Edited collection on contemporary African American satire in all media

full name / name of organization: 
Derek C. Maus and James J. Donahue
contact email: 

Patrice Evans, who blogs under the moniker "The Assimilated Negro," published an online essay on the ebonyjet.com website late in 2007 that lamented the seeming lack of satire in mainstream black culture:

[W]hy does it seem like black people are missing the boat -- treating the SS Satire like a slave ship? Sometimes it feels we only get the joke if it's the lowest common denominator, otherwise we have to put on our suits and let Oprah or Tyler Perry hold our hands and make sure there's a heavy Maya Angelou level of respect.[…] Where are the black branded satirists? Maybe we don't get it. Maybe we don't care to get it. Are there no satirists because of the lack of demand? It can't be for lack of opportunity. Every week we get a new race-event begging for lampooning: Watson, Jena 6, OJ, Imus, Michael Richards, Vick .... all present unique opportunities to make a joke that might mean a little more to someone with melanin.

Evans goes on to engage in some "speculative armchair psychology" and wonder openly if what he calls the "critical", "literary", and "detached" elements of satire are not barriers to African Americans' participation in this mode of cultural commentary. Not surprisingly, Evans's article garnered numerous online responses, both in its original form and in numerous repostings around the Internet. We seek to assemble a collection of scholarly essays about satire in contemporary African American culture in order to develop that response in both depth and breadth, examining both the premises that undergird Evans's original claims and a range of African American satirists working in a variety of media over the past thirty years.
Our volume seeks to build on the solid foundation laid by Darryl Dickson-Carr's African American Satire (Univ. of Missouri Press, 2001) and the contributors to Dana Williams's collection African American Humor, Irony and Satire (Cambridge Scholars, 2007). To that end we seek essays that critically examine African American satirical works since 1980, with an eye towards synthesizing a nuanced picture not only of the variety of forms in which African American satire appears but also of the larger media environment in which it participates. We invite close readings of individual satirists (a list of potential topics is appended below, but we welcome essays on other artists, especially women, from all media) as well as overarching meta-critical and theoretical discussions of themes, (sub)genres, or other aspects of the satirical mode as it relates to contemporary African American culture. We also would welcome essays that examine the use of satire by artists and within works not usually associated with the mode (e.g., Dickson-Carr's discussion of Toni Morrison's Jazz in his book) and wish to emphasize that our definition of satire is not limited solely to comedic or satiric-parodic works.

Proposals for essays should be between 750 and 1000 words and should articulate a clear critical question in relation to a set of primary and secondary texts. It is the editors' view (in accordance with the view of most academic presses) that a successful edited collection needs a clear and compelling organizing narrative and, thus, successful proposals will articulate clearly which critical narratives are at work within their rhetorical structures and why. Completed proposals are due on January 1, 2012 and can be sent to either Derek C. Maus (mausdc@potsdam.edu) or James J. Donahue (donahujj@potsdam.edu) or mailed in hard-copy to Derek Maus, 244 Morey Hall, State University of New York at Potsdam, Potsdam, NY, 13676. We welcome any inquiries or questions about the volume prior to this submission date as well. Submitters will be notified about the status of their essays by February 1, 2012 and final essays of 4500-6000 words will be due on June 1, 2012 with a projected publication date some time in 2013. We have received strong initial interest in this volume from a major academic press and have every reason to believe it will be accepted for publication along to this timeline.

Possible topics (others are welcomed)

  • Dawolu Jabari Anderson (visual artist; The Birth of a Nation: Yo! Bumrush the Show)
  • Damali Ayo (conceptual artist and writer; rent-a-negro.com; Obaminstan!: Land Without Racism)
  • Kevin Avery ("Siskel and Negro"; Thugs: the Musical)
  • Paul Beatty (novelist; The White Boy Shuffle; Slumberland; Tuff; etc.)
  • W. Kamau Bell (The W. Kamau Bell Curve: Ending Racism in About an Hour; Face Full of Flour; Laughter Against the Machine)
  • Black Dynamite (film)
  • Dave Chappelle (Chappelle's Show; stand-up comedy)
  • Chocolate News (short-lived African American-themed satirical news-show on Comedy Central hosted by David Alan Grier)
  • Rusty Cundieff (Fear of a Black Hat; Tales from the Hood; etc.)
  • Ego Trip (magazine and website)
  • Trey Ellis (novelist, screenwriter; Platitudes; Home Repairs; Right Here, Right Now)
  • Patrice Evans (Negropedia: The Assimilated Negro's Crash Course on the Modern Black Experience; "The Assimilated Negro" blog)
  • Percival Everett (novelist; A History of the African-American People (Proposed) by Strom Thurmond, as told to Percival Everett & James Kincaid; Erasure; I Am Not Sidney Poitier; etc.)
  • Donald Glover (stand-up comedy; Community; "Childish Gambino" hip=hop performances)
  • David Hammons (visual and conceptual artist; "African American Flag")
  • D. L. Hughley (stand-up comedy; D.L. Hughley Breaks the News [CNN show])
  • Darius James (Negrophobia: An Urban Parable)
  • Charles Johnson (novelist; Oxherding Tale; Middle Passage; etc.)
  • Mat Johnson (novelist; Pym; Hunting in Harlem)
  • Keith Knight (cartoonist of The K Chronicles and (Th)ink)
  • Spike Lee (filmmaker; School Daze; Bamboozled)
  • Aaron McGruder (Boondocks comic strip and television show)
  • Paul Mooney (stand-up comedy; television)
  • Tracy Morgan (stand-up comedy; Saturday Night Live; 30 Rock)
  • Z.Z. Packer (short-story writer; novelist; Drinking Coffee Elsewhere)
  • Ishmael Reed (novelist; The Terrible Twos; The Terrible Threes; Japanese By Spring; Juice!)
  • Chris Rock (Saturday Night Live; The Chris Rock Show; stand-up comedy)
  • Wanda Sykes (stand-up comedy; various television shows)
  • Baratunde Thurston (writer and editor for The Onion; Better Than Crying: Poking Fun at Politics, the Press & Pop Culture; How to Be Black)
  • Touré (novelist, short-story writer; journalist; Soul City; The Portable Promised Land)
  • Robert Townsend (Hollywood Shuffle)
  • Keenen Ivory Wayans and other Wayans family members (In Living Color; I'm Gonna Get You Sucka; White Chicks; etc.)
  • Colson Whitehead (novelist; The Intuitionist; John Henry Days; Apex Hides the Hurt; etc.)
  • George C. Wolfe (The Colored Museum)
    42178Editing Old English: Ælfric's Lives of Saints (Kalamazoo 2012)Grant Simpson and Rachel Andersonglsimpso@indiana.edu1311609839bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookinternational_conferencesmedievalreligionfull name / name of organization: Grant Simpson and Rachel Andersoncontact email: glsimpso@indiana.edu

    Editing Old English: Ælfric's Lives of the Saints
    Special Session at the 47th International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 2012)

    2012 marks the 100-year anniversary of the death of W. W. Skeat, the eminent lexicographer and editor of Anglo-Saxon texts. Skeat is known among Ælfric scholars as the editor of the four-volume Lives of Saints (1881-1890). This edition has numerous limitations, including an incomplete scholarly apparatus, a dated translation, and infrequent availability. A new edition is needed - but what would it look like? Who would it be for?

    This session will feature papers that examine Skeat's editorial choices and look towards what is needed for a future edition.

    Please send abstracts of around 300 words to Grant Simpson at glsimpso@indiana.edu by September 15. (Early submissons would be much appreciated.)

    cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookinternational_conferencesmedievalreligion 42179Thing Theory and Object-Oriented Studies in Medieval Contexts [International Medieval Congress, Kalamazoo, May 10-13 2012]Anthony AdamsAnthony_Adams@brown.edu1311615717cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinarymedievalscience_and_culturetheatretheoryfull name / name of organization: Anthony Adamscontact email: Anthony_Adams@brown.edu

    A new and exciting move toward 'object-oriented studies' is underway among historians and literary scholars, including medievalists. Such studies (colloquially known as 'thing theory') see 'things' neither as mirrors of human activity or will, nor deictic signs pointing to inner lives of human characters. Rather such an approach wishes to examine the 'network of relationships' between subjects and objects. Moreover, it has been argued that medieval literature has much to offer such studies, as objects have a degree of autonomy in medieval literature that is lacking in later texts, having been bullied out of the focal field by Enlightenment empiricism. This critical approach has connections to many current approaches, such as the claim by Bruno Latour that the boundaries between subjects and objects, persons and things, were far more porous to the premodern mind. Latour's emphasis, despite various critical problems that many have with his work, is representative of what Kellie Robertson has rightfully pointed out as a current movement to situating discussions of what constitutes 'modernity' in the region of 'phenomenal things'. Object-oriented studies also have much in common with the rage for hybridity, and fluidity, of human/animal, human/object, relations, such as has been foregrounded in the work of Jeffrey Jerome Cohen.

    For this special session, I am seeking papers on any aspect of medieval things and objects, simulacra, automata, or mirabilia, whether textual or material. Subjects that would be welcome would include aspects of mirabilia in Chaucer, Gower, and Lydgate, instances of prosopopoeia in medieval texts (such as the Old English Riddles), 'hurt' books that show damage either intentional or accidental, toys and machines as metaphors, mechanical automata unmasked, histories of talking objects, the use of puppetry, effigies, or props in medieval drama, folklore of living dolls or wooden toys, and any theoretical aspects of idols and images, simulations/simulacra, or other aspects of 'thing theory' as applied to medieval studies. Papers could also involve research into the history of science, Arabic studies, manuscript illumination, or any other related field that touches upon the presence of simulacra as object or as metaphor.

    Please send an abstract, along with the paper proposal form (found at http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html), to Anthony Adams, Anthony_Adams at brown.edu (substituting @ for at) by September 10, 2011. Inquiries welcome.

    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinarymedievalscience_and_culturetheatretheory 42180Computers and Writing May 17-20, 2012Wendi Sierrawajewell@ncsu.edu1311617186rhetoric_and_compositionfull name / name of organization: Wendi Sierracontact email: wajewell@ncsu.edu

    CFP: Computers and Writing 2012
    ArchiTEXTure: Composing and Constructing in Digital Spaces
    http://chasslamp.chass.ncsu.edu/~cw2012/

    North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
    Onsite Conference: Thursday, May 17, 2012 – Sunday, May 20, 2012
    Proposal Submission Opens: September 1, 2011
    Proposal Due Date: October 22, 2011 (before midnight EST)
    Notifications of Acceptance: December 15, 2011
    Registration Opens: January 15, 2012
    Online Conference: Dates to be announced

    Keynote Speakers: David Parry, Alex Reid, Anne Wysocki

    Overview
    We welcome proposal submissions for Computers and Writing 2012, "ArchiTEXTure: Composing and Constructing in Digital Spaces." Under this theme, we encourage submitters to consider issues, challenges, and benefits specifically related to the production of digital texts. Additionally, submissions are encouraged to consider questions that both address "archiTEXTure" in the classroom and as part of a scholarly agenda.

    The goal of this conference is to move beyond traditional, print-based examinations of new media objects as texts. Thus, we are interested in how digital spaces and new media objects interact with and influence the ways that we compose ourselves, our classrooms and our scholarly work. The archiTEXTure of new media can be the media object itself, but can also be the the contexts, spaces, bodies, materials, ideas, and histories of media. The TEXTure of the media could be the screen, but it could also be the differing surfaces and materials of media. In the space between the competing materialities of classroom and text, we can ask questions about construction, process, movement, and change.

    At Computers and Writing 2012 we will turn our focus to those issues related specifically to composing and constructing as writing flows from the page and the screen to new contexts and formats. The concerns listed below are not exhaustive, but a beginning point for participants to consider:

    * What are the material and/or immaterial barriers and considerations involved in creating new media/digital texts?
    * What changes in the creative process take place when students and instructors utilize new or unfamiliar technologies?
    * How do the institutions in which we teach and work constrain or enable different forms of production?
    * How do new media objects and digital spaces help us to build identities as scholars, instructors, and/or students?
    * How do new media objects and digital spaces enhance the way we construct our courses?
    * What practical concerns do we and our students face when developing new media/digital texts?
    * What do new media objects tell us about how technology influences the relationship to space, body, and self?

    Presentation Formats

    Computers and Writing 2012 invites proposals in a variety of formats: conference presentations and panels, posters, performances, half and full day workshops. We also introduce a new spin on the mini-workshop: a type of session we call CREATE! In all presentation formats, we strongly encourage presenters to move beyond a traditional read-aloud paper and consider other delivery methods.

    * Individual Presentations (20 minutes; 250-word proposal)
    * Panels and Roundtables (90 minutes; 3 or more presenters; 500-word proposals)
    * Interactive Installations (250-word proposals)
    o Replacing the traditional poster session, we instead encourage scholars to share research projects, game play, software, videos, or other media that they are researching in or teaching with. Interactive Installation proposals should describe space and technology requirements.
    * Half-Day or Full-Day Pre-Conference Workshops (1 or more presenters; 500-word proposals plus schedule of activities)
    o Pre-conference workshops are intended to involve participants in a technology or issue set that rewards intensive work, giving them opportunities to learn new applications, assessment, and integration of emergent technologies for writing, learning, and collaboration. Workshops should be participatory, and proposals should articulate how attendees will interact with each other, the presenters, and/or technologies involved.
    * CREATE! (1 or more presenters; 500-word proposals)
    o CREATE! sessions are similar to mini-workshop sessions at prior C&W conferences. For these sessions facilitators should focus on presenting a specific application or skill to attendees, and all participants should leave the CREATE! sessions with an artifact that they produced. This artifact can be something quite traditional—the basic outline for a lesson plan or a specific activity to use in a classroom—or it could be a new media object.

    * ConstrucTEXT (1 or more artists/performers; 500-word proposals, including samples of work if applicable)
    o ConstrucTEXT sessions are designed specifically to invite artists, performers, and creators to present their work at the conference. We are interested in highlighting artists who are interacting with technologies in some way, shape or form. Sessions can be performance-based, and artists should indicate length of performance, and space and technology needs. In addition, artists are encouraged to take some time to talk about their work which could be during a round table with other artists or an individual session.

    cfp categories: rhetoric_and_composition 42181Théâtre et actualité(s)ASECSyrobert@stanford.edu1311619758eighteenth_centuryinternational_conferencestheatrefull name / name of organization: ASECScontact email: yrobert@stanford.edu

    Dear List,

    We are currently seeking proposals for "Théâtre et actualité(s)," a panel at ASECS's upcoming meeting in San Antonio. Papers in English or in French are encouraged; please don't hesitate to send along any questions.

    "Théâtre et actualité(s)"

    Logan Connors, French & Francophone Studies Program, Bucknell U., Lewisburg, PA 17837 AND Yann Robert, Dept. of French & Italian, Stanford U., Pigott Hall, Room 105, Stanford, CA 94305

    logan.connors@bucknell.edu AND yrobert@stanford.edu

    During the French Revolution, the theatrical representation of current events (be it directly or allegorically) grew to an unprecedented popularity. Yet even in the decades prior-- for most of the eighteenth century, in fact -- France witnessed significant changes to the relationship between dramatic texts and contemporary events, performances and criticism, and the present and the past. These transformations both reflected and contributed to important debates, notably about the social and political function of theater and the aesthetic merits and perils of such a contemporary focus, especially in an art form characterized by mutability and impermanence.

    This panel invites proposals, in French or in English, which analyze any aspect of "théâtre et actualité(s)," broadly interpreted, and certainly not limited to:

    -- The staging of current events

    -- Dramatic criticism

    -- Theater anecdotes/the reporting of spectator behavior

    -- The uses and abuses of censorship

    -- The relationship between politics and theater

    -- Journalism and theater

    -- Aesthetic rebirth and decadence

    -- Theories on acting

    -- New representative strategies

    -- Architectural changes to the playhouse

    With best wishes,

    Yann Robert

    cfp categories: eighteenth_centuryinternational_conferencestheatre 42182CfP Kalamazoo Medieval ICMS 2012: Postcolonial EnglandDurham University English Departmentm.r.glass@durham.ac.uk1311621017bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalpopular_culturepostcolonialtheoryfull name / name of organization: Durham University English Departmentcontact email: m.r.glass@durham.ac.uk

    The Department of English Studies at Durham University invites submission of proposals for its session at the 47th International Congress on Medieval Studies at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Michigan from May 10-13, 2012. The panel seeks proposals of 300-500 words with a working title and department affiliation by September 1, 2011. Participants will be contacted regardless of whether or not their proposal has been accepted. All proposals submitted but not accepted will be sent on to the general committee for consideration in one of the general sessions at Kalamazoo. The CfP is as follows:

    Postcolonial England

    Postcolonial theory has been applied to studies of the Middle Ages with increasing frequency over the past decade. Throughout the 2000s, medieval studies has seen a plethora of publications in this area, from 'Postcolonial Middle Ages' to 'Empire of Magic.' This theory in particular has become a more prominent niche within contemporary criticism. Additionally, though it has been applied in many areas of disciplinary study, there are still many categories which need further research. One area in which postcolonial theory is particularly applicable is the analysis of national identity. This subject has also been a hot topic in the past few years, especially in relation to England (Ashe, McDonald, Lavezzo, Fenton). These two discourses sometimes, but not always, work together–and both areas could benefit from further exploration, both independently and symbiotically. Medieval postcolonialism can have the tendency to be too broad in its analysis and application throughout Europe, whereas discussions of national identity through specific texts can be overly narrow. By focusing on postcolonial interpretations of national identity in England alone, it makes for a more precise, but still broad area for discussion. This session will aim for papers which apply postcolonial theory to English texts in an attempt to better understand English concepts of national identity, specifically looking at less obvious, rather than canonical, texts as many of these have already been explored. For example, much work has already been done on romances such as Bevis of Hampton, Guy of Warwick, Richard Cour de Lyon, and Havelok the Dane. There is still much to be researched however, and this session aims to encourage such endeavours. As Thomas Crofts and Robert Rouse recently said in their 2009 chapter in 'A Companion to Medieval Popular Romance,' the lesser-explored romances "present more complex challenges for the critic [and] continue to demand individual detailed attention, lest we be lulled by their familiar rhythm into the belief that they speak with one voice." We have chosen to propose this session to provide a more focused exploration of medieval national identity and postcolonialism by focusing on England, and hope this session will provide a larger litmus test for these ideas through its focus on lesser-explored English texts.

    Meghan Glass
    Department of English
    Durham University
    m.r.glass@durham.ac.uk

    cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalpopular_culturepostcolonialtheory 42183CALL FOR SCHOLARLY ESSAYS AND CREATIVE WORKS Label Me Latina/oksanchez@georgian.edu; shaulm@queens.edu 1311628631americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarypoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialromantictheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Label Me Latina/ocontact email: ksanchez@georgian.edu; shaulm@queens.edu

    Label Me Latina/o (www.labelmelatin.com) is an online, refereed international e-journal that focuses on Latino Literary Production in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The journal invites scholarly essays focusing on these writers for its biannual publication. Label Me Latina/o also publishes creative literary pieces whose authors self-define as Latina or Latino regardless of thematic content. The Co-Directors will publish creative works in English, Spanish or Spanglish whereas analytical essays should be written in English or Spanish.
    Scholarly submissions should be between 12-30 pages in length and should follow the MLA Style Manual. Original, unpublished submissions in Microsoft Word (PC compatible format) should be sent electronically to both of the co-directors: Kathryn Quinn-Sánchez ksanchez@georgian.edu and Michele Shaul shaulm@queens.edu
    Creative poetry, essays and short fiction should not exceed 30 pages, 12 point font, double-spaced.
    Deadline for the Spring 2012 issue: December 9, 2011.
    Please include the following information in the body of the email:

    • Full name
    • Institutional Affiliation
    • Telephone number
    • Email address
    • Regular mail address
    • Title of the submission

    Please make sure that the actual manuscript bears no reference to the author's name or institution.
    Label Me Latina/o is indexed by the MLA International Bibliography and is listed in the MLA Directory of Periodicals.

    cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarypoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialromantictheatretwentieth_century_and_beyond 42184UPDATE: Performing South Asia at Home and Abroad, SALA 2012South Asian Literary Associationnbhatia2@uwo.ca, rgairola@uw.edu1311631731americancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturepostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: South Asian Literary Associationcontact email: nbhatia2@uwo.ca, rgairola@uw.edu

    Performing South Asia at Home and Abroad

    South Asian Literary Association (SALA), Seattle 2012

    Date: Wed., January 4, 2012 at 9:00am – Thurs., January 5, 2012 at 5:00pm

    Venue: Hyatt Place Downtown, 110 6th Avenue North (at Denny Way)

    Distinguished Keynote Speaker: Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak

    Distinguished Guest Author: Charles Johnson

    Abstract Deadline: August 31, 2011

    Given historical and current events that have shaped South Asia, its diasporas, and the complex identity formations that color its languages, identities, texts, etc., we offer the topic of "performativity" in all its complex manifestations as the conference theme for SALA 2012. Peformativity is a concept and act that has always had relevance to language studies: it is applied in the context of characters in fictional and non-fictional narratives, and has also been used to think about reading and speaking as performative acts that produce cultural objects that are open to myriad interpretations. This theme is also central to thinking about the marginalization of theatre and performance studies within South Asian and Postcolonial Studies, and gives us an opportunity to utilize the knowledge of theatre and performance studies as critical supplements to Postcolonial Studies.

    The politics of the stage and its space leads us to the many issues surrounding audience, place, space, locality, state, nation, etc., that have been much debated in critical theory and cultural studies. Such interdisciplinary work on fiction, non-fiction, theatre, and autobiographical narrative not only evinces the importance of critically examining "performativity" in all its familiar and new forms, but also opens up avenues of examining how the performativity of South Asia both challenges and transforms dominant models of what performance actually is and can be. Many questions arise:

    How does the geopolitical positioning of South Asia and its myriad diasporas compel us to re-think perfomativity as it has been traditionally conceived in the West? How might social practices, public figures, and religious rituals complicate the ways we think about performativity? What aspects of performances on the stage leak into the social and political discourses regarding colonialism, post-colonialism and globalization? Does theater represent a more effective intervention in the challenges faced by Dalits, Adivasis, and religious minorities? How might South Asian figures like hijras, courtesans, cross-dressers, sex workers, etc., complicate the constraints of current trends in gender and sexuality studies? How does South Asian fashion, including markers of gender like the bindi, sari, dhoti, etc., act as performative agents aside from Western dress conventions? How are oral and theatre discourses performed in South Asia in ways that would distinguish them from the more familiar models? In what ways does performativity intersect with "actors" on the political stage?

    We thus interpret the theme of "performativity" in the broadest and most challenging sense – from performances on the stage to performances in film and media, to performances on the sidewalk, as well as performances of identity and sexuality in fiction, memoir, creative non-fiction, and autobiography. Indeed, the SALA 2012 conference aims to question the very meaning of performance and its multiple possibilities within the network of power relations that attend ethnic or religious identifications, gender, sexuality, and place. Paper topics may include but are not limited to the following:

    · Popular cinema trends in South Asia and around the world

    · Staged Theatre Performances and their Relationship to Nationalism, Caste, Race, Class, etc.

    · Indigenous Traditions of Mourning and Celebration (rudalis, sangeet, bhangra, etc.)

    · Individual Authors, Playwrights, Directors, and Actors

    · Performance and Pedagogy: the South Asian Body in the Classroom

    · Performativity and Politics: Psychoanalysis, Feminism, and Queer Studies

    · Transnational Performativity in the South Asian Diaspora: The Liminal and the Exotic

    · Performance in Relation to Print Cultures (Novel, Film & Mass Media), Language, & Dialect

    · Courtesans, Cross-dressers, Hijras, Drag, and other forms of genderplay

    · Dalit & Budhan Theatre, Street Performances, Popular Theater

    · South Asian and Diasporic Music and Performance (M.I.A., Cornershop, Jay Sean, etc.)

    · Comparative Analyses of Performance in Novels, Life Narratives, Plays, and/or Films

    · Identity Performance and Popular and Marginal South Asian Fashions

    · South Asian Poetic Traditions: Ghazals, Mushaira, Kawwali, Humor and Satire

    · Ghazal as a Poetic Genre in North America: The Shadow of Agha Shahid Ali

    · South Asian Comedians in North America

    · Performative Aspects of Language, Speech, and Translation

    · Folklore/Myth in South Asia

    · Re-thinking History and its Representations

    · Representations of South Asia and its Diasporas in Television, Cinema, Animation, and Online Media (Outsourced, The Simpsons, YouTube videos, etc.)

    · "DesiDesigns" – tone, function, fashion, form, and graphic design in South Asian Studies.

    Please e-mail 300-word paper proposals in MS Word format including your email address and a short bio to the Conference Co-Chairs. Proposals for panels, roundtables, and short performances are also welcome. The Co-Chairs are happy to answer any questions or offer suggestions over e-mail regarding your proposals-in-progress.

    Dr. Nandi Bhatia, University of Western Ontario, Canada; nbhatia2@uwo.ca

    Dr. Rahul K. Gairola, University of Washington & Cornish College of the Arts; rgairola@uw.edu

    cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturepostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 42185Gothc Hawthorne, journal special issue, 9 Sept. 2011Nathaniel Hawthorne Reviewelbertm@mail.montclair.edu1311635542americanjournals_and_collections_of_essaysvictorianfull name / name of organization: Nathaniel Hawthorne Reviewcontact email: elbertm@mail.montclair.edu

    Reassessing Hawthorne's Gothic
    Special Issue, _Nathaniel Hawthorne Review_ (to be published fall, 2012)

    Although much work was done in the 1990s on Hawthorne's Gothic, including Teresa Goddu's influential chapter on Hawthorne and race in _Gothic America_, it may be time to revisit Hawthorne's Gothic mode and offer new interpretations. The topics may include the following (but the list is not meant to be exhaustive):
    Hawthorne's use and transformation of Gothic (European or American Gothic)
    Transatlantic or transnational influences
    Hawthorne and his Gothic predecessors, contemporaries, or followers
    Gothic Shadows: Philosophical Reactions to Enlightenment/Underpinnings of Romanticism
    Native American lore and Hawthorne's Gothic
    Folklore and Hawthorne's Gothic
    Gothic and Hawthorne's Puritanism
    Gothic Salem
    Gothic and Science Fiction in Hawthorne's works
    Hawthorne's hauntings/Hawthorne's old haunts
    Ghostly ancestors (real or literary)
    Ghosts of the past: Revolutionary ghosts, witches/wizards, Indians
    Gothic in Hawthorne's children's stories
    Gothic ideas in Hawthorne's Notebooks/connections to his fiction
    Gothic genres (in the novels, stories, or sketches)
    Tradition of the Gothic woman (and the exotic)
    Hawthorne's European travels and the Gothic
    Aging and Gothic horrors

    Please send queries or 2-page proposals to Monika Elbert, Editor, _Nathaniel Hawthorne Review_, elbertm@mail.montclair.edu, as e-mail attachments in MS Word doc format, by 9 September 2011. Completed essays will be due by 19 February 2012.

    cfp categories: americanjournals_and_collections_of_essaysvictorian 42186Hawthorne's Humor, journal (special issue), 11-15-2012Nathaniel Hawthorne Reviewelbertm@mail.montclair.edu1311636258americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysfull name / name of organization: Nathaniel Hawthorne Reviewcontact email: elbertm@mail.montclair.edu

    Call for Papers, Hawthorne's Humor

    A special issue of the _Nathaniel Hawthorne Review_ is being planned on Hawthorne's humor, to be published in fal1, 2013. Essays (no longer than 9,000 words, WORD doc files) are invited for consideration on the following topics, although the list is not meant to be exhaustive.

    1) Hawthorne's humor compared to that of other nineteenth-century writers (e.g., Irving, Poe, Fanny Fern, Twain)
    2) Hawthorne's self-deprecating humor, especially of his work (in his introductions to his fiction; his notebooks; his letters)
    3) Humor in his children's stories; humorous depictions of his own children.
    4) Hawthorne's dark, macabre, or acerbic humor; Hawthorne's Gothic humor
    5) Hawthorne's comic characters; Hawthorne's caricatures
    6) Hawthorne's romance theory and comic excursions enacting that theory
    7) Hawthorne's philosophy of life and humor
    8) Hawthorne's injection of humor in his formulation of Puritan history
    9) Hawthorne's sketches and the humor of the everyday
    10) Hawthorne's humorous assessments of European life during his travels abroad
    11) Hawthorne's theory of writing (or his attacks on the marketplace) and humor
    12) Hawthorne's humor and its relationship to psychoanalytic, philosophical, and aesthetic theories of humor
    13) Hawthorne's humor and its relationship to nineteenth-century gender roles
    14) Parodies and uses of Hawthorne and his works in comic strips, cartoons, and graphic narratives and how they reflect on his reputation as a great American author.

    Deadline for submissions of completed papers is Nov. 15, 2012. Final revised submissions (of accepted essays) deadline is April 30, 2013. Queries are welcome.
    Send essays to the guest editor, Prof. M. Thomas Inge at tinge@rmc.edu and to Prof. Monika Elbert, Editor of the _Nathaniel Hawthorne Review_, at elbertm@mail.montclair.edu

    cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesjournals_and_collections_of_essays 42187Southern Studies Conference (February 10-11, 2012)Auburn University Montgomery aumlac@aum.edu1311647524african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturetravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Auburn University Montgomery contact email: aumlac@aum.edu

    Southern Studies: The AUM Liberal Arts Conference at Auburn University Montgomery, February 10 and 11, 2012.

    Call for papers and panels on the topic of Southern culture.

    Now in its fourth year, AUMLAC invites panel and paper proposals on the literature of the American South. Topics might include:
    --Slavery and the American South; slave narratives
    --Civil War narratives
    --Civil rights narratives; explorations of race and conflict
    --Southern religion and literature
    --Ecocriticism and the landscape of Southern writing
    --Regionalist writers of the American South
    --Southern food studies
    --Explorations of the Southern worker
    --The plantation novel
    --Changing conceptions of Southern aristocracy in literature
    --Southern women writers
    --Southern travel writing
    --Southern children's literature
    --Cross-cultural exchanges between the South and other geographic areas
    --Native American literature of the South
    --Stories of immigration / migration and border-crossings
    --Contemporary reconceptions of "The South"
    --Contemporary literacy and writing programs of the American South
    --Studies of works by canonical Southern authors such as Twain, Welty, and Faulkner
    --Studies of works by lesser-known Southern writers

    The two-day conference includes a notable plenary speaker, art exhibition and lecture, and musical performance. Last year's distinguished speakers included poet and critic Robert Ray Morgan (Cornell) and Civil War historian William J. Cooper (LSU), and artist Doug Baulos (University of Alabama Birmingham).
    Registrants to the conference will be able to enjoy over twenty peer-reviewed panels on the topic of the South over two days, spanning the fields of anthropology, art history, American history, American literature and theater, music history, and sociology. Proposals for panels and papers of 250 words in length are being accepted until October 15, 2011, with notice of acceptance by November 15, 2011. Proposals will be refereed by established scholars in each discipline. Proposals for panels and papers as well as general queries can be addressed to aumlac@aum.edu. For more information go to www.aum.edu/aumlac.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturetravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 42188Call for Papers on Marguerite Porete, International Congress on Medieval Studies, 10–13 May 2012International Congress on Medieval Studiesinfo@margueriteporete.net1311649356bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalreligionrenaissancefull name / name of organization: International Congress on Medieval Studiescontact email: info@margueriteporete.net

    We invite conference papers on Marguerite Porete, her inquisition trial, and/or the Mirror of Simple Souls, for the International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA, on 10–13 May 2012.

    For details, please see the Call for Papers available online at

  • http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/sessions.html
  • A proposal consists of a 300-word abstract and the participant information form downloadable from

  • http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html#PIF
  • Presentations last 20 minutes. Medievalists in all countries and all subfields, including graduate students and independent scholars, are eligible to propose a paper. (Undergraduate students should look elsewhere in the Call for Papers online.)

    The deadline for proposals is September 15, 2011, but earlier proposals are welcome and encouraged. The most efficient way to send proposals and inquiries is by email.

    cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalreligionrenaissance 42189Volume on 20th-century exile literature, deadline Sept 1Axel Englund, Anders Olssonaxel.englund@littvet.su.se1311668407african-americanamericanethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespoetrypostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Axel Englund, Anders Olssoncontact email: axel.englund@littvet.su.se

    Call for papers

    LANGUAGES OF EXILE: MIGRATION AND MULTILINGUALISM IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY LITERATURE (working title)

    This book-to-be aims to examine the relation between geographic and linguistic border crossings in the context of twentieth-century exile literature. Its focal point will be the mark that the widespread experience of exile left upon the literary languages of that epoch: if the writer in exile must necessarily confront the fact of linguistic difference, literature can be read as the site where such confrontation is played out aesthetically. Literary writing, in other words, becomes the point of intersection between native and acquired language, between the indigenous and the alien, between self and other, in a complex bi- or multilingual dynamic specific to the situation of exile. In the last century, this position of the exile writer has been conditioned not only by wars, repression and persecution but by a new literary horizon with universal or transnational claims to validity. Through language and creation, the alienating experience of exilic loss can thus potentially be transformed into a paradoxical homecoming.

    The essays will address a number of interrelated examples: exile writers who continue to work in their native tongue, which is altered or influenced by the alien context; exile writers who take the leap into another language, in part or completely, and thus bring the experiences of their own language across into a foreign one; exile writers who cope with (or take advantage of) the confrontation with a new language and its literature through the practice of translation; exile writers who mix multiple languages in their work and thus create a literature that resists translation by sprawling across linguistic borders. New light will be shed upon these literary situations through concepts developed in contemporary theory of exile and transnational literature, including world literature, translation theory, post-colonialism, literary space, flight and deterritorialization. Contributions focusing on theoretical concepts and historical examples are equally welcome.

    Prospective contributors are asked to submit an abstract of ca 500 words no later than September 1, 2011. The abstracts will be reviewed during the first weeks of September, and the deadline for the complete essays will be early 2012. Please send your abstract and your current academic affiliation by e-mail to axel.englund@littvet.su.se and anders.olsson@littvet.su.se.

    Kind regards,

    Axel Englund,
    PhD, Anna Lindh Fellow, The Europe Center, Stanford University

    Anders Olsson,
    PhD, Professor, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, Stockholm University

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespoetrypostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 42190Merchants of Menace: The Business of Horror Cinema - Collection of Essays - Deadline for abstracts 31 October 2011Richard Nowell, Charles University in Praguerichard_nowell@hotmail.com1311683890americanfilm_and_televisionjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Richard Nowell, Charles University in Praguecontact email: richard_nowell@hotmail.com

    Call for Papers
    Merchants of Menace: The Business of Horror Cinema

    Despite scary movies having occupied prominent locations on the rosters of film producers, distributors, exhibitors, and other creative industry professionals around the world for about a century, the economic dimensions of horror cinema remain largely unexplored; the theoretical terrain remains loosely sketched and it has been supported by a quite limited number of specific case studies. Instead, scholars have tended over the years to approach horror films as organically occurring – even inevitable – by-products of myriad psychological, social, and political demons said to haunt the psyches of individual filmmakers, the populations of the nation states they call home, or chiefly a combination thereof (see for example Wood & Lippel; Creed; Clover; Benshoff; Lowenstein; Middleton). Such approaches have led to horror movies routinely being framed as mouthpieces for misogynistic sadists operating from the shadows of the exploitation sector, as subversive expressions of resistance enacted by noble progressives of various stripes, or as platforms for reactionary politics invariably supported by the biggest, scariest monster of all: Hollywood. As a consequence of these tendencies, the specific forms of commercial logic, strategy, and conduct that contribute to bringing individual horror films and specific horror trends to the screen have more often than not been side-stepped altogether or have been reduced gnomically and unhelpfully to the profit-making imperative underwriting all capitalist endeavours. A recent – albeit marginal – shift among historians of the culture industries towards centralizing considerations of the business side of fright flicks has, however, begun to suggest a range of sources, methods, approaches, frameworks, and models capable of illuminating the complex character of this largely unexplained aspect of media history (see for example Heffernan; Spadoni; Ryan; Nowell; Laboto & Ryan). Given that horror's status as an industrial category cuts across budgetary categories, across industry sectors, across national film cultures, and across media, the possibility of revealing new information about the commercial objectives and strategies that have underwritten horror cinema also promises to shed new light on the economics of global cinema more generally. It is therefore the aim of Merchants of Menace: The Business of Horror Cinema timely to fill a sizable and significant void in film history through a focused, sustained, and far-reaching effort to illuminate the multifaceted commercial logic that has shaped the production, distribution, and exhibition of one of the world's most enduring audiovisual forms.
    Accordingly, proposals are sought for original essays that focus on the business of bankrolling, making, marketing, disseminating, and exhibiting chillers, shockers, and other forms of horror cinema in a variety of national contexts and at different historical junctures. Suggested topics for this proposed collection include but are by no means restricted to:

    • Models of financing horror films
    • The logic of micro-budget horror
    • The economics of art-horror cinema
    • Nationally specific models of horror film financing
    • The economics of early horror cinema
    • Child- and "tween"-friendly horror
    • Horror and race demographics
    • Making and marketing horror to "mature" audiences
    • Horror and the commodification of nostalgia
    • Horror and appealing to specific sub-cultural taste formations
    • The economics of horror date movies
    • The economics of horror blockbusters
    • Merchandizing horror cinema
    • Publicizing horror
    • Strategies in the marketing of horror
    • Industrial histories of historically specific trends and cycles
    • The economics of stardom in horror cinema
    • The economics of brand name horror filmmakers, studios, and labels
    • Music and horror
    • Relationships between film horror and other creative industries
    • Horror and the commodification of prestige
    • The impact of economics on the portrayal of violence and gore
    • The business of horror film exhibition
    • The economics of exporting horror film

    Please send by 31 October 2011 your 200–400 word abstract and a 50–100 word academic biography to richard_nowell@hotmail.com. All notifications of acceptance will be emailed no later than 30 November 2011. If an abstract is accepted, essays can be expected to be between 7,500 and 8,000 words in length (including references).

    Yours Sincerely,
    Dr. Richard Nowell, Editor.

    Richard Nowell teaches American Cinema at Charles University in Prague. He is the author of Blood Money a History of the First Teen Slasher Film Cycle, has served as a guest editor of Iluminace: The Journal of Film Theory, History, and Aesthetics, and his articles have been published or are forthcoming in, among others, Cinema Journal, Journal of Film and Video, Post Script, and The New Review of Film and Television Studies

    Works Cited

    Benshoff, Harry. Monsters in the Closet: Homosexuality and the Horror Movie. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1997.

    Clover, Carol. J. Men, Women, and Chainsaws: Gender in the Modern Film. London: BFI 1992.

    Creed, Barbara. The Monstrous Feminine: Film, Feminism, and Pyschoanalysis. New York: Routledge, 1993.

    Heffernan, Kevin. Ghouls, Gimmicks and Gold: Horror Films and the American Movie
    Business, 1953–1968. Durham: Duke University Press, 2004.

    Laboto, Rabon, and, Mark David Ryan. "Rethinking Genre Studies through Distribution Analysis: Issues in International Horror Movie Circuits", New Review of Film and Television Studies (Forthcoming)

    Lowenstein, Adam. Shocking Representation: Historical Cinema, National Trauma, and the Modern Horror Film. New York: Columbia University Press, 2005.

    Jason Middleton, "The Subject of Torture: Regarding the Pain of Americans inHostel", Cinema Journal, vol. 49, no. 4 (Summer 2010), pp. 1–24

    Nowell, Richard. Blood Money: A History of the First Teen Slasher Film. New York: Continuum, 2011.

    Ryan, Mark David. "Australian Cinema's Dark Sun: The Boom in Australian Horror
    Film Production", Studies in Australian Cinema, vol. 4 no. 1, pp. 23–41.

    Spadoni, Robert. Uncanny Bodies: The Coming of Sound and the Origins of the Horror Genre. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2007.

    Wood, Robin, and Richard Lippel (eds.). The American Nightmare: Essays on the Horror Film. Toronto: Festival of Festivals, 1979.

    cfp categories: americanfilm_and_televisionjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 42191Interculturalism, Meaning and Identity 5 (March 2012; Prague, Czech Republic)Dr Rob Fisher/Inter-Discipinary.Netic5@inter-disciplinary.net1311690939african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr Rob Fisher/Inter-Discipinary.Netcontact email: ic5@inter-disciplinary.net

    5th Global Conference
    Interculturalism, Meaning and Identity

    Friday 9th March - Sunday 11th March 2012
    Prague, Czech Republic

    Call For Papers:
    This multi-disciplinary project seeks to explore the new and prominent place that the idea of culture has for the construction of meaning and identity, as well as the implications for social political membership in contemporary societies. In particular the project will assess the larger
    context of major world transformations, for example, new forms of
    migration and the massive movements of people across the globe, as well as the impact and contribution of globalisation on tensions, conflicts and the sense of rootedness and belonging. Looking to encourage innovative trans-disciplinary dialogues, we warmly welcome papers from all disciplines, professions and vocations which struggle to understand what it means for people, the world over, to forge identities in rapidly changing national, social and cultural contexts.

    Papers, workshops, presentations and pre-formed panels are invited on any of the following themes:

    1. Contemporary Rediscoveries and Redefinitions of Culture
    ~ Multiple, polyvalent and contradictory conceptions of culture
    ~ Infinite source of meaning and identity, of membership and exclusion, of privileging and stygmatising, of worth and misery, of place and history, of violence and destruction
    ~ Cultural remaking of self and other; recasting of links, bonds and relations
    ~ The contradictory forces of culture: diversity versus homogeneity, multiplicity versus sameness, alterity versus normality, recognition versus misrecognition
    ~ Textures of cultures: fixed, fluid, porous, hermetic, rigid and flexible

    2. Cultural Boundaries, Peoples and Nations
    ~ Dislocation and decoupling of culture and nation, of culture and place, of culture and history
    ~ Resurgence of the local, the diminishing importance of the national and the forces of the global
    ~ What does it mean, today, to be part of a culture, to be part of multiple cultures?
    ~ Massive and new forms of global migration and the new hybridity of cultures
    ~ Assimilation, integration, adaptation and other forms of 'forcing' cultures on migrants

    3. Individuals, Identity and the Inter-Subjective
    ~ De-centering individuals and the making of persons; thinking and acting with others in ind and interpersonality
    ~ Tensions, contradictions and conflicts of identity formation and social membership
    ~ New sources and forms of belonging; new tribalism, localism,
    parochialism and communitarianism
    ~ Bonds of care across boundaries of inequality and exclusion,
    ideologies and religions, politics and power, nations and geography
    ~ Who am I if not the Relation with Others?
    ~ Non-recognition as cultural violence

    4. Cultural Formations
    ~ What are the dynamics and processes that define the central tenets of a culture?
    ~ How are cultures defined and redefined? Who participates in the social
    and political task of defining and redefining culture?
    ~ What is shared from cultures? How are cultures shared? Who has access
    to the sharing of cultures?
    ~ Symbols and significations that connect people to cultures other than 'their own'
    ~ Culture and the construction of identities: destiny, happenstance, choice and politics

    5. Politicising Culture
    ~ Political battles over the principles and core values of a culture, of many cultures
    ~ The dynamics of cultural recognition and misrecognition
    ~ What is the place of cultural claims in today's forms of social and
    political membership?
    ~ Trans-cultural connections that escape institutional and political control
    ~ Cultural claims and human rights

    6. Art and Cultural Representations
    ~ Media and the construction of cultures and identities
    ~ Production and reproduction of cultural recognition and misrecognition
    ~ The contested space of representing meaning and identity, culture and belonging
    ~ Art, media and how to challenge the rigid and impenetrable
    constructions of culture
    ~ Living, being and belonging through art; life imitating art and fiction

    7. Crossing Cultural Boundaries
    ~ Interpenetration, overlapping, crossovers, interlacing, hybridisation
    and interdependence
    ~ Languages, idioms and new emerging forms of bridging the 'invisible' divide of cultures
    ~ Conceptualisations that foster the breaking down of rigid cultural boundaries
    ~ Equalising cultures; recognition and respect across cultures
    ~ How to revamp historically old concepts like tolerance, acceptance and hospitality?
    ~ An ethics for cultural relations

    Papers will also be considered which deal with related themes. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 30th September 2011. All submissions are minimally double blind peer reviewed where appropriate. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 13th February 2012. Abstracts should be submitted
    simultaneously to the Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

    a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e)
    body of abstract
    E-mails should be titled: Interculturalism Abstract Submission

    Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes
    and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold,
    italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper
    proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you
    should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in
    cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic
    route or resend.

    Joint Organising Chairs:
    Alejandro Cervantes-Carson
    Hub Leader,
    Inter-Disciplinary.Net,
    Barcelona, Catalunya, Spain
    Email: acc@inter-disciplinary.net

    Rob Fisher
    Network Leader
    Inter-Disciplinary.Net,
    Freeland, Oxfordshire,
    United Kingdom
    Email: ic5@inter-disciplinary.net

    The conference is part of the 'Diversity and Recognition' research
    projects, which in turn belong to the 'At the Interface' programmes of
    Inter-Disciplinary.Net. It aims to bring together people from different
    areas and interests to share ideas and explore discussions which are
    innovative and challenging. All papers accepted for and presented at the
    conference will be eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected
    papers may be developed for publication in themed hard copy volume(s).

    For further details of the project, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/at-the-interface/diversity-recognition...

    For further details of the conference, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/at-the-interface/diversity-recognition...

    Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or
    subsistence.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 42192[UPDATE] Shakespeare and the Natural World, March 29-31, 2012 (Abstracts due October 1, 2011)Jennifer Park and Katie Walker / The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hilljmpark@email.unc.edu and walkerkn@email.unc.edu1311694450cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesrenaissancetheatrefull name / name of organization: Jennifer Park and Katie Walker / The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hillcontact email: jmpark@email.unc.edu and walkerkn@email.unc.edu

    Recently Shakespeare studies have taken a "natural" turn. With the advent of ecocriticism and posthumanist thinking, a "green Shakespeare" has begun to emerge. The purpose of this conference is to consider the construction, politics, and history of the trope of "nature," both in Shakespeare's works and in current Shakespeare scholarship. Papers for this conference may consider animal studies, early modern zoology, bio-politics, climate theory, geohumoralism, food, medicine, botany, demonology, and more. Our aim will be to discuss a variety of questions: What constitutes early modern environmental studies? How did early modern writers define "nature," as opposed to supernature, or preternature, or culture? In what ways did travel, global exchanges, or economic shifts affect the construction of early modern "nature"? What role does gender play in conceptions of "nature"? What was natural knowledge? Who had access to it? How do these questions, and others, inform the worlds represented in Shakespeare's plays?

    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesrenaissancetheatre 42193NEMLA 2012: Fictional Readers of French LiteratureAna Oanceaaio2101@columbia.edu1311696329americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisionmodernist studiespopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Ana Oanceacontact email: aio2101@columbia.edu

    This panel welcomes papers analyzing the representation of characters in any fictional work [eg. Huysmans, O'Neill, Pasolini] who read French literature of any period. How and why do these characters read French literature? What influence does it exert on them? What is the value of French literature in these works?

    Please send 300 word abstracts, in English or in French, to Ana Oancea (aio2101@columbia.edu) by Sept. 30, 2011.

    'You are What you Read: Fictional Readers of French Literature' has been approved for inclusion in the NEMLA 2012 Convention, which will be held March 15-18 in Rochester, NY. The host institution is St. John Fisher College.

    cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisionmodernist studiespopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 42194Image and Language: Godard and the problem of expression NEMLA 2012 Rochester deadline: September 30Elif Sendur/Binghamton Universityesendur1@binghamton.edu1311697185cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespopular_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Elif Sendur/Binghamton Universitycontact email: esendur1@binghamton.edu

    This panel asks to question the relation between expression and language, between the image and the word using Godard's work. This young Turk of the New Wave or the philosopher king of cinema, besides tackling the question of politics and aesthetics, constantly constantly questions the relationship between images and language, a question that is crucial for cinema as well as for literature. From Nana's question in Vivre Sa Vie "Words should express exactly what one wants to say? Do they betray us?" to his Le Gai Savoir where the relation between image and words are questioned; from his extraordinary use of letters or words on filmic scenes to his separation of his films into book chapters, Godard experiments on language in its own limit. This panel will ask how do words betray us in expression? What is the relation between the image and language? What does the image express that language cannot account for? Examining Godard, this panel expects to find ways to open up these questions into discussion. How does Godard opens up the question of language in his work? What kind of relation one might perceive between the image and the world? What is the nature of this affinity between cinema and literature? How is the problem of expression problematized in Godard's work? Please send 300-500 word abstracts and brief biographical statements via e-mail to esendur1@binghamton.edu by September 30, 2011

    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespopular_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 42195"Reassessing John Neal:" C19: Berkeley, April 12-15, 2012: Deadline, Sept 15, 2011. C19: THE SOCIETY OF NINETEENTH-CENTURY AMERICANISTSdajcarls@csusb.edu1311704094americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachespopular_culturefull name / name of organization: C19: THE SOCIETY OF NINETEENTH-CENTURY AMERICANISTScontact email: dajcarls@csusb.edu

    Long appreciated primarily as a powerful advocate of literary nationalism in the United States, recent scholarship has begun to reveal John Neal (1793-1896) as an innovative literary stylist, a penetrating cultural critic, a pioneering regionalist, and a vital participant in the business of letters in America over his sixty-year career. A new volume of critical essays on Neal is forthcoming in 2012 (Headlong Enterprise: John Neal and Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Culture, edited by Edward Watts and David J. Carlson). This panel aims to continue the Neal "renaissance" by presenting further new work on Neal's writing (literary and non-literary), life, and cultural significance. Paper proposals from any critical/theoretical perspective are welcome. Some suggested topics might include the following (though proposals on other subjects are also welcome).

    • Neal as regionalist
    • Neal's dime-novel writing
    • Neal's newspaper career/Neal as pamphlet writer
    • Neal's poetic and dramatic writing
    • Neal's short fiction
    • Neal in a transatlantic context

    Abstracts (500 words maximum) are due by September 15, 2011 and should be emailed to the panel chair (David Carlson, dajcarls@csusb.edu). Please include academic affiliation, and a brief (2-3 sentence) biographical statement with all submissions.

    cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachespopular_culture 42196Call for Papers on Impediments to Confession in Medieval Literature, International Congress on Medieval Studies, 10–13 May 2012Kisha Tracy/International Congress on Medieval Studiesktracy3@fitchburgstate.edu1311717519medievalfull name / name of organization: Kisha Tracy/International Congress on Medieval Studiescontact email: ktracy3@fitchburgstate.edu

    Session on how medieval writers employ the device of failed confessions or explore impediments to confession. For more, see: http://massmedieval.wordpress.com/ For the International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA.

    cfp categories: medieval 42197Fictions of Reproduction: Representations of Contraception and Abortion in Film and Television / SCMS, 21-25 March 2012, BostonMegan Minarich / Vanderbilt Universitymegan.l.minarich@vanderbilt.edu1311719015film_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsmodernist studiespopular_culturescience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Megan Minarich / Vanderbilt Universitycontact email: megan.l.minarich@vanderbilt.edu

    This panel is organized around film and television programs that treat the issues of contraception and/or abortion in some facet. The texts in question might address conception, pregnancy, and/or childbirth in the absence or contraception, or it/they may be more invested in presenting measures for or concern with the prevention of pregnancy. Films/programs may range from educational to fictional, and may be generically diverse (melodrama, comedy, film noir, etc.). They may also vary in terms of national origin and time period. Here are some potential topics/questions:

    -To what extent is contraception/abortion politicized? In what way(s)? To what end(s)?
    -How do generic concerns affect how the topics are presented?
    -What is the relationship between contraception/abortion and censorship? First wave feminism? The birth control movement? Various social or religious groups, such as the Catholic Church or social conservatives? Women's agency? Eugenics? World War? The economy?
    -What similarities/differences do you notice between the earlier birth control films and contemporary treatments of contraception/abortion in film/television? What accounts for these similarities/differences?
    -How does national sociohistorical context affect the treatment of these topics? How does this vary between different national traditions?
    -What formal innovations do you find to be associated with contraception/abortion?

    If you are interested in this panel, please send a cv an abstract of 250 words to Megan Minarich at megan.l.minarich@vanderbilt.edu by 20 August 2011.

    cfp categories: film_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsmodernist studiespopular_culturescience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 42198The 22nd Annual English Graduate Student Conference at Louisiana State University Feb. 16th & 17th, 2012LSU EGSA Mardi Gras Conference--Co-Chairs Doris Raab & Catherine Rileymardigrasconference2012@gmail.com1311732573african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: LSU EGSA Mardi Gras Conference--Co-Chairs Doris Raab & Catherine Rileycontact email: mardigrasconference2012@gmail.com

    Major Minors: Neglected and New Issues in Literary Studies

    The 22nd Annual Mardi Gras Conference at Louisiana State University

    LSU Student Union

    February 16th & 17th, 2012

    Keynote Address by Meredith L McGill, Rutgers University

    The literary canon, that sacred body of texts and genres that we deem high art, stands surrounded today by rapidly expanding interests in newer or long-neglected works. A major form, a major author, or a major style of analysis often dominates and overshadows the lesser known and more obscure. Meanwhile, archival efforts and the expanding resources of the internet have made available works and authors otherwise inaccessible, opening study to vast materials heretofore unknown or ignored. Furthermore, popular culture has entered the field, as video games, romance novels, and comic books have all permeated our classrooms and our scholarly endeavors. Whether texts buried by time and tradition or new genres expanding the very concept of literature, these materials provide a significant point of access to cultural, social, and critical discourses.

    With this in mind, the 22nd annual Mardi Gras Graduate Student Conference aims to explore areas that are often neglected in the critical discourse: works deemed low art, works and authors that have fallen out of critical favor, popular works or those deemed simply not as significant as the major works by major authors. Panels will explore these "major minors" in a myriad of ways, including but not limited to:

    Authors: minor authors of any era, authors that were once deemed significant but who are no longer studied, major authors of an era who are deemed too "popular" to be part of the canon, etc.

    Works: minor works by a major author, works of any era that have been little studied, works by major authors that have received little critical attention, major works that have fallen out of favor, minor characters in major novels, new or neglected critical approaches, etc.

    Genres: any genre from any period that seems to be neglected by the critical tradition, for example: periodicals, theatre (especially Victorian), musical theatre, video games, comic books, science fiction, fantasy, popular music, television, pornography, material culture, fan culture, etc.

    We are pleased to announce Meredith L. McGill, Director of the Center for Cultural Analysis at Rutgers University and author of American Literature and the Culture of Reprinting, 1843-1853, as this year's keynote speaker.

    We encourage papers from a variety of disciplines. Proposals for individual 15-minute papers as well as hour-long panel proposals organized by topic will be considered. Please submit an abstract of 250 words as an attachment along with contact information, including name, institutional affiliation, degree level, email and phone number, by December 9, 2011 to mardigrasconference2012@gmail.com. If you are proposing a panel, please also include a 250 word abstract for the panel itself in addition to the essay abstracts.

    For more information, please visit our website: http://uiswcmsweb.prod.lsu.edu/ArtSci/english/GraduateProgram/MardiGrasC...

    Co-Chairs: Doris Raab & Catherine Riley

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 42199Sport and the Nation, International Conference, 19-20 January 2012 (Edited)Department of English and School of Media, Communication and Culture, Jadavpur Universitysupriya.chaudhuri@gmail.com1311737638cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinternational_conferencesfull name / name of organization: Department of English and School of Media, Communication and Culture, Jadavpur Universitycontact email: supriya.chaudhuri@gmail.com

    The history of modern sport is intimately linked to the rise of the modern nation-state and its cultures of self-representation. Indeed, though games have existed as long as human beings have inhabited the earth, organized sport in the contemporary sense is thought to be a distinctive product of modernity. Enshrined in the curriculum of the Victorian public school and viewed as a means of training imperial administrators, sport also entered the public sphere as a spectacle for mass audiences, leading to a regulation of its practices and the foundation of sports bodies.

    The founder of the modern Olympic Games, Baron Pierre de Coubertin, was convinced that 'organised sport can create both moral and social strength', and international sporting spectacles became a means for displaying the health and self-discipline of individual nation-states. This ideology, imperial and European in its origin, was transmitted also to the colonised subjects of European imperialism, and through a complex process of appropriation and re-investment, sport also became a site wherein the former 'subject-races' could assert their own strength and skill, as Jesse Owens famously did in the Berlin Olympics.

    The postcolonial ideology of the nation invests heavily in sport as a means of national self-projection, while at the very same time, globalization and multinational capital has created a huge sports industry where highly-paid athletes compete in profit-making spectacles for a global audience. Sport is a vital ingredient of contemporary culture, and has produced a rich literature of its own, as well as representations in other media such as film. But sport has remained a problematic constituent in the task of national self-construction in India: acknowledged but neglected, a focus of hope but also of disappointment. 2011 marked the centenary of Mohun Bagan's triumph in the IFA Shield, but in 2012, as India's athletes prepare for yet another Olympic Games, they carry the painful legacy of mismanagement and confusion from our hosting of the Commonwealth Games. Yet there have been notable gains and achievements, not just in cricket. In this context, it is important to explore what sport means for the modern nation, in India and in the world.

    We therefore propose to hold a two-day, Interdisciplinary International Conference on 'Sport and the Nation', looking at sporting identities and cultures, the literature of sport, sporting nationalisms, gender, race and multiculturalism in sport, competition, spectacle, and globalized sport, and a range of other issues. Earlier conferences on related themes have been held at the University of Leeds and the University of Paris (Sorbonne), and there is the prospect of building up an international collaborative research network in this field. We have already received expressions of interest from a number of scholars in India and abroad, including Ramachandra Guha and Ashis Nandy.

    Please note that there are limited places for papers offered in response to this notice.
    Last dates for receiving paper proposals is September 30, 2011. Successful applicants will be notified by October 31, 2011.

    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinternational_conferences 42200Annual Congress 2012Hamdan Bin Mohammed e-Universitycongress@hbmeu.ac.ae1311744344general_announcementsgraduate_conferencesprofessional_topicsfull name / name of organization: Hamdan Bin Mohammed e-Universitycontact email: congress@hbmeu.ac.ae

    The 4th e-Health and Environment Conference will provide unique opportunities for researchers to build this new vision through tackling specific healthcare and environmental topics. These topics are presented in the following section which represents priority topics for the conference sessions. Although topics have been categorized into healthcare and environmental ones, this by no means intend to separate both concepts, on the contrary, topics merging both fields will be appreciated

    We invite all those engaged in e-Health and Environment issues to share their experiences and practices by submitting research papers, case studies, poster presentations, students brief papers & reviews, in accordance to the following themes:

    Environmental Related Issues:

    - Environmental awareness for economic competitiveness
    - Updates on biomedical waste management
    - Innovative techniques to combat desertification and water problems
    - Progressing with meeting and enforcing auto emission standards
    - Environmental standards and competitiveness of key economic sectors

    e-Health Related Issues:

    - Enhance competitiveness of healthcare sector through e-health solutions
    - Information infrastructure to improve health and environment
    - e-Learning and competitiveness in the healthcare market
    - Caring for the e- Community
    - Need for e-health governance to enhance competitiveness
    - Responsiveness to patient needs for market competitiveness

    cfp categories: general_announcementsgraduate_conferencesprofessional_topics 42201Auteurs and Authorship in Indian Cinema (Society for Cinema and Media Studies Conference, March 21-25, Boston, MA)Dr. Christopher Meirchristopher.meir@sta.uwi.edu1311746210film_and_televisioninternational_conferencespostcolonialfull name / name of organization: Dr. Christopher Meircontact email: christopher.meir@sta.uwi.edu

    Much recent scholarship on Indian cinema has focused on the social, cultural and historical dimensions of the popular Hindi-language cinema or in some cases on the film cultures of other popular regional cinemas. As such, the field has seen numerous studies in recent years on the fans, stars and reception of 'Bollywood' in particular, but attention to the sociology of popular cinema in the nation has meant that the great artists of Indian film-making – auteur directors, producers and screenwriters – have been neglected. Such neglect is somewhat ironic given the prominence of auteurism in structuring the western reception of 'world' cinema, a tendency typified in the case of India by the emphasis that has historically been placed on the life and work of Satyajit Ray.

    This panel will seek to reinvigorate discourses around auteur film-makers in Indian cinema and thus invites proposals for papers which engage with the careers of specific film-makers beyond Ray whose work shows a distinctive style and consistent thematic concerns. We are also seeking papers that provide theoretical and/or historical perspectives on auteurism and Indian cinema. Any proposal along these lines is welcome, but we are particularly interested in papers that deal with any of the following:

    -Auteurs in various industrial contexts including popular (e.g. Guru Dutt, Raj Kapoor, Mani Ratnam) and art cinema (e.g. Mani Kaul, Shyam Benegal) film-makers
    -Auteurs for whom regional identity is particularly significant (e.g., Adoor Gopalakrishnan, Ritwik Ghatak, Priyadarshan).
    -Female film-makers (e.g. Mira Nair, Aparna Sen)
    -Contemporary and/or emerging auteurs (e.g. Nagesh Kukunoor, Kiran Rao)
    -Auteur producers (e.g. Yash Chopra) or screenwriters (e.g. K.A. Abbas, Javed Akhtar, Salim Khan)
    -Personal visions in the face of the industrial realities of Indian cinema
    -Western auteur theory and its applicability in Indian contexts
    -The industrial basis for Indian auteur cinema

    Please send a 250-300 word abstract and a brief bio to Dr. Christopher Meir (Christopher.meir@sta.uwi.edu) and Dr. Malini Guha (malini_guha@carleton.ca) by August 15, 2011. Applicants will be notified regarding the acceptance of their proposal by August 20, 2011. Conference participants must be members of SCMS.

    cfp categories: film_and_televisioninternational_conferencespostcolonial 42202Sixth Quality Conference in the Middle EastHamdan Bin Mohammed e-Universitycongress@hbmeu.ac.ae1311746298graduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesfull name / name of organization: Hamdan Bin Mohammed e-Universitycontact email: congress@hbmeu.ac.ae

    Conference dates: January 30 - 2 February 2012
    Paper submission deadline: August 30, 2011
    Conference website: http://congress.hbmeu.ae/
    Contact us at: congress@hbmeu.ac.ae
    Join the converstation on Twitter: @HBMeU

    The Sixth Quality Conference in the Middle East to be held in Dubai from 30th January to 2ⁿd February 2011 under the umbrella of the HBMeU 2012 Annual Congress, is recognized amongst the world top 5 conferences in the Quality Management discipline. This year's theme : Innovation Based Competitiveness and Business Excellence" has been crafted to address the recent recession and economic down turn. The topic is timely as innovation is widely quoted as "engine for the economy".

    In line with the above theme the conference organizing committee is seeking contributions from institutions as well as individuals about measures undertaken in developing governance structures, policies, frameworks, tools etc to help innovation and achieving excellence. Call is also open for general debate on topics related to Total quality Management, Excellence, CSR and sustainability.

    The QC6 Technical Committee invites submissions for full papers, case studies, poster presentations and presentations to student track.

    - Excellence based Competition, Excellence based Innovation, Innovation based Competitiveness
    - TQM and Radical Innovation; Innovation System in Knowledge Based Society; Open and closed Innovation; Innovation Clusters, Customer Centric Innovation
    - Excellence and Innovation in the Public Sector, Excellence and Innovation Service Sector
    - Excellence and Innovation in the Manufacturing Sector; Excellence and Innovation in the Social Sector
    - Leadership Role for Embedding Innovation Culture, Innovation and Personal Development
    - Technological Innovations; Innovation and CSR; Innovation and Learning; Creativity, Ideation & Knowledge Management; Innovation and Business Models
    - Innovation Clusters and Partnership; Managing Innovation and Economic Development;
    - Innovation Policy Development; Strategies for Managing Destructive Innovations

    cfp categories: graduate_conferencesinternational_conferences 42203Tagore: The Global Impact of a Writer in the CommunityEdinburgh Napier University, Scotlandscots@napier.ac.uk1311753841ecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespoetrypostcolonialrenaissancescience_and_culturetravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Edinburgh Napier University, Scotlandcontact email: scots@napier.ac.uk

    The conference is held under the aegis of the Scottish Centre of Tagore Studies (ScoTs) being established as part of the Centre for Literature and Writing (CLAW).

    Proposals of 250 words should be submitted by 31 October 2011. Please send proposals, plus a one-paragraph biography, as Word document or PDF to scots@napier.ac.uk

    Ashis Nandy has said that Tagore embodies the modern consciousness of India (Illegitimacy of Nationalism, 1998) and this year India celebrates Tagore's 150th birth anniversary.

    Tagore forged friendships with leading thinkers and cultural figures of his day, including Einstein, G. B. Shaw, W. B. Yeats, Ezra Pound, and Gandhi. He had a particular connection with Scotland: his grandfather, Prince Dwarkanath Tagore, was given the Freedom of the City of Edinburgh in 1845 and Rabindranath's friendship and collaboration with Patrick Geddes led to the realization of their vision for International Universities.

    Tagore's impact was international and interdisciplinary. However, his reputation in the West has been overlooked in recent decades. This conference addresses that oversight and projects Tagore's legacy into the global arena:

    You were a designer in every fold of existence
    Your robes a syncretic weave of fakir and sage
    Your houses were shaped by a multicultural essence
    And every genre you touched reached the ultimate stage

    Of achievement. The time has come, Poet, to acknowledge
    Our measureless debt to you and share your borderless knowledge.

    From 'Rabindranath', by Bashabi Fraser

    The conference invites papers exploring Tagore's literary and artistic output and welcomes presentations that evaluate his community and educational projects and assess his global impact in his time and today. Papers are also welcome on Tagore's literary output, art, poetry, and ideas about community projects and global peace. Topics for papers include, but are not limited to, the following:

    Tagore and Literature

    Tagore and the Environment/Ecology

    Tagore and Modernism/Modernity

    Tagore and the Renaissance/Enlightenment

    Tagore and Postcolonialism/Cosmopolitanism

    Tagore and Scotland/Scottish Studies/Irish-Scottish Studies

    Tagore and Geddes

    Tagore and Education

    Tagore and the West

    Tagore and India/and the Indian community in Europe

    Tagore and his Circle

    Tagore and Gender Politics

    Tagore's Legacy

    Proposals of 250 words should be submitted by 31 October 2011. Please send proposals, plus a one-paragraph biography, as Word document or PDF to scots@napier.ac.uk

    For further information, please contact scots@napier.ac.uk

    Conference organisers:
    Dr Bashabi Fraser, Lecturer in English and Creative Writing
    Dr Scott Lyall, Lecturer in Modern Literature
    Dr Emily Alder, Research Assistant

    Centre for Literature and Writing
    Edinburgh Napier University

    cfp categories: ecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespoetrypostcolonialrenaissancescience_and_culturetravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 422042nd Global Conference: Urban PopculturesDr Rob Fisher/ Inter-Discipinary.Netup2@inter-disciplinary.net1311761553african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr Rob Fisher/ Inter-Discipinary.Netcontact email: up2@inter-disciplinary.net

    2nd Global Conference
    Urban Popcultures

    Friday 9th March- Sunday 11th March 2012
    Prague, Czech Republic

    Call for Papers:
    This inter- and multi-disciplinary conference aims to examine, explore
    and critically engage with issues related to urban life. The project
    will promote the ongoing analysis of the varied creative trends and
    alternative cultural movements that comprise urban popultures and
    subcultures. In particular the conference will encourage equally
    theoretical and practical debates which surround the cultural and
    political contexts within which alternative urban subcultures are
    flourishing.

    Papers, reports, work-in-progress, workshops and pre-formed panels are
    invited on issues related to any of the following themes:

    1. Popular, Alternative, and Underground Music Cultures
    Alternative and Underground Dance, Electronica, Hip Hop, Gothic, Punk
    and Post-Rock Scenes. Local, Regional, and Global Scenes. The
    Mass-Appropriation of Underground Music. Independent Music Cultures.
    Popular Music Theory.

    2. Subcultures, Communities, and Codes
    Underground and Alternative Ideologies and Lifestyles. Issues of Gender,
    Sexuality, and Identity. The Avantgarde and Urban Codes. Urban Religion
    and Religious Expressions. D.I.Y.

    3. Theories and Critical Studies of Popular Culture
    Histories, Representations, and Discourses on Independent Scenes. The
    Frankfurt School. The Visual Turn. Urban Intertextualities and
    Intermedialities. Cultural Appropriations. Postmodernity and Beyond.

    4. Popular and Subversive Expressions in Fashion, Art, Film, and Literature
    Urban and Contemporary Life and Themes Considered in Music, Literature,
    Art and Film. Urban Fashion, Style, and Branding. Pop Art. Graffiti. Low
    vs. High Culture.

    5. The City as Creative Subject/Object
    Virtual Urbanity – Online Communities and the Impact of Social
    Networking. Urban Identity and Membership. Globalization/Localization of
    Urban Experience. Recent trends in Copyright/Copyleft. The Role of
    Internet in the Transformation of Music Industry. The Impact of
    User-generated Content.

    6. Conflict, Popular Revolt, and Politics
    Music and Politics. Race and Music Styles. Music Revolutions.
    Generational Conflicts. Class Divisions. Ageing Music Fans and
    Cross-generational Cool. New Schools vs. Old Schools.

    7. Popular Culture Online and in Massmedia
    The Visual Aspects of Urban Entertainment. The Evolution of Music and
    Thematic Television. Media Structure of Music Video. Explicit TV and
    Censorship.

    300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 30th September 2011.
    All submissions are minimally double blind peer reviewed where
    appropriate. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft
    paper should be submitted by Friday27th January 2012. Abstracts should
    be submitted simultaneously to the Organising Chairs; abstracts may be
    in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and
    in this order:

    a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e)
    body of abstract

    Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes
    and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold,
    italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper
    proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you
    should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in
    cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic
    route or resend.

    Organising Chairs
    Jordan Copeland
    La Salle University,
    Philadelphia, USA
    Emial: copeland@lasalle.edu

    Daniel Riha
    Hub Leader (Cyber), Inter-Disciplinary.Net
    Charles University,
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Email: rihad@inter-disciplinary.net

    Rob Fisher
    Network Founder and Network Leader
    Inter-Disciplinary.Net,
    Freeland, Oxfordshire, UK
    Email: up2@inter-disciplinary.net

    The conference is part of the 'Critical Issues' programme of research
    projects. It aims to bring together people from different areas and
    interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are
    innovative and exciting.

    All papers accepted for and presented at this conference will be
    eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers maybe invited
    for development for publication in a themed hard copy volume(s) or for
    inclusion in a new Cyber journal (launching 2011).

    For further details of the project, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/critical-issues/cyber/urban-popculture...

    For further details of the conference, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/critical-issues/cyber/urban-popculture...

    Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and
    we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or
    subsistence.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 422057th Global Conference: Pluralism, Inclusion and Citizenship (March 2012; Prague; czech Republic)Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netpic7@inter-disciplinary.net1311772591african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: pic7@inter-disciplinary.net

    7th Global Conference
    Pluralism, Inclusion and Citizenship

    Monday 12th - Wednesday 14th March 2012
    Prague, Czech Republic

    Call for Papers:

    With this multi-disciplinary project we seek to explore the new developments and changes of the idea of pluralism and their implications for social and political processes of inclusion and citizenship in contemporary societies. The project will also assess the larger context of major world transformations, such as new forms of migration and the massive movements of people across the globe, as well as the impact of the multiple dynamics of globalisation on rootedness and membership (including their tensions and conflicts) and on a general sense of social acceptance and recognition. Looking to encourage innovative trans-disciplinary dialogues, we warmly welcome papers from all disciplines, professions and vocations which struggle to understand what it means for people, the world over, to be citizens in rapidly changing national, social and political landscapes.

    In particular papers, workshops, presentations and pre-formed panels are invited on any of the following themes:

    1. Challenging Old Concepts of Citizen and Alien
    ~ Who is a citizen and who is an alien, a foreigner?
    ~ The new value of political pluralism and cultural multiplicity; breaking with homogeneity and sameness
    ~ What is the place of difference and alterity in defining membership and citizenship?
    ~ How to account for political membership and identity?
    ~ Making sense of transformations and their effects over citizenship identity and membership
    ~ Othering, marginalising, excluding, stygmatising

    2. Nations, Fluid Boundaries and Citizenship
    ~ What does it mean, today, to belong to a nation?
    ~ New migrants, new migratory flows and massive movements from peripheral to central countries
    ~ Resurgence of the local and the diminishing importance of the national
    ~ Are we living post-national realities?
    ~ What is the place of economic and cultural claims in today's forms of political membership?
    ~ Assimilation, integration, adaptation and other forms of placing the responsibility of change on migrants

    3. Institutions, Organizations and Social Movements
    ~ Evaluating the promises and institutions of post-national governing
    ~ What happened to the rights of migrants and displaced peoples?
    ~ Political battles over globalization and the forging of global citizenship
    ~ Social movements, new rebellion and alternative global politics
    ~ Trans-national connections that escape institutional and political control
    ~ New forms of global exclusion

    4. Renewal or Re-foundation of Democracy?
    ~ New forms of civic protest and the de-centering of politics
    ~ Financial crisis and the political burden taken by Nations and States in the name of citizens
    ~ Civic indignation and the lack of trust in institutional politics
    ~ Political legitimation, institutional crisis of representation and sidestepping formal politics
    ~ Finding new forms, building new routes for forcing political change
    ~ New citizens and the action of citizens outside institutional politics

    5. Personhood and the Inter-Personal
    ~ De-nationalising citizenship and the making of a global citizen
    ~ Tensions, contradictions and conflicts of citizenship formations and political membership
    ~ New sources and forms of political participation; new localism, parochialism and communitarianism
    ~ Bonds of care across boundaries of inequality and exclusion, ideologies and religions, politics and power, nations and geography
    ~ Thinking and acting with foreigners and migrants in mind
    ~ Citizens acknowledging the fundamental role of migrants; making migration personal and interpersonal

    6. Media and Artistic Representations
    ~ The role of new and old media in the construction of political membership, of nations and citizens
    ~ Production and reproduction of political and citizen typing and stereotyping
    ~ The contested space of representing politics, national identity and membership
    ~ Art, media and how to challenge the rigid and impenetrable constructions of political culture
    ~ Living, being and exercising membership through art
    ~ Political life imitating art and fiction

    7. Transnational Political Interlacing of Contemporary Life
    ~ What is shared from political cultures? How are political cultures shared? Who has access to the sharing of political cultures?
    ~ Human rights, migration and massive displacements of people
    ~ Living in a context with the political markers of a different context: Is that political trans-culturalism?
    ~ Languages, idioms and new emerging forms of wanting to bridge the 'invisible' divide between political cultures
    ~ Symbols and significations that connect people to places other than 'their own'
    ~ Politics, identity and belonging by choice

    8. New Concepts, New Forms of Inclusion
    ~ Recognition and respect without marginality
    ~ An ethics for social and political relations in a new millennium
    ~ What to do with historically old concepts like tolerance, acceptance and hospitality?
    ~ Should not we all be strangers? Should not we all be foreigners?
    ~ Is there any use for cosmopolitanism these days?
    ~ Embracing the alien within the citizen; building fluid boundaries of membership and political participation

    Papers will also be considered which deal with related themes. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 30th September 2011. All submissions are minimally double blind peer reviewed where appropriate. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 27th January 2012. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to the Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

    a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract
    E-mails should be titled: Pluralism Abstract Submission

    Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

    Joint Organising Chairs:
    Alejandro Cervantes-Carson
    Hub Leader,
    Inter-Disciplinary.Net,
    Barcelona, Catalunya, Spain
    Email: acc@inter-disciplinary.net

    Rob Fisher
    Network Leader
    Inter-Disciplinary.Net,
    Freeland, Oxfordshire,
    United Kingdom
    Email: pic7@inter-disciplinary.net

    The conference is part of the 'Diversity and Recognition' research projects, which in turn belong to the 'At the Interface' programmes of Inter-Disciplinary.Net. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore discussions which are innovative and challenging. All papers accepted for and presented at the conference will be eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be developed for publication in themed hard copy volume(s).

    For further details of the project, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/at-the-interface/diversity-recognition...

    For further details of the conference, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/at-the-interface/diversity-recognition...

    Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 42206Sound, Voice, MusicAlphaville Journal of Film and Screen MediaIssue3.Alphaville@gmail.com1311783910film_and_televisioninterdisciplinaryfull name / name of organization: Alphaville Journal of Film and Screen Mediacontact email: Issue3.Alphaville@gmail.com

    The editorial board of Alphaville: Journal of Film and Screen Media seeks articles for its third issue to be published online in Summer 2012.

    The third issue is dedicated to sound, voice and music in cinema in the broadest sense. The issue editors (Jessica Shine, Danijela Kulezic-Wilson, Christopher Morris) are interested in papers that examine the themes of sound, voice and music either in the context of specific films, bodies of work, directors, composers etc., or, more broadly, in relation to contemporary or historical cinematic practice, theory and aesthetics. Possible topics may include but are not limited to:

    -The role of music and sound in cinema
    -The history of music and sound in film
    -Impact/creation of soundscapes
    -The role of the composer/sound designer
    -Voiceover and narration
    -Voice and its relation to score/sound design
    -Voice as a means of representation
    -The contemporary musical
    -Popular and pre-existing music in film
    -Music and gender/sexuality in cinema

    Potential contributors are invited to submit an article abstract (300 words), along with a short bibliography and a short bio to the issue editors by October 1st 2011 and at the following email address: Issue3.Alphaville@gmail.com

    cfp categories: film_and_televisioninterdisciplinary 42207Negative Cosmopolitanisms: Abjection, Power, and Biopolitics, 11-13 October 2012Terri Tomsky, Eddy Kent, Imre Szeman (Organzers). The Department of English and Film Studies, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canadatomsky@ualberta.ca1311789479african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialreligiontheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Terri Tomsky, Eddy Kent, Imre Szeman (Organzers). The Department of English and Film Studies, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canadacontact email: tomsky@ualberta.ca

    This interdisciplinary conference seeks to explore the array of negative cosmopolitanisms operating today—all those ways in which cosmopolitan subjects are still stigmatized, disempowered, excluded, and denied. Against the superficial liberal celebration of cosmopolitan diversity in the world today, negative cosmopolitanism instead reveals experiences of rupture, exile, oppression, and imperialism. The conference will bring researchers together to explore the histories and constitution of cosmopolitanism past and present, with the aim of better understanding the complex experience of power today.

    Keynotes:
    Timothy Brennan (University of Minnesota)
    Pheng Cheah (University of California, Berkeley)
    Sneja Gunew (University of British Columbia)
    Peter Nyers (McMaster University)

    Themes you may wish to consider include:

    *The history /representations of cosmopolitanism
    *Slum- or ghetto-based cosmopolitanisms
    *Imperial cosmopolitanism (e.g. the military complex, the War on Terror)
    *Labor and Internationalism
    *Community or the Commons
    *Piracy
    *Trafficking, dislocation, border-crossing
    *State sovereignty/state vulnerability
    *Communication & information technologies, new media
    *Biopolitics
    *Religious movements
    *Feminism

    Proposals shall consist of an abstract of 350-500 words and a one-page CV. Please send applications to Dr. Terri Tomsky by 21 October 2011.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialreligiontheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 42208Negative Cosmopolitanisms: Abjection, Power, and Biopolitics, 11-13 October 2012Terri Tomsky, Eddy Kent, Imre Szeman (Organzers). The Department of English and Film Studies, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canadatomsky@ualberta.ca1311789488african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialreligiontheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Terri Tomsky, Eddy Kent, Imre Szeman (Organzers). The Department of English and Film Studies, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canadacontact email: tomsky@ualberta.ca

    This interdisciplinary conference seeks to explore the array of negative cosmopolitanisms operating today—all those ways in which cosmopolitan subjects are still stigmatized, disempowered, excluded, and denied. Against the superficial liberal celebration of cosmopolitan diversity in the world today, negative cosmopolitanism instead reveals experiences of rupture, exile, oppression, and imperialism. The conference will bring researchers together to explore the histories and constitution of cosmopolitanism past and present, with the aim of better understanding the complex experience of power today.

    Keynotes:
    Timothy Brennan (University of Minnesota)
    Pheng Cheah (University of California, Berkeley)
    Sneja Gunew (University of British Columbia)
    Peter Nyers (McMaster University)

    Themes you may wish to consider include:

    *The history /representations of cosmopolitanism
    *Slum- or ghetto-based cosmopolitanisms
    *Imperial cosmopolitanism (e.g. the military complex, the War on Terror)
    *Labor and Internationalism
    *Community or the Commons
    *Piracy
    *Trafficking, dislocation, border-crossing
    *State sovereignty/state vulnerability
    *Communication & information technologies, new media
    *Biopolitics
    *Religious movements
    *Feminism

    Proposals shall consist of an abstract of 350-500 words and a one-page CV. Please send applications to Dr. Terri Tomsky by 21 October 2011.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialreligiontheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 42209Mighty Protectors for the Merchant Class: Saints as Intercessors between the Wealthy and the Divine. International Congress on MEmily Kelleyedkelley@svsu.edu1311791189medievalfull name / name of organization: Emily Kelleycontact email: edkelley@svsu.edu

    By the late medieval period, merchants formed an integral part of urban society; among their activities, they facilitated trade between city centers, participated in the governing of cities, and were patrons of churches and monasteries. At the same time, the wealth that they amassed and their sometimes morally dubious activities, such as money lending, often left merchants fearful of what the afterlife would bring, causing them to appeal directly to specific saints for intercession. This session seeks to explore the religious lives of these elite members of urban society, specifically considering the individual saints to whom merchants appealed for their earthly protection and heavenly salvation as well as the manner in which they made these appeals.

    As an interdisciplinary discussion of the relationship between merchants and their saintly protectors, this session will invite papers examining evidence of specific relationships between merchants and saints that might include consideration of merchant's wills, artistic patronage, manuscript collections, and pilgrimage, as well as the religious practices of merchants' confraternities and guilds. The session will welcome papers from all disciplines including, but not limited to, history, art history, literature, religious studies, and music.

    Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words and a participant information form to Emily Kelley (edkelley@svsu.edu) no later than September 15, 2011. The participant information forms are available online at: http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html#PIF

    cfp categories: medieval 42210First Year Seminar CFP October 2011, NJANSANew Jersey Association of New Student Advocatesdanielrobinsonk@wpunj.edu1311798789general_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryfull name / name of organization: New Jersey Association of New Student Advocatescontact email: danielrobinsonk@wpunj.edu

    NJANSA: New Jersey Association of New Student Advocates

    Lifelong Learning in an Instant World
    Date: Friday, October 28, 2011
    9:00am to 3:30pm
    Host Institution: Union County College / Elizabeth, New Jersey

    Keynote Speaker: Carolyn Hopper, Middle Tennessee State University
    Keynote Title: "Making Learning Relevant"

    Our Mission: The New Jersey Association of New Student Advocates promotes and develops student success in higher education from various two-year and four-year institutions, both public and private from the areas of student and academic affairs.

    Information

    Call for Proposals: Proposals that address the multifaceted nature of the first year transition are invited for review. Specific areas of focus include but are not limited to:

    Academic Integrity
    Diversity, Access, & Equity
    Adult Learners
    First Generation/Veterans
    Assessment
    Learning Communities & Clustering
    Career and/or Academic Advising
    Pedagogy
    Distance Education
    Social Networking
    Writing
    Campus-Wide Reading Programs

    Proposal Deadline extended: Thursday, 15 September

    Selection Criteria: Proposals will be selected based on their relevancy to the conference topic, the expertise of the presenter(s), and the creativity of the presentation topic. Evidence of assessment will increase the likelihood of the proposal's acceptance.

    Session Types:
    Concurrent / breakout sessions: 60 minutes in length and should allow for 40 – 45 minutes of formal presentation and 15 – 20 minutes for questions and discussion. These sessions can focus on research, trends and issues, institutional initiatives, and best practices.

    15 – 20 minutes / mini presentations: Mini presenters will be grouped with similar topics to form panel presentations with discussions on linked topics. Presenters will be given 15 – 20 minutes to focus on either research findings or assessed programmatic initiatives at an institution. Following two to three panel presenters, a moderator will facilitate Q & A on the topics.

    To Submit: visit www.njansa.org; complete the proposal form and send it via e-mail to danielrobinsonk@wpunj.edu

    Notification of inclusion on the program will be made by 1 October 2011. Please note that all presenters must be registered for the conference prior to 15 October 15, 2011.

    Please contact Kim Daniel-Robinson, NJANSA Chair, at 973-720-3768 or danielrobinsonk@wpunj.edu, for additional information.

    cfp categories: general_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinary 422112nd Global Conference: Experiential Learning in Virtual Worlds (March 2012: Prague; Czech Republic)Dr Rob Fisher/Inter-Disciplinary.Netelvw2@inter-disciplinary.net1311836272african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Dr Rob Fisher/Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: elvw2@inter-disciplinary.net

    2nd Global Conference
    Experiential Learning in Virtual Worlds

    12th March - 14th March 2012
    Prague, Czech Republic

    Call for Papers:
    Interest in virtual worlds and their application to learning has increased dramatically in recent years. They play an increasingly important role for people in both social and work-based contexts, and they challenge many of our assumptions about how we work, teach, learn, and relate to each other. There are many different types of virtual worlds and they are used for a multiplicity of purposes including gaming, play, social networking, learning and development, work, and even business. The experiences gained in virtual worlds impact who we are in the physical world, and vice versa. What are we learning through those experiences and how transferable is that learning from one domain to another?

    The main aims of this conference are to increase our understanding of experiential learning in virtual worlds, to examine formal and informal learning in such worlds, and to critique both their essential characteristics and future possibilities. For the purposes of this call for papers, we define virtual worlds as 3D, immersive graphical environments representing realistic or imaginary worlds, in which users are co-presented as animated characters (avatars) and interact with each other and with the worlds' contents. However, we recognise both the complexity and contested nature of experiential learning in virtual worlds and welcome papers that challenge this definition.

    This conference will be of interest to educators, researchers, students, independent scholars, trainers, virtual world users, and anyone interested in what happens in virtual worlds and what it means for us as human (or virtual) beings.

    As it is such a broad subject area, Experiential Learning in Virtual Worlds precludes a definitive list of sub-topics, but the following list is indicative of the kind of topics or themes envisaged by this Call for Papers:

    * Art of building a virtual persona
    * Arts and entertainment in virtual worlds
    * Assessment in virtual worlds
    * Blended learning approaches
    * Case studies of experimental projects
    * Communication modes and etiquette
    * Conflict in virtual worlds
    * Education and training in virtual worlds
    * Emerging technologies within higher education
    * Identity and citizenship in virtual worlds
    * Immersion and presence in virtual worlds
    * International technology challenges
    * Online communities, formal and informal
    * Play, fun, fantasy and horror in the virtual world
    * Psychology and affect in virtual worlds
    * Role switching between traditional and virtual organizations
    * Scenarios, simulations, role-play and experimentation
    * Serious games
    * Sexuality and (in)appropriate behaviour in virtual learning worlds
    * Skill development in MMORPGs
    * Teaching
    * Technology convergence
    * Types of virtual worlds
    * Understanding mortality in virtual worlds
    * Virtual and global teams
    * Virtual world pedagogies
    * Work-related learning in virtual worlds

    Papers will be considered on any related theme. The Steering Group also welcomes the submission of pre-formed panel proposals. Papers will be considered on any related theme.

    300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 30th September 2011. All submissions are minimally double blind peer reviewed where appropriate. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday27th January 2012. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to the Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

    a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract

    Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a 12-20 page full draft paper should be submitted to both Organising Chairs by Monday 27th January 2012.

    For further details of the project, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/at-the-interface/education/experientia...

    For further details of the conference, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/at-the-interface/education/experientia...

    Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 42212Image & Text (journal) Call for PapersAmanda du Preez, University of Pretoriaamanda.dupreez@up.ac.za1311841632cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysfull name / name of organization: Amanda du Preez, University of Pretoriacontact email: amanda.dupreez@up.ac.za

    NEWLY LAUNCHED IMAGE & TEXT: CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS

    Image & Text, in its re-aligned and re-positioned format, aims to be a multi- and interdisciplinary
    journal that orbits around the visual culture nexus. The aim is to draw perspectives from a broad
    field of interests and subjects: visual anthropology, material culture, visual arts, design culture,
    visualising sciences and technologies, art history, philosophy, fashion, media and film studies,
    architecture, literary studies, new media and cyber theory. (The list is by no means exhaustive.) The
    grounding provided by visual culture studies as a comparative and enabling premise for all these
    approaches, subjects, interests and theories is located in the global South, not only geographically
    but also critically.

    The aim is to showcase new and young academic voices, as well as more established voices within
    the ambit of the growing field of visual culture studies. It is also a priority to show how
    interest, theories and approaches to visual culture have grown and developed in the recent
    past.

    The editors invite papers that address or intersect with the visual from any of these diverse fields
    and subjects with a particular emphasis on the visual. The journal is published annually and has been
    accredited by the South African Department of Higher Education and Training since 1997.

    Image & Text has a rigorous double-blind reviewing policy and all submitted articles are first
    subjected to editorial screening, after which they are sent anonymously to two reviewers. Only
    material deemed to be of a suitably high standard is published.

    Articles or other correspondence can be submitted electronically to:
    Jeanne.vaneeden@up.ac.za or Amanda.dupreez@up.ac.za

    Contributors should please ensure that their submissions satisfy the following editorial
    requirements.

    • Manuscripts must be typed in A4 format in 1.5 or double spacing with generous left and
    • right margins
    • All pages must be numbered and the Harvard Reference System must be used throughout
    • (example is available from the editors)
    • Length of articles must be approximately 5000 - 7000 words
    • All articles must have a cover sheet that provides the following details: Title of the article,
    • name of author/s, affiliation of author/s, designation of author/s and date of submission
    • Articles must be presented in the following sequence: title of article, name of author/s, main
    • text, notes, bibliography, captions, images
    • Digital images must be of a quality suitable for reproduction and printing and should
    • preferably be 300dpi and in jpg or tiff format
    • Authors are responsible for obtaining copyright and reproduction clearance for all visual
    • material submitted
    • Text and images must be submitted in separate files

    Image & Text is published and distributed by the Department of Visual Arts at the University of Pretoria. The views of contributors are not necessarily those of the editors or of the University of Pretoria. The University therefore accepts no responsibility for opinions expressed in the journal.
    This journal is an e-publication and is available through Sabinet online. For any enquiries in this regard, please contact the Department of Visual Arts at +27 12 4202353 or email petro.moraal@up.ac.za
    © Copyright reserved
    ISSN 1020 1497

    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essays 422134th Global Conference: Digital Memories (March 2012: Prague; Czech Republic)Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netdm4@inter-disciplinary.net1311844923bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: dm4@inter-disciplinary.net

    4th Global Conference
    Digital Memories

    Thursday 15th March - Saturday 17th March 2012
    Prague, Czech Republic

    Call for Papers:
    This inter- and multi-disciplinary conference aims to examine, explore and critically engage with the issues and implications created by the massive exploitation of digital technologies for inter-human communication and examine how online users form, archive and de-/code their memories in cybermedia environments, and how the systems used for production influence the way the users perceive and work with the memory. In particular the conference will encourage equally theoretical and practical debates which surround the cultural contexts of memory co-/production, re-/mediation, en-/decoding, dissemination, personal/mass interpretation and preservation.

    Papers, presentations, workshops and reports are invited on any of the following themes:

    1. Digital Personal and Community Memory
    Theories and Concepts of Memory. The Digitisation of Individual and Community Memory. Identifying Key Features and Issues.

    2. Externalization and Mediation of Memories
    Memory Metaphors in the Digital Age. Web 2.0 Services as a Medium for Production/Dissemination of Memory. Representational Principles for Memory Recording.

    3. Memory in Cybercultures and Arts
    New Interfaces. Cultural Visualizations and Mapping . The Memory of Digital Media and Systems. The Recording Device and the User Response. Strategies for Performing Digital Memory. Mobile Systems.

    4. Memory and Technology
    Fan Cultures and Social Networking. Music History and Cultural memory. New Media Arts and Memory. The Spatialization of Memories in New Media and Virtual Worlds.

    5. Archiving and Dissemination of memory Data
    Digital Data Recording. Memory Restoring and Preservation Strategies. The Future of Digital Libraries and Archives. Database Design, Data Retrieval, Usage and Preservation. Political, Judicial and Social Problems with Data Ownership.

    6. Uses of new media for Production of Historical Knowledge
    History of Society Memory. National Identity and Memory in the Digital Age. Political Uses of Cybermedia for Historical Revisionism. Digital Memory and Communities of Place.

    7. Specific Research on Community Memory
    Social Issues Research. Online Ethnographic Research. Privacy and Legal Issues in Community Informatics. Folksonomies as Anthropological Archives. Archeology of Interfaces

    The Steering Group particularly welcomes the submission of pre-formed panel proposals. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 30th September 2011. All submissions are minimally double blind peer reviewed where appropriate. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 27th January 2012. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to the Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

    a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract

    Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

    Organising Chairs

    Daniel Riha
    Cyber Hub Leader, Inter-Disciplinary.Net and
    Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic
    Email:rihad@inter-disciplinary.net

    Rob Fisher
    Network Founder and Network Leader
    Inter-Disciplinary.Net,
    Freeland, Oxfordshire, UK
    Email: dm4@inter-disciplinary.net

    The conference is part of the 'At the Interface' programme of research projects. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and exciting.

    All papers accepted for and presented at this conference will be eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers maybe invited for development for publication in a themed hard copy volume(s) or for inclusion in a new Cyber journal (launching 2011).

    For further details of the project, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/critical-issues/cyber/digital-memories...

    For further details of the conference, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/critical-issues/cyber/digital-memories...

    Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

    cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 422141st Global Conference: Celebrity: Exploring Critical Issues (March 2012: Prague; Czech Republic)Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netceleb@inter-disciplinary.net1311850212african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: celeb@inter-disciplinary.net

    1st Global Conference
    Celebrity: Exploring Critical Issues

    15th March - 17th March 2012
    Prague, Czech Republic

    Call for Papers:
    The dream to be famous is as old as humanity itself. Celebrities are born every day and they often disappear after their Warholian fifteen minutes. Celebrity culture has long ceased to be of interest only to tabloids and merchandisers and the people that consume them. Its analysis permeates all disciplines of study, making celebrity a multifaceted concept. Though more obvious in the late 20th century, academics have continually called for a broader programme of celebrity studies; anthropologists have been identifying connections between celebrity status and religion (shamanism; idolatry; reliquaries); psychologists have been discussing the consequences of 'celebrity worship' and warning about the fate of those who rose to questionable fame within a fortnight. With the seemingly insatiable desire for the lifestyle, style-tips and emulation of celebrity sociologists have been describing new ways of representing, producing and, most importantly, consuming celebrity; all manner of consumer products, not least the medical world, has been engaging celebrities to promote a cornucopia of products as well as health-awareness programmes or as spokes-persons for the UN, UNICEF, ambassadors, charities and beyond.; more recently, economists have pointed to the entertainment sector to find areas which have not been drastically touched by recession.

    This call for papers addresses a serious, interdisciplinary and multicultural analysis of the phenomenon of celebrity. Papers, reports, work-in-progress, workshops and pre-formed panels are invited on issues related to the following themes:

    * Definitions of celebrity-hood, stardom, charisma, uniqueness/singularity across cultures
    * The history of celebrity: the idols in the past and now
    * From zero to hero
    * The modern celebrity culture
    * Ideological conditions of celebrity culture
    * Celebrities as commodities
    * Representation of celebrities; 'celebrification' processes; the making of the 'star'
    * Celebrity and identity formation; empowerment or objectification; self-fashioning (public vs private self)
    * Celebrity culture and the audience (i.e. fandom; celebrity worship; stalking; role models; franchising)
    * Good and bad PR
    * Celebrities as cultural fabrications
    * Celebrity and power; political function of celebrity status
    * Politics and celebrities; celebrities in politics
    * Mass media and the formation of celebrity culture
    * Celebrity in the media: news, shows, tabloids
    * Celebrity and the law, accountability, morality, crime, transgressions
    * Celebrity status and gender
    * Celebrity as educators; their positive impact; celebrities and humanitarian actions; awareness-raising
    * Notorious celebrity/fame: The anti-heroes
    * Celebrities and their personnel
    * Child celebrities: Too young for fame?
    * Celebrity status as a burden; The weight of stardom
    * Forgotten celebrities: What happens when fame disappears? Celebrities and ageing
    * Unwanted fame
    * Intercultural perspective on celebrity: i.e. Bollywood vs Hollywood
    * (Post)colonialism and celebrity
    * (Auto)biographies of/by stars and idols: self-representation, truth/fiction
    * Celebrity confessional literature; Self-help books by celebrities

    Papers will be accepted which deal with related areas and themes. Papers will also be considered on any related theme. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 30th September 2011. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper of no more than 3000 words should be submitted by Friday 27th January 2012. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to both Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

    a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract
    E-mails should be entitled: Celebrity Abstract Submission.

    Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

    Organising Chairs

    Katarzyna Bronk
    Adam Mickiewicz University,
    Poznan,
    Poland
    E-mail: kbronk@ifa.amu.edu.pl

    Dr Rob Fisher
    Inter-Disciplinary.Net
    Priory House, Wroslyn Road,
    Freeland, Oxfordshire OX29 8HR
    Email: celeb@inter-disciplinary.net

    The conference is part of the Critical Issues series of research projects. The aim of the conference is to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and exciting. All papers accepted for and presented at this conference are eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be invited to go forward for development into a themed ISBN hard copy volume.

    For further details of the project, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/critical-issues/ethos/celebrity-explor...

    For further details of the conference, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/critical-issues/ethos/celebrity-explor...

    Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 4221513th Global Conference: Perspectives on Evil and Human Wickedness (March 2012: Prague; Czech Republic)Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netevil13@inter-disciplinary.net1311858240african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: evil13@inter-disciplinary.net

    13th Global Conference
    Perspectives on Evil and Human Wickedness

    15th March - 17th March 2012
    Prague, Czech Republic

    Call for Papers:
    Hitler. Spitzer. Torquemada. Weiner. Genghis Khan. Lucrecia Borgia. Ronald Reagan. Ivan the Terrible. Bill Clinton. What do all these people have in common? They are all considered "evil" by a few, some, many, or all others who know anything about them. Why? What makes them evil? Or even just plain old "wicked?" What makes them not-evil or not-wicked? How does the label "evil" or "wicked" change our estimation of them? How has the use of those labels for these folk — and others — changed over time? How will the use of these labels continue to evolve?

    Further, is evil an all-or-nothing term? Is some one either evil or not evil? Is it a term reserved for use in relation to 'special cases'? Serial killers? Paedophiles? Mothers who kill their children? Children who kill other children? Is it only people who can be evil? Can animals be evil? Can countries or nations be evil?

    Papers, presentations, reports and workshops are invited on issues on or broadly related to any of the following themes:

    1. Wrestling with 'Evil'
    - does the language of 'evil' make sense in the 21st Century?
    - what is 'evil'? What is the concept of 'evil'?
    - when we use the term 'evil' what do we seek to convey?
    - understanding the language of evil
    - 'evil' and other possibilities: morally objectionable; morally wrong; bad; immoral; iniquitous; reprobate; sinful; wrong; depraved; diabolical; heinous; malevolent; wicked

    2. The Nature of Evil
    - the contexts of evil; the 'meaning' of evil as context dependent
    - the roots of evil
    - what counts as evil? Evil, Evils. Is there such a thing?
    - the boundaries of evil; the forms of evil; types of evil; instances of evil. Universal evil?
    - the practices of evil
    - taking evil seriously; enjoying evil; satisfying evil

    3. Explanatory Frameworks
    - what are we looking for? The possibility of explanations
    - what is an explanation?
    - what does or should an explanation seek to achieve?
    - is evil capable of explanation?
    - explanation as evil

    4. Understanding Evil
    - from the perspectives of the disciplines
    indicative examples: anthropology, art, art history, criminology, cultural studies, history, legal studies, literature, philosophy, psychology, sociology, and theology

    - from the perspectives of professions
    indicative examples: accountants, architects, diplomats, doctors, engineers, lawyers, pharmacists, planners, teachers, vets; people working in economics, forensics, medicine, nursing, politics, prison services, psychiatry

    - from the perspectives of vocations
    indicative examples: people working in altruistic vocations, professional vocations, voluntary vocations, religious vocations, humanitarian campaigning and activities

    - from the perspectives of ngos
    indicative examples: United Nations, international ngo's, business oriented ngo's, governmental ngo's, quango's, civil society ngo's; people working with interest groups, lobbying activities; charity organisations; relief organisations; occupational organisations; not-for-profit networks

    5. Representations of Evil
    - art, art history, visual culture
    - cinema, tv, theatre, radio
    - music; metal
    - media
    - technological and multi-media representations
    - video games and on-line communities
    - subcultural formations and identities
    - fashion and evil
    - gothic subjectivities and Othering

    6. Confronting Evil
    - how is it possible to confront evil?
    - can evil be resolved? Should evil be resolved?
    - the work of Truth and Reconciliation commissions; the International Criminal Court; the role of law and local criminal justice procedures
    - the work of international organisations
    - the role of charities

    The Steering Group also welcomes the submission of pre-formed panel proposals. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 1st October 2010. All submissions are minimally double blind peer reviewed where appropriate. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 4th February 2011. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to the Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

    a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract

    Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

    Organising Chairs

    Stephen Morris
    Hub Leader (Evil)
    Independent Scholar
    New York, USA
    Email:nycstephen12@yahoo.com

    Rob Fisher
    Network Founder and Network Leader
    Inter-Disciplinary.Net,
    Freeland, Oxfordshire, UK
    Email: evil13@interdisciplinary.net

    The conference is part of the 'At the Interface' programme of research projects. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and exciting.

    All papers accepted for and presented at this conference will be eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers maybe invited for development for publication in a themed hard copy volume(s) or for inclusion in the Perspectives on Evil journal (relaunching 2011).

    For further details of the project, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/at-the-interface/evil/perspectives-on-...

    For further details of the conference, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/at-the-interface/evil/perspectives-on-...

    Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 42216ACLA 2012 :: The Corpse and CatastropheKaren Elizabeth Bishop (Rutgers) & David Sherman (Brandeis)kebishop@rci.rutgers.edu / davidsherman@brandeis.edu1311861939african-americanamericanclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Karen Elizabeth Bishop (Rutgers) & David Sherman (Brandeis)contact email: kebishop@rci.rutgers.edu / davidsherman@brandeis.edu

    Call for Papers: The Corpse and Catastrophe
    ACLA 2011: Collapse/Catastrophe/Change
    Providence, RI | 29 March-1 April 2012

    Seminar Organizers: Karen Elizabeth Bishop (Rutgers University) and David Sherman (Brandeis University)

    This seminar will examine the corpses in and of literature, including the catastrophic meaning of corpses. Papers with aesthetic, ethical, political, and historical dimensions are welcome, and might address a range of questions:

    • How does literature investigate the ethics of caring for the dead? How is the unburied corpse a site of ethical, as well as discursive, crisis? If catastrophe is a reversal of what is expected, but also a turning away from, a downturn, then what does the corpse turn us away from, and what turns us away from the corpses in our care?

    • How might the literary corpse function simultaneously as a marker of the legible, the visible, the manifest and as a marker of absence, the disappeared, the missing? What's at stake in this polyvalence? How does it inform how we read both text and context?

    • How has the desire to represent corpses affected literary style and form, and what do these literary techniques reveal about this desire? How do corpses pose representational problems for particular genres, movements, schools, traditions, media? What tensions between aesthetics and ethics does the corpse reveal? What is the relation between writing and tending to a dead body?

    • How has literature responded to the modernization and postmodernization of deathways? How are the dead a flashpoint for cultural tensions in colonial and postcolonial situations? How has the state—in its various techniques of regulation, ideological formation, and violence—complicated the politics of dead bodies?

    • How—by what catastrophes—do forms of literary production die, what are their remains, and how do we tend to them? What correlations can we trace between the circulation of corpses and the circulation of texts?

    Drafts of papers (2,500 words) for this seminar will be pre-circulated to workshop participants as well as posted via a panel website for audience participants. The seminar organizers will ask that invited members of the panel read their colleagues' papers in advance of the conference in order to facilitate an intimate and productive conversation about each work. During the seminar, each member will be afforded ten minutes in which to give a brief overview of his or her paper or to read aloud an excerpt of the paper; the remaining ten minutes of each presentation will be reserved for feedback and questions. A longer period for more open discussion will follow the presentations. Please note that ACLA seminars take place over 2-3 days with 8-12 participants; members are expected to attend all seminar sessions.

    Please submit abstracts of 300-500 words to Karen Bishop (kebishop@rci.rutgers.edu) and David Sherman (davidsherman@brandeis.edu) by 15 September 2012. Feel free to contact the organizers with any questions you may have.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 422173rd Global Conference: Urban Fantasies: Magic and the Supernatural (March 2012; Prague; Czech Republic)Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netuf3@inter-disciplinary.net1311864002african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: uf3@inter-disciplinary.net

    3rd Global Conference
    Urban Fantasies: Magic and the Supernatural

    15th March - 17th March 2012
    Prague, Czech Republic

    Call for Papers:

    Jimmy Paz. Harry Dresden. Matthew Swift. Felix Castor. Sookie Stackhouse and Bill Compton.

    These are among the more recent characters that fill the shelves of "Urban Fantasy" in local or online bookshops. The novels that constitute the genre are set in cities or gritty inner-cities and contain one or more fantastic elements. Alien races, mythological characters, paranormal beings, and the manipulation of magical forces all appear in these novels. Self-esteem issues and tragic pasts often color or shape the principal characters. Although most often "contemporary," the tales are sometimes set in the past or future as well. The books and stories demonstrate how magic or the supernatural interact with everyday quotidian life, either changing it forever (as in the *Shadow Saga*) or remaining a hidden force that protects the unknowing residents of the city (as in *The Chamber of Ten*).

    This "Urban Fantasy" thread is part of a larger project concerned with Magic and the Supernatural in all its myriad forms. The fascination and appeal of magic and supernatural entities pervades societies and cultures. The continuing appeal of these characters is a testimony to how they shape our daydreams and our nightmares, as well as how we yearn for something that is "more" or "beyond" what we can see-touch-taste-feel. Children still avoid stepping on cracks, lovers pluck petals from a daisy, cards are dealt and tea leaves read.

    A belief in magic as a means of influencing the world seems to have been common in all cultures. Some of these beliefs crossed over into nascent religions, influencing rites and religious celebrations. Over time, religiously-based supernatural events ("miracles") acquired their own flavour, separating themselves from standard magic. Some modern religions such as the Neopaganisms embrace connections to magic, while others retain only echoes of their distant origins.

    Papers from any discipline are welcome on any aspect of the Urban Fantasy genre as well as those concerned with Magic and the Supernatural in more general terms or other subheadings. Possible subjects include, but are not limited to, these:

    * Gender and sexual stereotypes/roles in UF stories
    * Updating and rewriting of traditional mythologies in UF
    * Role of / interaction of magic/philosophy/religion in UF
    * Magical practice as religion in UF
    * Changes in UF as reflections of /opposition to contemporary culture
    * Cultural and racial stereotypes in UF
    * Comparison of UF and other fantasy sub-genres
    * Importance of geographic location (ex. London, Salzburg, Venice) in UF
    * Importance of historical accuracy and fidelity in UF
    * Explanations for how "magic" functions/operates in varying UF stories
    * Magic as "paranormal," anything alleged to exist that is not explainable by any present laws of science
    * the distinctions between "magic" and "religion" and "science"
    * Magical thinking and the equation of coincidence with causality
    * Folk magic and "traditional" systems of magic
    * "Magick" and "Wicca" as religious systems in modern society
    * Witchcraft in the European context
    * "Witchcraft" and animism in African or Asian contexts
    * Magic as illusion, stagecraft, sleight-of-hand
    * Magic in modern literature (ex. Harry Potter, Harry Dresden, the saga of Middle Earth, the Chronicles of Narnia, etc.) and in traditional literatures (folk or fairy tales, legends, mythologies, etc.)
    * Magic in art and the depiction of magical creatures, practices or practitioners
    * the associations of magic with the "monstrous" or "evil;" does one imply the presence of the other?
    * the portrayal of magic, magical creatures, and magical practices or practitioners on television and in film
    * the roles or uses of magic in video games, on-line communities, role-playing games, subcultural formations and identities
    * the similarities and differences of magical creatures across societies and time periods
    * the interplay of "magic" and "religion" as well as "science"
    * the "sciences" of demonology and angelology
    * the role of divination or prophecy in societies or religions
    * the use of "natural" vs. "supernatural" explanations for world events
    * Magic and the supernatural as coping mechanisms for individuals and societies

    The Steering Group also welcomes the submission of pre-formed panel proposals. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 30th September 2011. All submissions are minimally double blind peer reviewed where appropriate. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 27th January 2012. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to the Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

    a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract

    Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

    Organising Chairs

    Stephen Morris
    Hub Leader (Evil)
    Independent Scholar
    New York, USA
    Email: smmorris58@yahoo.com

    Rob Fisher
    Network Founder and Network Leader
    Inter-Disciplinary.Net,
    Freeland, Oxfordshire, UK
    Email: uf3@inter-disciplinary.net

    The conference is part of the 'At the Interface' programme of research projects. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and exciting.

    All papers accepted for and presented at this conference will be eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers maybe invited for development for publication in a themed hard copy volume(s) or for inclusion in the Perspectives on Evil journal (relaunching 2011).

    For further details of the project, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/at-the-interface/evil/magic-and-the-su...

    For further details of the conference, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/at-the-interface/evil/magic-and-the-su...

    Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 42218Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Conference: Classifying the Medieval and Renaissance World, April 12-14, 2012Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association (RMMRA)kleithom@isu.edu1311873300interdisciplinarymedievalrenaissancefull name / name of organization: Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association (RMMRA)contact email: kleithom@isu.edu

    http://www.isu.edu/english/conf2012/

    Idaho State University
    Pocatello, Idaho
    April 12-14, 2012

    The Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association invites proposals for papers and panels concerning the categories and classifications used to understand the Medieval and Renaissance worlds, both in the period and now.

    Topics might include: Anachronism, Class, Dictionaries, Disciplines, Epistemology, Estates, Ethnicity, Gender, Genres, Grammars, Guilds, Medievalism, Narratives, Nationalism, Natural Histories, Periods, Professions, Race, Regionalism, or Travel.

    Keynote Speaker: Antonette diPaolo Healey (Editor of the Dictionary of Old English and Angus Cameron Professor of Old English Studies, University of Toronto)

    Please submit proposals for papers or sessions (along with a one- to two-page CV) to Thomas Klein (kleithom@isu.edu) by January 30, 2012.

    cfp categories: interdisciplinarymedievalrenaissance 42219[UPDATE] The Apocalypse in Literature and Film (October 1, 2011)_LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory_litjourn@yahoo.com1311896578african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: _LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory_contact email: litjourn@yahoo.com

    Alien invasion, viral outbreak, nuclear holocaust, the rise of the machines, the flood, the second coming, the second ice age—these are just a few of the ways human beings have imagined their "end of days." And someone's Armageddon clock is always ticking—we just dodged Harold Camping's rapture on May 21st of this year, and the Mayan-predicted doomsday of 2012 is just around the corner. In the end, what do we reveal about ourselves when we dream of the apocalypse? What are the social and political functions of these narratives in any given historical period? How do different cultures imagine the apocalypse, and what do these differences reveal? What is particular to the narratological design and content of apocalyptic texts? LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory solicits papers for an upcoming special issue on representations of the apocalypse in literature and film across a range of genres, time periods, and cultural traditions. LIT welcomes essays that consider representations of the apocalypse in literature and film and that are theoretically grounded but also engaging and accessible. Contributions should be from 5,000-10,000 words in length. Guest Editors: Karen J. Renner, Northern Arizona University; Joshua J. Masters, University of West Georgia.

    LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory publishes critical essays that employ engaging, coherent theoretical perspectives and provide original, close readings of texts. Because LIT addresses a general literate audience, we encourage essays unburdened by excessive theoretical jargon. We do not restrict the journal's scope to specific periods, genres, or critical paradigms. Submissions must use MLA citation style. Please email an electronic version of your essay (as an MS Word document), along with a 100 word abstract, to litjourn@yahoo.com.

    Deadline for submissions: October 1, 2011

    LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory also welcomes submissions for general issues.

    LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory
    Editors: Professor Regina Barreca, University of Connecticut &
    Associate Professor Margaret E. Mitchell, University of West Georgia

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 42220[UPDATE] The Art of Outrage: Poetics, Politics, Polarization. In NYC @Fordham University's Lincoln Center CampusFordham University's Graduate English Association (Deadline AUGUST 31st, 2011. Conference on Oct 14th, 2011)artofoutrage@gmail.com1311903986african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Fordham University's Graduate English Association (Deadline AUGUST 31st, 2011. Conference on Oct 14th, 2011)contact email: artofoutrage@gmail.com

    An interdisciplinary graduate conference.
    Keynote Speaker: Prof. Russ Castronovo, Dorothy Draheim Professor of English at University of Wisconsin-Madison.

    This one day interdisciplinary conference will be held at Fordham University's Lincoln Center Campus in New York City: (113 W 60th)

    We are currently accepting applications from PhD and MA students (as well as junior faculty members). The conference is free of charge and includes breakfast and an after-keynote reception w/food and beverages.

    We are also currently working on an after-conference event, which will most likely involve drink specials at a local pub.

    We strongly encourage applicants from Law, Psychology, History, Philosophy, Theology, English, Gender Studies, and other programs to apply.

    See the full CFP below for more info!

    Like us on FB:
    http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Art-of-Outrage/122069371217440

    Email us w/questions: artofoutrage@gmail.com

    Keynote Speaker:
    Prof. Russ Castronovo, Jean Wall Bennet Professor of English and American Studies at University of Wisconsin-Madison.
    More information at: http://www.english.wisc.edu/people/faculty/castronovo.html

    Prof. Castronovo's publications include:
    Beautiful Democracy: Aesthetics and Anarchy in a Global Era (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007);

    Materializing Democracy: Toward a Revitalized Cultural Politics, co-edited with Dana Nelson (Durham: Duke University Press, 2002)

    Necro Citizenship: Death, Eroticism, and the Public Sphere in the Nineteenth-Century United States (Durham: Duke University Press, 2001);

    Fathering the Nation: American Genealogies of Slavery and Freedom (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995)
    **************************************************************

    "'They're not like us,' and for that reason deserve to be ruled."
    Edward Said on the colonizing mindset, Culture and Imperialism (1994)

    Might there be degrees of intensity to processes like othering, abjection, and polarization? If we posit that certain historical and cultural moments (perhaps our own) are particularly fractured by tensions between various forms of radical extremism/extreme radicalism, how are articulations of the self and the other affected in such moments?

    This interdisciplinary graduate conference, hosted by Fordham University's Graduate English Association, calls for a day's worth of reasonable, temperate, diplomatic discourse on the topic of literary, historical, and political outrage. We are particularly concerned with investigating the role of outrage in the formation of radicalized selves and radicalized others. We take our inspiration from what many would describe as the current culturally and politically polarized American scene, but we encourage criticism and scholarship focused on the cultural productions of radically polarized eras past.

    We welcome all relevant disciplinary and interdisciplinary papers, and creative presentations are especially welcome. We anticipate a wide range of methodologies, theoretical interests, and idiosyncratic material. These many include, but are not limited to, intersections of language, and/ or literature with the following:

    • Colonial/postcolonial/world-literature studies
    • Contemporary neurology
    • Disability studies
    • Education
    • Feminism/gender studies
    • History
    • LGBTW/Queer Theory
    • Peace/war studies
    • Political science
    • Race theory
    • Religion
    • Sociology/ anthropology/ psychology

    Suggested Topics/ Provocations:
    Culture Wars, Poles, spectrum, center/periphery, left/right, fringe, moderate, middle of the road, dualism, friction, antithesis: the metaphors we use to discuss and portray difference vary across historical periods. What are the historical conditions of their emergences? What has each enabled? What has each occluded?

    How has radicalized discourse affected academia, recently and in the past? In what ways has pedagogy been invented, changed, and evolved to meet a radicalized discourse? Do the humanities have a radical future?

    What are the connections between radical/extremist discourse and political geography?
    The cultural work of comedy and comedians in relation to polarization.
    The figure of the moderate: the value or lack thereof of posing/acting/possessing moderation in a historical, literary or social discourse.

    What are the polarizing cultural effects of outrageous bodies/freaks?
    Polarization/Radicalization in Literature
    What extremist modes or conceits exist in literature? Which narratives/authors demonstrate radicalized discourse and how does this discourse manifest itself in plot, theme, and/or characterization?

    • Manifestos (make your own!)
    • Mass psychology/groups and groupthink.
    • Performance studies--affect and outrage.
    • Religion: From Stoics/Cynics to Orthodox/Reformed.
    • Sexuality: Polarized Bodies/Bodily Practices.
    • Speeches and speechifying; rallies and mobs.
    • Terrorism and the Terrorized.

    Presentations will be limited to 15 minutes. Please submit an abstract of 250 words as a MS Word attachment along with contact information, including name, institutional affiliation, degree level, email, and phone number, by August 31st, 2011 to artofoutrage@gmail.com.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 422211st Global Conference: Sins, Vices and Virtues (March 2012: Prague; Czech Republic)Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netsin@inter-disciplinary.net1311923706african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: sin@inter-disciplinary.net

    1st Global Conference
    Sins, Vices and Virtues

    18th March - 20th March 2012
    Prague, Czech Republic

    Call for Papers:
    In 2008, Archbishop Girotti triggered a heated public discussion when he identified new types of sins that wreak the modern world. The traditional list of the Church Fathers was unofficially updated to include social sins prevalent in what he called the era of "unstoppable globalisation". and not necessarily embracing Christians only. Thus, apart from the familiar, but Christianity specific: Pride, Envy, Gluttony, Lust, Anger, Greed, Sloth, which individuals were to test their conscience for, the Church now cautions the whole of humanity inter alia about: Genetic modification and human experimentations; Polluting the environment; Social injustice; Causing poverty; Paedophilia, contraception, abortion; Taking drugs; and Financial gluttony. Not only are the 'new sins' not necessarily Christian in nature but they seem inter- and transcultural, disregarding religious persuasion. It seems no longer the matter of individual transgression that has spiritual repercussions, but rather the sin whose subject is the entire, global society.

    Are we then to talk about a completely new hamartiology, new schematization, or are we just are revising, or adapting the Seven Deadly Sins to fit the secularized world of the 21st century? What are the real changes between medieval, originally Christian hamartiology and today's religious/moral doctrines preached across the modern world? And what about non-Christian cultures with different categories of religious/spiritual transgressions. May one actually still talk about 'sin' at all or is it an obsolete word in a multicultural world? Is the concept of religious transgression being secularised as well? Are all Western sins and virtues other cultures' vices too?

    This interdisciplinary conference seeks a new, provocative, intercultural perspective on some enduring truths concerning virtues and vices, sins and transgressions. Do we need a new list of moral commandments in the globalised, multicultural 21st century? Should they be religious or secular in nature? What are the foundations behind morality of the 'modern (wo)man'. And, finally, is it possible, reaching back to the origins of humanity, to find common denominators between religious/spiritual definitions of vices and virtues of all belief systems?

    Papers, reports, work-in-progress, workshops and pre-formed panels are invited on issues related to the following themes:

    * The genealogy of the idea of sin or religious transgression in Christian and non-Christian cultures
    * Sinful/Transgressive actions and evil thoughts in Christian and non-Christian cultures
    * Lexicon of sinfulness/transgression and virtuousness in Christian and non-Christian cultures
    * Social functions of sins and virtues
    * Modern sins and vices: Individual and social; religious and secular; intercultural
    * Social sins: 'Institutional' and 'structural'; their social ramifications
    * Communal versus individual sins/transgressions: Do societies sin?
    * The concept of sin or spiritual transgression/deviation and philosophy
    * Sins and vices on the political arena (secular morality or no morality)
    * Psychology of sin ('sinful' or 'abnormal'?; the concept of sin after Darwin, Nietzsche and Freud)
    * Representation of sins and sinners, vices, transgressions and virtues in art, literature, movies in Christian and non-Christian cultures
    * Genderization of sins, vices and virtues in Christian and non-Christian cultures
    * Ideology of sin/religious transgression and technological progress: G/god or the Machine; 'sins' of productive necessity
    * Sins/Vices and/in the Media (ie adveritising)
    * Medieval crusades and modern (holy) wars
    * Sinless, non-transgressive life in 21st century: Possibility or wishful thinking?
    * Fear of the confessional or 'McDonald-isation' of spiritual life; is confession needed at all?
    * Penitential practices across the ages and cultures
    * Punishment for sin/transgression and rewarding virtue across the ages and cultures: individual and collective
    * Visions of Hell and Paradise across cultures
    * Virtues in the modern times; virtues in a modern man

    Papers will be accepted which deal with related areas and themes. Papers will also be considered on any related theme. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 30th September 2011. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper of no more than 3000 words should be submitted by Friday 27th january 2012. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to both Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

    a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract
    E-mails should be entitled: Sins and Virtues Abstract Submission.

    Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

    Organising Chairs

    Katarzyna Bronk
    Independent Scholar,
    Poznan,
    Poland
    E-mail: bbronkk@gmail.com

    Dr Rob Fisher
    Inter-Disciplinary.Net
    Priory House, Wroslyn Road,
    Freeland, Oxfordshire OX29 8HR
    Email: sin@inter-disciplinary.net

    The conference is part of the At the Interface series of research projects. The aim of the conference is to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and exciting. All papers accepted for and presented at this conference are eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be invited to go forward for development into a themed ISBN hard copy volume.

    For further details of the project, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/at-the-interface/evil/sins-vices-and-v...

    For further details of the conference, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/at-the-interface/evil/sins-vices-and-v...

    Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 422222nd Global Conference: Trauma: Theory and Practice (March 2012: Prague; Czech Republic)Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netttp2@inter-disciplinary.net1311927340americanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: ttp2@inter-disciplinary.net

    2nd Global Conference
    Trauma: Theory and Practice

    21st March - 24th March 2012
    Prague, Czech Republic

    Call for Papers:
    This inter-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary conference seeks to examine and explore issues surrounding individual and collective trauma, both in terms of practice, theory and lived reality. Trauma studies have emerged from its foundation in psychoanalysis to be a dominant methodology for understanding contemporary events and our reactions to them. Critics have argued that we live in a "culture of trauma". Repeated images of suffering and death form our collective and/or cultural unconscious. The second global conference seeks papers on a variety of issues related to trauma including the function of memory and trauma, collective and cultural trauma, time and trauma, testimony and trauma, and strategies of dealing with/coming to terms with personal/political trauma.
    In addition to academic analysis, we welcome the submission of case studies or other approaches from those involved with its practice, such as people in the medical profession and therapists, victims of events which have resulted in traumas on either an individual or mass scale, journalists or authors (including playwrights and poets) whose work deals with both fictional and factual trauma, and theatre professionals.

    Papers, reports, work-in-progress, workshops and pre-formed panels are invited on issues related to any of the following themes:

    1. Public and Political Trauma

    ~ War and trauma, both past and present
    ~ Public disasters and trauma including environmental catastrophes
    ~ Disease, public health and trauma
    ~ Political trauma, silencing dissent/voicing dissent

    2. Personal and Individual Trauma
    ~ Bereavement
    ~ Murder and Assault
    ~ Domestic Violence
    ~ Child Abuse
    ~ Survivor guilt
    ~ Disability
    ~ Witnessing Trauma

    3. Diagnosing and Treating Trauma
    ~ Psychotherapy, cognitive psychology and other psychological approaches to treating victims of trauma
    ~ Psychiatry
    ~ Other medical approaches
    ~ non-medical approaches, for example, narrative approaches, music, art

    4. Theorising Trauma
    ~ Trauma and post colonialism
    ~ Memory and trauma
    ~ National identity and trauma
    ~ Trauma studies and psychoanalysis
    ~ Individual versus Collective trauma
    ~ Cultural trauma
    ~ Gender and trauma
    ~ The body and trauma
    ~ External and internal trauma

    5. Representing Trauma
    ~ Affect, trauma and art
    ~ Dramatizing trauma on screen and on stage
    ~ Vision and Trauma
    ~ Media images: reality and fiction
    ~ literature and poetry
    ~ Eyewitness testimony
    ~ video games, violence and trauma
    ~ technology and trauma
    ~ reporting on trauma
    ~ the aesthetics and experience of trauma
    ~ fear, horror and trauma
    ~ Otherness and trauma

    The Steering Group also welcomes the submission of pre-formed panel proposals. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 1st October 2010. All submissions are minimally double blind peer reviewed where appropriate. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 27th January 2012. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to the Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

    a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract

    Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

    Organising Chairs

    Colette Balmain
    Hub Leader (Horror), Inter-Disciplinary.Net
    Independent Scholar
    United Kingdom
    Email: cb@inter-disciplinary.net

    Rob Fisher
    Network Founder and Network Leader
    Inter-Disciplinary.Net,
    Freeland, Oxfordshire, UK
    Email: ttp2@inter-disciplinary.net

    The conference is part of the 'At the Interface' programme of research projects. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and exciting.

    All papers accepted for and presented at this conference will be eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers maybe invited for development for publication in a themed hard copy volume(s) or for inclusion in the Perspectives on Evil journal (relaunching 2011).

    For further details of the project, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/at-the-interface/evil/trauma/

    For further details of the conference, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/at-the-interface/evil/trauma/call-for-...

    Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

    cfp categories: americanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 422232nd Global Conference,Spirituality in the 21st Century: At the Interface of Theory, Praxis and Pedagogy (March 2012:Prague; CzecDr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Nets21-2@inter-disciplinary.net1311934880african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: s21-2@inter-disciplinary.net

    2nd Global Conference
    Spirituality in the 21st Century: At the Interface of Theory, Praxis and Pedagogy

    21st March - 24th March 2012
    Prague, Czech Republic

    Call for Papers:
    The contemporary study of spirituality encompasses a wide range of interests. These have come not only from the more traditional areas of religious scholarship—theology, philosophy of religion, history of religion, comparative religion, mysticism—but also more recently from management, medicine, and many other fields.

    This inter-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary conference seeks to examine and explore issues surrounding spirituality in regard to theory, praxis and pedagogy. Our first Conference, held in March 2011, was highly successful, with more than 50 presenters from greater than 25 countries around the world participating.

    We seek to expand the range of ideas, fields, and locales of Spiritual work for the 2nd Global Conference. Perspectives are sought from those engaged in the fields of Alcohol and Drug Rehabilitation, Business, Counseling, Ecology, Education, Healing, History, Management, Mass/Organizational/Speech Communication, Medicine, Nursing, Performance Studies, Philosophy, Psychiatry, Psychology, Reconciliation/Refugee/Resettlement Projects, Social Work, and Theatre. These disciplines are indicative only, as papers are welcomed from any area, profession and/or vocation in which Spirituality plays a part.

    Papers, reports, works-in-progress and workshops are invited on issues related to any of the following themes:

    * Conceptualizations of Spirituality
    * Social and/or Cultural Aspects of Spirituality
    * History(ies) of Spirituality
    * Interpreting elements and examples of Spirituality
    * The Liminal elements and facets of Spirituality
    * Research and/or Pedagogical Approaches to Spiritual Work
    * Social and cultural aspects of Spirituality
    * Spirituality and Children
    * Spirituality in Education, Curriculum Development and/or Pedagogy
    * Spirituality Compassion and Reconciliation
    * Spirituality and Cultural Identity
    * Spirituality and Healing
    * Spirituality and Addiction, Health Care, Medicine, and/or Nursing
    * Spirituality in Counseling, Healing, Hospice Care, Psychology, Psychiatry, Social Work, Therapy and/or Wellbeing
    * Spiritual and Ecological Maintenance of Health and Life of Human Beings
    * Spirituality as Therapy
    * Development of Personality as a Process of Spirit Creation
    * Cultural Expressions of Spirituality via Art, Dance, Film, The Internet, Literature, Music, Radio, Television and/or Theatre
    * Spirituality and Communication
    * Spirituality and the Environment
    * Spirituality in Business and/or Management
    * Spirituality and Gaia
    * Teaching Spirituality
    * Theology and Spirituality – use and/or abuse
    * Teleology and Spirituality
    * Comparisons and/or Contrasts between Spiritual Theory, Praxis and Pedagogy

    The Steering Group particularly welcomes the submission of pre-formed panel proposals. Papers will be considered on any related theme.

    300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 30th September 2010. All submissions are minimally double blind peer reviewed where appropriate. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 27th January 2012. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to the Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

    a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract

    Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a 8-10 page full draft paper should be submitted to both Organising Chairs by Monday 27th January 2011.

    Organising Chairs

    John L. Hochheimer
    College of Mass Communication and Media Arts
    1100 Lincoln Drive, Mail Code 6609
    Southern Illinois University
    Carbondale, IL. 62901 USA
    E-mail: Hoch@siu.edu

    Rob Fisher
    Network Founder and Leader,
    Inter-Disciplinary.Net
    Freeland, Oxfordshire, OX29 8HR
    E-mail: s21-2@inter-disciplinary.net

    The conference is part of the 'At the Interface' programme of research projects. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and exciting.

    All papers accepted for and presented at this conference will be eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers maybe invited for development for publication in a themed hard copy volume(s).

    For further details of the project, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/critical-issues/ethos/spirituality-in-...

    For further details of the conference, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/critical-issues/ethos/spirituality-in-...

    Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 42224[UPDATE] Renaissance and Baroque in Critical Theory, SRS conference, University of Manchester, July 9-11, 2012James Smithrenaissance.drama@manchester.ac.uk1311949528cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centurygender_studies_and_sexualityrenaissancetheoryfull name / name of organization: James Smithcontact email: renaissance.drama@manchester.ac.uk

    Renaissance and Baroque in Critical Theory

    A panel to be held at the 5th Biennial conference of the Society for Renaissance Studies, University of Manchester, July 9-11, 2012

    Proposals are invited for papers making up a panel on representations and appropriations of culture from the mid-1300s to the early 1700s by modern critical theory. Taking 'critical theory' broadly to include all those writing in the wake of Marx, Nietzsche, Freud and feminism, this panel seeks discussions of its passing remarks (such as those by Nietzsche and Lacan), sustained analyses (Bakhtin, Foucault, Kristeva), and more multifarious appropriations (Deleuze's baroque) on and of Renaissance texts, culture and terminology.

    Other welcome topics include the relationship or tension between readings of the Renaissance by critical theory and other differently-motivated forms of scholarship (Benjamin and the Warburg Institute, for instance), and assessments of the intervention critical theory can make in the situation of the study of the Renaissance today, or indeed, vice versa.

    The panel will include a presentation by Herman Rapaport (Wake Forest University), author of Milton and the Postmodern, Is There Truth in Art? and Later Derrida

    Applications of around 400 words should be sent to James Smith at renaissance.drama@manchester.ac.uk by 01/09/11.

    For further information about attending the SRS conference in 2012:

    http://www.rensoc.org.uk/SRSNationalConference2012.htm

    For further information on 'Renaissance and Baroque in Critical Theory' at the SRS conference 2012:

    http://manchester.academia.edu/JSmith

    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centurygender_studies_and_sexualityrenaissancetheory 42225Edited Collection: Urban Monstrosities, abstracts due Oct. 1Joseph Lamperez and J. Alexandra McGhee, University of Rochesterjosephlamperez@gmail.com and alimcghee@gmail.com1311957326americaninterdisciplinarymodernist studiespopular_cultureromantictheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Joseph Lamperez and J. Alexandra McGhee, University of Rochestercontact email: josephlamperez@gmail.com and alimcghee@gmail.com

    Call for Articles
    Edited Collection
    Urban Monstrosities
    Joseph Lamperez and J. Alexandra McGhee, University of Rochester

    The contemporary city bears the trace of at least two seismic developments: the Enlightenment rationalization of urban space, marked by the twinned banishment of death to the urban periphery and the creation of a regime of spatial surveillance; and the emergence of the modern city as simulacrum, its widened boulevards and glossy surfaces allowing for the continual flow of commodities and capital. How do contemporary authors of speculative fiction figure and respond to these and other major urban transformations in their own work? We are seeking articles that explore the city as a space of monstrous potential, and which examine how the uncanny cityscape has (d)evolved since the Industrial Revolution. SF and weird fiction, for example, often depict the city as a living organism that is alternately transformative and malicious. How do these and other literary and artistic modes figure urban space as a site of bizarre experiences and subjectivities? What entity can be read in, and attempts to speak through, the oneiric facades of the architectural fantasia? What are the ramifications of a sentient city? How useful are Blake's "dark Satanic Mills," Dickens's "Animate London," and Eliot's "unreal" cities as models for reading contemporary instances of urban monstrosity?

    This collection attempts to posit the neglected but important link between the nineteenth and early twentieth century city as an unreal spectacle of overwhelming crowds, urban wilderness, and new social formations, and contemporary representations of the city as an incipient organism or fantastic bestiary, its space a site of chthonic splendor and ruinous allure. What new readings become possible when sophisticated modern fantasists like China Mieville and Jeff VanderMeer are placed in a tradition of urban representation stretching back to Wordsworth and Blake, Baudelaire and Poe? How can Mayhew's explorations or Benjamin's body of work on the flâneur and the urban phantasmagoria offer new ways of theorizing the global renaissance of street art, or the burgeoning documentation and aestheticization of derelict architectural structures known as "ruin porn"? Are areas of potential insurrection within the city—Bhabha's "third space," the urban carnivalesque—inimical to, or in league with urban monstrosity?

    Please send a 500-word abstract, tentative title and brief (1-2 pp) CV to Joseph Lamperez at josephlamperez@gmail.com and J. Alexandra McGhee at alimcghee@gmail.com by October 1, 2011. Completed articles will be due April 1, 2012, and should be between 3500-5000 words. For queries please contact Joseph Lamperez and J. Alexandra McGhee at the email addresses above.

    cfp categories: americaninterdisciplinarymodernist studiespopular_cultureromantictheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 42226Children and Fame-- MLA 2013 BostonNicole Wilson/ Children's Literature Associationn.wilson@wayne.edu1311961132childrens_literaturefilm_and_televisionpopular_culturefull name / name of organization: Nicole Wilson/ Children's Literature Associationcontact email: n.wilson@wayne.edu

    Children and Fame
    Deadline: March 15, 2012
    Media critics often discuss how Americans are hooked on fame starting from childhood. Many popular book series have protagonists who suddenly find themselves famous and must learn how to negotiate that fame. These series, along with many YA films, perpetuate the idea that given the right circumstances anyone can be famous. This panel -- held at the MLA in Boston, January 2013 -- will investigate the relationship between children and fame. How do authors and directors present fame? What are the different attitudes regarding fame presented in texts? Do texts with famous protagonists fuel American readers' fascination with fame? Does fan fiction exist because of our addiction to fame? Please send 500 word abstracts and a short bio by Mar 15, 2012 to Nicole Wilson .

    cfp categories: childrens_literaturefilm_and_televisionpopular_culture 42227[UPDATED] Deadline extended LAND OWNERSHIP AND TENUREKirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicityshortlidge.2@osu.edu1311968601african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspostcolonialtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicitycontact email: shortlidge.2@osu.edu

    Call for Papers
    Race/Ethnicity: Multidisciplinary Global Contexts
    Volume 5, Number 3 (Spring 2012)
    "Land Ownership and Tenure"
    Papers must be received by November 1, 2011 to be considered for publication in this issue. Please send manuscript publications to the managing editor: Leslie Shortlidge shortlidge.2@osu.edu. See Style Guidelines at www.raceethnicity.org. Submission of artwork for the cover that relates to the theme of the issue is welcome. See website for submission guidelines.Race/Ethnicity: Multidisciplinary Global Contexts encourages and welcomes contributions by scholars, researchers, grassroots activists, policy advocates, and organizations.

    UN-Habitat, The United Nations Human Settlements Programme, concluded that more than one billion people live without any security of tenure in informal settlements in "developing" countries. If "land is not just a resource to be exploited, but a crucial vehicle for the achievement of improved socioeconomic, biological, and physical environments" (FAO), then access to land ensures the security and health of the poor. The politics of access to and exploitation of land and natural resources assume fundamental relations of power control and the policy of social inclusion; however, both notions imply and consolidate that access to land and land ownership, particularly in the Global South, reflect broader patterns of intra-institutional dynamics that explain how marginality and socio-political exclusion take place within countries and on the global stage.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspostcolonialtwentieth_century_and_beyond 42228Romance in Medieval Britain: Oxford, 24–26 March 2012Nicholas Perkinsnicholas.perkins@st-hughs.ox.ac.uk1311969743medievalfull name / name of organization: Nicholas Perkinscontact email: nicholas.perkins@st-hughs.ox.ac.uk

    The 13th Biennial Conference on Romance in Medieval Britain

    Papers are invited on all aspects of medieval romance, its circulation and reception in and around the Insular Middle Ages. The conference coincides with a major exhibition, 'The Romance of the Middle Ages', at the Bodleian Library, Oxford. Papers that address aspects of romance and materiality are particularly welcome, for example:
    • texts and textuality, in manuscript or print
    • the body and the sensual
    • objects, spaces and places
    • romance and medieval material culture
    Information at: www.medieval.ox.ac.uk/rmb2012

    Please send a brief abstract before 30th September 2011 to:
    Dr Nicholas Perkins
    St Hugh's College
    Oxford OX2 6LE
    UK
    nicholas.perkins@st-hughs.ox.ac.uk

    cfp categories: medieval 42229Northeast Modern Language Association Convention, March 15-18, 2012Randall Spinks, Northeast Language AssociationRandall.Spinks@ncc.edu1311976027americanfull name / name of organization: Randall Spinks, Northeast Language Associationcontact email: Randall.Spinks@ncc.edu

    Ernest Hemingway's Cost-Benefit Aesthetic

    This panel invites papers on metaphorical 'economic exchanges/expenditures' between (un)necessary risk, suffering and death and aesthetic meaning in Ernest Hemingway's works. What would be the 'cost/benefit' of the author's aesthetic of forthrightness versus his famous 'iceberg' method in the face of Modernist avant-gardism? What of such explorers of the political/economic unconscious as Ethnic, Feminist, Marxist, Queer Theorist, Disability, Animal or Masculinity Studies? (Please send abstracts of 300 words to Randall.Spinks@ncc.edu) by Sept. 30, 2011.

    cfp categories: american 42230Children's Literature and New York City (August 26, 2011)University of Dublin, Trinity College and the Church of Ireland College of Educationchildrensliteraturenewyork@gmail.com1311980229childrens_literaturefull name / name of organization: University of Dublin, Trinity College and the Church of Ireland College of Educationcontact email: childrensliteraturenewyork@gmail.com

    Scope:
    The proposed volume will examine the varying ways in which children's literature has engaged with New York as a city space, both in terms of (urban) realism and as 'idea' (a place of opportunity, etc). The volume will explore not just dominant themes, motifs, tropes, etc but also the different narrative methods employed to inform readers about the history, function, physical structure, conceptualization, etc of New York City. The volume will also acknowledge the shared or symbiotic relationship between literature and the city: just as the literature can give imaginative 'reality' to the city, the city has the potential to shape the literary text.

    Many contemporary children's texts are set in city environments and engage with the complexities of urban life. From the nineteenth century to the present day, New York has featured prominently in children's literature of the city. Newbery Medal Winners such as Ruth Sawyer's Roller Skates (1936), Emily Cheney Neville's It's Like This, Cat (1963) and E.L. Konigsburg's From the Mixed-up File of Mrs Basil E. Frankweiler (1967) are set in New York, while texts such as Mary Ann Sadleir's Bessy Conway; or, the Story of an Irish Girl (1863), J.D. Salinger's Catcher in the Rye (1951), Judy Blume's Are You there God? It's me Margaret (1970) and Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing (1972), Shaun Tan's The Arrival (2006), and Ned Vizzini's It's Kind of a Funny Story (2006) can all be read within the context of representations of New York City.

    The volume will cover a range of forms and genres – picture books, adventure novels, school stories, YA Fiction, fantasy, romantic realism, comic realism, film, etc – and movements – realism, naturalism, modernism, and postmodernism. Obvious themes that might be considered in essays include, for example: Class; Race and Ethnicity; Individual and National Identity; Opportunity and Alienation; Immigration and the Other; Globalisation and Cultural Transference/Transformation; Space and Place; Urbanism and the Natural; Metropolis and Hinterland; Megalopolis versus Frontier/Wilderness; and, Industrial versus the Post-industrial.

    Readership:
    This volume will have an international audience. It will be of interest to postgraduate and undergraduate students of literature and children's literature, literary scholars, academics, teachers, librarians, people working in the media (both print and television), and to all those interested in publishing and writing for children. However, the volume will also be of interest to scholars from other disciplines engaged in research within the humanities and social sciences.

    Deadlines:
    A 300- to 500-word abstract (we ask potential contributors to include a critical/theoretical framework, as well as specific primary texts), a brief biography, and a short CV should be submitted as an MS Word attachment by 26 August 2011 by e-mail to childrensliteraturenewyork@gmail.com (complete essays of circa 5,000 words should be submitted by 10 December 2011).

    Publisher:
    A major international publisher has expressed interest in the volume.

    Editors:
    Dr Pádraic Whyte is Lecturer in Children's Literature and co-director of the MPhil in Children's Literature at the School of English, University of Dublin, Trinity College. He has published several articles and essays in the areas of children's literature and film. He is author of Irish Childhoods: Children's Fiction and Irish History (2011).

    Dr Keith O'Sullivan is Lecturer in English at the Church of Ireland College of Education, Dublin (an Associated College of the University of Dublin, Trinity College). He is a founder member of the Irish Society for the Study of Children's Literature. His has published on Philip Pullman and Emily Brontë. He co-edited Irish Children's Literature: New Perspectives on Contemporary Writing (Routledge 2011).

    Contact:
    Please direct enquiries and submissions to the editors, Dr Pádraic Whyte and Dr Keith O'Sullivan. Email: childrensliteraturenewyork@gmail.com

    cfp categories: childrens_literature 42231[UPDATE] out of print, the evolution of twentieth-century writing, Friday 16 September 2011School of Literature & Creative Writing, University of East Anglia, UKinfo@outofprintconference.co.uk1312034900americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaystheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: School of Literature & Creative Writing, University of East Anglia, UKcontact email: info@outofprintconference.co.uk

    The conference will explore all aspects of the theme to ask: Why are some writers neglected? How can we read the position and problem of writing that is no longer published? What is at stake during the movement from page to other mediums? With the dawn of the kindle, what about the materiality of books, journals, newspapers? Has the role of small imprints changed, and what are the implications of print on demand? What happens at the margins of the printed? Rediscovery of neglected writing, the re-branding of second-hand books as desirable retro objects and an ever increasing number of film and television adaptations bring questions of the legacy and future of twentieth-century writing into ever-sharper focus. The conference aims to bring together postgraduates, academics and publishers to examine the wide variety of ways that writing comes to be 'out of print'.
    Introductory Address: Prof. Sarah Churchwell (UEA).
    Keynote Speakers: Prof. Jan Montefiore (University of Kent) and Dr Nick Turner (Manchester Metropolitan University).
    Publishers' Panel: Nicola Beauman (Persephone Books), Alexis Kirschbaum (Penguin Modern Classics) and TBC.
    Plenary Chair: Prof. Lyndsey Stonebridge (UEA).
    Registration now open. Please visit the website for further details, including abstracts.

    http://outofprintconference.co.uk/

    Registration Deadline: Monday 5 September 2011

    cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaystheatretwentieth_century_and_beyond 42232Sex, Blood, and Hybridity: The Discourse of Racial Anxiety in Antebellum Writing (NeMLA, March 15-18, 2012Rebecca Williamsrebelwill7@gmail.com1312061384african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfull name / name of organization: Rebecca Williamscontact email: rebelwill7@gmail.com

    In antebellum America, the notion of 'blood' as 'race' maintained a strong hold over the 19th century literary imagination. This panel will examine how antebellum literary texts worked dialectically with the new racial science of ethnology to respond to the dominant racial ideologies of the day. Mid-century works by authors as varied as Frederick Douglass, Louisa May Alcott, Herman Melville, Lydia Maria Child, and Frances E.W. Harper illustrated very clearly the instability of racial classification and its resultant sexual anxieties. Rather than phenotype, references to 'white' blood and 'black' blood came to be regarded as the primary signifiers of racial traits. The enduring fascination of white Americans with the mathematical fractionalization of blood was evident in the creation and use of words such as octoroon, quadroon, and mulatto in the titles of magazine articles, books, and pamphlets while, at the same time, actual skin color would become an increasingly invisible signifier of race. Among the anthropologists, anatomists, ethnologists, and naturalists who led the drive for racial classification in the mid-19th century were polygenists such as Josiah C. Nott, Samuel Cartwright, George Glidden, and others. Alabama physician Nott's 1844 Two Lectures on the Natural History of the Caucasian and Negro Races and 1854 Types of Mankind cut to the heart of race-based 'scientific' writing during the19th century. Nott's hypothesis that mulattoes, as the offspring of interracial sexual couplings—termed 'faulty stock'—could not be self-sustaining was never scientifically tested. In addition, the continued emphasis on the supposed degeneracy and diseased blood caused by race-mixing betrayed a degree of hysteria disproportionate to the actual numbers of the unions. This panel is significant in that it seeks a fresh investigation of paradigms through which antebellum literary texts can be read as directly responding to the new science and ideology of ethnology. Topics and/or critical paradigms can include, but are certainly not limited to: miscegenation, disease, politics, erotics, gender, feminism, science, politics, class, trauma, critical race/queer theory, reception theory, and reader-response. Send 1-page abstract and brief bio as Word attachment to Rebecca Williams, rebelwill7@gmail.com, with 'NEMLA' in subject line.

    he 43rd annual NEMLA convention will be held March 15-18th in Rochester, New York at the Hyatt Regency Hotel downtown. St. John Fisher College will serve as the host college, and the diverse array of area institutions are coordinating with conference organizers to sponsor various activities, such as celebrated keynote speakers, local events, and fiction readings.

    Conference information at http://www.nemla.org/convention/2012/

    cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approaches 42233September 30, 2011 DeadlineHULYA YILMAZ, THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITYHNU1@psu.edu1312078900ethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinarypoetrytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: HULYA YILMAZ, THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITYcontact email: HNU1@psu.edu

    "Identity, Identification, and Subject in the Marginal Literatures of Germany"

    This panel seeks papers on the examination of the relationships between identity, identification, and subject within the context of multi-language marginal literatures of Germany. The genres in focus are short prose, poetry and novel from the selected works of Turkish-German, Arab-German, (Far East) Asian-German and African-German writers. Please send 300 word English abstracts and brief bibliographical statements (via email and preferably in MSWord or PDF format) to Hulya Yilmaz, HNU1@psu.edu.

    cfp categories: ethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinarypoetrytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 42234Constructing and Locating Women Warriors in Medieval Eurasia (proposal due 9/15/2011)Sufen Lai/ CFP for 47th Internation Medieval Congress (Kalamazoo 2012)lais@gvsu.edu1312097927classical_studiesgender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalfull name / name of organization: Sufen Lai/ CFP for 47th Internation Medieval Congress (Kalamazoo 2012)contact email: lais@gvsu.edu

    47th International Medieval Congress
    Kalamazoo, Michigan
    May 10-13, 2012

    The construction and historicization of the Amazonian type women warriors have generated a long legacy in both Western and Eastern cultures.The ancient world's literary impulse to construct and the geographical impulse to locate the women warriors and women's kingdoms continued in the Middle Ages. Examples can be found in the writings of Boccaccio, Chaucer, De Pizan, and travel writings of Mandeville and Marco Polo. In the East, "women's kingdom" continued to evolve in Chinese literature and historiography.

    We invite papers that explore the appropriation and transformation of these cultural impulses of constructing and locating the women warriors in medieval Eurasia.

    cfp categories: classical_studiesgender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedieval 42235Information Literacy and Social Justice: Radical Professional Praxis (September 15, 2011)Shana Higgins and Lua Gregory/University of Redlandsshana_higgins@redlands.edu1312132448interdisciplinaryprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_compositionfull name / name of organization: Shana Higgins and Lua Gregory/University of Redlandscontact email: shana_higgins@redlands.edu

    Working title:
    Information Literacy and Social Justice: Radical Professional Praxis (An Edited Collection)

    Editors:
    Shana Higgins and Lua Gregory are instruction and reference librarians at University of Redlands.

    Outline:
    In her award winning essay "Information Literacy and Reflective Pedagogical Praxis," Heidi L.M. Jacobs draws out the inherent democratizing and social justice elements of information literacy as defined in the "Alexandria Proclamation On Information Literacy and Lifelong Learning." She suggests that because of these underlying social justice elements, information literacy "is not only educational but also inherently political, cultural, and social" (258). We propose to extend the discussion of information literacy and its social justice aspects that James Elmborg, Cushla Kapitzke, Maria T. Accardi, Emily Drabinski, and Alana Kumbier, and Maura Seale have begun. If we consider the democratizing values implicit in librarianship's professional ethics (such as intellectual freedom, social responsibility, diversity, democracy and privacy, among others) in relation to the sociopolitical context of information literacy, we will begin to make intentional connections between professional advocacy and curriculum and pedagogy. We hope this book will encourage a renewal of professional discourse about libraries in their social context, through a re-activation of the "neutrality debate," as well as through an investigation of what it means for a global citizen to be information literate in late capitalism.

    Objective of book:
    This edited collection, to be published by Library Juice Press in Fall 2012, poses the following questions: What are the limits of standards and outcomes, such as ACRL's [i.e. Standard 1.2 The information literate student identifies a variety of types and formats of potential sources for information. ], in fitting information literacy instruction to the complex contexts of information in the real world? Would the teaching of social justice and the democratizing values of the library profession strengthen critical information literacy in the classroom? And how do we balance the need to teach search skills and critical information literacy in our instructional efforts?

    Target audience:
    The target audience for this book includes instruction librarians, library instruction program coordinators, faculty and instructors interested in information literacy, and all librarians interested in the political, economic, social, and cultural contexts of the production, dissemination, suppression, and consumption of information.

    Possible topics:
    We encourage proposals on the intersections of information literacy instruction with the democratizing values of the library profession.

    • Possible topics may include information literacy aspects of media coverage of war and embedded journalism, renewal of the Patriot Act, market-based censorship, for-profit libraries (Library Systems & Services), EPA library closures and access to environmental information, immigrants and library access, Wikileaks and government censorship, corporate censorship, anti-communism and anti-socialism in the media, classification of government documents, international and comparative studies on censorship, First Amendment protection to whistleblowers and the press, British Petroleum and oil spill research, global warming censorship, and library database mergers.

    • Examples of information literacy sessions focusing on the above topics and/or framed by democratizing and social justice values of the library profession. Examples can also be aimed at specific disciplines.

    • Discussions of theories/theorists (e.g. Noam Chomsky, Edward S. Herman, C. Wright Mills, Paulo Friere, Peter McClaren, etc.) and their usefulness in illuminating sociopolitical contexts of information within the classroom.

    • Discussions on the "neutrality debate" in light of the sociopolitical and cultural context of information.

    Submission Guidelines:
    Please submit abstracts and proposals of up to 500 words to ilandsocialjustice@gmail.com by September 15, 2011. Notifications will be sent by November 1 and manuscripts from 1,500-7,000 words will be due by March 1, 2012.

    cfp categories: interdisciplinaryprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_composition 42236[UPDATE] Queer Places, Practices, and Lives conference (May 18-19, 2012; proposals due Aug. 12, 2011)Ohio State Universityponce.8@osu.edu1312138735african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialtheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Ohio State Universitycontact email: ponce.8@osu.edu

    QUEER PLACES, PRACTICES, AND LIVES: A SYMPOSIUM IN HONOR OF SAMUEL STEWARD

    The Ohio State University
    Columbus, OH

    MAY 18-19, 2012

    Deadline for proposals: Aug. 12, 2011

    Confirmed speakers
    Joseph Boone, Tim Dean, Kale Fajardo, Roderick Ferguson, Brian Glavey, Scott Herring, Eithne Lubhéid, Victor Mendoza, Deborah Miranda, José Esteban Muñoz, Hoang Tan Nguyen, Juana María Rodríguez, Nayan Shah, Justin Spring, Susan Stryker, Shane Vogel

    We invite proposals for the inaugural queer studies conference at The Ohio State University. The title is meant as an expansive call to consider a host of issues evoked by queer places (local/global, urban/rural, North/South, East/West, public/private, mobility/immobility …), queer practices (sexual cultures, expressive cultures, political activism, academic work …), and queer lives (biography, hagiography, psychology, sexology, history, development …). We envision the conference as an opportunity both to take stock of inter/disciplinary trends as well as provoke new ideas and frameworks for future work.

    The inspiration for this expansiveness and reevaluation is Samuel Steward, an OSU alum of the 1930s and the subject of Justin Spring's critically acclaimed biography Secret Historian: The Life and Times of Samuel Steward, Professor, Tattoo Artist, and Sexual Renegade (2010). As a literary studies academic, writer, and visual and tattoo artist, Steward lived a highly varied life, coming into contact, and in some cases formed long-lasting friendships, with such figures as Gertrude Stein, Alice B. Toklas, Thornton Wilder, André Gide, Thomas Mann, Alfred Kinsey, Albert Camus, Christopher Isherwood, George Platt Lynes, and Paul Cadmus. As something of a gay Casanova (and a scrupulous archivist of his sexual encounters), Steward also "linked in," as he might say, with such movie stars as Rudolf Valentino and Rock Hudson.

    In 1995, Steward's estate donated funds to the OSU English department to further research in LGBTQ scholarship, but these funds have only recently been "rediscovered." To pay tribute to this queer Buckeye who studied at, taught at, and invested in OSU, we are taking our points of departure for panel themes from Steward's life and work. Papers may thus address any of the following (or related) topics:

    Aestheticism, decadence, Catholicism
    Archives and material culture
    Biography, autobiography, life-writing
    Body art and modification
    Colonialism, imperialism, decolonization
    Expatriatism, migration, diaspora
    Genealogies, invented traditions
    Modernism
    Performativity, self-elaboration, world-making
    Popular genres (pulp, erotica, mystery novels)
    Public intellectuals and subcultural lives
    Queer life in the academy, 1920-present
    Race and ethnicity
    Regionalism (especially the Midwest)
    Rural, urban, suburban sexual geographies
    Sailors, seamen, and other seafarers
    Sexology (especially Havelock Ellis and Kinsey)
    Sexual pleasure and perversity (BDSM, porn, hustling)
    Visualities (painting, photography, film)

    In addition, we are planning to publish a collection of essays on Samuel Steward after the conference. Thus, papers that focus on any aspect of Steward's life and work are especially welcome.

    Send 500-word abstract and 2-page CV by Aug. 12, 2011 to Joe Ponce ponce.8@osu.edu.

    Direct inquiries to Debra Moddelmog moddelmog.1@osu.edu or ponce.8@osu.edu.

    Conference organizing committee
    Mollie Blackburn
    Andrea Breau
    Debanuj DasGupta
    Tommy Davis
    Ally Day
    Nikki Engel
    Deema Kaedbey
    Meredith Lee
    Meg LeMay
    Chris Lewis
    Corinne Martin
    Debra Moddelmog
    Joe Ponce
    Jim Sanders
    Mary Thomas
    Blake Wilder
    Shannon Winnubst

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialtheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 42237Final Deadline (30 August 2011): 'Poetic Optimism and the Post-Enlightenment Social Identity, 1794-1878'Dr Maryam Farahani-Dr Nick Davispoeticoptimism@gmail.com1312142477americanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturereligionrhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheorytravel_writingvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr Maryam Farahani-Dr Nick Daviscontact email: poeticoptimism@gmail.com

    We are developing a collection of articles for a special issue journal of Studies in the Literary Imagination entitled 'Poetic Optimism and the Post-Enlightenment Social Identity, 1794-1878'. This collection will explore the meaning and application of poetic optimism in relation to the question of social identity from 1794 to 1878.

    The collection will be introduced and edited by Dr Maryam Farahani (University of Liverpool) and Dr Anna Szczepan-Wojnarska (Cardinal Wyszynski University of Warsaw & The Woolf Institute of Abrahamic Faiths, Cambridge),with a foreword by Dr Nick Davis and Dr Ian Schermbrucker (University of Liverpool).

    The final deadline for abstracts is 30 August 2011. More details at:

    http://paranoiapain.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/poetic-optimism.pdf

    cfp categories: americanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturereligionrhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheorytravel_writingvictorian 42238Call for Papers: Teaching with Harry Potter [Update]Valerie Frankel, MFAvalerie@calithwain.com1312153189childrens_literaturehumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturefull name / name of organization: Valerie Frankel, MFAcontact email: valerie@calithwain.com

    Call for Papers: Teaching with Harry Potter

    Harry Potter defined a decade and more. In its wake, children began reading, began gravitating to the fantasy section. The midnight book release began, along with Wizard Rock, parodies, movies, college Quiddich teams, and finally a theme park. It built some of its popularity and reputation through hot nineties technology, the internet with its fanfiction, chatrooms, and lexicons. And in its unprecedented fandom we see how startlingly a book can become popular, become a phenomenon. This collection looks at Harry Potter as a reflection of us, twenty-first century fans, and addresses how children, teen, and college/adult/scholarly culture has been altered by the Harry Potter phenomenon. Essays studying kid or teen behavior influenced by the series, or formal and informal education with Harry Potter are especially welcome.

    This is for a nearly-completed collection that an academic publisher has expressed interest in; however, as the focus and length of the project have changed somewhat, I'm seeking a few more essays to round it out. For this reason, I need proposals right away, though I don't mind a certain roughness. The deadline is August 15th 2011.

    The completed essays should be 4000-5000 words. Essays must adhere to MLA format and be friendly and approachable, yet academic in scope and content.

    Proposal Guidelines: Please send a 350-500 word summary of your proposed essay pasted into your email, along with a short professional bio. Direct inquiries and proposals can be sent to Valerie Frankel, author and professor, at valerie@calithwain.com with a subject of HARRY POTTER SUBMISSION.

    cfp categories: childrens_literaturehumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culture