[Extended Deadline] New British Fiction Special Issue

full name / name of organization: 
Modern Fiction Studies
contact email: 
mfs@purdue.edu

Call for Papers: Upcoming Special Issue
New British Fiction

Guest Editor: Patrick O’Donnell
EXTENDED deadline for Submission: 15 November 2011

The Editors of MFS seek essays that consider the fiction of the group of young British writers whose work has been evolving and maturing since the turn into the twenty-first century. Over the past fifteen years, there has been a remarkable outpouring of new and innovative fiction from Britain comparable in quality and range to that of American postmodernist experimentation during the 1960s and 1970s. This new writing reflects, in part, the continuation of that experiment into the twenty-first century, and it also reflects the crucial impact of postcolonial thought, multiculturalism, globalization, and, as Rebecca Walkowitz has characterized it, an emergent cosmopolitanism, “a cultural paradigm that values contact with strangers and their ways of life . . . [as well as] individualism, artistic experimentation, social deviance, and urban mobility.”

This special issue will examine the generation after Rushdie, McEwan, Ishiguro, and Byatt. The 2003 version of Granta’s decennial list of “Best Young British Novelists” included the increasingly familiar names of David Mitchell, Monica Ali, Zadie Smith, Philip Hensher, and Sarah Waters; in June, 2010, the Telegraph published an update that listed writers who were beginning to make an impact in the intervening years, including China Miéville, Mohsin Hamid, Kamila Shamsie, and Steven Hall. This list of writers is meant to be indicative, not exclusive: we invite essays on these and many other British writers who are involved in the making of new British fiction. Essays on individual writers and works are welcome, as well as essays on broader trends and issues in new British fiction, but all essays should consider how the works discussed reflect the developing, interactive cultural, historical, and aesthetic contexts that inform the writing of new British fiction.

Essays should be 6000-9000 words and should follow the MLA Handbook (7th Edition) for internal citation and works cited. Please submit two copies of your essay to The Editors, MFS, Department of English, Purdue University, 500 Oval Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2038. Queries should be directed to Patrick O’Donnell (pod@msu.edu).

cfp categories: 
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
ecocriticism_and_environmental_studies
ethnicity_and_national_identity
film_and_television
gender_studies_and_sexuality
interdisciplinary
journals_and_collections_of_essays
poetry
postcolonial
science_and_culture
theory
travel_writing
twentieth_century_and_beyond