Keeping the Fools in Play: Money, Finance, and Credit in the Eighteenth Century (SCSECS, Asheville, Feb 23-25)

full name / name of organization: 
Dwight D. Codr / South Central Society for Eighteenth Century Studies (SCSECS)
contact email: 
dwight.codr@uconn.edu

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Ventriloquizing the sentiments of Lord Bathurst, Alexander Pope remarks in his epistle to the same that in order to amuse themselves, the gods sent gold into the world to activate humanity's fundamentally silly sordidness. To be sure, the subject of gold and its myriad modern forms kept a great many writers in play throughout the century, and this panel seeks papers interested in just this kind of play. Although always having been central to our understanding the long eighteenth century, the study of finance, commerce, money, and economics in our period has been reinvigorated by the increasing prominence of such issues in our daily news and meditations. The impact of such new institutions as the Bank of England and National Lottery, the system and culture of credit, modern theories of property, the figure of the financier, the gambling trope, and stock bubbles might even be read as phenomena which, collectively, helped to define the discursive field that enables us to articulate the economic crises of the present moment. This panel seeks papers that investigate these or other dimensions of the culture of money, broadly defined, in the long eighteenth century. Possible topics might include:

Credit/Lady Credit
Gambling
Banking
Lotteries
Financiers
The Invisible Hand
Exchange Alley
Usury
South Sea Bubble
Mississippi Bubble
Insurance
Joint-Stock Companies
Money/Cash/Notes/Gold

Please send abstracts of 250-500 words to dwight.codr@uconn.edu.

Dwight Codr
Assistant Professor
Department of English
University of Connecticut

cfp categories: 
african-american
american
bibliography_and_history_of_the_book
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
eighteenth_century
ethnicity_and_national_identity
interdisciplinary
popular_culture
postcolonial
religion
renaissance
romantic
science_and_culture
theory
travel_writing
victorian