'Narratives of Difference' in the Global Marketplace

full name / name of organization: 
The University of Northampton, UK and The University of Vigo, Spain
contact email: 
Janet.Wilson@northampton.ac.uk and bmartin@uvigo.es

“’Narratives of Difference’ in the Global Marketplace”

At: School of the Arts, Avenue Campus, University of Northampton

25-26 October 2012

This conference reflects research interests shared between the University of Vigo, host to the international project, ‘Globalized Cultural Markets: The Production, Circulation and Reception of Culture in the Global Market Place’, and the Centre of Contemporary Narrative and Cultural Theory in the School of Arts at the University of Northampton. Its topic relates to these global, cultural and pedagogic contexts. The focus is on how ‘difference’ and ‘diversity’ are commodified in the production and reception of culture through narrative strategies and/or modes of narrativization.

In today’s age of unprecedented circulation of ideas, values and cultural practices across nation states and the technological flow of goods and financial capital across borders, we need urgently to consider new perspectives and possibilities for society. How are differences between peoples, cultures, minorities articulated and (re)produced for the circulation of cultural products in the global market place and what are the chief modes of resistance? With increasing mobilization of culture what are the checks and balances between justice and inequality?

We encourage work which addresses difference as a narrative construction and identifies ‘narratives of difference’ (e.g. racial, ethnic, gender, linguistic, sexual) that may also be strategies of resistance or dissent. In particular we ask how such narratives are constructed round cultural products and peoples that are circulated, exchanged and exploited in the global market place.

How are ‘narratives of difference’ articulated in the marketing of transnational products both from and within Europe, and other multicultural societies? How do they represent daily life practices of cultural products for global production and reception? Are existing constructions of difference reoriented and reconfigured by narrativisations for the global market place? In what ways do already existing narratives such as oral stories, fictions, urban myths, indigenous legends contribute to the articulation of difference and diversity in the selling of cultural products?

Particular approaches might address the following:

• What global narratives constructed by cultural agents create new representations of products, people and everyday practices?
• How do media technologies rewrite and reformat existing narratives in mobilizing culture, and in whose interests?
• How do urban narratives of cityscapes/ethnoscapes contribute to the production and reception of cultural difference in the globalised marketplace?
• What new narratives articulate the movements of diasporic, migrant, transnational production?
• How do new stories/ narratives contribute to and/or critique the transmission of cultural traditions in cyberspace?
• How are policies and practices of cultural exception (language, economic investment, national culture) articulated and what products are protected?
• How does narrative contribute to making ‘difference‘ an asset in the cultural markets?
• What marketing strategies of ‘difference’ are used for academic pedagogies of postcolonial, queer, citizenship and globalization studies?
• How can postcolonial criticism respond to matters of literary economy?
• How do visual technologies and new media define new narratives of difference for global audiences?
• What paradigms of linguistic difference and resistance develop from narrativisation in translation studies?
• What narrative strategies of dissent and/or resistance challenge the exploitation of difference in the cultural markets?
• What impact do audience expectation and location have on creative acts in different modes (visual, performance, oral) and how can these be assessed?

Keynote Speakers: TB

Abstracts: Please send abstracts for 20 minute papers or proposals for 90 minute panels to Professor Janet Wilson, School of the Arts, University of Northampton and Associate Professor Belén Martín-Lucas, University of Vigo (bmartin@uvigo.es and
Janet.Wilson@northampton.ac.uk)

Deadline for abstracts: 30 May 2012

Registration: Early Bird: £110; £70 (students) by 1 July 2012
Late: £130.00; £90.00 (students)
Day Rate: £80.00; £50.00 (students)

Accommodation: A number of nearby hotels will be recommended, including some rooms at Sunley Management Centre, Park Campus, University of Northampton.

cfp categories: 
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
ethnicity_and_national_identity
interdisciplinary
popular_culture
postcolonial
twentieth_century_and_beyond