[UPDATE] (dis)junctions2011: En route to a Nueva Movida

full name / name of organization: 
Graduate Department of English, University of California, Riverside
contact email: 
disjunctions2011@gmail.com

Here are a few additional topic-specific panels for our event scheduled for April 1-2, 2011. The deadline for submissions is February 18, 2011.

Early Modern Movements and Spaces
The early modern period is generally thought of as an age of great energy and cultural transformation; in keeping with this year's conference theme, we are especially interested in papers that explore some aspect of early modern culture or literature with regard to the function of, and challenges to, hierarchies; narratives of discovery and colonization; the role of the family and the family versus the nation; and questions of difference and identity. These are only suggested topics; submissions on any aspect of early modern literature or culture will be considered. Please send 100-200 word abstracts to disjunctions2011@gmail.com by February 18, 2011.

Folklore and Mythologies
In keeping with this year's conference theme, our title references the plurality of mythologies, emphasizing a multiplicity of voices and narratives. For this panel, we are interested in papers exploring any aspects of folklore and myth studies, but especially those that examine the function and rhetoric of storytelling: what stories become naturalized or institutionalized? Can mythic narratives be read as sites of resistance or strategic intervention, or as expressions of dominant ideologies? We will consider papers on any related topics, from Easter Island statues to the Welsh Robin Hood tradition. Please send 100-200 word abstracts to disjunctions2011@gmail.com by February 18, 2011.

The Middle Ages/Medievalism
For this panel, we are seeking not only papers dealing with medieval texts, but also papers examining how "the medieval" functions in the world today. How are medieval narratives produced, disseminated, codified, and reimagined, both in the Middle Ages and today? How are medieval narratives, characters, and tropes used as sites of resistance, or expressions of dominant cultural ideologies, both in the historical Middle Ages and the present day? What does it mean to talk about "the" Middle Ages? These are only starting points; papers on all aspects of the medieval or modern medievalisms are welcome. Please send 100-200 word abstracts to disjunctions2011@gmail.com by February 18, 2011.

Creative Writing
For (dis)junctions 2011, the general CFP calls for papers that “explore the ways in which oppression, violence, and asymmetrical hierarchies of power are invisibilized and covered over in our particular historical moment.” This panel is calling for Creative Writing submissions that question, subvert, highlight, or antagonize American discourses of change and intolerance. This call can be broadly construed as asking for Creative Writing pieces that take up the problematic hegemonies within American culture. This panel welcomes short stories, poems, chapter readings of longer novels, fiction and non-fiction, screenplay excerpts, or any other writing considered creative. Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words to disjunctions2011@gmail.com by February 18, 2011.

Borders
Contributors are invited to submit critical works on the topic of the border, intended both as a point of encounter for different geographies, cultures, and languages, but also as a site of violence and/or containment. Potential topics may include:

Black/White Racial Binarism
Geographical borders
Linguistic borders
Cultural issues
Identity
Gender
Colonization
Race, "the color line"
Cosmopolitanism
Globalization
Class, Social structures
Abstracts of 250-300 words should be e-mailed to disjunctions2011@gmail.com by February 18, 2011.
Empire
Contributors are invited to submit critical works that examine the conjunctions/disjunctions between enactments and perceptions of empire from antiquity to the present. Participants are not limited to issues concerning national empires but are welcome to examine those of media, corporate, and technological empires as well. Potential topics include:
Diasporas and migrations: geographic, cultural, ideological, rhetorical, technological, or other
Reverse colonization: of place, media, or technologies
Imperial borders and language: dominance, discrimination, acculturation, assimilation
Media empires, rebellions, and collaborations
Home: migration, place, and identity
Constructing/constricting identities
Theories of empire: political, historical, erotic, and aesthetic
Networks of resistance: feminist, ecological, ethnic, technological, etc.
Dialectism and resistance: black English, red English, Chicanismo, and linguistic minorities
Gender and migration, diasporas, and/or networks
Cosmopolitanism: world culture vs. local identity
Abstracts of 250-300 words should be emailed to disjunctions2011@gmail.com by February 18, 2011.

Pedagogy as Resistance
In 2000, Piya Chatterjee wrote that “pedagogy becomes a medium though which…larger scripts are translated into the microcosm of classroom cultures.” This panel invites critical works, testimony, and theory to consider the ways in which dominant ideologies might be successfully problematized and subverted in the college classroom setting. Panel topics might include, but are by no means limited to, the following:
The “gaze”
Emotion and Affect
Racialized, Gendered, and Sexualized Subjectities in the Classroom
Feminist Pedagogical Practice

Violence
Contributors are invited to submit critical works on the effects of violence in narratives. Papers may examine any aspect of violence, including specific texts and/or critical and cultural frameworks for such texts. What sort of cultural and individual capacities for violent events are articulated in our current cultural moment? How do cultural understandings of violence affect understandings of self? How do violence narratives influence and change notions of gender, sex, family, and reproduction? Other potential topics may include:
participation
witnessing
giving testimony
violence and gender
confessions
community
domestic violence
child abuse
war narratives
torture
psychological violence
social displacement
fictional and non-fictional narratives of violence
violence narratives and postmodernism
Abstracts of 250-300 words should be emailed to disjunctions2011@gmail.com by February 18, 2011.

Children’s Literature
Contributors are invited to submit critical works on any aspect of children’s literature. Papers may examine specific texts, authors, and/or analyses of necessary critical interventions. Abstracts of 250-300 words should be emailed to disjunctions2011 by February 18, 2011.

Urban Space and Chicana/o Literature
This panel focuses on the interaction between Latinas/os and urban space in literature. Possible topics may include:
Los Angeles or other major Chicana/Latina cities
Freeways
Public transportation
The Barrio
Immigration/Immigration Reform
Abstracts of 250-300 words should be e-mailed to disjunctions2011@gmail.com by February 18, 2011.

Toni Morrison
This panel welcomes submissions focusing upon any aspect of Toni Morrison’s creative and critical canon. Potential paper topics might include:

The power of Playing in the Dark
The Native presence/absence in Beloved
A Mercy as pre-text?
Violence, Trauma, and Witnessing
Morrison and Contemporary Black Feminist Thought
Self-Hatred and The Bluest Eye
Recitatif as Pedagogy
Please email abstracts of no more than 300 words to disjunctions2011@gmail.com by February 18, 2011.

Social Networking and Blogging
Our panel invites submissions on social networking sites and blogging which intersect with the overall conference theme. That is, how do such venues help or prevent the ushering in of a “nueva movida”? Potential topics may include:
Facebook
MySpace
Twitter
The relationship between social networking and pedagogy
Blogging and critical autobiography theory
Blogging, political empowerment, and cultural capital
Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words to disjunctions2011@gmail.com by February 18, 2011.

Insurgencies and Counter-movements
This panel seeks to feature presentations that engage the history, theory, and/or praxis of insurgencies, counter-movements, and other collective, subversive responses to oppression within existing power structures. How do people organize to develop distinct methods of effectively resisting institutional oppression (e.g., human rights violations, censorship, denial of access to resources, forced assimilation, etc.)? Why are some methods of insurgency deemed requisite while others are vilified, for example as utilizing unnecessary force? How is retaliation from the existing power structure avoided or combated, and at what cost to the movement or the society at large? Does the success of an insurgency or counter-movement mean the overthrown regime has to be replaced, destroyed, or altered? Are international actors obliged to recognize the competing claims to power? What is the value of passive recognition on the part of outsiders? Or, if recognition is active, what delineates the boundary between assistance and exploitation or imperialism? What is at stake for the academic engagement of these issues; i.e., how can we discuss the motivation of insurgency without evaluating it in terms of its instrumentality to the academic subject’s own biases? The panel welcomes papers on topics from any discipline, historical period, or geographical location.
Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words to disjunctions2011@gmail.com by February 18, 2011.

Is Another University Really Possible?
Influenced by the activism across the UC campuses 4 March 2010, this call seeks papers (or other formats) that offer thought provoking dialogue regarding real possibilities for another university. Papers may respond to issues such as racism, sexism, paternalism, gender equality, racial relevance, or economic stratification in the university setting. This call seeks papers that engage and question the core missions of the university system and invites a variety of disciplinary (or anti-disciplinary) engagement with the topic.
Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words to disjunctions2011@gmail.com by February 18, 2011.

(Dis)sident Poetics
This panel is seeking papers that consider dissident poetics in contemporary literature. In crafting a dissident poetics, many contemporary authors (such as those associated with movements such as Language Poetry and Spoken Word) have sought to problematize canonical texts and aesthetics. In that light, the very nature of form and presentation are often deployed such that they function in and of themselves as critical of normative structures such as language, culture, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, citizenship and the nation state, etc. A central issue for this panel is to explore ways that (aside from or in addition to content) form, poetics, and language itself, stage interventions and productive dissent in contemporary literature and literary discourse.

Sample paper topics for this panel could include presentations on Theresa Hak Kyung Cha’s experiments with the politics of form, Lyn Hejinian’s explorations into the relationships between gender, subject, and author, Junot Díaz’ rollicking use of Spanglish to complicate and refine notions of “the American,” Kathy Acker’s radical reworking of novelistic form, or ways that the often overt politics of Spoken Word poets/poetry becomes an aesthetic in its own right, both within/against canonical poetry and as a mode of socio-cultural critique. Of course, there are many more authors and texts (often, but not necessarily, associated with postmodern literature or experimental writing) that could prove fertile ground for these explorations.

Please forward submissions to disjunctions2011@gmail.com by February 18, 2011.

Power and dissidence in science-fiction, fantasy, and horror
For (dis)junctions 2011, we are seeking papers that explore how science-fiction, fantasy, and horror (in literature, film, or other media) address and illuminate structures of power and authority, and resistance to those structures. Possible topics include, but are not limited to: the impact of technology on power structures; fantastic depictions of race, gender, and sexuality; "new worlds" and colonialism; and magic as power. We also welcome papers on any other topics relating to science-fiction, fantasy, and horror.

Abstracts (250-300 words) may be emailed to disjunctions2011@gmail.com by February 18th. Please note any A/V needs you may have at that time. We can obtain VCRs, DVDs, and projectors for laptops. Less standard equipment is possible (although not guaranteed) upon request.

Visions of power and dissidence in comics and animation
For (dis)junctions 2011, we are seeking papers that explore how comics and animation address and illuminate structures of power and authority, and resistance to those structures. Possible topics include, but are not limited to: superheroes as representations of power or dissidence; superheroes in relation to law or nationalism; visual representations of power or dissidence; depictions of race, gender, and sexuality in comics and animation; and comics as a dissident art form. We also welcome papers on any other topics relating to comics and animation.

Abstracts (250-300 words) may be emailed to Disjunctions2011@gmail.com by February 18th. Please note any A/V needs you may have at that time. We can obtain VCRs, DVDs, and projectors for laptops. Less standard equipment is possible (although not guaranteed) upon request.

Power and dissidence in games and cyber-culture
For (dis)junctions 2011, we are seeking papers that explore how videogames, role-playing games, MMORPG's, and cyber-culture address and illuminate structures of power and authority, and resistance to those structures. Possible topics include, but are not limited to: depictions of race, gender, and sexuality in games and cyber-culture; militaristic or colonialist discourses in games; how cyber-culture destabilizes or recreates existing systems of control or division; and identity and anonymity on the internet. We also welcome papers on any other topics relating to games and cyber-culture.

Abstracts (250-300 words) may be emailed to Disjunctions2011@gmail.com by February 18th. Please note any A/V needs you may have at that time. We can obtain VCRs, DVDs, and projectors for laptops. Less standard equipment is possible (although not guaranteed) upon request.

Mestiz@ Rhetoric In the Composition Classroom: Classroom Experiences with Non-Traditional Texts and Invention from “Different Ways of Knowing”
Taking cues from the critical race composition theory of Katherine Pendegrast and Keith Gilyard (Race, Rhetoric, and Composition), and centering the recent work of Damian Baca (Mestiz@ Scripts, Digital Migrations and the Territories of Writing), namely his concept of Mestiz@ Rhetoric, this panel calls for graduate papers and studies on Chicano/a (Movement) Literature, Gloria Anzaldua’s mestiza consciousness, Tucson’s Raza Studies program, mestiz@ rhetoric, and/or classroom experiences that challenges traditional composition instruction by recognizing “other ways of knowing.” Mestiz@ rhetoric, according to Baca, resists a Eurocentric loyalty to Greek and European rhetoric, and opts for a “co-evolutionary approach” that recognizes pre-Columbian, indigenous and mestizo rhetorical traditions in the borderlands. This panel aims to take up a discussion around Anzaldua’s mestiza consciousness, ‘double consciousness’, critical race theory in the classroom, the call to “re-write a dominant narrative of assimilation,” and Baca’s premise that mestiz@ rhetorics are rich and rooted in “different ways of knowing.”

Please forward submissions to disjunctions2011@gmail.com by February 18, 2011.

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN:
Contributors are welcome to submit papers investigating any aspect of the music, philosophy, or career of Bruce Springsteen. Creative and performance pieces inspired by or in response to Springsteen’s music will also be considered. In keeping with this year’s conference theme, submissions of particular interest might deal with issues of violence and call-to-action in Springsteen’s oeuvre, although all Springsteen-related submissions are welcome. Possible topics include:
Crises of masculinity in Springsteen’s music
Social activism and Springsteen’s music
Springsteen’s philosophy of love
Cars and driving in Springsteen’s music
Nebraska and criminality
Born to Run and movement / freedom
“Born in the USA” and the Vietnam War / veterans’ issues
“My Hometown” and crises of place / identity
“Glory Days” and the passage of time
“Streets of Philadelphia” and the AIDS epidemic
The Ghost of Tom Joad and immigration issues
The Rising and Post-9/11 America

Abstracts of 250-300 words should be emailed to disjunctions2011@gmail.com by February 18, 2011. Please indicate any A/V needs.

MAD MEN:
Contributors are welcome to submit papers investigating the popular AMC television show Mad Men. In keeping with this year’s conference theme, submissions of particular interest might deal with issues of violence, oppression, disintegration, and omission in the lives of the characters or in the cultural milieu of the show’s 1960s setting. Possible topics include:
Fractured identities and the multiple lives of Don Draper
Betty Draper and female sexuality
The show’s depiction of race/gender/sexuality
Pregnancy as crisis
Advertising and the moral violence of American Capitalism
Mad Men and the changing face of the American workplace
The Cuban Missile Crisis / JFK Assassination and collective response to (inter)national trauma
Mad Men and Frank O’Hara’s “Meditations in an Emergency”
Cultural nostalgia and Mad Men’s popularity today

Abstracts of 250-300 words should be emailed to disjunctions2011@gmail.com by February 18, 2011. Please indicate any A/V needs.

COSMOPOLITANISM:
Contributors are welcome to submit papers examining cosmopolitanism, cosmopolitan theory, cosmopolitanism in literature, cosmopolitan ethics, etc. Possible topics include:
The roots / routes of cosmopolitanism
Contemporary cosmopolitan thought
Cosmopolitanism and government
Cosmopolitanism and the environment
Cosmopolitanism and the global economy
Cosmopolitanism in a particular literary piece / genre / period
Cosmopolitanism en route to a Nueva Movida

Abstracts of 250-300 words should be emailed to disjunctions2011@gmail.com by February 18, 2011. Please indicate any A/V needs.

Spiritual Double Entendre: The Language of (dis)sidence in Religious Communities
How is religion used as a language to express humans innermost hopes, fears, and desires? This call is seeking papers that interrogate religious communities as spaces for the articulation of possibilities of dissidence, disjunction, and dissemblance in their contemporary societies. It is open to a variety of religious expression across spatial and geographic boundaries.

Abstracts (250-300 words) may be emailed to Disjunctions2011@gmail.com by February 18, 2011. Please note any A/V needs you may have at that time. We can obtain VCRs, DVDs, and projectors for laptops. Less standard equipment is possible (although not guaranteed) upon request.

cfp categories: 
graduate_conferences
interdisciplinary