL FOR PROPOSALS: Sirens
    Vail, Colorado
    October 6–9, 2011
    A conference on women in fantasy literature presented by Narrate Conferences, Inc.

    Sirens, a conference focused on literary contributions by women to the fantasy genre and on fantasy works with prominent female characters, will take place October 6–9, 2011, in Vail, Colorado. The conference seeks papers, panels, interactive workshops, roundtable discussions, and other presentations suitable for an audience of academics, professionals, educators, librarians, authors, and fantasy readers.

    The theme for 2011 is "monsters," and presenters are invited to explore what it means to be "monstrous." Programming prompted by the theme is encouraged; presenters are not limited to this theme, however, and proposals that address specific aspects of a work or series, works related by other themes, and studies of the fantasy genre across all disciplines are encouraged as well. A non-exhaustive list of sample topics includes literary analyses of novels; studies of genre history; use of fantasy works in schools and libraries for education; examination of related business and legal issues; media and fan studies; craft-based workshops in writing, art, and publishing; and overviews of how fantasy works fit into larger contexts.

    Presentation submission to the vetting board is by online system only. No other format or contact will be considered. The online submission system is located at http://www.sirensconference.org/submissions/.

    The deadline for proposals is May 7, 2011, and notices regarding proposals will be sent no later than June 1, 2011. Those requiring an early decision in order to obtain travel funding should contact the programming coordinator at (programming at sirensconference.org).

    At the time of proposal submission, presenters must provide an abstract of 300-500 words, a 50-100 word presentation summary for publication, and a presenter biography of no more than 100 words. Those wishing to submit a proposal for an interactive roundtable discussion may submit a brief explanation of a topic and a list of 10-15 sample discussion questions in lieu of a formal abstract; workshop proposals may be formatted as lesson plans. Afternoon classes—interactive demonstrations of interest to fantasy readers that may be less formally related to the theme—may also be presented as lesson plans. Presenters must be available to attend the conference in its entirety; no partial or day registrations will be offered.

    Conference papers will be collected for publication at a later date. Presenters must be registered for the conference no later than June 30, 2011. For more information about programming, the review process, suggested timing and structure of presentations, audio-visual availability, and proposal submissions, please see the Sirens website at http://www.sirensconference.org/programming/. Questions specifically about programming may be directed to (programming at sirensconference.org), and general conference inquiries may be sent to (help at sirensconference.org).

    Sirens is a presentation of Narrate Conferences, Inc., a 501(c)(3) charitable organization with the mission of organizing academic, literary, and exploratory educational conferences that address themes of interest to scholars, educators, students, professionals, and readers. For inquiries about Narrate Conferences, Inc., please write to (info at narrateconferences.org).

    cfp categories: americanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarymedievalpopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissancetwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian