Northern Renaissance Seminar: 'Genre in the Renaissance'

full name / name of organization: 
Anna Mackenzie, University of Chester
contact email: 
a.mackenzie@chester.ac.uk

University of Chester

17th March 2012

'Genre in the Renaissance'

*Confirmed keynote speakers: Professor John Drakakis (University of Stirling) and Professor Marion Wynne-Davies (University of Surrey)*

Proposals for papers are invited on any aspect of the ways in which literary/poetic/dramatic genres function in the Renaissance. This seminar endeavours to expose some of the ways in which genres are employed, manipulated, or resisted in Renaissance literature, poetry and drama.
Topics may include, but are certainly not restricted to:

- The emergence and evolution of genres in relation to Renaissance culture;

- The tensions or compliance of literary/dramatic works with genre theory;

- How social discourses shape categories and classifications of literary production;

- How and why do literary works resist or subvert generic classifications;

- How dramatic formulations contribute to the synergy between genre and culture;

- The use of genre as an ideological construct;

- How genre interacts with other driving forces in the literary/poetic/dramatic work.

Comparative, interdisciplinary, and performance-oriented approaches are welcome. We invite proposals (250 words) for papers addressing these questions, and considering the use or subversions of genre and generic readings in the Renaissance. Submissions from postgraduate students, and early career researchers welcomed. Please send your proposals or any queries to Anna Mackenzie: a.mackenzie@chester.ac.uk.

Deadline for proposals: 31st December 2011.

cfp categories: 
bibliography_and_history_of_the_book
childrens_literature
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
ecocriticism_and_environmental_studies
film_and_television
gender_studies_and_sexuality
general_announcements
graduate_conferences
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popular_culture
renaissance
rhetoric_and_composition
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theory