CFP: "Performances of Citizenship" (Aug 2-5, 2012; SUBMISSIONS DUE Oct 29, 2011)

full name / name of organization: 
Association for Theatre in Higher Education

Call for Papers
"Performances of Citizenship"
The Association for Theatre in Higher Education's 2012 Conference
August 2-5, 2012; Washington D.C.

I am looking for panelists to fill out a session for the Association for Theatre in Higher Education Conference in 2012. The panel, which will be sponsored by the Performance Studies Focus Group, will explore the contours of performances that engage in some way with the ideas of nationalism and citizenship. How do people enact belonging to (or separation from) a nation through performances of citizenship? Possible performances may include (but are certainly not limited to):

- protests and rallies
- inaugural parades/balls
- daily ceremonies, such as the Changing of the Guard in Arlington National Cemetery, or reciting the Pledge of Allegiance
- citizenship tests
- civic pilgrimage/tourism
- commemorative ceremonies
- historical reenactments
- "patriotic" performances

Papers from various historical, critical, theoretical, and geographical perspectives are welcome. Please send a 200-word abstract and short bio to Lindsay Adamson Livingston (adamson.livingston@gmail.com) by Oct 29, 2011. Feel free to contact Lindsay with questions.

43447Velvet Light Trap Journal #71 CFP: The ArchiveVelvet Light Traplandaamanda@gmail.com1319417441african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturepostcolonialscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Velvet Light Trapcontact email: landaamanda@gmail.com

CFP: The Archive

The Velvet Light Trap Issue #71: The Archive

From material to immaterial, the archive serves as an interface between past and future knowledge. In this relationship, the archive is both a method and a space of theory and politics. As the production and exchange of information continue to expand at exponential rates, understanding the role of the archive in the storage, accessibility, and legacy of this information becomes increasingly necessary. Already this call has joined the digital archives of inboxes, servers, and hard drives, underscoring the prevalence of archives in everyday life. The study of the production of knowledge necessitates an interrogation of the contemporary state of the archive.

Across the many directions and facets of media studies, the archive acts as one of the few points of intersection in the field. To this extent, The Velvet Light Trap seeks articles addressing implications of the archive related to theories of the archive, non-traditional and new archives, and new directions in historical archival research. Possible research topics include, but are not limited to:

Historical archival research:

● Artifactual studies
● Collections studies
● Institutional studies

Non-traditional and new archives:

● Digitization of material collections
● Personal or non-institutional collections
● Digital archiving of social media
● Marginal archives
● Ephemeral and performative archives
● Affective archives

Theories and practices of the archive:

● Politics of collecting
● Media heritage and repatriation
● Accessibility, preservation policy, and marketing
● Queering the archive
● Broader role(s) of the archive in culture, politics, and economics

Submission Instructions

Papers should be between 6,000 and 7,500 words (approximately 20-25 pages double-spaced), in Chicago style with a cover page including the writer's name and contact information.

Please send one copy of the paper (including a one-page abstract with each copy) and one electronic copy saved as a Word .doc file in a format suitable to be sent to a reader anonymously. The journal's Editorial Advisory Board will referee all submissions.

Hard copy submissions are due January 20, 2012, and should be sent to:

The Velvet Light Trap, c/o The Department of Radio-Television-Film,

University of Texas at Austin, CMA 6.118, Mail Code A0800, Austin, TX, 78712

The electronic copy submission is also due on January 20, 2012, and should be sent to Amanda Landa at LandaAmanda@gmail.com

The Velvet Light Trap is an academic, peer-reviewed journal of film and television studies. Graduate students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Texas-Austin alternately coordinate issues. The Editorial Advisory Board includes such notable scholars as Richard Allen, Harry Benshoff, Mia Consalvo, Radhika Gajjala, Darrell Hamamoto, Joan Hawkins, Barbara Klinger, Jon Kraszewski, Diane Negra, Michael Newman, Alisa Perren, Yeidy Rivero, Nicholas Sammond, Beretta Smith-Shomade, Cristina Venegas, Michael Williams.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturepostcolonialscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 43448CFP: The End of the World as We Know It? Religious Scholarship on Apocalyptic Themes - Weekend of March 23rd 2012Boston University School of Theology Doctoral Student Associationdsa@bu.edu1319421811graduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturereligionfull name / name of organization: Boston University School of Theology Doctoral Student Associationcontact email: dsa@bu.edu

The Boston University School of Theology Doctoral Student Association invites submissions to a graduate student conference titled "The End of the World as We Know It? Religious Scholarship on Apocalyptic Themes." The conference will be held the weekend of March 23, 2012 at Boston University. The keynote speaker will be Professor John Collins, Holmes Professor of Old Testament, Yale Divinity School.

Apocalyptic themes fill popular media – in movies such as 2012, Know1ng, and The Road, in television series like The Walking Dead, and in the news coverage of religious groups claiming the end of the world is nigh. Apocalypticism has obvious religious implications [but] and also contains ethical, political, social, and economic dimensions. We seek to include papers that engage any of these dimensions of apocalypticism from a religious studies and/or theological perspective. Paper submissions analyzing apocalypticism through any discipline of religious scholarship (theology, biblical studies, sociology of religion, psychology of religion, religion and popular culture, ethics, etc.) are invited.

Deadline: January 6th

Proposals should consist of two pages. The first page should include your name, title of paper, university affiliation, mailing address, email address, and phone number. The second page should contain a 250-300 word abstract outlining your presentation topic and thesis. Your abstract should indicate how your paper will incorporate the conference theme. Please do not include any identifying information on the second page of the proposal as to eliminate the possibility of bias in selection.
Presentations should be within 15 to 20 minutes long (approximately 8 doubled-spaced pages). (.doc, .docx, or .pdf files accepted) to dsa@bu.edu

cfp categories: graduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturereligion 43449Interdisciplinary Studies: "Food & Culture(s) in a Global Context"- Due December 1, 2011SWTX PCA/ACA 33rd Annual Conference DeAnna Kay Varela at http://conference2012.swtxpca.org1319425452african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: SWTX PCA/ACA 33rd Annual Conference contact email: DeAnna Kay Varela at http://conference2012.swtxpca.org

Call for Papers: Interdisciplinary Studies

SWTX PCA/ACA 33rd Annual Conference celebrating

"Food & Culture(s) in a Global Context"

February 8 - 11, 2012
Albuquerque, NM

http://www.swtxpca.org

Conference Location:
Hyatt Regency Downtown Albuquerque
330 Tijeras NW, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA 87102
Tel: +1 505 842 1234 Fax: +1 505 843 2710

Proposal submission deadline: December 1, 2011

Proposal submission location: http://conference2012.swtxpca.org

Topics: The Interdisciplinary Studies area is seeking papers on topics of:

1. Popular and/or American culture for which an interdisciplinary approach has been used and explained
[Suggestions are not offered; you have the floor].

2. Cultural issues related to interdisciplinarity or Interdisciplinary Studies.
[Suggestions are, but are not limited to: disciplinary/interdisciplinary culture and/or politics; changing epistemological landscapes in academia and society; interdisciplinarity in applied study or service learning; finding common ground in contested spaces; implications of student-led degree design; imagination and interdisciplinary research; interdisciplinarity and philosophies of education; research at the edges of academia].

Scholars, researchers, professionals, teachers, graduate students and others interested in this area are encouraged to submit an abstract. Graduate students are especially encouraged, and the conference offers monetary awards for the best graduate student papers.
Submit 250 word abstracts for individual presentations, or 500 word abstracts for panel proposals [panel submissions need 3 or 4 presenters], along with your current CV and email address to:

Area Chair DeAnna Kay Varela at http://conference2012.swtxpca.org

DeAnna Kay Varela, MA
SWTX PCA/ACA Area Chair of Interdisciplinary Studies Women's Studies Program
University of Texas at El Paso
500 W University Ave.
Liberal Arts, Room 339
University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX 79968
dkvarela@utep.edu
*Please do NOT submit proposals to this address. Use the website provided above.
915.747.7065

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 434508th eLearning and Software for Education ConferenceeLearning and Software for Education else@adlnet.ro 1319439850graduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesprofessional_topicsfull name / name of organization: eLearning and Software for Education contact email: else@adlnet.ro

The 8th eLearning and Software for Education Conference - eLSE 2012 is organized by the Romanian Advanced Distributed Learning Association and will be held in Bucharest, in April 26th - 27th 2012.

The purpose of the annual international scientific conference on "eLearning and software for education" is to enable the academia, research entities and corporate to boost the potential of the technology enhanced learning environments, by providing a forum for exchange of ideas, research outcomes, business case and technical achievements.

The central theme of this forthcoming event focuses on "Leveraging technology for learning".

The conference aims to promote original articles of basic research results and experimental development, case studies and best practices, critical analysis and commentary, statistics, assessments and forecasts on Technology Enhanced Learning.

The conference advances for discussion the following main sections:

Management strategies and policies
Pedagogy and psychopedagogy in new learning environments
Computer science and new support technologies in learning
Serious games in theory and practice
Corporate elearning and training
E- Content / Instructional design.

cfp categories: graduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesprofessional_topics 43451ORALITY AND LITERACY (London C19 Studies Seminar), Saturday 17 March 2012 (Deadline: Friday 2 December 2011)London Nineteenth-Century Studies Seminarjames@emmott.org, thomas.wright@uea.ac.uk1319449288bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarypoetrypopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositionvictorianfull name / name of organization: London Nineteenth-Century Studies Seminarcontact email: james@emmott.org, thomas.wright@uea.ac.uk

The theme for the London Nineteenth-Century Studies Seminar in the Spring term 2012 will be Orality and Literacy, marking the thirtieth anniversary of the appearance of Walter Ong's influential book. Over three days in January, February, and March, speakers will explore a range of issues relating to the interactions between voice and text in the Anglo-American long nineteenth century: philology and acoustic nostalgia, melody and poetic form, laughter, and more.

We are soliciting 20-minute papers on the Seminar theme to form a panel discussion on the extended final day of the Seminar programme, Saturday 17 March 2012.

Please send 300-word proposals to the convenors, James Emmott (Birkbeck) and Tom F. Wright (UEA)

Deadline: Friday 2 December 2011

Seminar Programme

14 January, 11:00-13:00
Herbert Tucker (Virginia)
William Abberley (Exeter)

25 February, 11:00-13:00
Matthew Bevis (Oxford)
Louise Lee (KCL)

17 March, 11:00-17:00
Sandra M. Gustafson (Notre Dame)
Jason Camlot (Concordia)
Panel discussion
James Mussell (Birmingham)

About the London Nineteenth-Century Studies Seminar

Inaugurated by Birkbeck's Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies in 1987, the Seminar is being organised now by a committee made up of nineteenth century specialists from the English Departments of the colleges of the University of London. Responsibility for each season of seminars is passed around the group. The Seminar meets at the Institute of English Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London.

cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarypoetrypopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositionvictorian 43452LIES 2012: "Of what is past, or passing, Or to come": Travelling in time and space in literature in EnglishAdam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Polandkbronk@ifa.amu.edu.pl1319450095cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromantictheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Polandcontact email: kbronk@ifa.amu.edu.pl

The lines quoted in the title of the conference from W.B. Yeats' "Sailing to Byzantium," which are recalled by one of the characters in Marina Warner's novel In a Dark Wood, bring to light the theme of this year's Literature in English Symposium: Travelling in space and time.
The idea of a journey is inherently connected with changing places and movement, but, through reading, we can traverse space and time, continents and cultures, whilst remaining static.
The 8th Literature in English Symposium (LIES 8) held at Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań (Poland) is devoted to: the explorations of individual space and landscape of the mind through analyzing trauma and addressing psychological wounds; travels into fairy tales, oriental scenery (real and imaginary) as well as interrelationships between memory and fiction in non-fictional and fictional discourses.
Our guest writer of LIES 2012 is Professor Marina Warner, a fiction writer, a professor of literature, theater and film. With her we can travel into the land of fairy tales, myth, and spiritual visions and meet exemplary women such as the Virgin Mary and Joan of Arc or visionaries such as Maria Pia, a character from In a Dark Wood.
Our plenary speaker is Professor Cathy Caruth (Cornell University) and with her we might take a "voyage out" into trauma (and healing)narratives.
Abstracts of 300 words should be submitted to Katarzyna Bronk at kbronk@ifa.amu.edu.pl or bbronkk@gmail.com by 15th December 2011.

Conference Organiser:
Professor Liliana Sikorska
Head of Department of English Literature and Literary Linguistics

Conference Secretary:
Katarzyna Bronk, PhD
Department of English Literature and Literary Linguistics

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromantictheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 43453[UPDATE] CFP: Marxism and New Media Conference, Duke UniversityDuke University Graduate Program in Literaturemarxismandnewmedia@gmail.com1319466632african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Duke University Graduate Program in Literaturecontact email: marxismandnewmedia@gmail.com

CALL FOR PAPERS / CALL FOR PROJECTS: MARXISM AND NEW MEDIA
http://literature.duke.edu/conference2012 (note new URL)
DUKE UNIVERSITY PROGRAM IN LITERATURE (DURHAM, NC)
JANUARY 20 & 21, 2012
KEYNOTES: ALEX GALLOWAY (NYU) and RICARDO DOMINGUEZ (UCSD)
DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: OCTOBER 30, 2011
CONTACT: marxismandnewmedia@gmail.com

New media technologies are leading to the emergence of vibrant public spaces in countries like China and Tunisia, facilitating previously restricted dissent and political deliberation. Similarly, scholars, journalists, and activists are using networking and social media to organize coalitions and mobilize resistance in contexts as diverse as the Wisconsin protests, the Wall Street protests, and the so-called "Arab Spring." In an ironic self-critique, smartphone applications like the newly released "Phone Game" are even exposing the global working conditions and problematic material production of contemporary consumer technology through their very gameplay. With the implicit resistance to hegemony and material critique in these examples, Marxism offers both methodological and interpretive tools for interfacing with new media, not least among them a dialectical analysis of the global relations of production. However, writing in the Nation, Chris Lehmann has recently argued that the Internet is less the harbinger of post-capitalist cyber-Utopia than a "digital plantation" in which unpaid digital labor and leisure time become transmogrified into ad revenue. In their article, "The Internet's Unholy Marriage to Capitalism," John Bellamy Foster and Robert W. McChesney likewise argue that the Internet and related media signify not the suspension of the laws of capitalism, but rather their final perfection.

It seems, then, that a number of unresolved questions linger concerning the ways new media both participate in and creatively resist institutional power. As such, we hope to provide a fresh articulation interrogating the intersection between the theories and practices of new media technologies and Marxist critique. For example: how should we consider the economic, environmental, and human costs incurred in the production of new media technologies? How might resistance and radical change emerge among the ongoing institutionalization, and the incumbent conservatism, of both Marxism and new media studies? How will we navigate through the internal divisions of an academy that has eagerly appropriated new media as a strategy to "reinvigorate" the humanities through renewed funding and (often) corporate partnership?

We invite both papers and creative/artistic work that address these issues and others that deal with the engagement of Marxist thought and the study of media technologies. Papers may intervene at points of seeming incompatibility, address the current place of this convergence in one or many institutional and cultural settings, or perhaps look forward to emerging discourses relating to this intersection.

Possible paper, project, and panel topics might include:

New Opportunities for Resistance, Wikileaks, Hacking and Hacktivism, Pirate Culture, the Arab Spring, the Jasmine Revolution, and Anonymous
Immaterial Labor, User-Generated Content, the Knowledge Worker, Affective Labor, Precariousness and "the Precariat," the Digital Plantation, and the Attention Economy
Intellectual Property, Copyright, Creative Commons, Open Access and Open Source Practices, and Virtual Property
New Forms of Collectivity, Wikipedia, Crowdsourcing, Flash Mobs, Smart Mobs, and Partcipatory Journalism
New Regimes of Control, Censorship, Filtering, Firewalls, and Search Engine Rankings
New Media Art
Critical Code Studies
Critical Game Studies
Biomedicine and Biometrics
Energy, Ecology, Tech Trash
The Open University
'Re-Visualizing' Marxism
Ideology, Contact Zones, and Interfaces
Please send a 250-500 word abstract to marxismandnewmedia@gmail.com by October 30, 2011.

ORGANIZERS
Zach Blas
Gerry Canavan
Amanda Starling Gould
Rachel Greenspan
Melody Jue
Lisa Klarr
Clarissa Lee
John Stadler
Michael Swacha
Karim Wissa

CONTACT
marxismandnewmedia@gmail.com

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 43454"Politics of Literary Storytelling" panel, abstract due 10/31/11 "Storytelling: Global Reflections on Narrative" conference, May 2012, Prague, Czech Republicamorlan@pace.edu, mf43242n@pace.edu1319480347americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialtheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: "Storytelling: Global Reflections on Narrative" conference, May 2012, Prague, Czech Republiccontact email: amorlan@pace.edu, mf43242n@pace.edu

This is a call for papers for a panel on "Politics of Literary Storytelling" for the conference on "Storytelling: Global Reflections on Narrative" that will take place in May 2012 in Prague, Czech Republic. Our panel will explore storytelling across genres of Postmodern fiction, involving plays, short stories, and novels, seeking to answer some of the following questions: Do stories of individual experience have a better capacity to effect social change when they are related through multiple or fragmented narrators? The Postmodern exercise seems to focus on this type of storytelling, but does it actually have any political potential, and if so, how? Our panel will focus on the ways postmodern storytellers present us with a fragmented mirror of experience, and the possibility for social commentary this process enables.

Please submit a 250-word abstract, along with a short bio, to the panel organizers: Anna Morlan (amorlan@pace.edu) and Madelyn Farris (mf43242n@pace.edu)

Deadline October 31st.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialtheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 43455Mechademia 8 (1/9/12) Tezuka Osamu: Manga LifeMechademiasubmissions@mechademia.org1319481837cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisioninterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturefull name / name of organization: Mechademiacontact email: submissions@mechademia.org

CFP: Mechademia 8. Tezuka Osamu: Manga Life

We seek submissions for the eighth volume of Mechademia, an annual, peer-reviewed forum for critical work on Japanese manga, anime, and related arts. The theme of volume 8 is "Manga Life: Tezuka..."

Tezuka Osamu is one of Japan's most renowned anime and manga creators, often regarded as an origin figure in Japanese popular culture. Published in conjunction with a major exhibit of Tezuka's Work to be held at the Weisman Museum in Minneapolis Minnesota in 2013, Mechademia 8 will attempt to provide some new perspectives on Tezuka—including his context and his legacy--through the broad rubric of "Manga Life." We imagine this theme to encompass:

  • Tezuka's profound interest in the relationship between human and non-human life forms.
  • drawn or animated characters as quasi-autonomous life forms at the center of multimedia franchises or media mixes, a development Tezuka's work (across manga and anime, for example) helped foster.
  • the emergence of professional manga creators; the ability of artists and writers to live a "manga life" as manga production emerges as a viable livelihood.
  • links between popular culture and daily life, with attention to the transformations in everyday life in Japan during the span of the Shôwa period (1926-1989), which corresponds almost perfectly with Tezuka's life (1928-1989).
  • We invite submissions that deepen or complicate our understanding of these areas, centered on any aspect of Tezuka's work and life, as well as on related artists and work. We particularly welcome essays exploring historical and political implications of Tezuka's "manga life."

    The deadline for submissions is January 9, 2012 to submissions(at)Mechademia.org Essays may be up to 5,000 words in length, with shorter pieces also welcome, and we will consider submissions in creative, non-traditional formats as well. Further information on the volume and the format for submissions is available on Mechademia's web page at http://mechademia.org/volumes/

    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisioninterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culture 43456Revised Call for Papers: "Saints and Sinners: Teaching the Blessed and the Blasphemous"MART (Medieval and Renaissance Teaching) Conferencembaldridge@cn.edu1319483204interdisciplinarymedievalrenaissancefull name / name of organization: MART (Medieval and Renaissance Teaching) Conferencecontact email: mbaldridge@cn.edu

    The Medieval and Renaissance Teaching Conference invites your participation in its second bi-annual meeting from March 16-17 in Dandridge, TN. Come join us in the heart of the Smoky Mountains, in the midst of the beautiful spring flowers!

    Submissions of abstracts are welcome in any discipline involved in the teaching of the Middle Ages or Renaissance. In honor of Saint Patrick's Day, we are especially interested in papers dealing with the teaching of Saints and/or sinners! Any proposals on the topic are welcome, but papers with a pedagogical focus will be given preference.

    Papers should be limited to no more than 20 minutes (roughly eight double-spaced pages).

    SUBMISSION OF ABSTRACTS
    Anyone interested in reading an original paper or proposing an organized panel should submit a one-page abstract for consideration. All abstracts will be submitted electronically. Email your abstract as a MS Word or PDF attachment to Mary Baldridge (mbaldridge@cn.edu) or Kip Wheeler (kwheeler@cn.edu).

    The deadline for submission of abstracts is December 1, 2011. Participants will be notified of acceptance by January 15, 2012.

    cfp categories: interdisciplinarymedievalrenaissance 43457Call for Papers-Television, 33rd Annual Conference February 8-11, 2012 (Abstract or Panel Proposal submission deadline: DecemberSouthwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Associationmganas@apu.edu1319489920americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisionpopular_culturefull name / name of organization: Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Associationcontact email: mganas@apu.edu

    Call for Papers: Television
    Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Associations' 33rd Annual Conference
    February 8-11, 2012
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    http://www.swtxpca.org
    Abstract or Panel Proposal submission deadline: December 1, 2011
    Conference Hotel: Hyatt Regency Albuquerque
    330 Tijeras, Albuquerque, NM 87102, USA
    Hotel Phone: 1-505-842-1234
    Fax: 1-505-766-6710

    The Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Associations' annual conference is one of the nation's largest gatherings of interdisciplinary scholars. Panels are now forming for all of the SW/TX PCA/ACA individual subject areas, including the Television area.

    The Television Area Chair invites interested scholars to submit papers on any aspect of television (current and past shows, content, television as a media format, the possible future of television, television effects or cultural impact, television and society, television artifacts and rituals, theories and criticism of television, the television business, etc.)

    Scholars, teachers, professionals, and others interested in television are encouraged to participate. Graduate students are also particularly welcome, with award opportunities for best graduate papers. If you wish to form your own television-focused panel, I would be glad to help facilitate your needs. Please submit 100-200 word abstract or panel proposal with names of all participants by Dec 1 to the conference database http://conference2012.swtxpca.org.

    Monica Ganas
    Television Area Chair
    Azusa Pacific University
    mganas@apu.edu

    cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisionpopular_culture 43458[UPDATE] Ancient Civilization: Political Institutions and Legal RegulationThe Scientific & Educational Centre for Classical Studies at Yaroslavl State University (Russia)yar.antik.center@gmail.com1319490523classical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesreligionfull name / name of organization: The Scientific & Educational Centre for Classical Studies at Yaroslavl State University (Russia)contact email: yar.antik.center@gmail.com

    The Scientific & Educational Centre for Classical Studies at Yaroslavl State University (Russia) resumes acceptance of papers for the web-conference «Ancient Civilization: Political Institutions and Legal Regulation» which is currently conducted on the Centre's website (http://antik-yar.ru/events-2/ancient-civilization-political-institutions...). The format of the event is a forum-like discussion of presented papers. All professors, PhD students and qualified scholars in Classical Studies are invited to participate.

    Taking into consideration results of the conference "first phase", we would like to emphasize, that a participant, whose paper has been accepted, must sign up on the website (http://antik-yar.ru/wp-login.php?action=register&lang=en). We strongly recommend that all presenters check from time to time the page with their work and answer the comments. It is also supposed that those, whose papers are posted, will participate in discussion of other papers. (All comments, written in Russian, we will translate into English.)

    • Papers (in English) are to be submitted by the 31st of March 2012 and will be posted right after their acceptance.
    • Length of a paper: up to 20,000 characters.
    • Abstract of approximately 1,500 characters is required (it will be further translated into Russian).
    • State your first name, family name, current position, affiliation, mailing (postal) address, e-mail address.

    It is planned to publish the conference proceedings.

    Please, email your papers to yar.antik.center@gmail.com.
    You are welcome to specify any information by using this e-mail address.

    cfp categories: classical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesreligion 43459"Forces at Play: Bodies, Power, and Spaces," March 31, 2012 Interdisciplinary Graduate ConferenceUniversity of Massachusetts Amherst, English Graduate Organizationumassengconf@gmail.com1319491118african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: University of Massachusetts Amherst, English Graduate Organizationcontact email: umassengconf@gmail.com

    Forces at Play: Bodies, Power, and Spaces

    Cyber bullying, the male gaze in cinema, SlutWalk in Toronto, the canonization of slave narratives, border rhetoric in the classroom – issues such as these take up the ways bodies, power, and spaces converge in a re-seeing and re-interpreting of historical and contemporary social complexities. Investigating this nexus in our discursive and material realities gives us the language for articulating the machinations of power and space that construct and dismantle singular and collective (im)material bodies.

    The English Graduate Organization of the University of Massachusetts Amherst invites submissions to our 2012 graduate interdisciplinary conference on March 31st 2012. This year's conference will push against standardized and finite notions of body, power, and space to explore how these three variables act upon each other to produce layered, complex, and radical permutations. We urge submitters to investigate the systems of regulation and control that maintain power over singular and collective bodies within various spaces. We invite submissions from a diverse range of disciplines, critical perspectives, and time periods; all three terms need not explicitly be examined in the project, though the possibility of convergence is an encouraged angle. Projects may include papers and/or panel presentations, performance pieces, and multi-media approaches on the following topics:

    -literary theoretical approaches
    -social spaces and institutions
    -composition and rhetorical studies
    -canonical studies of bodies of literature
    -national and communal boundaries (migrant communities, diasporas, refugee camps)
    -(post)colonialism and global studies
    -gender and sexuality studies
    -animal studies
    -social thought and political economy studies
    -media studies and digital spaces
    -visual and performing arts
    -pop culture/material culture
    -emerging creative projects
    -disability studies

    SUBMISSIONS:
    We accept three different types of submissions:
    1. Individual papers/projects: please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words. Include your name,
    paper title, institution, and email address.
    2. Panels: please submit a 1000 word proposal for an entire panel of presentations (3-4 presenters). Included in this proposal should be abstracts of 200-300 words for all presentations, title of the panel, and information for each presenter (name, paper title, institution, and email address). If you are forming your own panel, you have the option of providing your own chair.
    3. Performances and creative presentations/panels: we welcome submission of creative works, including creative writing, visual art, and dramatic performance. Please include a brief description of your project, as well as your name, project title, institution, and email address.
    Email submissions to umassengconf@gmail.com no later than January 25th, 2012.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 43460Midwestern Literary Naturalism at SSML Symposium 2012Scott Emmert (University of Wisconsin–Fox Valley) and Andy Oler (Indiana University)soler@indiana.edu1319492226african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityfull name / name of organization: Scott Emmert (University of Wisconsin–Fox Valley) and Andy Oler (Indiana University)contact email: soler@indiana.edu

    The Society for the Study of Midwestern Literature seeks papers exploring Midwestern literary naturalism for a panel at the SSML's 42nd Annual Symposium, held on May 10-12, 2012 at Michigan State University in East Lansing, MI.

    We welcome papers examining naturalism that is located in the Midwest or written by Midwestern authors. We are interested in addressing a wide swath of Midwestern literary naturalism and therefore welcome proposals that consider turn-of-the-century novels and stories, mid-twentieth century proletarian naturalism, or later naturalist-inflected texts. This panel will be especially interested in papers establishing, investigating, or denying a regionalized version of literary naturalism.

    Please e-mail an abstract (250-300 words) and brief biographical note to Andy Oler (soler@indiana.edu) and Scott Emmert (scott.emmert@uwc.edu) by January 1, 2012. All accepted presenters must join SSML prior to the May 2012 symposium. More information about the Society for the Study of Midwestern Literature and the Annual Symposium can be found at www.ssml.org.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexuality 43461CFP ACLA Spring 2011 Panel "Post - : Remembering, Binding, Afterness."American Comparative Literature Association Annual Conference on Collapse/ Catastrophe/ Changenstrobach@ucdavis.edu 1319499833bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookclassical_studiesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centurygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarymodernist studiesscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: American Comparative Literature Association Annual Conference on Collapse/ Catastrophe/ Changecontact email: nstrobach@ucdavis.edu

    This spring's ACLA conference will be at Brown University from March 29th to April 1st.

    Building off of this year's ACLA theme of "Collapse/ Catastrophe/ Change," this panel seeks to explore the space left in the wake of these three Cs. What remnants or remainders are left in their afterness? How do we mark the time of these events or the coming of these events? This panel will take as its starting point the act of mourning which is called to recognize these events, as well as the naming of the events. We will also call into question the act of remembering as binding. How is writing the space of afterness; can writing stitch together what remains of a collapse? Does the mere recording of the event eternalize it or memorialize it? How does catastrophe call us to bind together the spaces that surround and make them anew?

    Take as an example the writing we have seen after disaster, from Japanese intellectuals responding to the Great Kanto Earthquake—called to reimagine Tokyo, to the Frankfurt School theorists attempting to reconceptualize humanity after World War II. We are looking for papers that respond to either the attempt to recreate continuity in a discontinuous world, or to those precise portraits of temporality and the triumphs and travails over the catastrophic atemporal and discontinuous space. This panel looks to take into consideration work on trauma studies, spatiality, and area studies of any region.

    Topics may include:
    Afterlife
    Memory
    Book Binding
    Mapping
    Topography
    The Book
    Formal Experimentation
    Post-Humanism.

    SUBMISSION INFORMATION:

    Please contact us via email to let us know you will be submitting a paper proposal. In order for your proposal to be officially reviewed you must also submit it directly through the ACLA conference website: http://www.acla.org/submit/index.php

    Be sure to scroll down the Seminar dropbox to select our exact panel.

    Organizer: Natalie Strobach (UC Davis) Nstrobach AT ucdavis DOT edu
    Co-Organizer: Michael Graziano (UC Davis) Mrgraziano AT ucdavis DOT edu

    We look forward to reading your submissions! Please email us with any questions you may have.

    cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookclassical_studiesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centurygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarymodernist studiesscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 43462Borders and Border Crossings - May 1 & 2, 2012University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus; Interdisciplinary Graduate Student's Associationubco.igsa@gmail.com1319503449african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarymedievalpoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus; Interdisciplinary Graduate Student's Associationcontact email: ubco.igsa@gmail.com

    The Interdisciplinary Graduate Students Association at the University of British Columbia's Okanagan campus invites you to attend our fifth annual graduate student conference. This conference invites papers from creative and critical perspectives that examine the role of borders and border crossings as they intersect with, uphold, or challenge ideologies, institutions, and social spaces. Although the focus is on interdisciplinary studies in the Humanities and Social Sciences, we encourage submissions from across graduate disciplines.

    Proposals for both academic papers and creative work will be considered, and all presentations will be 15 minutes in length. Proposals should be no longer than 300 words, bear no identifying information, and be accompanied by a covering letter that includes the applicant's name and contact information. Please submit proposals to ubco.igsa@gmail.com as email attachments in .pdf, .rtf, .doc or .docx format by January 15, 2012.

    Graduate students are encouraged to apply to one of the following panels. These are not meant to restrict topics of presentation; rather, they are meant to inspire creative and critical thinking around the various borders we encounter. Please feel free to submit any proposals around the conference theme. Panel proposals are also welcome, and must be submitted by January 15, 2012. Please feel free to contact us with

    Suggested Panel Topics
    • Health and culture
    • International relations
    • Gender and sexuality
    • Pop culture
    • Post-colonialisms
    • Forbidden ground
    • Serious play
    • Gods and monsters
    • Children and culture
    • Humans and animals
    • The university and the world

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarymedievalpoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 43463riverscaping: a multidisciplinary symposium on the river in the arts, humanities, and sciences.Riverscaping Projectangela@riverscaping.org1319506067cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryscience_and_culturefull name / name of organization: Riverscaping Projectcontact email: angela@riverscaping.org

    When: April 19th to 22st 2012

    Where: The Five College Consortium (Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke and Smith Colleges and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst)

    Who: The symposium will bring together participants from a wide variety of places, disciplines, and approaches—in the humanities, arts, and sciences—to examine how the river has shaped their work and/or provoked new modes of investigation, inquiry, research and
    practice.

    Background: A multi-disciplinary, international inquiry into our collective relationships with the river, "Riverscaping: Alles am Fluss: Rethinking Art, Environment and Community" is an 18-month series of events funded by the Five College consortium (Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke and Smith Colleges and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst) and the American Delegation of the European Union as part of their "Getting to Know Europe" grant
    program. (see: www.riverscaping.org)

    Riverscapes is a term that has recently emerged to describe the most immediate landscapes that follow and flank rivers. Historically, this term was used to describe the physical earth around the river as a place impacted by and connected to the water––it refers to both actual places and represented landscapes. Our project extends this definition: the impact of the river on art, culture, space, the environment and the imagination is far more complex and oscillating. We see the riverscape as a term that binds together multiple histories, sciences, arts, practices and communities. Is there coalescence between the soft boundaries of a flowing, rising and sinking, inhabited water body, its adjacent natural topologies, our human-made material conditions and shifting modes of inquiry?

    How: Please submit one page prospectus, resume and cover letter briefly outlining your interest in the topic to: kkoehler@hampshire.edu and angela@riverscaping.org by December
    1st. 2011. Speakers will be notified of their acceptance by mid January 2012. Please indicate which session(s) you are targeting: Moments, Motion, Contestation, or the open session.

    What: Papers should be approximately 20 minutes in length; drafts will be due to the session chairs and respondents by March 15th 2012. We will prepare for some common areas of discussion by proposing a series of organizing questions with the speakers in each session in the weeks before the symposium.

    Sessions: [Saturday April 21st] We are seeking papers that are concerned with everything from: the river as a literary metaphor, as a form of choreography, as iconography, or as inspiration for a symphony; the role of the river in national or political confrontations or resolutions, or patterns of slavery and repression; or, as the catalyst for the design of greenways, parks, watersheds, or urban farming; or the river as a site for creative economies,
    educational innovations, and historical heritage institutions; etc.

    I. MOMENTS: Can you step in the same river twice?
    Questions of time, change, sustainability, transformation…

    II. MOTION: How does the river go?
    Currents, fluidity, metabolism, performance, displacement, or transport…

    III. CONTESTATION: Who owns a river?
    Property, boundaries, stewardship, bridges, nations, cultures, battlefields…

    Purposely abstract yet suggestive, each session of the symposium is intended to allow speakers from a range of approaches and fields—philosophical, political, historical, economic, artistic, geological, geographical, and environmental—to explore the river as a physical reality, a spectacle, an obstacle and as a representational metaphor.

    IV. OPEN SESSION
    While both landscapes and water follow natural rules, the resultant form and interaction at any given place along the river is wholly unique and its mutations are infinite. This same idea defines
    the riverscaping project, and so we are planning an open session to allow for ideas that do not clearly match our conceptual categories above. While there are clear systems of ecology, economy, transport, arts and public space surrounding and representing the river, we hope to uncover and dissect the many interdisciplinary topologies and convergent iterations that the presence of the river cultivates.

    Speakers include: Jonathan Lash, President of Hampshire College and former president of the World Resources Institute; T.S. McMillan, Oberlin College and author of The Meaning of Rivers: Flow and Reflection in American Literature (Iowa University Press, 2011 ) ; Hidenobu Jinnai Faculty of Engineering, Hosei University; Johan C. Varekamp, Environmental Studies, Wesleyan University; Julian
    Bonder/ Krzysztof Wodiczko.

    Additional Events: There will be opportunities for exploring the natural, cultural, and culinary wonders along the Connecticut River in Western Massachusetts—including historic houses, museum
    and gallery tours, public art exhibitions, as well as numerous hiking and biking paths. Keynote lectures, an evening of performances and a closing forum will enable the exchange of ideas with scholars, artists and community groups who have been working with the riverscaping project in a number of different situations—discussions, presentations, competitions, and workshops.

    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryscience_and_culture 43464UPDATE: Trans Literary Reader--Deadline for Proposals Extended to 11/15/2011The Trans Literary Readertransreader@mills.edu1319511707african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitymedievalpostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: The Trans Literary Readercontact email: transreader@mills.edu

    We invite proposals for inclusion in an edited collection of essays that will approach literary texts (broadly conceived) from a trans-theoretical lens.

    We are interested in essays that attend to the slippages, the connects and the disconnects between trans experience, trans theories, and trans readings of literary texts. We are also interested in essays that engage both the tensions and productive links between queer, trans and feminist approaches to literature, as well as the affects and rhetorics of embodied possibility within and across various generic, national, and temporal categories. We are particularly interested in essays that practice intersectional readings, looking at, for example, the confluence of ability, class, ethnicity, gender, and race.

    Interested scholars should submit a current cv and 250- to 400-word abstract of the proposed essay by November 15, 2011. Scholars will be notified of the status of their proposal by December 1, 2011. Completed essays based on accepted proposals must be submitted by May 1, 2012.

    Please send your MS Word compatible proposals (abstract and cv) to Rebekah Edwards, Kirsten Saxton, and Ajuan Mance (transreader@mills.edu).

    cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitymedievalpostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 43465Women, The Arts, and Activism a Conference at Sarah Lawrence College Friday-Saturday, March 2-3, 2012 Women's History Graduate Program at Sarah Lawrence Collegetjames@sarahlawrence.edu1319511710african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencespopular_culturerenaissanceromantictheatretheoryfull name / name of organization: Women's History Graduate Program at Sarah Lawrence Collegecontact email: tjames@sarahlawrence.edu

    CALL FOR PROPOSALS
    Women, The Arts, and Activism

    a Conference at Sarah Lawrence College
    Friday-Saturday, March 2-3, 2012
    Free and Open to the Public

    Historically, women have been seen and represented as protectors and transmitters of culture, yet, although some women gained recognition as artists, many more struggled to be seen, heard, and taken seriously. As in other disciplines, women bring their own diverse voices and points of view to the canvass, writing table, music stand, stage, and street. From Renaissance painters to contemporary hip hop and performance artists, women represent their particular journeys as singular personalities and as members of various groups. Whoever they are and from wherever they hail, their expression expands our global understanding of women's history. Additionally, The women's history conference at its core is about women's activism. Throughout time, women have used their artistic expression as a method of activism. This year we will explore the ways in which women have used their art as means of liberation.

    We invite the submission of proposals for papers, panels, workshops and performances that express the extremely diverse nature of the story of women in the arts, from ancient to modern/postmodern from all areas of the arts.

    Specific topics may include, but are not limited to:
    Women, Art, and Material Culture
    Women in the Black Arts Movement
    Women's Social Protest Expressed Through the Arts
    Arts and Race
    Women, Art and Sexuality
    Women's Artistic Expression Across Cultures
    Debating Canon
    Women in Literature
    The Role of Women's Artistic Expression in War and Revolution

    Please include a short description of each presentation and a one-page c.v. for each presenter. Proposals for whole panels or workshops are especially welcome, but we will also consider individual papers.

    Deadline: Monday, December 5, 2011
    Send proposals to: tjames@slc.edu
    (email submissions are preferred)
    Tara James, Associate Director
    Graduate Program in Women's History
    Sarah Lawrence College
    1 Mead Way, Bronxville, New York 10708
    914-395-2405

    cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencespopular_culturerenaissanceromantictheatretheory 43466[Update] The Apocalypse in Popular Culture Feb 8-11; Abstract Dec 1stShane Trayers SWTX PCA/ACA in Albuquerque, New Mexicoshane.trayers@maconstate.edu1319517814ecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarypoetrypopular_culturescience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Shane Trayers SWTX PCA/ACA in Albuquerque, New Mexicocontact email: shane.trayers@maconstate.edu

    The Apocalypse in Popular Culture
    SWTX PCA/ACA February 8-11, 2012 in Albuquerque, New Mexico

    2012, the year of the Mayan predicted apocalypse, will certainly be a stellar year for apocalyptic research. These days the apocalypse is prolific in its depictions, creeping in to all kinds of popular culture. Proposals and panels are currently being accepted for this area. Ideas for topics are included below; however, proposals are not limited to these ideas.

    Apocalypse in film and television: Terminator, 2012, The Core, Daybreakers, Zombieland, Independence Day, Night of the Comet, Day after Tomorrow, Armegeddon, The War of the Worlds, End of Days, Resident Evil, Last Night, 12 Monkeys, The Road, The Book of Eli, Dark Angel, Jericho, Battlestar Galactica, Children of Men, The Matrix, The Hunger Games, Crimson Tide, Invasion, V, Contagion,

    Apocalypse in literature: The Road, Children of Men, The Hunger Games, Alas Babylon, The Stand, etc.

    Apocalypse in comic books and video games: Left 4 Dead, Resident Evil etc.

    Apocalypse in poetry: William Butler Yeats, Gerald Stern, etc.

    Religious Apocalypse: Revelations and other religious apocalyptic texts.
    Apocalypse as response to terrorism, economics, conservatism, gender issues
    Cultural Apocalypse of native cultures through colonization

    The Apocalypse in Music: "End of the World as we know it," "2012".

    Abstracts are Due By December 1st and should be submitted to the new-and-improved submission database that will go online soon at http://conference2012.swtxpca.org. Please submit your abstracts through the database by the deadline.

    If you have any questions, please contact Shane Trayers at shane.trayers@maconstate.edu.

    cfp categories: ecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarypoetrypopular_culturescience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 43467The Globalization of African-American Consumer CultureGerman Historical Insitutedavis@ghi-dc.org1319553216african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityinternational_conferencespopular_culturetravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: German Historical Insitutecontact email: davis@ghi-dc.org

    The Globalization of African-American Business and Consumer Culture

    Call for Papers

    Convener: Joshua Clark Davis (GHI)

    German Historical Institute, Washington, D.C.

    February 24-25, 2012

    In recent decades, the historical topics of both the development of American consumer culture and the U.S.'s interactions with the wider world have gained substantial attention from scholars. In the process some historians have combined these approaches to produce the small but growing body of work on the globalization of U.S. business and consumer culture. Roughly coinciding with rise of the U.S.'s global military empire, the behemoths of American business such as Ford Motor Company, Coca-Cola, McDonald's and the United Fruit Company are said to have spread American consumer culture around the world in the twentieth century. To a large degree, the globalization of U.S. business and consumer culture has been understood as the campaign of white American businesspeople to shape the world's economies and market cultures into their own image. Yet this workshop will move beyond perspectives that explain the globalization of American consumer culture in such narrow terms.

    Instead, this workshop will investigate the global impact of African-American businesses and consumer cultures. A range of the questions that this workshop seeks to address include but are not limited to the following. Simply put, how have African Americans exported their products, goods and culture beyond U.S. borders? How have African-American businesses and consumer cultures, when exported abroad, shaped global perceptions both of black Americans, and of the United States more generally? How have white American businesses marketed and repackaged African-American products for global audiences? Can African-American consumer cultures, when exported abroad, undermine, challenge and alter dominant conceptions of the American marketplace as the exclusive province of white elites? How did the civil rights and black power movements shape global markets for African American businesses and products?

    Just as important, how have African-American consumers participated in the global economy? What impact have non-American business and products had on African-American consumer culture? How have immigrant businesses, especially from Asia, the Caribbean and Africa, shaped black American consumer culture? How have African Americans participated in the global tourist trade, not only as travelers, but also as hosts, as seen in the rise of international civil rights and music tourism in the U.S.? In what ways have international businesses reinterpreted black consumer cultures for their own purposes, sometimes even importing those adaptations back into the United States?

    In addition, this workshop will investigate the globalization of African American popular and youth cultures, not simply as entertainment that spreads through electronic media, but as commodities that are bought and sold in the world marketplace. To mention just one example, the famed record label Motown Industries, once the largest black business in America, earned about 40 percent of its revenues outside the U.S. by the 1970s. How have black businesses, as well as white companies, sold black cultural products like music film, and literature around the world? How do the trades in rhythm and blues or hip hop—musical cultures that have often but not always challenged dominant American hierarchies of race, class and political authority—exert a profound effect on global perceptions of the United States?

    In the process of addressing these and other questions, this workshop hopes to attract a broad range of scholars who wish to contribute to the ongoing historical discourse on the global dimensions of the African American experience.

    Potential topics include, but are not limited to

    * The marketing and selling of African-American culture (e.g. music, film, literature) around the globe

    * African-American consumers and the global economy (e.g. import products)

    *African-American businesses and businesspeople around the world

    *Non-American cultural products (e.g. music, film, literature) and African-American consumers

    *African-American international tourists and international tourists visiting African-American sites

    *African-American consumers and immigrant businesses

    *The international trade in the black freedom struggle's legacy (e.g. The Black Power Mixtape)

    Please send a paper title, a one-page abstract, and a CV to Joshua Clark Davis (davis@ghi-dc.org) no later than Friday, December 2, 2011. Expenses for travel (economy class) and accommodations will be covered, although we also encourage participants to defray travel costs with funds from their home institution if possible.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityinternational_conferencespopular_culturetravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 43468LIES 2012: "Of what is past, or passing, Or to come" : Travelling in time and space in literature in English.Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Polandkbronk@ifa.amu.edu.pl1319560593cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromantictheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Polandcontact email: kbronk@ifa.amu.edu.pl

    The lines quoted in the title of the conference from W.B. Yeats' "Sailing to Byzantium," which are recalled by one of the characters in Marina Warner's novel In a Dark Wood, bring to light the theme of this year's Literature in English Symposium: Travelling in space and time.

    The idea of a journey is inherently connected with changing places and movement, but, through reading, we can traverse space and time, continents and cultures, whilst remaining static.
    The 8th Literature in English Symposium (LIES 8) held on 13th May 2012 at Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań (Poland) is devoted to: the explorations of individual space and landscape of the mind through analyzing trauma and addressing psychological wounds; travels into fairy tales, oriental scenery (real and imaginary) as well as interrelationships between memory and fiction in non-fictional and fictional discourses.

    Our guest writer of LIES 2012 is Professor Marina Warner, a fiction writer, a professor of literature, theater and film. With her we can travel into the land of fairy tales, myth, and spiritual visions and meet exemplary women such as the Virgin Mary and Joan of Arc or visionaries such as Maria Pia, a character from In a Dark Wood.
    Our plenary speaker is Professor Cathy Caruth (Cornell University) and with her we might take a "voyage out" into trauma (and healing)narratives.
    Abstracts of 300 words should be submitted to Katarzyna Bronk at kbronk@ifa.amu.edu.pl or bbronkk@gmail.com by 15th December 2011.

    Conference Organiser:
    Professor Liliana Sikorska
    Head of Department of English Literature and Literary Linguistics

    Conference Secretary:
    Katarzyna Bronk, PhD
    Department of English Literature and Literary Linguistics

    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromantictheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 43469Psychology, Emotion, and the Human SciencesUniversity of Windsorspender@uwindsor.ca1319561817classical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centurygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheoryfull name / name of organization: University of Windsorcontact email: spender@uwindsor.ca

    Psychology, Emotion, and the Human Sciences
    A Symposium at the University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario Canada

    20 to 21 April 2012

    Call for Papers
    Deadline 1 November 2011

    Keynote Speaker: Professor Stephen Leighton, Philosophy, Queen's University, Kingston

    In Alchemies of the Mind: Rationality and the Emotions [Cambridge, 1999], Jon Elster argues that "with an important subset of the emotions [for example, regret, relief, envy, malice, pity, indignation, ...] we can learn more from moralists, novelists, and playwrights than from the cumulative findings of scientific psychology." Elster then explores the work of both ancient and early modern moral philosophers in order to substantiate his argument.

    This symposium will explore Elster's assertions: what can contemporary 'scientific psychology,' barely 150 years old, teach us about the emotions that early modern literary and philosophical inquiry cannot? Does psychology [of various sorts] deserve its status as the discipline of feeling? What can contemporary philosophical work teach us about feeling and emotion? Are there viable ways of bringing historical and contemporary emotional inquiry into contact? What insight can various forms of inquiry bring to the increasingly prominent issue of affective education [the education of emotions, dispositions, and values]? What is the status of emotional inquiry across disciplines?

    Abstracts for twenty-minute papers are invited by scholars engaged in the history of psychology, contemporary psychology and sociology, philosophy, literary studies, the history of emotion, the scholarship of teaching and learning, and informal logic and argumentation. Papers may treat any period from 1500 to the present. Maximum 500 word abstracts should be sent [in word or rtf files] by 1 November 2011 to spender@uwindsor.ca.

    Possible topics might include, but are not limited to, the following:

    - rhetoric and the emotions
    - emotion and informal logic
    - argument and emotion
    - affective education
    - emotion in the classroom
    - the history of psychology
    - neuroscience and emotion
    - the passions in history
    - psychoanalysis and emotion
    - the sociology of emotion

    The organisers are hopeful that participants are aware of, and incorporate, the history of emotion in their respective disciplines or areas of inquiry. Selected papers will be considered for a collection of essays, and all applicants will be informed by 15 November 2011 about their participation in the symposium.

    For more information, contact Stephen Pender, spender@uwindsor.ca

    With all best wishes,
    Stephen Pender

    Stephen Pender, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor, English
    Research Leadership Chair, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
    Centre for Research in Reasoning, Argumentation, and Rhetoric
    University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada N9B 3P4
    t: 519.253.3000 [2307] f: 519.971.3620 e: spender@uwindsor.ca

    cfp categories: classical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centurygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheory 43470Call for Papers, Interdisciplinary Studies Section (Abstracts due Nov 28, 2011)Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Lettersbennettc@oakland.edu1319562048interdisciplinaryfull name / name of organization: Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letterscontact email: bennettc@oakland.edu

    Accepting panel, poster, and paper proposals on any interdisciplinary topic. Special interest in studies that discuss/employ/integrate science, social sciences, arts and/or humanities. In particular:

    -differentiation and integration of sciences and arts;
    -integration of scholarly research and autobiography, including psychobiography;
    -integration of quantitative and qualitative research;
    -interdisciplinary approaches to learning;;
    -interdisciplinary perspectives on basic concerns of human beings such as life and death, identity, relationships, work, survival, and human well-being.

    Conference: March 2, 2011 at Alma College in Alma, Michigan

    Abstracts are due by November 28, 2010. Abstracts should be submitted online at the Michigan Academy website: themichiganacademy.org

    Section Leader/Chair: Ben Bennett-Carpenter, Department of Writing & Rhetoric, and Bachelor of Integrative Studies program, Oakland University (Michigan) | 248 854 8340 | bennettc@oakland.edu

    Link here for a full call for papers and further information:
    https://sites.google.com/a/oakland.edu/benjamin-bennett-carpenter/home/c...

    cfp categories: interdisciplinary 43471H.D. International Society -- CFP for the American Literature AssociationH.D. International Societyadebo@wcu.edu1319566254americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsmodernist studiespoetrytheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: H.D. International Societycontact email: adebo@wcu.edu

    The H.D. International Society invites papers to be delivered in a panel at the American Literature Association Conference in San Francisco, May 24-27, 2012. Presentations on any topic are welcome, and we look forward to showcasing new research on H.D.

    Please send abstracts of 250-500 words by January 13 to Annette Debo (adebo@wcu.edu) and Lara Vetter (LVetter@uncc.edu).

    Annette Debo
    Co-Chair of the H.D. International Society &
    Associate Professor, Department of English
    Western Carolina University

    Lara Vetter
    Co-Chair of the H.D. International Society &
    Associate Professor, Department of English
    University of North Carolina at Charlotte

    cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsmodernist studiespoetrytheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 43472Poetics of Collapse: Form and PoliticsAmerican Comparative Literature Associationanthony.reed@yale.edu, or smp254@cornell.edu1319571900african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitypoetrypostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: American Comparative Literature Associationcontact email: anthony.reed@yale.edu, or smp254@cornell.edu

    Variations on the idea of collapse have shaped an array of poetic experiments with form and approaches to figuring personal and political crisis, disarray, and decline. How, then, have poets imagined and responded to visions of social, political, emotional, environmental, or economic collapse, and how in turn has poetic play with formal ideas of collapse or collapsibility rendered poetic ideas about political and aesthetic futures? Processes and structures of collapse change the organization of our social worlds in time and space. How might poets' ideas about the forms and meanings of collapse refine, extend, or contest analogous ideas in political economy, social theory, or aesthetics? Whereas some poets describe personal crises or social collapses as punctual events, others understand them as ongoing processes, challenging political philosophies of the event by affirming the importance of lived duration. Spatially, meanwhile, collapse can signify disorder and the loss of structure, but it also can indicate compressions that do not disrupt structural relations—as, for instance, the parts of a collapsible table remain hinged together. This seminar will explore how the formal and social notions of collapse continue to shape poetic genres, aesthetic theories, and political visions of poetry from an array of cultural and historical contexts. We welcome papers addressing poetics of collapse from a variety of perspectives—including the collapse of social structures in former colonies or "failed states," poetic approaches to social or emotional collapse, and poetry about financial crises, environmental or industrial disasters, and millennial anxieties.

    The ACLA has a unique conference format, with seminars of twelve people meeting for two hours each day over the course three days, generating a more substantive and collaborative set of conversations than most other conferences allow for. The conference this year is hosted at Brown University, 3/29 - 4/1/2012.

    General information about the conference may be found here: http://acla.org/acla2012/
    Information about this seminar may be found here: http://acla.org/acla2012/?page_id=539
    The submission deadline is 11/15, and you must submit through the ACLA's website; we cannot take your submissions directly.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitypoetrypostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 43473Year Round Call for Submissions Rougarou and Online Literary Journal Matthew Teutsch/ Rougaroujxt0090@louisiana.edu1319578594journals_and_collections_of_essayspoetryfull name / name of organization: Matthew Teutsch/ Rougaroucontact email: jxt0090@louisiana.edu

    Rougarou is the online literary magazine edited by graduate students of the Department of English at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. We seek submissions of fiction, poetry, nonfiction and book reviews. We are interested in original, resonant, well-crafted work. We accept submissions year-round. Simultaneous submissions are fine, assuming you will notify us immediately if your work is accepted elsewhere. We do not accept previously published work. For our full guidelines, please visit our website at: www.louisiana.edu/Rougarou

    E-mail all work as a Word document or RTF attachment, with the appropriate genre as the subject line of the e-mail.

    Send fiction to: rougaroufiction@gmail.com
    Send poetry to: rougaroupoetry@gmail.com
    Send nonfiction to: rougarounonfiction@gmail.com
    Send book reviews and all other queries to: rougaroueditors@gmail.com

    cfp categories: journals_and_collections_of_essayspoetry 43474DEADLINE APPROACHING: Call For Papers / Essays for Applied Nonexistence: A Journal of Negation TheoryApplied Nonexistenceappliednonexistence@gmail.com1319593722americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositiontheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Applied Nonexistencecontact email: appliednonexistence@gmail.com

    DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: October 31, 2011.

    Applied Nonexistence is an anti-political / anti-state communist / insurrectionary anarchist peer-reviewed journal seeking submissions on the theme of INSURRECTION. Utilizing a detourned reading of the Negriian conception of "Empire" Tiqqun in "How is it to be done?" claims that, "Empire is when the means of production have become the means of control and the means of control the means of production. Empire signifies that henceforth the political moment dominates the economic moment. And the general strike is powerless against it. What must be opposed to Empire is the human strike." This notion of the human strike as the eradication of all political subjectivities can be posited as the most extreme form of insurrectionary praxis.

    Applied Nonexistence seeks submissions on the role of INSURRECTION within a poststructuralist terrain of hostis and civil war, where the seemingly infinite conduits of power become the very nodes of social control which define this late-capitalist epoch.

    We are interested in papers which utilize the notion of INSURRECTION as an ontological social rupture, one in which political subjectivities are destabilized, subverted, and ultimately negated. Submissions may take the form of essays, creative pieces, or literature reviews. Submissions may either deal with the notion of INSURRECTION explicitly, or use it as a means to evaluate works of cultural production.

    A few examples of topical relevance…

    The cultural production and representation of INSURRECTION viewed through the following theoretical perspectives:

    Tiqqun's notions of the "Bloom" and "Zones of Offensive Opacity"
    Claire Fontaine and Tiqqun's notion of "The Human Strike"
    Communization Theory as articulated by Gilles Duave and Amadeo Bordiga
    Giorgio Agamben's treatment of Homo Sacer and "whatever singularities"
    Foucauldian Biopower
    Deleuze and Guattari's Schizoanalysis
    Adorno's Negative Dialectics
    Anti-political nihilism

    Submissions should be no longer than 20 pages. Send a 500-word abstract along with a little bit of information about yourself to Mary Celeste at appliednonexistence@gmail.com before October 31, 2011. Final submissions will be due by January 15, 2012.

    Mary Celeste: appliednonexistence@gmail.com
    www.appliednonexistence.org

    cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositiontheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 43475Narratiing Women's Lives, Labeling Women's Narratives Due Nov. 7 for NEMLA March15-18Northeast Modern Language Associationmary.lannon@ncc.edu1319593836gender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarytheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Northeast Modern Language Associationcontact email: mary.lannon@ncc.edu

    Narrating Women's Lives, Labeling Women's Narratives
    In 1995, Chris Mazza and Jeff DeShell edited Chick-Lit: Postfeminist Fiction and in 2005 Elizabeth Herrick edited This is Not Chick Lit. In between Chick Lit lost its dash(pun intended?) and changed its meaning. Mazza had defined Chick-lit as breaking out of the stereotypical feminist narratives of the second wave: victim and self-empowerment stories particularly irked her. She declared the stories in her volume offering new lenses for women, and she boldly declared these "human." Flash forward eleven years and Elizabeth Herrick directed the reader's eye to books with pink covers focused on shopping and finding men and traced their origins to the 1996 novel Bridget Jones Diary, leaving Mazza's work unmentioned. Noting that chick lit allows for necessary escapism, she nonetheless, argued that the wild success of the genre obscured the literary work of many women, something her volume championed. Though clearly irritated with the genre, she saw the success of all women as part of the feminist movement. Contributors to this panel are asked to read their own fiction that in some way narrates women's lives and offer some understanding of how they see their work in relationship (if any) to (post) feminism (any of the waves), womanism, and chick-lit\chick lit. Please send a one-page sample of your fiction along with a150-250 word proposal by Nov. 7 to Mary.Lannon@ncc.edu

    cfp categories: gender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarytheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 43476CREOLENESS AND FRENCH-SPEAKING AREAS CREOLIZATION : A RELEVANT CONCEPT FOR THE UNDERSTANDING OF THE CITY/PROJECT?Stéphanie MELYON-REINETTE, PhD (AgoraCulture, non-profit Organization), François Durpaire, PhD (Mouvement pluricitoyen "Nous sommes tous les France") and Pr. Christine Delory-Momberger (Université Paris 13, "le sujet dans la cité)smr_3@hotmail.com1319614639ethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialfull name / name of organization: Stéphanie MELYON-REINETTE, PhD (AgoraCulture, non-profit Organization), François Durpaire, PhD (Mouvement pluricitoyen "Nous sommes tous les France") and Pr. Christine Delory-Momberger (Université Paris 13, "le sujet dans la cité)contact email: smr_3@hotmail.com

    Abstract
    The martiniquan philosopher Edouard Glissant, deceased on february 3rd, 2011, was one of the first theorizers of "globalness". His concept of "creolization", has broken away from the "chock of civilizations" idea, and supported by Samuel Hutington, allows to the understanding of the cross-fertilization of cultures. Yet, it is largely under-utilized, specially in the French-speaking areas. This conference firstly aims at comprehending the different creole identities, the meetings and intermingling of french cultures and the "elsewheres"in order to – at a second stage – apprehending the concept of "creolization" and studying its relevance; how can it be relevant in the appreciation of the evolutions of our societies in the early 21st century?Sociologists, historians, politists, didacticians, and so on, will be asked to confront their theories and methodologies in accordance with this concept.

    An idea : « the people university of diversity (Une idée : « L'université populaire de la diversité »).
    The second objective of this conference is to propose a new form of cultural and intellectual meeting. Initiated by the association (Non-gouvernemental organization) AgoraCulture, headed by Stéphanie Melyon-Reinette, by François Durpaire, president of le mouvement pluricitoyen « Nous sommes tous la France » (We are all France) and by Christine Delory-Momberger, Professor and director of « Le Sujet dans la Cité. Education. Socialisation. Biographisation », part of the research team EXPERICE at the university Paris 8/13. This conference will be the first encounter of the Popular University of Diversity (Université Poulaire de la Diversité) whose objective is to pass knowledge informally over a larger audience than the one attracted by most scholar conferences, to provoke fruitful encounters between the scholars and the cultural and artistic worlds (singers, slam poets, painters, story-tellers, etc.)

    The axes

    In late 2009, in France, is prominently questioned the issue of national identity, even though sociologists, historians and other researchers had already been interested in it since the 1980s. Yet, this issue seemed much more salient whereas those movements which were deemed « social » – when they'd rather be quelified as identity and revolutionary claimings – upset the French overseas departments ; especially Guadeloupe where the discourse « La Gwadloup sé tan nou, la Gwadloup a pa ta yo.. » (Gwadloup is ours, Gwadloup is not theirs…) seemed to make reappear questionings and a kind of unrest vis-à-vis the French identity (Frenchness) they were given in 1946, when the « départementalisation » was voted.

    Various perspectives gave birth to this questioning :

    1) The first one was about the dominance of creole identity confronted with France, with the French identity – dare we say frenchness – and Francophonie or French spaces. In fact, isn't the latter, « francophonie », simply an ensemble of geographical areas where French remains as a vestige of colonization. Colonization and assimilation language creating a identity and linguistic divalence – or equivalence (diglossia or bilinguism for example) in those countries. Because there is a glaring distinction between this ensemble called "francophonie" or the French-speaking communities and the fact of loving the French language or "francophilie". And what types of encounters does this coexistence or cohabitation provoke?

    2) Secondly, creoleness which is always presented on a singular stance never leaves paths to other forms of identity, linguistic, cultural or political cross-breedings. As a matter of fact, creoleness which could be simply defined as « the ensemble of the creole culture's values », and once again, only gives singularity where there is only plurality. Consequently, the french colonizations (often linked with other influences : spanish, portuguese, dutch…) gave birth to various forms of creoleness which are lived at various levels : identity, collective claiming, legacy culture, vehicular or vernacular languages? A creole was a slave assimilated to the master's culture in contrast with the maroon, the bossals. Was it the same thing elsewhere? In the French West Indies, people don't identify as "creoles" contrarily to Reunionese people. But they eat "creole" food, and speak creole.

    I was asked: « And why should we always link this terminology either to négritude or to antillanité (West-Indianness), or else to the Edouard Glissant's Tout-Monde? » It is true that this concept, supported in « Eloge de la Créolité » (1989) written by Jean Bernabé, Patrick Chamoiseau and Raphaël Confiant, allows the emergence of a movement for the defense of the cultural and spiritual values of the creoles of the French West Indies, and becomes the main neuralgia of a project of postcolonial emancipation and of recognition of the Antillean specificities. Heirs of Aimé Césaire and of Négritude – which was thought as the struggle against assimilation and as a unilateral identification of the colonies and their writers with France – those researchers valued the creole issue. But what about the creole issue in La Réunion? In Madagascar ? What about the creole languages in the Seychelles, in Africa? Are they assorted with a particular identity? Singular identity ? Are they discriminatory ? Are they minor languages ? common or vernacular languages ? Obstacles or vectors ? In front of the domination of the Antillean model in the common thinking, we would like to discover the points of view on the other creole areas.

    3) The third point refers to « creolization ». If we consider creolity as a process, a dynamic – like the « oraliture » of Raphael Confiant who paradoxically wanted to graphically and morphologically fix this language whereas it is quintessencially a mutation – how to dfine creolization? The suffix [-ization] would define an action, a process opposed to [-ness/-ity] which would define a fact, "the fact of doing". Identity versus identification. This example is significant. So, creolization must be questioned in opposition with creoleness as a process of the cultural, identity, and legacy constructions, from Slavery until today.

    Glissant speaks about this « Tout-Monde », this refusal of an essentializing identity, bound to a territory, a race, a nation, in order to favor an identity in rhizomes. Regarding this Glissantian ideal, creole, creoleness and creolization can't be limited to the West Indies, as every man is a creole, is creolized. Let's dare question this reality: is every language a creole? Is every space creolized and the result of cross-breeding and intermingling? Aren't the great French cities and their « surburbs » laboratories and creolized spaces or in creolization ? Can't we talk about a caribeanization, an africanization and a arabianization of the French cities, of Ile-de-France?
    The traditional cultures – apparently passed over through the regional, local and minority languages – might be fundamental and crucial in the foundation of these peoples. Thus, let's question ourselves on the linguistic and cultural evolutions which occur in France: at the crossroads of the minority languages, aren't there new forms of creoles? Languages and cultures?

    The French territory and francophonie meeting those islands scattered in confettis in the Caribbean waters and the Indian Ocean. It will deal with incorporate the following frame according to those three points:
    - Creoleness and creolenesses: definitions of creoleness.
    - French-speaking communities/Francophonie, regional identities and tradition
    - Creolization: process of social, cultural and ethnic intermingling and diversity

    And at the junction with those various spaces : West-Indies, Caribbean, Francophonie, former french colonies, Africa, Tradition, modernity, languages, cultures, politics, Pacific Areas, Indian Ocean…

    This call for papers is directed at scholars (linguists, anthropologists, sociologists, musicologists, ethnologists, historians…), writers, but also artists using those languages or claiming their creole identities, or else setting up new creolization processes (slam artists, rappers, singers, dancers, etc.) and the « tradition supporters » (story-tellers, griots, fonn kerr, and others).

    The association holding the project : AgoraCulture

    Founded in July 2011 by Stéphanie Melyon-Reinette (PhD), AgoraCulture is a non-profit organization (association Loi 1901) whose letimotiv is to favor exchanges, the thinking and dialogues amongst the different cultures of France. This association is intended to favor multicultural and intercultural experiences and the communication between various cultures through the organizing of conferences (local, national and international), workshops, seminars and debates around cultural topics, whether they are linguistic, social, religious, society, education, ethnic or linked with cultural or artistic practices. Moreover, the aim is to discover cultures, to acquire knowledge and learn history through other spheres than the traditional education system: learn from one's peers, from one's grand-parents, from one's fellows, from the architectural, urban and patrimony archives.

    Information and sending of your proposals

    Contact : Stéphanie Melyon-Reinette, PhD : smr_3@hotmail.com
    Deadline for the sending : march 31st, 2012
    Scholars : send a 150-word abstract (with keywords) to the following address : smr_3@hotmail.com
    Artists : send a resume and a link (myspace, youtube or any other)

    cfp categories: ethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonial 43477Rethinking the Self: Transnational and Transdisciplinary Bioethical and Biopolitical ConcernsHelsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki, Finlandsuvi.salmenniemi@helsinki.fi and donna.mccormack@helsinki.fi1319619282cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki, Finlandcontact email: suvi.salmenniemi@helsinki.fi and donna.mccormack@helsinki.fi

    Keynote speakers include Prof. Beverley Skeggs, Goldsmiths, University of London, UK, and Dr. Jenny Slatman, Maastricht University, the Netherlands.

    This international and interdisciplinary symposium addresses how cultural, medical and political understandings of the self are shifting and changing in contemporary societies. It explores how humanness is imagined and conceived in various symbolic systems of knowledge, and how gender, disability, class and ethnicity articulate these understandings. With a particular focus on how ideas of the flesh and national identity reconfigure experiences of the embodied self, the symposium aims to bring together scholars whose work engages with issues that range from medical and cultural technologies, globalisation, migration and neoliberalism to phenomenology and ethics, political ideologies and subjectivities, and theories of social transformation.

    This symposium aims to create a transdisciplinary dialogue regarding the local and global changing understandings of and practices related to the self by bringing together speakers from a broad range of cultural, methodological, national, disciplinary and transnational foci. It seeks to further conversations and research on topical and vexing questions of the self, especially in relation to recent medical, cultural, technological, political, social and neo-colonial developments. With an emphasis on the biopolitics of bodies, machines and institutional structures, the symposium also addresses the ethics of human selfhood, specifically how we define the human and what is at stake in our definitions of this now global being.

    We welcome submissions for papers, poster-presentations and artwork from a broad range of disciplines and fields of research. Topics can include, but are not limited to:
    • Theories and technologies of the self (Foucault, Agamben, Butler, etc.)
    • Community belonging and violence
    • Contemporary medical therapies, technologies and ethics (organ donation and transplantation, gene therapy, HIV therapies, etc.)
    • Class dimensions of the self (Skeggs, etc.)
    • The self, disability and monstrosity (Shildrick, etc)
    • Self harm and narratives of the self
    • Medicalised race theories
    • Gender, sexuality and queering the self
    • Phenomenology, the senses and an embodied sense of self
    • Ethics and the ethics of the human

    If you would like to participate, please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words and a brief biography (max. 100 words) to Suvi Salmenniemi (suvi.salmenniemi@helsinki.fi) and Donna McCormack (donna.mccormack@helsinki.fi) by 1st December 2011.
    For more information, see http://www.helsinki.fi/collegium/events/rethinking-the-self.htm

    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 43478JoDRM Call for PapersJournal of Defense Resources Managementjournal@crmra.ro1319623718interdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysprofessional_topicsfull name / name of organization: Journal of Defense Resources Managementcontact email: journal@crmra.ro

    The Regional Department of Defense Resources Management Studies- DRESMARA- issues biannually, in April and October, the Journal of Defense Resources Management (JODRM).

    The aim of JODRM is to disseminate the results of the theoretical and practical research investigations undertaken by reputable professionals worldwide in the holistic field of defense resources management.

    Emphasis is placed on interdisciplinary studies, for the current environment worldwide is complex, uncertain, volatile, and ambiguous and, therefore, requires the use of a set of reasoning tools that cannot be limited to a single field of interest.

    As a result, the areas covered by the research reports and articles published in DRESMARA's journal are as follows:

    * Management theory and practice (e.g. organization theory and practice, human resource management, decision-making theory, logistics, etc.)
    * Information management (e.g. information security, e-learning, information technology, communications, etc.)
    * Economics and financial management (e.g. globalization and economic crises, marketing, etc.)
    * Socio-humanities (e.g. organizational behavior, intercultural studies, linguistic and cultural studies, etc.)
    * Military science (e.g. tactics, leadership, etc.)

    The deadlines for submitting materials to be published in the Aprilie issue, 2012 are as follows:
    • January 31, 2012: paper submission;
    • February 15, 2012: review board conclusions;
    • February 28, final paper submission
    • April 30, 2012: paper publication.

    For further information, you may access journal homepage: http://journal.dresmara.ro or contact the editorial board: journal@crmra.ro.

    cfp categories: interdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysprofessional_topics 43479CALL FOR PAPERS: SUB-SHAHARA AFRICAN JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENT AND ADMINISTRATION (SSAJDA) - December 16th, 2011Centre for Human Capacity Development in Sub-Saharainfo@chcdss.org1319627899interdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysfull name / name of organization: Centre for Human Capacity Development in Sub-Saharacontact email: info@chcdss.org

    We welcome scholarly articles from researchers in the areas of social sciences, humanities, law, management sciences and environmental sciences which focus on policy development, analysis and administration, programme development, analysis, evaluation and administration, justice administration and development, legislative and constitutional development.

    Submissions should not exceed15 pages of A4 paper size. All entries should adhere strictly to the APA referencing style.
    Papers to be considered for the current issue of the journal should be submitted to www.chcdss.org or info@chcdss.org. Please note that a processing fee of US$22 or its equivalent in other currencies should accompany the paper. Fees are payable to Centre for Human Capacity Development in Sub-Sahara, at Sterling Bank No: 5033002612510. Papers not accompanied with the processing fee will not be considered.

    Deadline for submission for the current issue is Friday, 16th December, 2011.
    Direct further inquiries to:
    (1) Professor Edwin Ijeoma, Department of Public Administration, University of Forte Hare, Alice, Eastern Cape, South Africa.
    (2) Professor C. O. Bassey, Department of Political Science,
    University of Calabar, Nigeria.
    (3) Dr. Nnamdi Nwaodu,Centre for Human Capacity Development in Sub-Sahara,Abuja, Nigeria.

    cfp categories: interdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essays 43480Is Féidir Linn! [Yes, We Can!]: Politics and Ideology in Children's LiteratureIrish Society for the Study of Children's Literatureaine.mcgillicuddy@dcu.ie1319637937childrens_literaturefull name / name of organization: Irish Society for the Study of Children's Literaturecontact email: aine.mcgillicuddy@dcu.ie

    Date: Saturday 25th and Sunday 26th February 2012

    Venue : Dublin City University, Ireland

    Call for Papers

    Proposals are welcome relating to the overall theme and associated topics in the context of both Irish and international literature for children, and in relation to historical as well as contemporary issues.

    Associated themes include:

    • Utopias and dystopias
    • War and peace
    • Nationalism
    • Cultural memory and empowerment
    • The literary marketplace
    • Education: choice and change
    • Imagology: images and perceptions of the Self and Other
    • Geocriticism: space, place and time
    • Ecocriticism: nature and the physical environment

    Proposals of 300 words maximum should be sent to ISSCL Conference Secretary Dr. Áine McGillicuddy. Email: aine.mcgillicuddy@dcu.ie

    Subject line should clearly indicate "ISSCL Proposal" to arrive no later than Friday 18th November 2011.

    Celebrating 10 years of the ISSCL: 2002-2012
    Affiliated Society of IRSCL
    www.isscl.com

    cfp categories: childrens_literature 43481Call for Proposals: Film & History -- SW/TX PCA/ACA Conference 2012Southwest/Texas Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association bradley.lane@seattlecolleges.edu1319638896americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongraduate_conferencespopular_culturefull name / name of organization: Southwest/Texas Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association contact email: bradley.lane@seattlecolleges.edu

    Call for Proposals: Film & History

    Southwest/Texas Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association
    33rd Annual Conference • February 8-11, 2012
    Hyatt Regency Hotel and Conference Center
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    http://swtxpca.org
    http://albuquerque.hyatt.com
    Deadline: December 1, 2011

    Proposals for papers and panels are now being considered for the Film & History Area of the annual SW/TX PCA/ACA conference. This year's conference theme is Celebrating "Foods & Culture(s) in a Global Context."

    Our area is concerned with the impact of motion pictures on our society and how films represent and interpret history. Presentations can, for example, feature analyses of individual films and/or TV programs from historical perspectives, surveys of documents related to the production of films, or analyses of history and culture as explored through film. Genres could include historical films attempting to define history, propaganda films, documentaries, docudramas, newsreels and broadcast media, war films, music videos and concert films, reality shows, avant-garde, cinema vérité, actualités, and direct cinema. Proposals could consider some aspect of the intersections among film, history, society, and culture, exploring films as social and historical artifacts of the culture from which they arise as well as the role played by film in constructing, shaping, and re-imagining history. Papers may take a single film focus, make comparative considerations, or explore critical films focused on a given era, individual, or historical event. Papers that connect to the conference-wide theme of global food and culture are also particularly sought.

    Listed below are suggestions for possible presentations or panels, but topics not included here are also welcome:
    • Historical representations of race, ethnicity, and gender in fiction or non-fiction film
    • Biographies of key artistic, political, military, activist, or cinematic figures
    • Representations of wars, the West, borders, national characters and ideologies
    • Documentaries: How true is 'The Truth'?
    • Film and social commentary
    • Politics and government in film
    • Film and the political economy
    • Histories of film production, the film industry, or the science and technology of film
    • Cult, alternative, and independent films and icons through history
    • The histories of particular film schools or film theories
    • Pedagogies of teaching film & history

    If you wish to form your own panel within the Film & History area, we would be glad to facilitate your needs. Roundtable sessions and international participation are also encouraged.

    Proposals should be submitted directly to the Film & History subject area at our conference database at http://conference2012.swtxpca.org.

    Additional questions and inquiries may be directed to

    Brad Houston Lane,
    Coordinator, Programs in English and Humanities
    North Seattle Community College
    9600 College Way North
    Seattle, WA 98105
    206.934.4536 / 206.934.3784 fax
    bradley.lane@seattlecolleges.edu

    Professors, independent scholars, teachers, and professionals are encouraged to participate. Graduate students are particularly welcome at the conference, which offers awards for the best graduate papers. Please note that SW/TX PCA/ACA only permits one presentation per person per year. The conference features numerous individual subject areas with its own Area Chair and multiple subject area panels. Therefore, please refrain from submitting the same paper to more than subject area or submitting multiple papers to separate areas.

    Information about our areas of study, graduate student awards, conference travel, lodging, and the organization can be found at our regularly updated website: http://www.swtxpca.org.

    cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongraduate_conferencespopular_culture 43482Popular Fiction and the English RenaissanceDr Katherine Heavey, Newcastle Universitykatherine.heavey@ncl.ac.uk1319640695classical_studiesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalpoetrypopular_culturerenaissancetheatrefull name / name of organization: Dr Katherine Heavey, Newcastle Universitycontact email: katherine.heavey@ncl.ac.uk

    Abstracts are invited for a conference on "Popular Fiction and the English Renaissance", to take place at Newcastle University 14-15 April 2012. The conference aims to explore those texts and plays which were most enthusiastically received and read by sixteenth and seventeenth century readers, as well as, more broadly, the themes and approaches which Renaissance authors identified as appealing to a broad audience of readers and theatre-goers. Topics could include (but are not limited to) the following:

    Particularly popular sixteenth and seventeenth century texts, for example John Lyly's Euphues; literary responses to these works by other writers.

    Renaissance authors who were particularly concerned with the popularity and saleability of their works.

    The early modern literary marketplace; tension between print and manuscript culture.

    The rise of the sequel in Elizabethan and Jacobean literature.

    The cult of the author in the Renaissance.

    Renaissance recycling of classical and/or medieval material.

    English use of popular continental models and texts.

    Authorial interaction with/awareness of the reader.

    Renaissance texts and authors in modern popular culture (print, film, television or theatre)

    Papers which address any of these themes from an interdisciplinary perspective are also warmly welcomed. The conference will consider papers on any aspect of the theme, in the period 1500-1700.

    Abstracts (250 words max) should be sent to Katherine Heavey (katherine.heavey@ncl.ac.uk) by Friday 16th December.

    cfp categories: classical_studiesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalpoetrypopular_culturerenaissancetheatre 43483The Sixth Prize in Economics Research- Economics JournalEnsayos Revista de Economics, UANLensayos_uanl@yahoo.com.mx1319641094graduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysfull name / name of organization: Ensayos Revista de Economics, UANLcontact email: ensayos_uanl@yahoo.com.mx

    UNIVERSIDAD AUTONOMA DE NUEVO LEON

    Department of Economics
    Call for papers to
    THE SIXTH PRIZE IN ECONOMIC RESEARCH

    1. Papers related to economics, finance, statistics and social sciences can be submitted.
    2. Articles can be written by one or more authors without concerning nationality. Authors cannot submit more than one paper to the prize.
    3. Papers must show a clear indication of the purpose of the research, methodology, major results, implications and key references.
    4. The author must submit the paper to ensayos@uanl.mx or ensayos_uanl@yahoo.com.mx
    5. The author must send a signed letter specifying that the paper is unpublished, original and that it is not under consideration in another journal for publication.
    6. The author or authors must send a CV and fill the entry form available in the website of Ensayos Revista de Economía: http://www.economia.uanl.mx/.
    7. References must be alphabetically listed at the end of the paper following APA reference format for journals, books, book chapters, working papers, dissertations among other informative sources.
    8. Papers must be finished.
    9. The deadline is December 2nd, 2011.
    Language: English or Spanish
    Maximum Length: 45 pages (including tables, figures and appendix)
    Platform: Word or compatible format. Tables, figures and appendix must be sent in Excel format. (not jpg).
    Font: 12 pt Times New Roman
    Spacing: One and a half
    Abstract: It must be written in Spanish and English, and limited to 100 words.
    Title/cover page: The submission must have two title pages. The first title page must include the title and the following information about each author: . name, affiliation, contact address, office and home phone numbers, . email address, and a fax number, if available. For papers with multiple . authors, please mention the primary address for future . correspondence. The second title page must have only the title of the . article, in both Spanish and English.

    Prizes
    1. The eight best papers will be published in one of the issues of Ensayos Revista de Economía 2012 and 2013.
    2. The best paper will be awarded with 25,000 Mexican pesos and a diploma. The other seven papers will be awarded with 5,000 Mexican pesos and a diploma each.

    Contact information

    Economic Research Center, UANL
    Avenida Lázaro Cárdenas 4600 Ote. Fracc. Residencial Las Torres
    Monterrey, N.L. C.P. 64930
    Tel. +52 (81) 83294150 Ext. 2470 y 2450
    Fax. +52 (81) 83422897
    Contact: Dr. Cinthya G. Caamal Olvera
    ensayos@uanl.mx, ensayos_uanl@yahoo.com.mx

    cfp categories: graduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essays 43484UPDATE: SSAWW 2012 Awards AnnouncementKristin J. Jacobson/Society for the Study of American Women Writerskristinjjacobson@gmail.com1319643023african-americanamericangender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsfull name / name of organization: Kristin J. Jacobson/Society for the Study of American Women Writerscontact email: kristinjjacobson@gmail.com

    THE SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY OF AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS 2012 AWARDS

    Full submission details included in this update.

    The Society for the Study of American Women Writers was founded in 2000 to promote the study of American women writers through research, teaching, and publication. The following three awards were established in 2011 to honor the work and legacies of the Society's founding members and to further SSAWW's goal to support and broaden knowledge among academics as well as the general public about American women writers.

    BOOK AWARD--Submission Deadline: 1 Jan. 2012
    The SSAWW Book Award is given every three years at the Society for the Study of American Women Writers' conference to recognize excellence in the field. The award recognizes the monograph's significant contribution to scholarship related to American women writers published during the preceding three years before the conference. Eligible books must contribute to the field of American women writers, have been published between November 2008-November 2011, and mailed to all committee members (listed below) by the submission deadline, January 1, 2012 (postmark date). Edited collections are not eligible for the award.

    ELIZABETH DUQUETTE
    Associate Professor, Department of English
    Gettysburg College
    300 N. Washington Street
    Gettysburg, PA 17325

    JULIA C. EHRHARDT
    Reach for Excellence Associate Professor
    McClendon Honors College
    University of Oklahoma
    David L. Boren Hall, 1300 Asp
    Norman, OK 73019

    GREGORY EISELEIN
    Professor of English & Coffman University Distinguished
    Teaching Scholar
    Department of English
    108 ECS Bldg
    Kansas State University
    Manhattan, KS 66506-6501

    EDITION AWARD--Submission Deadline: 1 Jan. 2012
    The SSAWW Edition Award is given every three years at the Society for the Study of American Women Writers' conference to recognize excellence in the recovery of American women writers. The award recognizes an edition published during the preceding three years before the conference. Eligible editions must contribute to the field of American women writers, have been published between November 2008-November 2011, and mailed to all committee members (listed below) by the submission deadline, January 1, 2012 (postmark date). Print and digital collections are welcome.

    EMILY E. VANDETTE
    Assistant Professor, English
    SUNY Fredonia
    259 Fenton Hall
    Fredonia, NY 14063
    Email: Emily.Vandette@fredonia.edu

    TERRY NOVAK
    Professor of English
    Director, Collaborative Learning Program
    Johnson & Wales University
    8 Abbott Park Place
    Providence, RI 02903
    Email: Terry.Novak@jwu.edu

    HIROKO UNO
    Professor
    English Department
    School of Literature
    Kobe College
    4-1 Okadayama
    Nishinomiya
    662-8505 Japan
    Email: hirouno@mail.kobe-c.ac.j

    KAREN DANDURAND LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT MEDAL
    The Karen Dandurand Lifetime Achievement Medal is given every three years at the Society for the Study of American Women Writers' conference to recognize a scholar's career achievement in the study of American women writers. The award recognizes the individual's commitment to the field as demonstrated in his/her teaching, mentoring of students, scholarship and service.

    The award is named in honor of Karen Dandurand, who passed away in 2011. She was one of the founding editors of Legacy and was an active member of SSAWW, serving as Vice President of Development (2004-2009).

    2012 KAREN DANDURAND LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT MEDAL SELECTION COMMITTEE

    JENNIFER S. TUTTLE
    Dorothy M. Healy Chair in Literature & Health
    Department of English and Language Studies
    University of New England

    RICKIE-ANN LEGLEITNER
    Graduate Teaching Assistant
    Department of English
    The University of South Dakota

    MARCY L. TANTER
    Associate Professor of English
    Department of English and Languages
    Tarleton State University

    ERIC GARDNER
    Professor of English
    Department of English
    Saginaw Valley State University

    STEPHANIE PALMER
    Lecturer of Nineteenth-Century American Literature
    School of Arts and Humanities
    Nottingham Trent University

    Complete award and submission information is available on our website (http://public.wsu.edu/~campbelld/ssaww/index.html) and on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/pages/Society-for-the-Study-of-American-Women-Wr...). Questions about the awards may be directed to Kristin J. Jacobson, Vice President of Development, SSAWW (kristinjjacobson@gmail.com).

    All winners will be announced and honored at SSAWW's 2012 Conference, "Citizenship and Belonging," Westin Tabor Center in downtown Denver, Colorado: October 10-13, 2012.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericangender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcements 43485Modernism and the Folk: Beyond Primitivism - Rutgers University, March 23rd, 2012 - abstracts due 11/30/2011Rutgers University Modernist Studies Group and Americanist Colloquium modernistfolk@gmail.com 1319650056americanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Rutgers University Modernist Studies Group and Americanist Colloquium contact email: modernistfolk@gmail.com

    The Rutgers University Modernist Studies Group and the Americanist Colloquium announce "Modernism and the Folk: Beyond Primitivism," a transatlantic and interdisciplinary graduate student conference. This day-long event will take place at Rutgers – New Brunswick on March 23, 2012. Christopher Reed, Professor of English and Visual Studies at Penn State, will deliver the keynote lecture, "Bachelor Japanists."

    We invite papers from across disciplines that examine the intersection of literary and artistic modernism and the seemingly opposed discourse of the folk. As modernism is increasingly subdivided into "many modernisms," is a similar subdivision happening with its folk or primitivist offshoots? How does a changing definition of modernism or an expanded canon alter our definition of such categories as the folk, the "primitive," and the avant-garde? How does it alter or expand our view of modernism and its others?

    While we envision the conference as centering on the early twentieth century, we welcome proposals that challenge or expand the temporal boundaries of modernism. We also welcome papers that consider work written in languages other than English.

    Specific areas of interest include, but are not limited to:

    The folk/avant-garde dialectic in literature, art, performance, and music
    Primtivism in its relationship to colonialism and imperialism
    Primitivism in an American context
    Theories of creole degeneracy and the "New World primitive"
    "Inner primitivism" and the "thin veneer" of civilization
    The power or potential of the folk
    The folk and the modernist project of renewal or revitalization
    The circulation of images, books, periodicals, films, radio
    The postcolonial critique of "primitivist" appropriation and problems with this critique
    The relationship between animism, vitalism, and "the new materialism"
    Fascism and the folk
    Ethnography, auto-ethnography, counter-ethnography
    Folklore and alternative histories
    The history of anthropology and folklore studies

    Please submit a 250-word abstract to modernistfolk@gmail.com by Wednesday, November 30.

    Sponsored by the Rutgers Modernism and Globalization Seminar Series, the Rutgers Graduate Student Association, the Rutgers Americanist Colloquium, and the Rutgers Modernist Studies Group.

    cfp categories: americanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 43486CFP: To Belong or Not: Belonging in African American Women's Writings of the 19th & 20th Centuries, SSAWW Oct. 10-13, 2012Miranda Green-Barteet/University of Western Ontariomgreenb6@uwo.ca1319653194african-americanamericanethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityfull name / name of organization: Miranda Green-Barteet/University of Western Ontariocontact email: mgreenb6@uwo.ca

    To Belong or Not: Belonging in African American Women's
    Writings of the 19th & 20th Centuries

    In her 1861 slave narrative Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Harriet Jacobs juxtaposes her experience of being a formerly enslaved woman living and working in the Northeast United States against the time she spent in Britain, where she was working for an American family. Jacobs writes that, in the Northeast, she is constantly reminded that her position as an African American woman makes her a second-class citizen in the eyes of most white Americans. From her struggle to find employment, to being forced to ride in segregated railway cars, to her interactions with people in the streets, Jacobs tells her readers that she was constantly subject to racism, something she had naively thought she would escape when she fled the South. In contrast, during her ten months abroad, she reveals that she knows, "for the first time . . . pure, unadulterated freedom." She further tells her readers that "I never saw the slightest symptom of prejudice against color. Indeed, I entirely forgot it, till the time came for [me] to return to America." With this statement, Jacobs implicitly argues that she felt more accepted and, indeed, more welcomed abroad than in the country of her birth. In Britain, perhaps for the first time since realizing she was enslaved, Jacobs experienced a sense of belonging, while she consistently struggled to feel as though she belonged in the United States.

    In keeping with the theme of the 2012 SSAWW conference, this proposed panel seeks papers that explore the theme of belonging in works by 19th- and 20th-century African American women writers. By focusing on this time period, we hope to consider how African American women writers came to both see themselves as Americans while struggling to be seen as American citizens by the larger, predominantly white American population. The panel is equally interested in papers that consider belonging in a broad sense—as Elizabeth Keckley seems to consider how she, as an African American woman working in Washington, D.C. before, during, and after the Civil War, belongs to American society—as well as papers that consider belonging in a more intimate sense—as Jarena Lee seemingly does when she examines the ways an African American woman can belong to God in a culture that justified slavery through religion. Works of fiction and non-fiction will be considered. Possible topics may include but are not limited to:
    •Marital/familial relationships, i.e., belonging to a family, a spouse, or a parent;
    •Independence/individuality/subjectivity, i.e., how can one become a subject when she legally belongs to someone else?;
    •National belonging/citizenship;
    •Religious belonging;
    •Communal relationships, i.e., belonging to a community; and
    •Space and place, i.e., can one belong if she doesn't have a space of her own?

    Please send abstracts of 300 words along with a brief C.V. by Jan. 1, 2012 to Miranda Green-Barteet (mgreenb6@uwo.ca).

    The Society for the Study of American Women Writers Trieniall Conference of 2012 will take place October 10-13, 2012 in Denver, Colorado.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexuality 43487Creatures of the Night - Collection of EssaysNadine Farghaly, M.A., Mag. Phil.creatures_of_the_night@gmx.net1319655666americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysfull name / name of organization: Nadine Farghaly, M.A., Mag. Phil.contact email: creatures_of_the_night@gmx.net

    Since we live in a society which has embraced stories about vampires and werewolves and regards them as a part of our mythical heritage, it is not very surprising that the audience is craving new monsters with whom they can identify. These magical beings are filling the pages of books and the screens of televisions in an ever increasing number; nowadays, it is not enough to dazzle the audience with reoccurring plots and ideas about our favorite bloodsucking fiends and their furry counterparts, instead authors, screenwriters and other artists need to extend their realms to include other creatures like dragons, centaurs, mermaids and zombies to name but a few. The aim of this collection is to relate the undead, shape-shifting, monstrous, othered, magical and marginal in literature, art, and other media to questions concerning sexuality, gender, social change and otherness. It will provide an interdisciplinary space for the development of innovative and creative research and examine these creatures in all their various manifestations and cultural meanings.
    We welcome any theoretical or (inter)disciplinary approach to any topic related to all aspects of creatures of the night: art; literature; film; television; comics and graphic novels; video, role-playing, and multi-player online games. Though not at all an exhaustive list, potential presenters may wish to consider the following. We would particularly like to encourage submissions that examine Gender, Sexuality and Otherness.

    Possible topics may include (but are not limited to) the following:
    • Fans and Fandom
    • Gender and Sexuality
    • Queer Studies
    • Class and Hierarchies
    • Utopia/Dystopia
    • Audience Reception
    • Regeneration—Moving Narratives from One Medium to Another
    • Genre—Space Opera, Cyberpunk, Dark Fantasy, etc.
    • Sexuality and the (living or undead) body
    • Identity politics
    • Celluloid creatures: adaptations and incarnations
    • Teen vampire/zombie/shape-shifting fiction
    • The Undead and Monstrous as Other (nationality, class, gender, etc.)

    Please send the following information to creatures_of_the_night@gmx.net
    Writers submit a 1-page synopsis of their proposed chapter to us clearly stating:
    [a] the research question
    [b] the methodology
    [c] the findings
    [d] the bibliography (5 sources)

    By December 1st 2011

    Hope to hear from you soon

    Nadine

    cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essays 43488The Asian Conference on the Social Sciences 2012, May 3-6 - Osaka, JapanThe International Academic Forumacss@iafor.org1319670159cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturereligionscience_and_culturefull name / name of organization: The International Academic Forumcontact email: acss@iafor.org

    The International Academic Forum in conjunction with its global partners is proud to announce the Third Asian Conference on the Social Sciences, at the Ramada Hotel, Osaka, Japan to be held from May 3-6 2012.

    Theme: "Working Together Towards a Sustainable World"

    The Asian Conference on the Social Sciences 2010 and 2011 hosted a combined total of more than 600 academics and thought leaders from around the globe in a celebration of interdisciplinary study in the social sciences. In 2012 we hope to build on the conversations and partnerships started in the previous two years, and to forge new relationships as we again encourage academics and scholars to meet and exchange ideas and views in a forum encouraging respectful dialogue.

    This year's conference will again include a variety of presenters representing a wide range of social science disciplines, expressing divergent views, searching for common ground, and creating the synergies that can inspire multi-disciplinary collaborations. In developing these relationships among ourselves, the role of the social sciences is strengthened as we take our place at the table, along with scholars in the STEM disciplines (i.e., science, technology, engineering, and mathematics), in seeking solutions to the complex issues and problems of the 21st century. I sincerely hope that we will use this time together, not just for intellectual discovery and discourse, but to establish a common vision and to motivate each other to do our part in the creation of a better world. We greatly appreciate your attendance and encourage your active engagement throughout the conference

    Professor Stuart D. B. Picken
    Chairman, IAFOR International Advisory Board

    ACSS 2012 will be held alongside ACSEE 2012, or the Asian Conference on Sustainability, Energy & the Environment, and registrants for either conference will be given the opportunity to attend sessions in the parallel event at no extra charge. Please click on the banner below to go to the ACSEE 2012 sister site.

    www.acss.iafor.org

    Deadline for submission of abstracts: April 1 2012

    Results of abstract reviews returned to authors: Usually within two weeks of submission

    Deadline for submission of full papers: June 1 2012

    Deadline for full conference registration payment for all presenters: April 15 2012

    Conference Programme Published Online: April 22 2012

    ACSS Conference: May 3-6 2012

    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturereligionscience_and_culture 43489The Asian Conference on Sustainability, Energy & the Environment 2012, May 3-6 - Osaka, JapanThe International Academic Forumacsee@iafor.org1319670712ecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesinternational_conferencesscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: The International Academic Forumcontact email: acsee@iafor.org

    The International Academic Forum in conjunction with its global partners is proud to announce the Second Annual Asian Conference on Sustainability, Energy and the Environment, to be held from May 3-6 2012, at the Ramada Osaka, Osaka, Japan.

    CONFERENCE THEME: "Working Together Towards a Sustainable World"

    Sustainability has emerged as the most important global issue for business, industry, government, and academia, and yet to begin with sustainability was associated only with environmental concerns such as energy and global warming. It is now recognized that the concept of sustainability is applicable to all areas of human society, for example in terms of social/economic justice, or responsible business practice. Issues such as poverty, hunger, education, health care, and access to markets should be a part of the evolution of any comprehensive sustainability paradigm as we work together to achieve a sustainable future. ACSEE 2012 will address these various dimensions of human sustainability as we invite scholars from around the world to address questions and search for solutions to the complex issues surrounding sustainability in a forum encouraging serious and thoughtful exchange between academics, members of the global business community, and practitioners in the fields of human endeavor that link these. We call on scientists from around the globe to meet and share our respective outlooks and collective wisdom on a critical issue of common concern: the pursuit of a sustainable world.

    It is a sincere hope that attendees will use this time together, not just for intellectual discovery and discourse, but to establish a common vision and to motivate each other to do our part in the creation of a better world. We greatly appreciate your attendance and encourage your active engagement throughout the conference.

    Deadline for submission of abstracts: April 1 2012

    Results of abstract reviews returned to authors: Usually within two weeks of submission

    Deadline for submission of full papers: June 1 2012

    Deadline for full conference registration payment for all presenters: April 15 2012

    Conference Programme Published Online: April 22 2012

    ACSS Conference: May 3-6 2012

    Contact: Kiyoshi Mana
    Email: acsee@iafor.org

    cfp categories: ecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesinternational_conferencesscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 43490KATHERINE MANSFIELD AND CONTINENTAL EUROPE [UPDATE]KATHERINE MANSFIELD SOCIETYkms@katherinemansfieldsociety.org1319671585general_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespostcolonialtravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: KATHERINE MANSFIELD SOCIETYcontact email: kms@katherinemansfieldsociety.org

    KATHERINE MANSFIELD
    AND CONTINENTAL EUROPE

    An International Conference hosted by the Faculty of Arts and Letters,
    Catholic University in Ružomberok, Slovakia
    in association with the Katherine Mansfield Society

    27-29 June 2012

    Keynote Speakers:

    Angela Smith, C. K. Stead, Maurizio Ascari,
    Gerri Kimber, Claire Davison-Pégon

    Having arrived in London from New Zealand in 1908 to commence her life as a writer, Katherine Mansfield travelled widely in Europe during the 1910s and early 1920s. Rarely was this for pleasure; the notion of escaping from a situation, people, and later her search for a cure for tuberculosis, predetermined much of her journeying. The resonances of this constant travelling and immersion in foreign cultures can be perceived in both her personal writing and her creative endeavours.

    Possible topics for discussion might include, but are not limited to:

    • KM and Germany
    • KM and Russia
    • KM and Poland
    • KM and Belgium
    • KM and France
    • KM and Italy
    • KM and Switzerland
    • Notion of expatriation and displacement in KM's stories
    • Responses to, and reception of, KM in Europe
    • KM's influence on continental writers
    • KM as (post)colonial traveller

    A highlight of the conference will be an optional trip on 30 June to nearby Krakow, the home of Poland's most celebrated artist, Stanislaw Wyspianski, with a visit to see the internationally renowned Wyspianksi museum and the stained glass window in the Franciscan church, the inspiration for two of KM's poems.

    Please send 200 word abstracts for individual papers of 20 minutes, or 500 word proposals for panels of 3 papers to Dr Janka Kaščáková atjanka.kascakova@ff.ku.sk by 1 November 2011. Decisions will be announced by 15 December 2011.

    FURTHER INFORMATION:
    Conference venue:
    The conference will take place on the premises of the Faculty of Arts and Letters, at the Catholic University in Ružomberok.

    About the University:
    The Catholic University in Ružomberok is a state university established in 2000. Being so young, we don't have much history but the advantage is that we can create that history ourselves. The Department of English Language and Literature, which will organize the conference in cooperation with the Katherine Mansfield Society, has just celebrated its 15th year, having being previously a part of the school that developed into the new university.

    About Ružomberok:
    Ružomberok is a small industrial town in the north of Slovakia, quite close to the Polish border. Although in itself a typical industrial city with hardly any places of interest (apart from our department;), Ružomberok is surrounded by spectacular forests and mountains and its surrounding countryside is a favourite place for hiking in summer and skiing in winter. On approaching it from the south-west (where you would most probably approach it from), one passes through the valley of the river Váh, which is adorned by a range of old medieval castles (most of them in ruins) that were built to create a certain chain of communication. The defenders of one could always see the castles next to theirs and communicate by fire signals in case of emergency, or shoot cannon balls at each other for fun when they were extremely bored.

    Accompanying events:
    Trip to Poland:
    This will take place on Saturday, 30 June. We will do our best to spend as much of the day in Krakow as possible – we will certainly visit the Wyspianski Museum and the stained glass window in the Franciscan church, the inspiration for two of KM's poems.

    Other events:
    We have been contacted by a group of Ukrainian film-makers who have just made a film based on KM's "A Cup of Tea", and if all goes well, the film will be screened at the conference and you'll have the opportunity to speak to the director, producer and the main actress. The Facebook page for the film is athttp://www.facebook.com/Cup.of.Tea.Short.Film

    Further excursion:
    As we could never take you to Poland without first showing you a bit of Slovakia, we are planning a small trip (sort of a short-break in between the academic debate) – the destination and other details will be published in due time.

    How to get to Ružomberok:
    By plane:
    You can fly to Krakow, Bratislava or Vienna airports. Although Krakow is the closest, to get to Ružomberok from there might be a bit tricky (you would have to change trains or coaches). In case more of you choose this option, we will arrange a coach for you. (This would certainly be a very good option for those who plan to attend the trip to Krakow. After the trip you could stay there and fly home directly).
    Bratislava and Vienna airports are close to each other and whether you choose one or the other, there is a very good connection to Ružomberok. There is a shuttle bus from Vienna airport to Bratislava (leaving every hour) and from there, you can either take a direct coach or train to Ružomberok.
    By coach:
    Ružomberok is an important traffic junction and lies on the main east-west and south-north roads. For that reason many coaches from Slovakia and Czech Republic stop there (unfortunately not Polish ones).
    By train: Most fast trains from the direction of Bratislava, Košice and Prague stop here.
    By car: The best solution is to use your GPS ;))))
    Should you need any assistance with your travel arrangements, do not hesitate to contact Janka Kaščáková at kascakova@ff.ku.sk. She will send you train or coach schedules and/or advise you on how to get to Ružomberok easily.
    Those who fly from overseas are also advised to contact Janka prior to the purchase of the plane ticket. She can sometimes find better value tickets than your travel agents ;))))

    cfp categories: general_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespostcolonialtravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 43491Crossroads - HERA Conference, March 8-10 2012 Salt Lake City, UtahHumanities Education and Research Association [HERA]mgreen@sfsu.edu1319675190african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Humanities Education and Research Association [HERA]contact email: mgreen@sfsu.edu

    Crossroads
    In keeping with HERA's mission of promoting the study of the humanities across a wide range of disciplines, we invite presentations exploring any form of artistic representation---literature, the visual arts, music, theatre, opera, dance, film, photography, architecture et al---from any world culture, using an interdisciplinary "crossroads" approach to enrich and deepen our understanding of these cultural artifacts and the societies that produced them. Presentations on interdisciplinary approaches to teaching the humanities are also welcome. Proposals for papers, panels, or workshops must be submitted through the conference web portal on the HERA website at
    www.h-e-r-a.org. Questions may be directed to the conference organizers, Francesca Lawson (francesca_lawson@byu.edu) or Michael Call (michael_call@byu.edu).
    Presentation time for individual papers is limited to 15-20 minutes.
    Deadline for submission: November 15, 2011.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 43492Identity and Image: 18th Annual Postgraduate Medieval Conference (24-25th Febraury 2012)University of Bristolhannah.walters@bristol.ac.uk1319706599interdisciplinarymedievalfull name / name of organization: University of Bristolcontact email: hannah.walters@bristol.ac.uk

    The University of Bristol hosts the longest-running international medieval postgraduate conference in the UK. This annual event offers medievalists the opportunity to present their research and discuss ideas in an interdisciplinary setting. The conference is now in its 18th year, and we are inviting proposals for papers from postgraduates and early career scholars on the theme of Identity and Image.

    The aim of this year's conference is to explore how identity was formed, expressed and understood in the Middle Ages. We are interested in the way individuals and groups constructed images of themselves and others, and how identity was affected by religious, racial, political and other social factors on an international, national or local scale. The theme 'Identity and Image' invites consideration of how, and if, we can interpret medieval notions of identity from the textual, visual, musical and material sources that have survived to the present day. We welcome a wide range of discussion from issues of religious and artistic patronage, devotional practice, language choice and material culture to considerations of how the self or the other is presented in literary and visual culture.

    Visit our website for more information: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/medievalcentre/postgraduate-conference/index_ht...

    cfp categories: interdisciplinarymedieval 43493[UPDATE] 20th Anniversary British Women Writers Conference (BWWC): June 7-10, 201218th- and 19th-Century British Women Writers Associationbwwc2012@colorado.edu1319719018bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespoetrypostcolonialreligionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingvictorianfull name / name of organization: 18th- and 19th-Century British Women Writers Associationcontact email: bwwc2012@colorado.edu

    In 2012, the 18th- and 19th-Century British Women Writers Conference (BWWC) will commemorate its 20th anniversary in Boulder, Colorado, by focusing on the theme of "Landmarks."  Rich in both physical and metaphorical significance, landmarks form loci by which we organize history and chart the development of individuals, nations, and cultures. We therefore invite papers that explore how women writers and their texts engage with an ever-changing geography that is both material and abstract. These conference papers should address the people, places, events, and texts that have made their marks on history, and/or the processes and implications of marking, mapping, reading, preserving, overwriting, or erasing. Likewise, we wish to investigate land as space and place, acts and effects of landing or arriving, marks of land upon people and cultures, geographical and imaginative landscapes, liminal no-(wo)man's-lands, and the state of being landed (or not) with property.

    Please send a 500-word abstract to bwwc2012@colorado.edu by January 15, 2012. Papers should address the conference theme and apply it to 18th-century, Romantic, or Victorian texts. See the conference website for more details: www.bwwc2012.com.

    Coordinating a Special Session:
    If you wish to coordinate a special session relating to the theme of "Landmarks," please submit a 200-word proposal to bwwc2012@colorado.edu that describes and provides rationale for your proposed session topic. The Conference Committee will review your proposal and notify you if your session has been approved. We will post approved special sessions under the CFP on the conference website.
    - By Nov. 25: Submit a 200-word special session topic description to bwwc2012@colorado.edu.

    - By Dec. 1: The Conference Committee will notify you of acceptance or rejection.

    Applying to Participate in a Special Session:

    In December, we will post a list of approved special sessions on our website under the CFP. Those wishing to apply to a special session (please apply to only one) should submit two copies of the abstract: one to the session organizer and one to bwwc2012@colorado.edu. On your abstract you must clearly state to which special session you have applied. Those abstracts not accepted to the special session will be returned to the general submission pool for consideration in other panels.

    - By Jan. 15: Submit 2 copies of your proposal, one to special session organizers and one to the Conference Committee.
    - 
By Feb. 15: Special session organizers will notify the Conference Committee about their decisions. Send to: bwwc2012@colorado.edu.

    - By March 15: We will notify all applicants of acceptance or rejection.

    Possible topics include:
    - Landmark Events and Ideas: Historical moments; defining milestones; turning points; crises or victories; anniversaries; stages; experiments; memories or visions; aesthetic debates; scientific discoveries; technologies

    - Landmark Works: Publication and reception; authorship or readership; emerging genres; histories or chronicles; canon formation; travel writing

    - Geographical Land Marks: Historical or tourist sites; borders and national boundaries; high points and burials; property and ownership; memorials, monuments, museums; ruins and traces

    - Making Marks: Print culture; media; diaries and personal writings; glosses, annotations, and marginalia; building, development, or enclosure; landscaping and gardening; architecture; fashion and costume design; cosmetics and tattoos; creating space and place; epitaphs, cemeteries, tombs

    - Reading, Interpreting, or Imagining Lands/Marks: Physiognomy or phrenology; psychics; reading practices; sciences of navigation; distance and time; fictional worlds

    - Mapping/Preserving Marks: Maps and cartography; emblems; classification systems; libraries, museums, collections

    - Marks of Land on People: Farming and agriculture; gentility and nobility; industry; food and foodways; defining the local, national, imperial, native, or foreign

    - Contested Marks and Marks of Difference: Stealing/transplanting landmarks; marks of faith or creed; religious practices; the supernatural; commerce, currency, credit; ownership; identity politics or marginalization

    cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespoetrypostcolonialreligionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingvictorian 43494[UPDATE] edited collection: BUST CULTURE: NOTES FROM THE GREAT RECESSION Kirk Boyle (UNC Asheville) and Daniel Mrozowski (Trinity College)bustculture@gmail.com1319726528african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfilm_and_televisioninterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Kirk Boyle (UNC Asheville) and Daniel Mrozowski (Trinity College)contact email: bustculture@gmail.com

    Abstracts due December 21, 2011 (250-300 words; include contact info and short bio)
    Final essays due December 2012 (4,000-8,000 words)

    In the throes of a double-dip recession and the wake of the Dot-Com crash, we seek proposals for an edited collection tentatively titled Bust Culture: Notes from the Great Recession, with completed essays due in Winter 2012. We are soliciting articles on cultural artifacts from all forms of media (televisual, cinematic, literary, musical, as well as videogames, websites, fine art) that reflect, refract, and/or respond to the recessionary times of the 21st century. Considering that the current economic downturn is ongoing, we hope this collection offers a timely foray into comprehending contemporary "bust culture." Possible topics include but are not limited to:

    * Television (Critical-Realist, Reactionary, Reality: Breaking Bad, Pawn Stars, etc.)
    * Films (Up in the Air, Wall St. 2, Larry Crowne, Horrible Bosses, etc.)
    * Documentary Responses (Capitalism: A Love Story, Inside Job, etc.)
    * Satirical News Sources (The Onion, The Daily Show, The Colbert Report, etc.)
    * CEO Portraits, Corporate Personhood, and White-Collar Crime
    * Informal Economies, Black Markets, Prison Culture, Narcocultura
    * Migrant Workers, Immigration, and Outsourcing
    * Unions, Union-Busting, and the Legacy of Ronald Reagan
    * Neoliberalism (Harvey), "Disaster Capitalism" (Klein), and Tea Party Politics
    * "House Hunters" and Other Forms of Wealth Voyeurism
    * "Mancession" and Blue-Collar Nostalgia
    * Women in the New Economy
    * Race and Racism in the Great Recession
    * End of the "American Century"
    * Bubbles (housing, dot.com, gold, energy)
    * Financialization, Derivatives, and Computerized Stock Trading
    * Cognitive Mappings of Bust Geography and Architecture
    * Consumption: Advertising, Shopping, Fashion, and Marketing Trends
    * DIY (Do-It-Yourself) Culture
    * Religion and Apocalyptic Discourse
    * Sports as Big Business

    We aim to assemble a diverse collection of academically rigorous pieces accessible to the general public (non-academics are encouraged to submit). For further information, visit www.bustculture.com and https://twitter.com/#!/BustCulture. Please direct all queries, questions, and submissions to bustculture@gmail.com.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfilm_and_televisioninterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 43495[UPDATE] Philadelphia Theatre Research Symposium - January 20, 2012Villanova University: Theatre Departmentptrs@villanova.edu1319736329interdisciplinarytheatrefull name / name of organization: Villanova University: Theatre Departmentcontact email: ptrs@villanova.edu

    Call for Papers
    and
    Call for Performances
    Philadelphia Theatre Research Symposium

    Conference Theme:
    The work of Elizabeth LeCompte,
    The Wooster Group, the Avant Garde, Textual Intervention, and Experimental Theatre Collectives

    Friday, January 20, 2012

    Keynote Speaker
    Elizabeth LeCompte

    Papers:
    The Philadelphia Theatre Research Symposium is seeking abstracts for papers for our sixth annual gathering of theatre scholars. This year's PTRS seeks to highlight the work of new scholars in the area of, but not limited to, the Avant Garde, Textual Intervention, Ensemble and Experimental Theatre Collectives, with a special emphasis on the work of Elizabeth LeCompte and the Wooster Group. This symposium offers the opportunity to present work in progress and to share ideas with other researchers. We are seeking papers which engage a broad range of topics in theatre and drama studies including performance analysis, gender, politics, and cultural theory. Participants' papers will be eligible for publication in Praxis: The Journal for Theatre, Performance Studies and Criticism.

    Abstracts of 250 words or less should be submitted along with a brief bio to PTRS@villanova.edu.

    Performances:
    This year PTRS also seeks submissions for performance in the areas of Textual Intervention and Experimental Theatre Collectives. Submissions for ensemble performance projects are limited to one hour. Submissions should include a description and a video, or a video link for the performance. Artists will be responsible for their own tech.

    Materials should be submitted to PTRS@villanova.edu.

    We are proud to announce that this year's symposium will launch an accompanying journal. This journal will provide a publishing opportunity for some of the papers presented. This journal will include established scholars but seeks to create publishing opportunities for new scholars and interesting practitioners in the area of theatre and drama.

    The deadline for submission is November 18, 2011.

    http://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/admission/visit/maps.html

    cfp categories: interdisciplinarytheatre 43496[UPDATE] Philadelphia Theatre Research Symposium - January 20, 2012Villanova University: Theatre Departmentptrs@villanova.edu1319736482theatrefull name / name of organization: Villanova University: Theatre Departmentcontact email: ptrs@villanova.edu

    Call for Papers
    and
    Call for Performances
    Philadelphia Theatre Research Symposium

    Conference Theme:
    The work of Elizabeth LeCompte,
    The Wooster Group, the Avant Garde, Textual Intervention, and Experimental Theatre Collectives

    Friday, January 20, 2012

    Keynote Speaker
    Elizabeth LeCompte

    Papers:
    The Philadelphia Theatre Research Symposium is seeking abstracts for papers for our sixth annual gathering of theatre scholars. This year's PTRS seeks to highlight the work of new scholars in the area of, but not limited to, the Avant Garde, Textual Intervention, Ensemble and Experimental Theatre Collectives, with a special emphasis on the work of Elizabeth LeCompte and the Wooster Group. This symposium offers the opportunity to present work in progress and to share ideas with other researchers. We are seeking papers which engage a broad range of topics in theatre and drama studies including performance analysis, gender, politics, and cultural theory. Participants' papers will be eligible for publication in Praxis: The Journal for Theatre, Performance Studies and Criticism.

    Abstracts of 250 words or less should be submitted along with a brief bio to PTRS@villanova.edu.

    Performances:
    This year PTRS also seeks submissions for performance in the areas of Textual Intervention and Experimental Theatre Collectives. Submissions for ensemble performance projects are limited to one hour. Submissions should include a description and a video, or a video link for the performance. Artists will be responsible for their own tech.

    Materials should be submitted to PTRS@villanova.edu.

    We are proud to announce that this year's symposium will launch an accompanying journal. This journal will provide a publishing opportunity for some of the papers presented. This journal will include established scholars but seeks to create publishing opportunities for new scholars and interesting practitioners in the area of theatre and drama.

    The deadline for submission is November 18, 2011.

    http://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/admission/visit/maps.html

    cfp categories: theatre 43497Racial Economics or the Economics of Race (Nov 15th/March 29-April 1, 2012)American Comparative Literature Association 2012 aopitz@stonehill.edu and pbarbeit@risd.edu1319737276african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisionpostcolonialtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: American Comparative Literature Association 2012 contact email: aopitz@stonehill.edu and pbarbeit@risd.edu

    "Racism, in the first place, is a weapon used by the wealthy to increase the profits they bring in by paying Black workers less for their work." Angela Davis

    In light of the spate of recent articles chronicling how the financial crisis has disproportionately impacted the African-American population and fueled the fires of anti- immigration sentiment worldwide, this seminar interrogates the seemingly inevitable interrelation of discourses of race and economics.

    How have financial crises over the centuries helped shape emerging conceptions of racial and ethnic identity? How have racial and ethnic discourses of identity sought to articulate themselves through and beyond the material and economic? How do race and economics inform each other across different pedagogical, cultural and historical settings? And how is their interaction understood differently in these different contexts and disciplinary frameworks? How are the tropes and rhetoric of crisis embedded in the conceptualizations of race and economics and vice versa?

    Examples might range from current controversies surrounding the representation of racial and ethnic minorities in the language of the "Occupy Wall Street Declaration" to the role of Marxism in protest movements worldwide, to discussions of how economic migrants represent their experiences in literature and film, to the way we teach courses on race and identity.

    The seminar invites dialogue on any or all of these questions from a variety of different cultural, literary, and historical perspectives.

    Following the traditional ACLA seminar set up, we'll be meeting two or three times, depending on the seminar size, so we're asking everyone who participates to commit to this structure as we believe it is the best way to get a productive conversation going.

    To submit a proposal please go directly to the ACLA submission website by Nov 15th:

    http://www.acla.org/submit/index.php

    If you have questions about this seminar please email Andrea Opitz (aopitz@stonehill.edu) or Patricia Barbeito (pbarbeit@risd.edu).

    cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisionpostcolonialtwentieth_century_and_beyond 43498Re-conceptualizing Cartography: Space-Time Compression and Narrative Mapping (20–21 April 2012)The English Graduate Student Association at the University of South Floridajyirinec@mail.usf.edu and cassiechilds@mail.usf.edu1319738278african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: The English Graduate Student Association at the University of South Floridacontact email: jyirinec@mail.usf.edu and cassiechilds@mail.usf.edu

    Re-conceptualizing Cartography: Space-Time Compression and Narrative Mapping
    University of South Florida Graduate Conference
    Tampa, FL
    20–21 April 2012

    Sponsored by the English Graduate Student Association at the University of South Florida, this interdisciplinary conference seeks presentations relating to considerations of time and/or space, space-time compression, and mapping. We encourage submissions from graduate students and professors from all fields, especially geography; sociology; literature; rhetoric and composition; gender, race, and sexuality studies; disability studies; history; political science; and globalization studies. We invite proposals for complete panels of three or four papers, round table sessions of up to five speakers, as well as individual papers. Please send abstracts (250 words for individual papers and 500 words for complete panels) and a brief biographical statement (if proposing a panel, one for each participant) to both Cassie Childs (cassiechilds@mail.usf.edu) and Jennifer Yirinec (jyirinec@mail.usf.edu) by December 30, 2011. Papers should take between 15–20 minutes to present, and panels should last no longer than 1 hour and 20 minutes.

    Our inspiration for this conference comes from geographer David Harvey, who, in his The Condition of Postmodernity, explores the evolution of conceptions of time and space from the Enlightenment to the postmodern world. In his study, he contends that "our subjective experience can take us into realms of perception, imagination, fiction, and fantasy, which produce mental spaces and maps as so many mirages of the supposedly 'real' thing" (203). We hope this conference fosters productive considerations of mapping as more than a "factual" representation of space and illuminates the interrelatedness of power structures, mapping, territorialization, and boundary construction.

    Papers might respond to, but are not limited by, the following questions/topics:

    Travel narratives
    Time travel
    Temporality in writing (verb tenses, the present of online
    publication, the past and present of memoir)
    The politics/rhetoric of cartography
    Using narrative as a means to colonize/demystify territory
    Constructing place through narrative
    The ways in which mapping and materiality affect rhetorical
    practice
    Mapping the body, sexuality, race, and/or gender
    Liminal spaces and the phenomenology of place
    Mapping the past
    Demarcating social, geographical, mental, and other
    boundaries
    Pedagogical insight on incorporating maps into the classroom

    For conference-related inquiries, please email either Jennifer Yirinec (jyirinec@mail.usf.edu) or Cassie Childs (cassiechilds@mail.usf.edu).

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 43499ACLA Seminar: Poetics of Collapse: Form and PoliticsAmerican Comparative Literature Associationanthony.reed@yale.edu, or smp254@cornell.edu1319745061african-americanamericanpoetrytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: American Comparative Literature Associationcontact email: anthony.reed@yale.edu, or smp254@cornell.edu

    Variations on the idea of collapse have shaped an array of poetic experiments with form and approaches to figuring personal and political crisis, disarray, and decline. How, then, have poets imagined and responded to visions of social, political, emotional, environmental, or economic collapse, and how in turn has poetic play with formal ideas of collapse or collapsibility rendered poetic ideas about political and aesthetic futures? Processes and structures of collapse change the organization of our social worlds in time and space. How might poets' ideas about the forms and meanings of collapse refine, extend, or contest analogous ideas in political economy, social theory, or aesthetics? Whereas some poets describe personal crises or social collapses as punctual events, others understand them as ongoing processes, challenging political philosophies of the event by affirming the importance of lived duration. Spatially, meanwhile, collapse can signify disorder and the loss of structure, but it also can indicate compressions that do not disrupt structural relations—as, for instance, the parts of a collapsible table remain hinged together. This seminar will explore how the formal and social notions of collapse continue to shape poetic genres, aesthetic theories, and political visions of poetry from an array of cultural and historical contexts. We welcome papers addressing poetics of collapse from a variety of perspectives—including the collapse of social structures in former colonies or "failed states," nineteenth-century approaches to social or emotional collapse, and poetry about financial crises, environmental or industrial disasters, and millennial anxieties.

    The ACLA has a unique conference format, with seminars of twelve people meeting for two hours each day over the course three days, generating a more substantive and collaborative set of conversations than most other conferences allow for. The conference this year is hosted at Brown University, 3/29 - 4/1/2012.

    General information about the conference may be found here: http://acla.org/acla2012/
    Information about this seminar may be found here: http://acla.org/acla2012/?page_id=539
    The submission deadline is 11/15, and you must submit through the ACLA's website; we cannot take your submissions directly.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanpoetrytwentieth_century_and_beyond 43500Sentimental Geographies: Geography, Affect, and Contemporary Cultural Practice. 24 February 2012CUNY Graduate Center, PhD in Frenchgcfrenchconference@gmail.com1319745313african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarypoetrytheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: CUNY Graduate Center, PhD in Frenchcontact email: gcfrenchconference@gmail.com

    SENTIMENTAL GEOGRAPHIES: Geography, Affect, and Contemporary Cultural Practice

    "Autrement dit, la littérature ne se produit pas dans une suspension, ce n'est pas une suspension en l'air. Elle provient d'un lieu…"
    — Édouard Glissant

    "The personal vocabulary, the individual melody whose metre is one's biography, joins in that sound, with any luck, and the body moves like a walking, a waking island."
    — Derek Walcott

    When, during the Arab Spring, the journalist Hamid Dabashi wrote that, "The world is giving birth to a new geography of itself," he touched upon a crucial area for exploration that goes beyond the narrowly political and presents rich possibilities both within and beyond French studies. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, we ask how changing conditions of identity and technology have inflected geographical definition, not only as a new set of cartographies emerges but also as these conditions influence networks of emotion and affect. Considering the influence of Deleuze and Guattari's spatial metaphor of the rhizome, as well as Édouard Glissant's more recent theorizing of la Relation and the totalité-monde, how might a new understanding of geography relate to, or even help to articulate, emotional or affective experience? Given the rapid social and political transformations of this century, what different poetic and artistic articulations reveal themselves in this nexus of emotion, affect, and place?

    The multilingual poetics and theories of the Caribbean, for instance, give us assertions like that of Glissant, wherein "L'Inde est imaginaire, mais sa manifestation ne l'est pas"; Derek Walcott writes of a "walking…waking island." How is geographical space transformed, through affective and/or aesthetic processes, into artistic site or public space? What are the problems raised by such a binary reading? What are the implications of situating the artist, or artwork, in terms of geographical identity? We welcome submissions that focus on poetics, politics, and/or the visual in relation to the geographical, beginning with a focus on French and French studies but extending into other disciplines of art history, poetry and poetics, political studies, and translation.

    Questions raised by papers might include (but are not limited to) the following:

    Political identity;
    Relationship between identity and place;
    Conceptual practices in art and writing (historically and today);
    Visual/poetic representations of place/landscape;
    Questions of and/or Hybrid articulations of genre;
    Sexualities, the body, and desire;
    Movement of people/s;
    The place of affect in poetic or artistic movements.

    Abstracts of 200 words should be submitted as Microsoft Word attachment (.doc) to GCFrenchConference@gmail.com by 1 December 2011.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarypoetrytheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 43501[UPDATE] CFP: Collection on Nature and the Environment in American Public AddressRichard D. Besel and Bernard K. Duffy, California Polytechnic State Universityrbesel@calpoly.edu and bduffy@calpoly.edu1319770317african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositiontheoryfull name / name of organization: Richard D. Besel and Bernard K. Duffy, California Polytechnic State Universitycontact email: rbesel@calpoly.edu and bduffy@calpoly.edu

    Call for Chapter Proposals: Collection on Nature and the Environment in American Public Address

    According to M. Jimmie Killingsworth and Jacqueline S. Palmer, "As much as the environmental dilemma is a problem of ethics and epistemology, it is also a problem of discourse" (Killingsworth & Palmer, 1992, p. 6). Although there has been an abundance of texts dedicated to analyzing the written works of environmental activists and leaders, very little has been written about their spoken words. This oversight is concerning given Wayland Maxfield Parrish's modest observation that "…speeches have often been instrumental in shaping the course of history, in defining and strengthening a people's ideals, and in determining its culture" (Parrish, 1969, p. 2). In specific reference to the environmental movement, Alon Tal has more recently noted, "the 'oration' has been a central mechanism for galvanizing change" (Tal, 2006, p. xv). The speeches of environmental leaders are social repositories that allow us to glean reflections about prevailing attitudes and ideas of their respective moments in time. Indeed, we agree with Ernest Wrage that "adequate social and intellectual history cannot be written without reference to public speaking as it contributed to the ideas injected into public consciousness" (Wrage, 1947, p. 457). Thus, Green Voices: Nature and the Environment in American Public Address aims to redress this paucity of scholarship. After all, when it comes to the leaders, heroes, and activists of the environmental movement, "there is no better way to understand their environmental vision, than through their spoken words" (Tal, 2006, p. xx).

    Richard D. Besel and Bernard K. Duffy of California Polytechnic State University invite proposals for additional original essays addressing important, yet relatively unknown or unexamined, speeches delivered by well-known or influential environmental figures. Chapter proposals that have already been accepted include analyses of Lois Gibbs' testimony before the U.S. Congress, Sigurd Olson's speeches on the role of science in environmental policy making, and David Brower's "The Sermon." We welcome submissions using humanistic/textual methodological approaches from a variety of critical, cultural, historical, rhetorical, and/or political origins.

    Send your proposed chapter abstract (no more than 300 words) and brief biographical sketch to Profs. Richard D. Besel (rbesel@calpoly.edu) and Bernard K. Duffy (bduffy@calpoly.edu) by December 15, 2011.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositiontheory 43502MEMORY: IMPRESSIONS, EXPRESSIONS, REFLECTIONS 28-30 MARCH 2012DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH STUDIES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICAbyrnedc@unisa.ac.za1319805719general_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesreligionfull name / name of organization: DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH STUDIES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICAcontact email: byrnedc@unisa.ac.za

    Please submit a full title and 150-word abstract by 30 November 2011 to Prof. Deirdre Byrne: byrnedc@unisa.ac.za.
    Possible topics include, but are not limited to:
    • Representations of memory in literature, music, film, popular culture and the visual arts;
    • History as collective memory; memory and time;
    • The resurgence of suppressed memory;
    • Memory of/as trauma
    • Memory and/in the body;
    • Memory and diaspora;
    • The gender of memory/memories of gender;
    • Speculative fiction and refraction/s of memory;
    • The psychology and neuroscience of memory;
    • Spatial memory.

    cfp categories: general_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesreligion 43503Forces at Play: Bodies, Power, and Spaces--Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference--Proposals due January 25English Graduate Organization/ University of Massachusettsumassengconf@gmail.com1319810461african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: English Graduate Organization/ University of Massachusettscontact email: umassengconf@gmail.com

    Forces at Play: Bodies, Power, and Spaces

    Cyber bullying, the male gaze in cinema, SlutWalk in Toronto, the canonization of slave narratives, border rhetoric in the classroom – issues such as these take up the ways bodies, power, and spaces converge in a re-seeing and re-interpreting of historical and contemporary social complexities. Investigating this nexus in our discursive and material realities gives us the language for articulating the machinations of power and space that construct and dismantle singular and collective (im)material bodies.

    The English Graduate Organization of the University of Massachusetts Amherst invites submissions to our graduate interdisciplinary conference on March 31st 2012. This year's conference will push against standardized and finite notions of body, power, and space to explore how these three variables act upon each other to produce layered, complex, and radical permutations. We urge submitters to investigate the systems of regulation and control that maintain power over singular and collective bodies within various spaces. We invite submissions from a diverse range of disciplines, critical perspectives, and time periods; all three terms need not explicitly be examined in the project, though the possibility of convergence is an encouraged angle. Projects may include papers and/or panel presentations, performance pieces, and multi-media approaches on the following topics:

    -literary theoretical approaches
    -social spaces and institutions
    -composition and rhetorical studies
    -canonical studies of bodies of literature
    -national and communal boundaries (migrant communities, diasporas, refugee camps)
    -(post)colonialism and global studies
    -gender and sexuality studies
    -animal studies
    -childhood studies
    -social thought and political economy studies
    -media studies and digital spaces
    -visual and performing arts
    -pop culture/material culture
    -emerging creative projects
    -disability studies

    SUBMISSIONS:
    We accept three different types of submissions:
    1. Individual papers/projects: please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words. Include your name,
    paper title, institution, and email address.
    2. Panels: please submit a 1000 word proposal for an entire panel of presentations (3-4 presenters). Included in this proposal should be abstracts of 200-300 words for all presentations, title of the panel, and information for each presenter (name, paper title, institution, and email address). If you are forming your own panel, you have the option of providing your own chair.
    3. Performances and creative presentations/panels: we welcome submission of creative works, including creative writing, visual art, and dramatic performance. Please include a brief description of your project, as well as your name, project title, institution, and email address.
    Email submissions to umassengconf@gmail.com no later than January 25th, 2012.

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 43504From Love & Theft to Modern Times: Bob Dylan and the Twenty First CenturyEric Hoffmandiamondjoecity@gmail.com1319812835americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Eric Hoffmancontact email: diamondjoecity@gmail.com

    Call for Papers

    Planned scholarly book of essays centered around Bob Dylan's 2001 and 2006 albums Love & Theft and Modern Times, arguably two of his best and most important works since 1975's Blood on the Tracks.

    Essays to be edited with an introduction by Eric Hoffman.

    Tentative title: From Love & Theft to Modern Times: Bob Dylan and the Twenty First Century

    Possible topics to include:

    • Love & Theft and Modern Times in context: modern rock, the baby boom generation, in contrast to Dylan's other works, etc.
    • Song structure: Dylan's use of the American songbook
    • Lyrics: Dylan's use of various texts including Peter Green's Ovid translations, Saga's Confessions of a Yakuza, etc.
    • Political content in Dylan's late work
    • Love & Theft and musical blackface: Dylan's self-conscious "borrowings" of American roots music

    Suggested length: 7,500 words.

    Papers can be previously published.

    Deadline for abstracts: June 2012
    Deadline for final papers: October 2012

    cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 43505Undergraduate Conference on English Language and Literatures March 24, 2012University of St. Francisjkourtidis@stfrancis.edu1319820560african-americanamericanclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromantictheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: University of St. Franciscontact email: jkourtidis@stfrancis.edu

    Call for Student Papers:

    Twenty-first Annual University of St. Francis Undergraduate Conference on English Language and Literatures

    Saturday, March 24, 2012
    University of St. Francis
    Joliet, Illinois

    Submit complete papers or abstracts on any topic in literary studies, including comparative literature, literature in translation, faculty-student collaborations, creative writing (story, poetry, performance--two sessions planned).

    Include mailing address, telephone number, email address, and the name of your college. Papers and readings are limited to 20 minutes (8-12 pages). Authors of papers accepted for the program are obliged to present in person.

    Deadline: December 15, 2011

    Submit proposals to:

    Dr. Randolph Chilton/Dr. Karen Duys
    ELL Conference
    Department of English
    University of St. Francis
    500 Wilcox Street
    Joliet, IL 60435

    or email them to:
    Dr. Randolph Chilton at rchilton@stfrancis.edu
    Dr. Karen Duys at kduys@stfrancis.edu

    Phone inquiries: 815-740-3454, or 815-740-3453

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromantictheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 43506Conference in progress.NYU Department of French, Graduate Student Associationconferenceinprogress@gmail.com1319826229african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: NYU Department of French, Graduate Student Associationcontact email: conferenceinprogress@gmail.com



    The Conference, both a space and a genre, is a staple of academic practice. To participate in a conference is not only to share work with one's peers, it is also always a performance. As a specific kind of social and intellectual interaction, it is both a gathering and a workshop; the format is both familiar and obligatory, bordering on ritual. Obscure yet inevitable, exclusive yet struggling for wide relevance, the conference is an event that can serve as a locus of interrogation of academic themes and academia more broadly.



    Academic jobs are few; Wall Street is occupied. We find it necessary both intellectually and politically to question what happens when and where we speak. Beyond simple self-reflexivity or mise en abyme, we aim to stage a conference on conference. How is it a specific space and event? How do we conference, why do we conference? What reflex is behind this ritual; what gestures does it convey, omit or repress? Who belongs at a conference, and to whom does a conference speak?



    To reflect the seriousness of our purpose, instead of simply parodying a conference, we wish to incite new considerations on the Conference through new forms. To this end, we welcome project proposals that address a vast and enormous range of subjects, in imaginative and multitudinous forms. These could include, but are not limited to: papers, workshops, posters, reenactments, pecha kucha, PowerPoint, panel discussions, roundtables, short films, alternative media, seminars, Socratic dialogue, etc.



    Please submit project proposals to conferenceinprogress@gmail.com by January 1, 2012. Each proposal should clearly state what you want to do and how you want to do it; presenters will be chosen based on coherence of content with form. The form of the conference will thus depend on the projects proposed, and on our work together.



    In the course of our brainstorming, these words were mentioned:

    humor – performance – prendre la parole – audience – panel – keynote – call – time – space – roundtable – accepting – rejecting – questions – opening remarks – boredom – frustration – tension – listening to yourself speak – nervousness – arousal – response – stage fright – intellectuals on vacation – professionalism – conference center – conference call – accent – language – translation – titles – format – idea fair – workshop – se montreracte – reading out loud – technology – coffee break – risk – banquet – reflexivity – networking – "meta" – événement – presenting – moderating – moderation – expose – exposé – presence – "giving" a paper – speech acts

    cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 43507Impact: The Journal of the Center of Interdisciplinary Teaching and Learning (submission deadline Feb. 15, 2012).Center for Interdisciplinary Teaching and Learning, Boston Universityrhansen@bu.edu1319829209interdisciplinaryprofessional_topicsfull name / name of organization: Center for Interdisciplinary Teaching and Learning, Boston Universitycontact email: rhansen@bu.edu

    Impact: The Journal of the Center for Interdisciplinary Teaching and Learning

    Impact, the bi-annual online journal of the Center for Interdisciplinary Teaching and Learning (CITL), publishes scholarly and creative non-fiction essays about the theory, practice and assessment of interdisciplinary education. It also publishes essays that explore compelling connections between the ideas of great thinkers from different disciplines and different times. Essays should be between 500 and 3,000 words. Submissions can be made at: http://CITL.submishmash.com/submit.

    cfp categories: interdisciplinaryprofessional_topics 43508Roundtable on American Regionalism and Modern Technology, May 24-27, 2012American Literature Association Conference, San Franciscoregionalismtechnology@gmail.com1319831373americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisioninterdisciplinarymodernist studiesscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: American Literature Association Conference, San Franciscocontact email: regionalismtechnology@gmail.com

    The United States modernized unevenly. By the latter half of the nineteenth century, the effects of new technologies registered in significant ways in American modernist art and culture, reflecting the emergence of industrial, cosmopolitan cities and new ways of life. Yet the proliferation of emerging technologies also affected the culture in parts of the United States beyond the modern metropolises. American "regional" cultures—broadly understood to include art and literature, visual and material culture, and an array of vernacular and folk traditions—absorbed the influences of technological change while maintaining numerous distinctive regional identities and forms.

    This roundtable will bring together papers that explore the complex relations between technology and region in the United States across a "long" modernist period, from the late nineteenth century to the middle of the twentieth century. We seek abstracts that examine particular places, theorize region in innovative and interdisciplinary ways, and examine regional encounters with specific technological developments, which may be understood broadly. The session as a whole seeks to understand how regional American experiences of technology have complicated, enriched, and troubled both the traditions of American modernism and the ongoing efforts to come to terms with the legacies of these encounters in a contemporary American culture.

    Papers could explore some of the following areas:

    • American literary regionalism's relations with technological change
    • Regionalism and critical or social theory
    • Political institutions, technology, and regional culture
    • Ethnic, immigrant, racial, or nationalist minority identity in regional context
    • Race or identity as technology
    • Modes of transportation (railways, automobiles, air travel, and so on)
    • Mechanization and agriculture or food distribution networks
    • Film, photography, and other visual media in regional context
    • Radio, early television, and regional aspects of mass communication
    • Sheet music, music halls, rural entertainment circuits
    • Jazz, blues, country music, early rock and roll, and regional musical genres
    • Mail order products, RFD, and other networks of distribution
    • The fashion industry in regional permutations
    • Domestic and public architecture, regional planning, and human geography
    • Regional urbanism or cultures of the regional city
    • Nature, ecology, conservation, resource utilization, and technology
    • The military-regional complex

    The organizers of this proposed session are Sarah Gleeson-White (University of Sydney), Robert Jackson (University of Tulsa), and David A. Davis (Mercer University). The roundtable will feature six or seven short statements—about eight minutes reading time—that should provoke greater inquiry into this field of discourse. Proposals of about 250 words should be sent to regionalismtechnology@gmail.com by January 1, 2012.

    cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisioninterdisciplinarymodernist studiesscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 43509Literary Journalism and Catastrophe Panel, ACLA Conference, Mar 29-Apr 1, 2012International Association for Literary Journalism Studies (IALJS)ralexander@brocku.ca.1319834525cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinternational_conferencespopular_cultureprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_compositiontravel_writingfull name / name of organization: International Association for Literary Journalism Studies (IALJS)contact email: ralexander@brocku.ca.

    Paper abstracts are invited for an International Association for Literary Journalism Studies session on Literary Journalism and Catastrophe at the American Comparative Literature Association annual conference at Brown University, Providence, RI from March 29th to April 1st, 2012. In keeping with the conference theme, this session will consider the complex relationship between literary journalism and crisis. Literary journalism – "journalism as literature" – has a longstanding relationship with the catastrophic. From The Storm, Daniel Defoe's report of the hurricane which devastated much of southern and central England and Wales in 1703, to Stephanie Nolen's 28 Stories of AIDS in Africa, and, more recently, Into the Forbidden Zone, William T. Vollmann's account of his journey through the evacuated area around the Fukishima power plant just weeks after the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster of March 2011, literary journalists have often been attracted to scenes of catastrophe and collapse for their material. But, unlike their counterparts in the mainstream news media, literary journalists find the truth of their subjects less in the raw, spectacular facts of catastrophe than in the lived experiences of those who suffer its often traumatic consequences as well as in the cultural understanding such stories may yield. As Mark Kramer has noted, "Literary journalists write mostly about routine events," and this focus remains even when the everyday is disrupted by the most calamitous of events. This seminar seeks to investigate from a comparative perspective the diverse ways in which literary journalism, as a genre, has responded to collapse in all of its forms – environmental, political, historical, economic, personal, and even the current collapse of journalism itself. We are particularly interested in papers that discuss literary journalism across cultures and welcome all research methodologies and scholarly approaches.
    If interested, please e-mail IALJS contact, Rob Alexander at ralexander@brocku.ca. The submission deadline for paper abstracts is November 15th via the ACLA website (http://acla.org/acla2012/?page_id=45). Submissions by graduate students are encouraged.

    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinternational_conferencespopular_cultureprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_compositiontravel_writing 43510CFP: Shakespeare on Film, TV, Video (SW/TX PCA/ACA)SW/TX PCA/ACAkellirmarshall@gmail.com1319846876cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturerenaissancetheatrefull name / name of organization: SW/TX PCA/ACAcontact email: kellirmarshall@gmail.com

    Shakespeare on Film, TV, Video (SW/TX PCA/ACA)
    CFP: SW/TX PCA/ACA Regional Conference
    Albuquerque, NM
    Feb. 8-11, 2012

    Submission deadline: Dec. 1, 2011

    Proposals are now being accepted for the Shakespeare on Film, Television, and Video Area. While any topic on Shakespeare and moving images is welcome, here are some to consider:

    -- Shakespeare and the genre film
    -- viral Shakespeare (viral videos)
    -- apocalyptic Shakespeares
    -- Shakespeare online
    -- Shakespeare and parody/homage
    -- Shakespearean
    -- foreign Shakespeare
    -- silent Shakespeare
    -- political Shakespeare
    -- transgressive Shakespeare
    -- Shakespeare and gender
    -- Shakespeare and race
    -- Shakespeare and class
    -- postmodern Shakespeare

    Please send all proposals (approx. 250 words) to the SW/TX PCA/ACA database: http://conference2012.swtxpca.org.

    Any queries may be sent to the Shakespeare on Film, Television, and Video Area Chair: Kelli Marshall, kellirmarshall_at_gmail.com.

    All participants MUST register online at the SW/TX website as soon as papers are accepted; more information and forms are available at http://swtxpca.org.

    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturerenaissancetheatre 43511William Dean Howells Panels at the American Literature Association Conference, San Francisco, CA, May 24-27, 2012Lance Rubin/William Dean Howells Associationlance.rubin@arapahoe.edu1319856195americangeneral_announcementstwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Lance Rubin/William Dean Howells Associationcontact email: lance.rubin@arapahoe.edu

    The William Dean Howells Society welcomes submissions for two panels at the 2012 American Literature Association in San Francisco, which is being held over Memorial Day weekend.

    Panel 1: The Late Howells

    We are looking for papers that focuses on Howells's late work. Though scholarship on his novels through A Hazard of New Fortunes is abundant, Howells remained prolific until his death in 1920. Why has his work after 1890 gotten relatively little attention? What works deserve another (or even a first) look? What of Howells' work as a playwright? Or his work in the short story genre? How does ignoring the late Howells' alter his position in American literary history, or perhaps even complicate American literary history?

    Panel 2: Open Topic

    We are looking for insightful, original papers that address any aspect of Howells's work.

    Please submit your 200-250 word abstract and a current CV (or any inquiries) to Lance Rubin at lance.rubin@arapahoe.edu by December 17, 2011.

    cfp categories: americangeneral_announcementstwentieth_century_and_beyond 435123rd Biennial Oxford/Cambridge International Chronicles Symposium, 5-7 July 2012, University of OxfordOxford/Cambridge International Chronicles Symposium (OCICS) 2012ocics@history.ox.ac.uk1319893364bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalreligionrenaissancetravel_writingfull name / name of organization: Oxford/Cambridge International Chronicles Symposium (OCICS) 2012contact email: ocics@history.ox.ac.uk

    The Oxford/Cambridge International Chronicles Symposium (OCICS) is a biennial conference devoted to the interdisciplinary study of historical texts in the medieval and Early Modern periods. It provides a forum for discussions of chronicles and related texts written across a range of languages, periods and places. It seeks to strengthen the network of chronicle studies worldwide, and aims to encourage collaboration between researchers working in a variety of disciplines from around the globe.

    The theme for the 2012 conference, taking place at the University of Oxford on 5-7 July, is 'Bonds, Links, and Ties in Medieval and Renaissance Chronicles'. Keynote addresses will be given by Prof Pauline Stafford (Liverpool), Dr Elizabeth van Houts (Cambridge), and Dr James Howard-Johnston (Oxford). The conference will take place at Oxford's Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies.

    Registration is £60 (full) or £50 (reduced). This includes lunch and refreshments on all three days. A limited number of bursaries will be available to assist graduate students with travel costs.

    Call for Papers

    Abstracts of no more than 300 words for papers of 20 minutes must be submitted to the organizers via e-mail (at ocics@history.ox.ac.uk) by 31 January 2012.

    Topics may include, but are not limited to:

    • genealogies (real or imagined)
    • family bonds
    • textual links
    • breaks and discontinuities
    • links between past, present, and future
    • ties of religion and faith
    • law, order, and disruption
    • oaths, promises, and betrayals
    • local, regional, and national identities

    Please visit our website for more information: www.ocics.co.uk

    cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalreligionrenaissancetravel_writing 43513Punk precursors and offshoots: popular culture outside the mainstream February 8-11, 2012 Bryan L. Jones/ Southwest/Texas Popular Culture/American Culture Assoiationbryan.l.jones@okstate.edu1319895773cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositiontheoryfull name / name of organization: Bryan L. Jones/ Southwest/Texas Popular Culture/American Culture Assoiationcontact email: bryan.l.jones@okstate.edu

    Punk precursors and offshoots: popular culture outside the mainstream
    2012 Southwest/Texas Popular Culture/American Culture Association
    33rd Annual Conference February 8-11, 2012
    Hyatt Regency Downtown/ Albuquerque, NM
    Proposals are now being sought for review in the Topic: Punk precursors and offshoots area. Review begins immediately and continues until December 1, 2011. Listed below are some suggestions for possible presentations; other topics in the area are also welcome:

    Recognizing that there is more than one way to explore new boundaries of artistic expression in popular culture, this area is open to papers examining artistic expression in popular formats that transgress the boundaries of accepted culture. This area explores those artifacts of culture that pertain to certain music scenes that don't crossover into respected mainstream culture.

    Such explorations will include punk, naturally, but also those artistic expressions that grew (and continue to grow) out of punk: New wave, grunge, emo, indie, shoegaze, etc.

    One may think that a linking of these types of musical expression would be the absence of major record companies, but such a reduction only succeeds in limiting the scope of experimental music. One would be remiss to exclude the music and spectacle of, say, The Flaming Lips simply because they record on WB.
    Categories include (but are not limited too)
    • Precursors and offshoots: Beats, Protest Folk, New Wave, Grunge, Emo, Indie, etc.
    • Punk History
    • Indexical Punk (is this punk? what kind?)
    • Punk Economics
    • Expressions of Punk in non-musical forms: Fashion, Cinema, the written word (Cyberpunk, Steampunk) Punk writers (Jim Carroll and others)
    • There is also room for experimental forms not typically associated with punk that display a clear
    devotion upon close examination, such as: Radiohead, The Flaming Lips, Tool, U2, etc.

    Any form of analysis is allowed. Rhetorical, Philosophical, Psychological, Economical, Ideological, etc.

    Bryan L. Jones
    Oklahoma State University
    English Department
    Morrill Hall 402
    Stillwater, OK
    bryan.l.jones@okstate.edu

    Please upload an abstract of 250 words and a current curriculum vitae to
    http://conference2012.swtxpca.org for review no later than December 1, 2011. Inquiries in advance of submissions are welcome, and may be sent to Bryan L. Jones at bryan.l.jones@okstate.edu All confirmed participants should be registered by December 31, 2011.

    Further details regarding the conference (listing of all panel areas, hotel, registration, tours, etc.) can be found at http://www.swtxpca.org A number of graduate student awards are given each year, and graduate student travel grants are also available. I look forward to hearing from you!

    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositiontheory 43514[UPDATE] Call for Papers: Alfred HitchcockSouthwest Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Association - 33rd Annual Conferencehowarth-m@mssu.edu1319901552americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarypopular_culturereligionrhetoric_and_compositionromantictheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Southwest Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Association - 33rd Annual Conferencecontact email: howarth-m@mssu.edu

    Call for Papers: Alfred Hitchcock

    Southwest Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Association
    33rd Annual Conference
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    February 8-11, 2012
    Hyatt Regency Hotel and Conference Center
    330 Tijeras Ave. NW
    Albuquerque, New Mexico 87102 USA
    Phone: 1-505-842-1234
    Submission Deadline: December 1st, 2011

    Conference Website: (updated regularly)

    Panels now forming for presentations on the films and career of Alfred Hitchcock. Listed below are some suggestions for possible presentations.

    • Hitchcock and Music
    • Hitchcock and Television
    • Hitchcock and Pedagogy
    • Hitchcock and Film Theory
    • Hitchcock and Film Genres
    • Hitchcock and Voyeurism
    • Hitchcock and the Silent Era
    • Hitchcock and Gender
    • Hitchcock and Black Humor

    This list of topics suggests a few possible ways to consider Alfred Hitchcock's work, but it is not final. Any other approaches to discussing the "master of suspense" are certainly welcome.

    Please submit your abstract to the database at the following web address: http://conference2012.swtxpca.org. Your abstract must be submitted by December 1st 2011.

    If you have any questions, please contact:

    Michael Howarth, Alfred Hitchcock Chair
    Assistant Professor of English
    Missouri Southern State University
    3950 E. Newman Road
    Kuhn Hall
    Joplin MO 64801
    417-625-3051
    Howarth-M@mssu.edu

    cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarypopular_culturereligionrhetoric_and_compositionromantictheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 43515[UPDATE] From the Glorious Revolution to the European Union: Connections Between the British Isles and the Continent, March 9 & University of Notre Dame and Nanovic InstituteBritishIslesandtheContinent@gmail.com1319913840cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligiontravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: University of Notre Dame and Nanovic Institutecontact email: BritishIslesandtheContinent@gmail.com

    britishislesandthecontinent.com

    Nanovic Institute for European Studies at the University of Notre Dame announces an interdisciplinary graduate student conference on the history and literature of the British Isles in a European context from the Glorious Revolution to the twenty-first century.

    In light of the recent economic collapses in Ireland and Greece and their painful consequences across Europe, the clash between national sovereignty and interdependence within the European Union has recently become a widely contested topic, raising fundamental questions about the European project itself. Although many contemporary pundits proclaim that this interdependence to be the result of the rise of the EU, historical and literary records indicate that this is not the case. We find instead that people, goods, information, ideas, and beliefs have traveled between the British Isles and the Continent for centuries. The aim of this conference is to focus on the relationships between the four nations of the British Isles and the rest of Europe in order to examine the nature of those connections and to track the changes and continuities over time. This central concern has many implications we would seek to tease out in our program, including questions of how national identity is reconciled with European identity, the potential associations between revolutions (the Glorious, French, Industrial, etc.) across time and space, the effects of European conflicts on the connections between the nations, and the role of empire-building and the impact of resulting rivalries between nations on their relationships. To fully engage these issues, we will even need to question how we define sovereignty itself.

    The conference will take place at McKenna Hall at the University of Notre Dame on Friday, March 9 and Saturday, March 10, 2012. Papers from history and literature departments are especially encouraged. The authors of all accepted papers will be fully compensated for lodging for two nights and will receive a travel subvention of $100. All contributions should be submitted on britishislesandthecontinent.com by November 1, 2011 and include a 250-word abstract and curriculum vitae.

    Panels will likely include the following topics:

    *The British Isles and European Modernisms
    *Diplomacy /International Relations
    *Religion and the State
    *Intellectual Exchange
    *Material and Popular Culture
    *Diaspora
    *Literature and Music
    *Gender/Sexuality across national boundaries
    *Inter-cultural Representations

    Speakers to include:
    Tony Claydon, Hugh McLeod, Nicholas Grene, Robert Sullivan, and Susan Cannon Harris

    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligiontravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 43516[UPDATE] From the Glorious Revolution to the European Union: Connections Between the British Isles and the Continent, March 9 &University of Notre Dame and Nanovic InstituteBritishIslesandtheContinent@gmail.com1319914741cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centurygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialtravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: University of Notre Dame and Nanovic Institutecontact email: BritishIslesandtheContinent@gmail.com

    ABSTRACTS DUE NOVEMBER 18, 2012

    www.BritishIslesandtheContinent.com

    Nanovic Institute for European Studies at the University of Notre Dame announces an interdisciplinary graduate student conference on the history and literature of the British Isles in a European context from the Glorious Revolution to the twenty-first century. In light of the recent economic collapses in Ireland and Greece and their painful consequences across Europe, the clash between national sovereignty and interdependence within the European Union has recently become a widely contested topic, raising fundamental questions about the European project itself. Although many contemporary pundits proclaim that this interdependence to be the result of the rise of the EU, historical and literary records indicate that this is not the case. We find instead that people, goods, information, ideas, and beliefs have traveled between the British Isles and the Continent for centuries. The aim of this conference is to focus on the relationships between the four nations of the British Isles and the rest of Europe in order to examine the nature of those connections and to track the changes and continuities over time. This central concern has many implications we would seek to tease out in our program, including questions of how national identity is reconciled with European identity, the potential associations between revolutions (the Glorious, French, Industrial, etc.) across time and space, the effects of European conflicts on the connections between the nations, and the role of empire-building and the impact of resulting rivalries between nations on their relationships. To fully engage these issues, we will even need to question how we define sovereignty itself.

    The conference will take place at McKenna Hall at the University of Notre Dame on Friday, March 9 and Saturday, March 10, 2012. Papers from history and literature departments are especially encouraged. The authors of all accepted papers will be fully compensated for lodging for two nights and will receive a travel subvention of $100. All contributions should be submitted by going to the "Submit Abstract" tab on this website by November 18, 2011 and include a 250-word abstract and curriculum vitae.

    cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centurygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialtravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 43517Narrating Women's Lives, Labeling Women's narratives Nov. 7\March15-18Mary LannonMary.Lannon@ncc.edu1319936020gender_studies_and_sexualitypopular_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Mary Lannoncontact email: Mary.Lannon@ncc.edu

    Narrating Women's Lives, Labeling Women's Narratives
    In 1995, Chris Mazza and Jeff DeShell edited Chick-Lit: Postfeminist Fiction and in 2005 Elizabeth Herrick edited This is Not Chick Lit. In between Chick Lit lost its dash(pun intended?) and changed its meaning. Mazza had defined Chick-lit as breaking out of the stereotypical feminist narratives of the second wave: victim and self-empowerment stories particularly irked her. She declared the stories in her volume offering new lenses for women, and she boldly declared these "postfeminist" and "human." Flash forward eleven years and Elizabeth Herrick directed the reader's eye to books with pink covers focused on shopping and finding men and traced their origins to the 1996 novel Bridget Jones Diary, leaving Mazza's work unmentioned. Noting that chick lit allows for necessary escapism, she nonetheless, argued that the wild success of the genre obscured the literary work of many women, something her volume championed. Though clearly irritated with the genre, she saw the success of all women as part of the feminist movement. Contributors to this panel are asked to read their own fiction that in some way narrates women's lives and offer some understanding of how they see their work in relationship (if any) to (post) feminism (any of the waves), womanism, and chick-lit\chick lit. Please send a one-page sample of your fiction along with a150-250 word proposal by Nov. 7 to Mary.Lannon@ncc.edu

    cfp categories: gender_studies_and_sexualitypopular_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 43518Dynamic Inter-Linkage Transnational Synergy: Indian Diaspora Submission deadlines for abstracts: November 10th , 2011 SAP and GOPIO at Gujarat Universitydrneerjaarun@yahoo.com1319980960ethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesfull name / name of organization: SAP and GOPIO at Gujarat Universitycontact email: drneerjaarun@yahoo.com

    The impact of Indian Diaspora has motivated its homeland to map its history and factors for migration. Concerns for Economic, Political, Cultural and Social engagements of Indian Diaspora have been widely shown in the society. It also brought sociologists and researchers to look into the process of migration and found themselves into pondering upon the trends of Indian Diaspora.
    The considerable presence of Indian Diaspora in almost all parts of the world and its insistence upon sending success stories back home in all spheres inspired homeland India to connect with her Diaspora with renewed passion.
    1990s have brought considerable change in the Indian Perspectives for her Diaspora. Brain Drain led way to Brain Gain and post liberalization situations gave opportunities for considerable remittances from direct foreign investments. The impact of Indian Diaspora can be felt all where in recent times.
    A key feature of globalization today is the rapid flow of capital. The Diaspora's capacity and propensity to engage in India are dependent upon a range of factors. The individual and collective contributions are largely two modes that have impacted Indian society.
    ICT, Infrastructure, Education, Research and Technology, Finance and Banking and Oriental art & culture are emergent issues that need serious considerations of partnership with Indian Diaspora. Policy-makers with both domestic and international remits are appreciating the two-way linkages between diasporas and their home regions.
    The Endeavour of collective activities is timelier to participate in synergic advancements of the homeland. Government is playing a crucial supportive role in partnership with civil society and the private sector. Funders and policy-makers should collaborate more to tackle social challenges that blur traditional sectoral, departmental or geographical boundaries but to do this they need to be clear about why, what they are seeking to achieve, etc, and also remain within their legal limits, geographically.
    At the same time the native Indians have larger responsibility of looking after the emotional, spiritual, cultural and social needs of her counterpart abroad. The intellectual and emotional combination shall be the order of the 21st century India

    Proposals to be placed:
    1. Community Chapters in India
    2. Indian Diaspora and development day
    3. Combined Research Initiatives/ Academic Chairs

    The conference committee is seeking submissions of papers for oral presentation at the conference in following categories:
    1. Here and there: merging spheres
    2. Transforming the local with global initiatives
    3. Funders' agenda: pitching ideas for development
    4. Role of Indian Diaspora in re-conceiving and reconstituting faith in physical and virtual places of spiritualism: India and Abroad
    5. Literary and cultural Concerns
     Peer reviewed papers – these papers will be selected on basis of blind peer review by members of the program committee and other independent reviewers (where necessary). Case studies, research in progress and full research papers including theoretical papers will be considered for the inclusion in the conference program. It is anticipated that submissions will be between 2700 and 4500 words. The program committee will not accept research proposals for submission to the conference.
     Other papers – Written by students, these papers will not be peer reviewed. However, due to the considerable interest in the conference, these papers will also be reviewed and selected for acceptance by the program committee.
     Policy Papers__This category covers corporate papers, best practices, new technologies, policy issues etc and the conference committee are eager to obtain submissions from NGOs, industry, government and other sectors for this category. However, marketing papers will not be accepted for the conference.
    All accepted papers will be published in the printed version of the SAP Conference Proceedings (book with ISBN). The best Paper will be awarded by the conference committee.

    Deadlines and forms of submission:
    Submission deadlines for abstracts:
    November 10th , 2011

    Acceptance notification to participants:
    November 10th , 2011

    Submission deadlines complete paper:
    December 15th, 2011

    Submission Mail ID: drneerjaarun@yahoo.com
    All submissions will be handled electronically and the review/acceptance process will be conducted anonymously by the conference committee:
    • Academic papers should be submitted via on-line in rich text format (RTF) or Microsoft Word 97 or newer format (DOCX).
    Registration deadline and charges:
    Scholars cum participants from India: INR 4500/-
    Scholars cum participants from Other Countries: USD 240/-
    Students Participants: INR 900/-
    (Registration amount doesn't include lodging and boarding. However it includes local transport from stay to conference venue and back, breakfast, lunch and dinner for 12th and 13th January, get together eve on 12th January, 2011, paper proceedings of the conference and conference kit).
    (Stay arrangements may be made at nominal cost in guest houses and hotels if conveyed by November 15th, 2011. Participants shall directly pay for lodging and boarding.)
    City of Ahmedabad:
    Ahmedabad is situated in Gujarat, the western part of the country. It is widely connected with major national and international airports and all important national rail routes. January is specially known for Uttarayan. 14th January is specially enjoyed for Makar Sankranti as kite-flying day. It is celebrated every year when the family members come together and enjoy the jest of cutting each other's kites. Important cities of Gujarat are the host of this popular kite flying festival. This festival attracts Connoisseurs of kites from the world over along with native kite fighters. Miniature as well as colossal designer kites forms the part of kite exhibitions.
    Vibrant Ahmedabad in Gujarat is the best place to celebrate this festival. Rajasthan, Delhi and Haryana also are the interesting places to visit during this festival
    Organizing Chairs
    Dr Neerja Arun
    Study Abroad Program
    Gujarat University
    Ahmedabad, India
    drneerjaarun@yahoo.com

    Dr Thomas Abraham
    Founder President and Chairman Emeritus
    GOPIO
    NY, US
    innoresearch@optonline.net

    Dr Jagat Motwani
    International Academic Chair
    GOPIO
    NY, US
    acacouncilgopio@yahoo.com

    cfp categories: ethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferences 43519Reproduction, Life, and Futurity in the Humanities/ ACLA March 29 - April 1, 2012American Comparative Literature Association Conferencekaren.weingarten@qc.cuny.edu1319982285americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: American Comparative Literature Association Conferencecontact email: karen.weingarten@qc.cuny.edu

    This seminar for the 2012 American Comparative Literature Association Conference examines how reproductive politics function in connection to the three conference themes of collapse, catastrophe, and change. These themes and their implicit concerns with reproduction and futurity—with what happens after the disaster—are part of what we see as a current focus on biopolitics and "the politics of life" in the Humanities. We seek to discuss the reproductive dimensions of this focus by asking if there are ways to reconfigure present life politics so that they no longer solely privilege the human, and to unbind them from an obsessive focus on futurity.

    We welcome papers from diverse disciplinary and theoretical backgrounds that discuss how text, art, film, literature and philosophy can help us answer questions such as: How are fears about political collapse, catastrophe and change connected to, configured by, and imaginably dealt with via narratives dealing with reproduction? How are reproductive biopolitics, and the politics of the present, connected to literary discourse? Is it possible to imagine concepts like "humanity" or "community" without appealing to notions of futurity? What does it mean to posit the biological as a solution to the political? And, can we imagine reproduction, and the idea of "life itself," without relying on "prolife" concepts that fixate on what is to come next for us—for humans?

    Alongside papers that focus on reproductive rights, fiction and film, futurism and biopolitics, other areas of interest include reproductive dystopias, embodiment, queer politics, ecology, science fiction, and modern/postmodern thought.

    Please email abstracts to karen.weingarten@qc.cuny.edu and Heather Latimer at heatherdlatimer@gmail.com, as well as submitting directly to the conference website (http://www.acla.org/submit/index.php) by November 15, 2011.

    cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 43520ACLA 2012 Seminar: Critique of Singularity: On the Iteration of Catastrophe Isabel Capeloa Gil & Daniela Agostinho (Catholic University of Portugal)isabel.gil@fch.lisboa.ucp.pt / agostinho.daniela@gmail.com1319985407americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesinterdisciplinarypostcolonialscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Isabel Capeloa Gil & Daniela Agostinho (Catholic University of Portugal)contact email: isabel.gil@fch.lisboa.ucp.pt / agostinho.daniela@gmail.com

    ACLA 2012: Collapse/Catastrophe/Change

    The American Comparative Literature Association's 2012 Annual Meeting will take place at Brown University, Providence, RI from March 29th to April 1st, 2012.

    Seminar Organizers: Isabel Capeloa Gil & Daniela Agostinho (Catholic University of Portugal)

    At a time of generalized crisis, when the discourse of calamity, from economics to politics and the environment, seems to have become the new master narrative of the 21st century, it is particularly relevant and timely to engage in a critical appraisal of the rhetoric of catastrophe and discuss its impact and effects. Moreover, it also useful to discuss the way literature contributes to shape social and cultural perceptions of a disastrous future. Although literature is singular and tends to stress the singularity of any given catastrophic event, the fact of the matter is that notwithstanding the factual contingency, the specific materiality of the medium of representation and its creative uniqueness, there are rhetorical figurations that travel across time and space and contest representational singularity. It needs to be argued that singularity does not simply pertain to what is unique and unrepeatable, it is not a property, but rather the result of an event (Attridge, 2004:64) that is culturally and socially produced. Yet, even though the representation of different catastrophes may partake of similar rhetorical tropes, they are never identical and work their differences by means of an iteration without overlapping. Without denying either the uniqueness of the aesthetic or the situatedness of the event, the seminar on the critique of singularity wishes to challenge the narrative of exceptionality at the roots of national figurations of disaster and understand the role played by representation in the processing of catastrophe in modernity.

    Please note that ACLA seminars take place over 2-3 days with 8-12 participants; members are expected to attend all seminar sessions.

    Please submit abstracts up to 350 words to Isabel Gil(isabel.gil@fch.lisboa.ucp.pt) and Daniela Agostinho(agostinho.daniela@gmail.com) by 15 November 2011. Feel free to contact the organizers with any questions you may have.

    cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesinterdisciplinarypostcolonialscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 43521James Hogg and the RomanticsJames Hogg Society / University of Glasgow School of Critical StudiesKirsteen.McCue@glasgow.ac.uk1319995376eighteenth_centurygraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespoetryromantictheoryfull name / name of organization: James Hogg Society / University of Glasgow School of Critical Studiescontact email: Kirsteen.McCue@glasgow.ac.uk

    2012 James Hogg Conference: "James Hog and the Romantics"

    The next Biannual James Hogg Conference will be jointly hosted by the James Hogg Society and the School of Critical Studies at the University of Glasgow. It will take place at the University of Glasgow from Friday 29 to Saturday 30 June 2012. A trip to Burns country is planned for Sunday 1 July.

    The theme of the Conference is "James Hogg and the Romantics". The Conference will provide an opportunity to explore the nature of Hogg's relationship with other Romantic writers and welcomes, in particular, papers relating to all aspects of Hogg's relationship with Scottish Romanticism.

    Papers on topics related to the life and works of James Hogg and to Hogg's literary connections and influence are also welcomed. Reading time should not exceed 20 minutes.

    Proposals or abstracts should be sent by 29 February 15, 2012 to:

    Dr Kirsteen McCue
    Scottish Literature
    School of Critical Studies
    University of Glasgow
    7 University Gardens
    Glasgow G12 8QQ
    Kirsteen.McCue@glasgow.ac.uk

    cfp categories: eighteenth_centurygraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespoetryromantictheory 43522Shakespeare and Performance (January 31, 2012)Early Modern Studies Journal (EMSJ) formally Early English Studies (EES)Amy Tigner: altigner@gmail.com1319998223americancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryfilm_and_televisionjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturerenaissancetheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Early Modern Studies Journal (EMSJ) formally Early English Studies (EES)contact email: Amy Tigner: altigner@gmail.com

    The 2012 volume will focus on "Shakespeare and Performance." We are interested in articles that consider any aspect of performance in historical or contemporary productions of Shakespeare and his contemporary playwrights. The following list is of possible topics, but should not be considered exhaustive:

    Comparative performance in England



    Comparative performances in England and other countries


    Street performance


    Provincial performance


    Performance of Guilds



    Women and performance


    Boy's companies



    Current productions of early modern plays



    Shakespeare Festivals



    Playing spaces



    Actors and the text



    Theatrical Gesture



    Court Performances and Masques



    Film or TV productions of Shakespeare

    Please submit double-spaced manuscripts in Times New Roman, 12 pt font that do not exceed thirty pages in length, including notes (9,000 words total); electronic submission in Word format is required. Please use endnotes rather than a bibliography, formatting to Chicago Manual of Style, 15th Ed. The author's name, affiliation, and academic history should be included on the first page of the document. Thereafter, the author's name should not appear in the document. For more information about submissions or about the journal generally please see: http://www.uta.edu/english/ees/

    Submissions are due January 31, 2012.

    Please send submissions to Amy Tigner, earlyenglishstudies@gmail.com or altigner@gmail.com. The issue will appear in Fall 2012.

    Early Modern Studies Journal (EMSJ) formerly Early English Studies (EES) is an online journal under the auspices of the University of Texas, Arlington English Department and is devoted to literary and cultural topics of study in early modern period. EMSJ is published annually, peer-reviewed, and open to general submission.

    cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryfilm_and_televisionjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturerenaissancetheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 435232th International Conference on ECitizen and Cellphone - 16,17 Jan of 2012Ghalamchi Management and Technology Improvement Instituteinfo@icecc.net1320015671international_conferencesprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturefull name / name of organization: Ghalamchi Management and Technology Improvement Institutecontact email: info@icecc.net

    Dear researchers, specialists, professors and students can send their related papers by submitting in the ICECC. This conference welcomes papers for both oral and poster presentations. The main topics are as the bellow:

    Conference axis:
    1)Reviewing Strategies, challenges, products, solutions and activities on Mobile ICT in various parts of social, political, cultural, industrial, commercial, economical and healthily .
    2)Reviewing effects of Mobile ICT services to reduce traffic, unnecessary travels and environmental pollutions
    3)Information security on Mobile ICT
    4)Investment trends and outlook at the future of Mobile ICT

    Conference topics and palens:
    Cloud computing, m-Learning, SMS, Information security, m-Commerce, m-Health, m-Banking, m-Tourism, Mobile Infra Structures, Teleworking, Bluetooth, Mobile Internet, m-Advertisement, Smart phones, m-News, CMS, IP Cameras, Automation, RFID, GPS, EDGE, Wi-Fi, WiMAX, m-Traffic

    Notice:
    1)attention to the key times.
    2)Pay attention to the paper format presented in this web site.
    3)We will donate the accepted papers, valued prizes.
    4)all the accepted papers will be published in the conference proceeding, explored in GMTII and selected articles will be published in Journals which are indexed by ABI/INFORM, EBSCO, Inspec, SCOPUS, ISC &NMRJ.
    5) register your papers on http://icecc.net/default.asp?lang_id=2 website.

    When: Jan 16, 2012 - Jan 17, 2012
    Where: Tehran, Iran.
    Submission Deadline: Dec 16, 2011
    Notification Due Jan 5, 2012
    Final Version Due Dec 16, 2011

    cfp categories: international_conferencesprofessional_topicsscience_and_culture