New Zealand's Cultures: Sources, Histories, Futures

full name / name of organization: 
New Zealand Studies Network (UK and Ireland)

New Zealand Studies Network (UK and Ireland)

Inaugural Conference

New Zealand's Cultures: Sources, Histories, Futures

Hosts: Birkbeck, University of London and The University of Northampton

Friday 6 July to Saturday 7 July 2012 at Birkbeck, University of London

This conference aims to examine the 'making of New Zealanders' in the past, present and future. It will focus on New Zealand and its many different cultures, exploring their origins, historical sources and influences, contemporary changes and future developments. It aims to embrace as many as possible of the disciplinary fields within the humanities, social sciences and the natural sciences.
We anticipate that the cultures that will be explored will include not only the more obvious national, ethnic and religious ones, but the practices and mindsets of governmental, professional, business, educational, religious and sporting subcultures, and of cultures found in other daily occupations and interests, such as eating, drinking and entertainment.
We are interested in how elements of national culture have been imported from the Pacific, the UK, the USA, Europe and Australia, and how they have been exported through migration, disapora, and the media. We welcome proposals that approach New Zealand's cultures from alternative, 'outsider' perspectives, and those that consider whether or not New Zealand's cultures exhibit any remarkable 'exceptionalism' .

Topics might well be located in or refer to one or more of the following categories of culture:

National
Local
Political
Ethnic
Immigrant/diasporic/minority
Professional
Business
Creative Arts
Gastronomic
Sporting
Historical / critical writing
Environmental
Religion

Keynote speakers: Dame Judith Mayhew Jonas; Professor Hugh Lauder (University of Bath). Others to be confirmed.

In the evening of 6th July, will be the launch of the 25 New Zealand Poets for the UK Poetry Archive 2011, with Directors, Sir Andrew Motion and Richard Carrington, Co-ordinating Director Jan Kemp, and readings by some of the poets.

Registration: Earlybird (til 31 March): £140.00; students/unwaged £90.00
Standard: £180.00; students/unwaged: £140.00

Abstracts: for 20 minute papers of c 250 words plus brief biosketch by 31 March to info.nzsn@gmail.com. Intending delegates should be current members of the NZSN. For details of how to join see the NZSN website at http://www.nzstudies.com. The website will post regular updates of the conference.

Accommodation: Due to anticipated heavy demand caused by the Olympics, we recommend booking early at nearby hotels.

For any queries write to the convenors, Professor Janet Wilson at janet.wilson@northampton.ac.uk and Andrew Sharp at a.sharp@auckland.ac.nz.

451082nd International Conference on Theoretical and Applied Linguistics: Structure, Use, and MeaningTransilvania University of Brasov, Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguisticsstanca.mada@unitbv.ro1329244480interdisciplinaryinternational_conferencestheoryfull name / name of organization: Transilvania University of Brasov, Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguisticscontact email: stanca.mada@unitbv.ro

2nd Conference on Theoretical and Applied Linguistics: Structure, Use, and Meaning - SUM 2012, September 20-22, 2012, Brasov, Romania.

The conference aims to bring together researchers and practitioners in the field of theoretical and applied linguistics with a view to placing language in an interdisciplinary dialogue and promoting the merging of present-day approaches to the study of language. At the same time, this conference would be an opportunity to re-enforce the dialogue on research and collaboration in academic and professional contexts. Such collaboration, in turn, is fundamental to the design and implementation of effective pedagogy, assessment and curricula.

We invite papers on any of the following areas:
• Morphology
• Syntax
• Pragmatics
• Stylistics
• Language acquisition
• Current research methods in linguistics
• Discourse analysis
• Semantics
• Language teaching
• Sociolinguistics/Psycholinguistics
• Miscellanea
The official languages of the conference are English, French, German and Romanian.

For presentation guidelines, submission of abstracts and registration, please visit the conference website at:

http://www.unitbv.ro/dlta/SUM2012/tabid/8052/language/en-US/Default.aspx

The deadline for submitting the abstracts is April 30, 2012. The abstracts will be peer-reviewed and a notification of acceptance will be given by June 1, 2012.

cfp categories: interdisciplinaryinternational_conferencestheory 45109[UPDATE] CFP: Modernist Reputations (MSA 14; Oct. 18-21, 2012)Will Scheibel / Modernist Studies Associationwillscheibel@gmail.com1329245553film_and_televisionmodernist studiesfull name / name of organization: Will Scheibel / Modernist Studies Associationcontact email: willscheibel@gmail.com

Prospective Conference Panel

Modernist Studies Association 14: Modernism & Spectacle (The Flamingo Hotel, Las Vegas, NV)

Deadline for submission: April 1, 2012 (please note date change)

Organizer: Will Scheibel, Indiana University
Chair: Faye Hammill, University of Strathclyde

Some of the most historically and theoretically provocative areas of modernist studies have recently occupied the interrelated areas of modernism, celebrity, and publicity, challenging the divide between the high culture of modernism (and the elite reputations of its figures) and the publicly mediated culture of celebrity (and the consumerist economy from which modernists claimed to rebel). Following the work of scholars such as Aaron Jaffe in Modernism and the Culture of Celebrity (2005), Justus Nieland in Feeling Modern (2008), and Jonathan Goldman in Modernism Is the Literature of Celebrity (2011), this interdisciplinary panel seeks to explore further the idea of a "modernist reputation" in aspects of art and literature, as well as media and popular culture.

Apropos of this year's conference theme, it will also devote special attention to the ways in which a quotidian or "vernacular" modernism affectively enables such reputations. As Miriam Hansen argues, modernism encompasses "a whole range of cultural and artistic practices that register, respond to, and reflect upon processes of modernization and the experience of modernity, including the paradigmatic transformation of the conditions under which art is produced, transmitted, and consumed." What do particular reputations signify in particular cultural moments and how do they change over time? What does it mean from an ideological perspective to have a reputation associated with modernist aesthetics? What are the discursive and art-historical currents from which these reputations flow through the modernist imaginary, particularly along a phenomenological horizon where modernity is worked through at the level of the senses?

Possible topics may include, but are not limited to the following:
- Media stardom, celebrity, and visibility
- Reputations across media forms
- Popular images: production, consumption, and circulation
- The machinery of reputation building: publicity, promotion, and criticism/commentary
- The role of the press
- The relationships between and among new technologies, publics, and reputations
- Reception contexts: readers, audiences, and fans
- Canonicity, taste cultures, and reading formations
- The identity politics of reputations
- Fame, glamour, and beauty
- Success stories
- Performance styles in music, theater, and/or cinema
- Renowned authorship
- Art world reputations
- Self-made reputations
- Global reputations
- Infamy and notoriety
- Forgotten figures and the undoing of reputations

Send 300 word abstract with 5 item bibliography and full academic CV (as separate e-mail attachments) to: Will Scheibel (willscheibel@gmail.com).

Please visit the MSA website for more details about the 2012 conference: http://msa.press.jhu.edu/conferences/msa14/cfp.html

cfp categories: film_and_televisionmodernist studies 45110Transnational Sexualities (MSA 14. Las Vegas. 18-21 Oct. 2012) [Due March 22]Jennifer Mitchellmitchell.jen@gmail.com1329249956african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypostcolonialscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Jennifer Mitchellcontact email: mitchell.jen@gmail.com

Transnational Sexualities

Recent scholarship in the humanities and modernism reveals the desire and demand for more transnational approaches to literature and history. This panel aims to bring such a methodology to bear on the interdisciplinary discourses of sexology and sexuality. The late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century saw the emergence of an extensive and complex language that helped establish a new spectrum of sexual identities. Sexology, including the work of Richard von Krafft-Ebing and Havelock Ellis, set the stage for the development of modern understandings of sex and gender; yet, the process by which such concepts were brought into public and private conversations reflects the conflict between the impulse to recognize and legitimize and the impulse to diagnose and criminalize. Such conflict intensified the spectacle of sexuality incited by the releases and translations of Psychopathia Sexualis and Studies in the Psychology of Sex, among other foundational texts. At times, such language emerged in isolation from other international discourses, but more often than not, it was part of a comprehensive transatlantic economy of ideas. Up until now, this international exchange has been left largely unexplored.

The publication of Heike Bauer's English Literary Sexology (2009) exposed the public to the connection between literature and sexology as manifest in the figure of the invert. By broadening the subject—focusing on various ideas, figures, cases, and claims related to sexology and sexuality—and by narrowing the chronology, this panel is a critical consideration of the relationship between circulating ideas about sexuality and the development of modernist aesthetics and identities. In particular, this conversation contributes directly to a recognition of sexual theory and identity as integral parts of any understanding of the relationship between modernism and spectacle. We welcome papers across disciplines that can shed light on the international ties that constituted this network. Submissions might include those that demonstrate the international context of a sexual identity or inclination (i.e. the influence of Austrian theories of sexual deviance), the dissemination of particular sexological claims across several national cultures (i.e. masturbation in France, Germany, and England), the connections between the global avant-garde and sexological or sexual theories (i.e. aesthetic experimentation and sexual degeneracy), and pseudo-scientific racial theories tied to sexual proclivities (Jewishness and masochism). Salient questions may include: How does the emergence of international sexology influence modernism? How do issues of the modern manifest themselves in the ideas of sexology? Where and in what works can we locate overlaps and intersections between modernism and sexology?

Possible topics to consider:
-sexological influence in the works of a given author
-modernist contributions to the development and dissemination of sexology
-historical approaches to the relationship between modernism and sexology
-technologies of sex in literature
-mass production and the reproduction of the masses
-political sex scandals and the body politic
-fascism and the body
-influences of sexological case studies on literature, and vice versa

Please submit 500 word abstract and curriculum vitae to mitchell.jen@gmail.com by March 22, 2012. The intention is to move towards an edited collection based on the success of the panel itself.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypostcolonialscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 45111Comics, Religion & Politics, 4th & 5th September 2012, Lancaster University [UPDATE]Emily Laycock, Lancaster Universitye.laycock@lancaster.ac.uk1329252395bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturereligionrhetoric_and_compositiontwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Emily Laycock, Lancaster Universitycontact email: e.laycock@lancaster.ac.uk

Keynote Speakers:

Will Brooker (Kingston University)
Mike Carey (British writer)
Lincoln Geraghty (University of Portsmouth)

Alongside the continued popularity of political themes in comics recent years have also seen the rise of religious themes entering into the medium. The aim of this two day conference is to explore the relationship between comics, religion and politics in greater depth, to show how through the unique properties of the medium comics have the ability to be as thought-provoking as they are entertaining. The conference will examine the history and impact of religious and political themes, their relationship to audiences, and consider the future of such themes in all forms of sequential art narrative.

We invite papers that address religious and/or political themes in comic strips, comic books, graphic novels, or manga. Papers working at the interface of these two areas are particularly encouraged. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

- Comics as social, religious, political text
- Use of religious imagery and themes
- Fan culture
- Political cartoons and cartoonists
- Gothic comics
- Comics and magic
- Representation of politics, religion, spirituality
- Religious or political rhetoric of comics and their authors
- Myths, legends, fables
- Depiction of religious figures or politicians as comic characters
- Comics and science fiction
- Comics and propaganda
- Comics and conspiracy theories
- Representation of apocalypse, utopia, dystopia
- Representation of war
- Superheroes and religious, political identity
- Theoretical approaches to the study of religion, politics in comics

Contributions are sought from researchers at any stage of their careers. Abstracts (300 words) for papers 20 minutes in length should be sent with a short biography to Emily Laycock (Department of Politics, Philosophy & Religion) at e.laycock@lancaster.ac.uk

Deadline for abstracts: 31st May 2012

Please CONTACT for details: Emily Laycock e.laycock@lancaster.ac.uk

Website: http://www.lancs.ac.uk/fass/ppr/event/3960/

cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturereligionrhetoric_and_compositiontwentieth_century_and_beyond 45112CFP for Edited Collection: Primary Stein (Abstracts by May 15, 2012)Janet Boyd (Fairleigh Dickinson University) and Sharon Kirsch (Arizona State University)boydj@fdu.edu and sharon.kirsch@asu.edu1329256775americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespoetryrhetoric_and_compositiontheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Janet Boyd (Fairleigh Dickinson University) and Sharon Kirsch (Arizona State University)contact email: boydj@fdu.edu and sharon.kirsch@asu.edu

The overwhelming success of Gertrude Stein's The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas finally confirmed Stein's celebrity status in the United States in 1933. Yet she lamented that she had become known less as an important author than as the host of a Parisian salon in which famous writers and European painters gathered amidst her collection of modern art. Her earlier, more challenging writing continued to go unnoticed and unpublished despite the wide public appeal of the autobiography and the success of Virgil Thomson's production of Stein's opera Four Saints in Three Acts in 1934. Her growing popularity in the United States induced the reluctant Stein to return for a lecture tour through which she would introduce her more obscure work to an American audience—even if it meant having to explain it to them. As she tells us, she "want[ed] readers not collectors. . . she want[ed] her books read not owned" (Autobiography 301).

Even so, few scholars took serious interest in Stein before the mid-twentieth century, and, even then, the criticism that emerged tended to make Stein herself the main subject. In the later 1970s and throughout the 1980s, Stein's writing began to receive attention from a variety of scholars: those who sought to align her literary aims with the Cubist painters; feminists who read her work as a challenge to patriarchal language; and critics who examined Stein's writing as a more general subversion of the process of signification. In the 1990s, Stein criticism turned its focus to how her writing engages issues of American national and/or cultural identity. As Lisa Ruddick observes, "work in a cultural studies mode. . . moved the conversation about Stein's artistic innovations beyond a sense of her offering a challenge to patriarchy in the abstract" and into "larger cultural fields—fields defined by discourses of race and ethnicity" (Modern Fiction Studies 648).

Most recently, Stein the celebrity has re-emerged. Her life has again become the focus of scholarly inquiry in articles, books and exhibits: Stein's politics, Stein's friendships, Stein the collector, and Stein the visual icon. Popular interest in Stein has of late generated The Steins Collect museum exhibit, a children's book celebrating her writing, a novel told from the perspective of Stein and Toklas's Vietnamese cook, and Stein as a character in the Woody Allen film Midnight in Paris. In addition, Seeing Gertrude Stein, the companion book to the current exhibit of the same name, creates a cultural and visual portrait of Stein, rendering "a richly complex woman" whose "contradictions ran deep" (7). No doubt, these recent examinations enrich and complicate our understanding of Stein and of how we might read her work, as she implores us to do.

Here, in response to these current trends, we seek to assemble a collection of essays that turns the lens back on Stein's writing, in and across all genres in which she wrote. We are interested in scholarly essays that take Stein's primary works as their core analytical focus. We do not suggest jettisoning contextual approaches, but we do encourage inquiry into the writing itself, in all its historical trajectories and discursive iterations. Essays might ask what it is we learn from the tensions produced in Stein's work in order to expand fields of inquiry and transform the ways we can read, write about, and teach her writing.

The editors are pleased to report that this project has already received attention from a scholarly press. Please send abstracts of 500-700 words (final essays to range from 4,000-8,000 words), brief bios, and CVs to Janet Boyd (boydj@fdu.edu) and/or Sharon Kirsch (Sharon.Kirsch@asu.edu) by May 15, 2012. Queries are welcomed.
Possible topics (others are welcome):
Genre studies
Rhetoric
Linguistics
Formalism
Poetry
Drama
Autobiography
Travel writing
War narrative
Racial theory/identity
Queer theory
Gender/sexuality
Spatiality/temporality
Geography/landscape
National/ethnic identity
Political discourse
Post-colonialism
Advertising/public relations
Celebrity/fame
Humor
Pleasure

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespoetryrhetoric_and_compositiontheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 45114Marginal Women Modernists (October 18-21, Las Vegas)Modernist Studies Associationcharlessumner@hotmail.com1329281016modernist studiestwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Modernist Studies Associationcontact email: charlessumner@hotmail.com

This panel will examine the cultural politics that left notable modernist women writers on the periphery of literary history even as modernism evolved from a self-consciously marginal position to gain canonical status in academic circles.
Topics to consider include but are not limited to:
• The intersection of militant feminist and suffragette movements and avant-garde culture
• Feminist critiques of canonical modernism and its construction of the public sphere
• Affinities between supposed "cavemen" like Wyndham Lewis, T.E. Hulme, and Henry Miller and feminist discourses derived from works by Rebecca West, Kay Boyle, Laura Riding, Jane Bowles, Anaïs Nin, etc.
Please send 250-word abstracts to charlessumner@hotmail.com by April 1, 2012.

cfp categories: modernist studiestwentieth_century_and_beyond 45115The St. John's University Humanities Review - Call For Submissions DUE DATE MARCH 17thSt. John's Universitydanielle.lee10a@stjohns.edu1329284777african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositiontheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: St. John's Universitycontact email: danielle.lee10a@stjohns.edu

The St. John's Humanities Review is a graduate student-run journal at St John's University in New York City that publishes book reviews, essays, and interviews on a broad range of topics in the arts and humanities.

We seek scholarly essays, book reviews, and interviews under the broad heading of Nationalism: Roots and Transgressions. The focus is on the areas of national identity or transnationalism, acculturation, cultural diffusion, or culture shock. The approach may be primarily sociological and historical, or literary in nature.

Essays should be no longer than 25 pages and in Times New Roman 12 pt. font in MSWord and follow a citation system suitable to the pertinent discipline. Footnotes should be minimized, but use depends on the material.

DEADLINE: MARCH 17.
sjuhumanities@gmail.com

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositiontheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 45116Call for Papers - IJORCS - Volume 2, Issue 3International Journal of Research in Computer Scienceeditor@ijorcs.org, submission@ijorcs.org1329289931general_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysscience_and_culturetheoryfull name / name of organization: International Journal of Research in Computer Sciencecontact email: editor@ijorcs.org, submission@ijorcs.org

Call For Papers
International Journal of Research in Computer Science
eISSN: 2249 – 8265
ISSN: 2249 – 8257

Deadline: 1st April 2012
Notification: 18th April 2012
Revision: 23rd April 2012
Publication: 30th April 2012

It is our immense pleasure to invite you to submit manuscripts of your original paper for publication in International Journal of Research in Computer Sciences. IJORCS is a blind peer-reviewed periodical dedicated to the propagation and elucidation of scholarly research results. IJORCS promotes research work among young students and teachers and motivate them to carry out actual research work and publish their manuscripts. We also like to invite you to visit our website, www.ijorcs.org, where you can;

  • View complete list of topics covered by our journal
  • View aims, scope, editorial board of our journal

IJORCS is now accepting manuscripts for its next issue, Volume 2, Issue 3. Authors are encouraged to contribute to the journal by submitting articles that clarify new research results, projects, surveying works and industrial experiences that describe significant advances in field of computer science.

Topic Coverage

  • Ad Hoc networks
  • Autonomous and context-aware computing
  • Advanced Computing Architectures
  • BioInformatics & Biotechnology
  • Cloud Computing and Applications
  • Computational intelligence
  • Computer Architecture and Embedded Systems
  • Cryptography
  • Data Base Management
  • Data Mining Data
  • Digital signal processing theory
  • E-Commerce
  • Fuzzy algorithms & Fuzzy logics
  • Information Technology
  • Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
  • Image analysis and processing
  • Multimedia applications
  • Neural networks
  • Information and data security
  • Knowledge based systems
  • Medical imagin
  • Natural Language Processing
  • Real-time systems
  • Remote Sensing
  • Software Engineering
  • Supply Chain Management
  • Virtual reality
  • Wireless technology

For more topics visit, Call for Papers (http://www.ijorcs.org/topics)
Accepted papers will be published, and authors will be provided with printed copies of the issue.

All submitted papers will be judged on the basis of their quality by the Editorial Board, Anti-Plagiarism Board.(http://www.ijorcs.org/editorial-board)

All paper submissions (http://www.ijorcs.org/submit-paper) will be handled electronically and detailed instructions on submission procedure are available on IJORCS website (http://www.ijorcs.org/author-guidelines)

Papers that describe research and experimentation are encouraged.

cfp categories: general_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysscience_and_culturetheory 45117[UPDATE] Call for Articles - Submission Deadline, March 1Diesis: Footnotes on Literary Identitiessubmissions@diesisjournal.org1329313971african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Diesis: Footnotes on Literary Identitiescontact email: submissions@diesisjournal.org

Submission Deadline: March 1st, 2012

The Editorial Board of Diesis: Footnotes Literary Identities (ISSN 2161-3095), a journal of literary criticism particularly interested in giving voice to undergraduate and graduate students, is inviting submissions to its third issue.

Please send completed manuscripts of no less than 5,000 and no more than 10,000 words electronically to the Diesis Editorial Board at submissions@diesisjournal.org with "Submission: 2.2" and the title of your article as the subject line. Articles should conform to current MLA guidelines and be in a Word document format (.doc). Document titles should contain the name of your article. All articles should be written in footnote format. Lines should be double spaced, including quotations, and in 12 point Times New Roman with 1 inch margins. Pages should be numbered consecutively and should include a short title in the header. All articles should be written in or translated into English.

To facilitate blind review, please do not include any identifying information in your manuscript. Instead, provide your name, institution, manuscript title, and a brief biographical note in the body of your email. So that we may comply with copyright law, you must also confirm that your article has not been published and is not being considered for publication elsewhere.

Further information concerning submissions to Diesis: Footnotes Literary Identities can be found at www.diesisjournal.org/submissions. Inquiries about submissions should be directed to the Diesis Editorial Board at submissions@diesisjournal.org.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 45118Fumbling in the Greasy Till: Economics and Irish Literature Abstracts: May 15, 2012Amanda Sperry / Georgia State Universityasperry1@gsu.edu1329315390cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitypoetrytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Amanda Sperry / Georgia State Universitycontact email: asperry1@gsu.edu

Due to the recent global constriction of national economies, the impending debt crises of sovereign nations brings to the forefront the relationship between capital and culture. In Ireland, the Celtic Tiger has given way once again to a debt crisis akin to the one of the 1980s, and as austerity driven measures are demanded by the European Union, International Monetary Fund, and the European Central Bank the national economic crisis has drawn over 100,000 bodies into the streets of Dublin to protest. At such times, when banks receive "bailouts" and the Irish public receives austerity measures, there is a populist sentiment that the people who comprise the political and cultural nation are not the people who comprise the economic nation. In Ireland, literature is rife with images of economic exclusion especially from the Famine forward. This panel seeks to address the prevalence of economics in modern and contemporary Irish literature. Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words and a brief bio to asperry1@gsu.edu by May 15th, 2012. This panel will occur at the South Atlantic Modern Language Association's 2012 conference on November 9-11, 2012 in Durham, North Carolina. For conference details see SAMLA's website at samla.gsu.edu.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitypoetrytwentieth_century_and_beyond 45119Service Learning and Literary Studies in Colleges and UniversitiesModern Language Association Conventionrrosenb@cnu.edu1329315500eighteenth_centuryinternational_conferencesfull name / name of organization: Modern Language Association Conventioncontact email: rrosenb@cnu.edu

Service Learning and Literary Studies
Special Session at the Modern Language Association Convention, Boston, January 3-6, 2013
Service learning enriches and/or transforms the study of literature in the college and university curriculum while meeting community needs. Proposals should integrate theory and practice. 250 word abstract by 1 March 2012; Roberta Rosenberg (rrosenb@cnu.edu) and Laurie Grobman (leg8@psu.edu).

cfp categories: eighteenth_centuryinternational_conferences 451209th Global Conference: War, Civil Conflict, Security and Peace (November, 2012: Salzburg, Austria)Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netwar9@inter-disciplinary.net1329316914african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissancescience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: war9@inter-disciplinary.net

9th Global Conference
War, Civil Conflict, Security and Peace

Wednesday 7th November – Friday 9th November 2012
Salzburg, Austria

Call for Papers:

What is the experience of war and what does it mean to us? Is war an extension of politics by other means? The locomotive of technology? Does a state of peace truly exist, or do we perpetually live in absentia bello ? Is humankind at war in its most natural state; or is human society – despite perceptions and ongoing conflict around the world today – actually moving toward an aversion to war and toward a state of peace? Are Human Rights illusory and is the quest for Human Security achievable?

This inter-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary conference seeks to provide a challenging forum for the examination and evaluation of the nature, purpose and experience of war, and its impacts on all aspects of communities across the world.

Viewing war as a multi-layered phenomenon, this conference series invites committed academics, non-academic based professionals from all walks of life, including those from Military forces, serving or retired, Emergency, Aid and Development Organisations (IOs, International Non-Governmental Organisations (INGOs), NGOs and other Non-State Actors (NSAs) or Trans-National Social Movement(TNSMs), Commercial companies and corporate institutions, the public services, Faith based institutions, charities, the media, the medical professions, the arts and students in all related fields of interest, to explore the historical, legal, social, human, religious, economic, and political contexts of conflicts, and assess the place of nations, alliances, politics, the military, peace activism, science, academia, faith, the humanitarian sector, art, journalism, literature, music, the media and the internet in representation and interpretation of the experience of warfare.

In particular papers, workshops, reports, formed panels and presentations are invited on any of the following themes;

1. How do we Talk about War?
Portrayal, awareness, language and expression. How do we come to understand war in contemporary and historical cultures?

* The Language of modern contemporary warfare, the language of war in society, in the work space and popular culture; obscuration of conditions of being at 'war' and the condition of 'peace'.
* Militarization of society, propaganda, war toys, computer gaming; in fashion -'military chic'.
* Representing the realities of war versus 'national interest' – images of the heroism, glory, tacit and explicit justifications of war; the horror of war and societal responses.

2. Representations and Experiences
Viewing War as a multi-layered social phenomena.

* The individual experience of war, the impact of war, in protest; in the alleviation of the impacts of war and in peace building.
* Nations, Communities and individuals recovering from war, trauma, rehabilitation and nation building.
* The experience of war; art, literature, music, poetry, cinema and the theatre; the role of the media – journalism, radio, television, the internet; propaganda.
* The representations and experiences of protest.

3. History and Development of Warfare and War Fighting.
How have we fought and why. Lessons learned, mistakes repeated.

* Warfare in human history, revisionism and post-revisionism.
* The sources, origins, and causes of war; why and how do wars begin?
* Means and methods in war – land, sea, air, space, nuclear, chemical, biological; terror and terrorism; conventional and guerrilla warfare; civil war; 'total' warfare'. Where are the new 'battlespaces'?
* The nature of warfare; strategy and strategic thought; changes and the implications of changes in the ways wars are fought; the influence and effect of technologies; nuclear deterrence/compellance; changes in the nature and role of military personnel; information and information warfare.
* New and perceived 'Revolutions in Military Affairs'.

4. Extent, Conduct and Morality
Can war even be distinguished from peace, combatant from non-combatant, who are legitimate targets? The totalisation of war in modern society and culture.

* Where are we now? How has war pervaded our society and culture in everyday life?
* The extent of war; geo-political, physical; blockades, sanctions, defence expenditure and the impact on social and public policy; on social and human capital.
* The regulation and control of warfare; how is and should warfare be conducted? What are the limits of conflict? Are there any prohibitions in fighting a war?
* Globalization; the human, geographic, social and economic boundaries of war in the modern era.
* Resource warfare, food, water, oil and mineral wealth, challenges in the 21st century.
* International Humanitarian Law and Conflict.

5. Human Rights and Human Security
Have the means and methods in war, finally outpaced International law and norms of behaviour? What protection is available? If truth is the first casualty in war, is human rights the second?

* Human security issues; protection, shelter, economic security; public health.
* Human rights; protection, promotion and abuses; genocide, ethnic cleansing; terrorism; scorched earth; war crimes; crimes against humanity.
* The Humanitarian space in conflict.
* Armed non-state actors, roles, practices and regulation.
* Gender and Race in War and Peace.

6. The Boundaries of War
How far will humankind push the limits of acceptable behaviour and practice in war?

* The 'morality' and the 'ethics' of war; just war; deterrence; pre-emptive war; defence and self-defence; the influence of nationalism; the place of human rights; societies and the military; increases in moral sensibilities – qualms about carpet bombing, collateral damage; the status of combatants in warfare, the impact of civilians; neutrality.
* War and religion; the important role of religion, the church, and the intellectual elite in multi-ethnic conflict specifically and in war in general; just war, jihad and crusade.
* War and gender; women in war; impact, abuses, role in war as combatants and in peace building. Gender equality issues and peace building, cultures of violence in society propagating conflict.
* Children and war, child soldiers, trauma, exposure, conditioning, propaganda, bereavement, expression though play, art and behaviour.
* Slavery and war; past, present and future; unwilling combatants, from janissaries to mamelukes, to conscripts and child soldiers.
* Resistance under occupation, where collaboration ends and resistance begins? Forms of resistance.

7. Prevention and Peacebuilding
Can we give peace a chance? Viewing war as un-natural, preventable within a variety of frameworks. The legal mechanisms and the trans-national social movements 'waging peace'.

* Peace building; means and methods; negative peace and building a positive peace; war-termination and nation-building.
* The prevention of war; the role of conflict resolution; avoiding war; peace-keeping; the role and importance of law and international legal order; the rise and impact of non-violent movements.
* The effectiveness of Supra-National, Trans-National and International organsiations in conflict prevention, mediation and resolution.
* Peace and Balances of Power.
* Disarmament and Arms Control.
* Conscientious objection, alternative service.
* The Peace Movement.

8. The Role of Non-state Actors and NGOs in War and Post-conflict.
Breaking the state conundrum, participation in relief from the depredations of war, alleviating the suffering, advocacy from theatres of war. Or compromising humanitarian Aid? Force multipliers? Abrogating combatant's responsibilities toward their populations.

* History: The Quakers to the Red Cross and beyond.
* NGOs, the 'third space' actors in the relief of the impact of warfare, aid and development programmes, refugees and IDPs, child soldiers, landmines / cluster munitions; small arms light weapons (SALW/DDR), Depleted Uranium (DU), NGOs prolonging conflict by abrogating state and combatants responsibilities in time of conflict.
* Armed non-state actors. Terrorists? Freedom fighters? Private security companies and forces. Mercenaries in the modern world.

9. Future War: Revolutions in Military Affairs – Emerging Types of Warfare.
Be afraid, be very afraid. Are there no limits to mans inhumanity to man?

* Cyber-war Virtual war; cyber-terrorism; cyber-power, cyber-war; computer technologies in the conduct of war.
* Technology leaps – acquiring WMD.
* Space war – fantasy or an emerging reality? Issue in the militarisation and weaponisation of space.
* Bio-warfare: gene warfare; the genetic codes of agriculture and livestock as targets in war
* Economic warfare in a Globalised world.

The Steering Group particularly welcomes the submission of pre-formed panel proposals. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 4th May 2012. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 3rd August 2012.

300 word abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to both Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract, f) up to 10 keywords.
E-mails should be entitled: WAR Abstract Submission.

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). Please note that a Book of Abstracts is planned for the end of the year.
All accepted abstracts will be included in this publication. We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Joint Organising Chairs:
Graeme Goldsworthy
Webster University and the Hague Centre for Strategic Studies (HCSS),
The Netherlands
Email: graeme@inter-disciplinary.net

Rob Fisher
Network Founder and Leader, Inter-Disciplinary.Net
Freeland, Oxfordshire,
United Kingdom
Email: war9@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the Probing the Boundaries programme of research projects. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and exciting.

For further details of the project, please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/hostility-and-v...

For further details of the conference, please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/hostility-and-v...

Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissancescience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 45121Transition and Transformation in Medieval and Early Modern CulturesDurham MEMSA (Medieval and Early Modern Student Association)imrs.mrpdg@durham.ac.uk1329317981bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalpopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytravel_writingfull name / name of organization: Durham MEMSA (Medieval and Early Modern Student Association)contact email: imrs.mrpdg@durham.ac.uk

Transition and Transformation in Medieval and Early Modern Cultures

Durham University, 5-6 July 2012

Keynote Speakers: Professor David Cowling, Institute of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Durham and Professor Margaret Cormack, College of Charleston, South Carolina

The Medieval and Early Modern Student Association of Durham University is holding its annual interdisciplinary conference for postgraduates and early career researchers and seeks papers on the theme of "Transition and Transformation in Medieval and Early Modern Cultures". Attached please find the complete call for papers.

The conference will also feature a special exhibition of the Durham manuscript collection by Professor Richard Gameson, to be hosted in Durham Cathedral, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

This year's Medieval & Early Modern Student Association conference will explore the liminal and transformative aspects of the medieval and Early Modern periods in a multidisciplinary forum. We welcome abstracts from postgraduates and early career researchers working in the fields of archaeology, history, literature, theology, art, music, and culture. Presentation topics may include, but are not limited to:

--Linguistic change and textual transformation
--The parameters between the terrestrial and the celestial
--The historical effects of transition and transformation
--Appropriation and evolution in genres of narrative
--Fluctuating boundaries and perceptions in landscape
--Agency and motivation for innovation
--(Dis)continuities between orthodoxy and heterodoxy
--Shifts in material culture and images of transformation

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words to imrs.mrpdg@durham.ac.uk by no later than 31 March, 2012. Registration for attendance and the conference banquet will be sent in May.

For more information please visit our blog: https://durhammemsa.wordpress.com/ follow us on twitter: https://twitter.com/durhammemsa look at our website: http://www.dur.ac.uk/imrs/memsa/ or email us: imrs.mrpdg@durham.ac.uk

cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalpopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytravel_writing 45122Cultural Equity: The Politics of Folklore, Archives, and DigitizationMeredith McCarroll/Clemson Universitymmccarr@clemson.edu1329318883african-americanamericanethnicity_and_national_identityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturetravel_writingfull name / name of organization: Meredith McCarroll/Clemson Universitycontact email: mmccarr@clemson.edu

SAMLA Panel, November 9-11, 2012, Durham, NC
Throughout his lifetime of travelling to collect and record folk traditions, Alan Lomax developed a devotion to what he called "cultural equity"—a conceptual leveling of cultures made available to all who are interested. As Lomax's collection at the Library of Congress goes public after a long digitization process, the promise of access to all is becoming a reality. This panel investigates the role of the archivist/folklorist as well at the impact of digitization on collections like Lomax'. We are particularly interested in interdisciplinary approaches to the questions raised here. We seek article interested in, but not limited to:
• The role of the folklorist
• The uses of archives by writers, musicians, and scholars
• The implications of digitization
• Alan Lomax as collector
Please submit abstracts of 200-300 words to Meredith McCarroll at Clemson University via mmccarr@clemson.edu by March 15. Please note if you are also interested in being considered for a developing collection for publication.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanethnicity_and_national_identityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturetravel_writing 45123CFP Graduate Journal: The Word HoardWord Hoard: A new interdisciplinary journal from the University of Western Ontario English Graduate Societywordhoard.editors@gmail.com1329325174african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialtheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Word Hoard: A new interdisciplinary journal from the University of Western Ontario English Graduate Societycontact email: wordhoard.editors@gmail.com

The editors at Word Hoard, a new interdisciplinary journal at the University of Western Ontario, are pleased to announce our inaugural issue. We are seeking submissions of between 3000 and 5000 words related to the interwoven ideas of Community and Dissent. Topics may examine multiple historical periods of literature, cultural studies, philosophy, or theoretical thought. Submissions are due 5 March 2012, addressed to wordhoard.editors@gmail.com; include a brief biographical sketch and an abstract of 150 words, but don't include your name on the submission itself. Please see the attached Call for Papers for further details.

Conceivable subjects could include the following:

Communitas: canon, coterie, salon, school, church, parliament. What makes a community? How do we know? Perhaps most importantly, how do we represent community spaces?

Individuality, individuation, individualism: how do we understand ourselves as identities working with or against others? Is self-expression dissent?

Social activism: just words, or critical articulation? What does it mean to be an activist or a public intellectual? Can we not be involved in society? Rebels without a cause?

Language, translation, diaspora: what does it mean to cross borders? Can we migrate between ideologies of science, culture, religion, business, the arts?

Exile and the imagined community: questions of national or familial boundaries. Can we feel like exiles in our own place of origin? Lost homes, ghost/Geist towns, war zones. How do we
represent groups formed from a basis in dissent?

Social realism and historical narrative: is the novel, the chronicle, the local history a community building force? Stories of hometown heroes and home-grown terrorists.

The place of speaking: where in society is the artist, the writer, the poet? Do our artists work to support and enrich our daily lives, or is the artist's task one of challenge, conscience, dissent?

Bodies, inconvenient bodies: we can't get rid of them. How do our embodied selves (sexually, sensually, grotesquely) function in the space of culture and the fabric of community?

Aesthetics and the public: From the well-wrought urn to the epic poem, how does a community bildungsroman, if such a thing exists, find worth in gathering around art objects?

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialtheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 45124Journal of the Sylvia Townsend Warner Society 20 September 2012The Sylvia Townsend Warner SocietyHelen.Sutherland@glasgow.ac.uk1329325481gender_studies_and_sexualityjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: The Sylvia Townsend Warner Societycontact email: Helen.Sutherland@glasgow.ac.uk

Articles on any aspect of the life and work of Sylvia Townsend Warner are invited for the 2012 issue of the Journal of the Sylvia Townsend Warner Society.
Contributions should be no more than 5000 words long, and be emailed to the editor by 20 September 2012.
Further information is available from the editor at Helen.Sutherland@glasgow.ac.uk or from The Sylvia Townsend Warner Society at http://www.townsendwarner.com

cfp categories: gender_studies_and_sexualityjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrytwentieth_century_and_beyond 45125CFP: Solitary Spectacles: (MSA: Las Vegas, Oct. 18-21, 2012). Submissions due March 23.Kerry Higgins Wendt/ Modernist Studies Associationkerry.wendt@emory.edu1329325750interdisciplinarymodernist studiestheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Kerry Higgins Wendt/ Modernist Studies Associationcontact email: kerry.wendt@emory.edu

Solitary Spectacles

Proposed Panel for the Modernist Studies Association's 14th Conference, "Modernism and Spectacle," October 18-21, 2012, in Las Vegas.

Modernist writers experimented to find both the essence and the furthest limits of their genres, as well as how their genres intersected with each other and with the other arts. This panel will investigate how modernist writers used spectacle within genres that normally don't lend themselves to spectacle: in what ways, to what ends, and to what effects did Modernist writers use spectacle (theatrical, painterly, or musical means) in their novels and poems – in works understood to be usually read silently and solitarily?

Please send an abstract of about 300 words to kerry.wendt@emory.edu by March 23, 2012. Include your name, paper title, institutional affiliation, discipline, position or title, contact information, a 2-3 sentence scholarly biography, and any requests for AV.

Please note that this is a proposed panel; accepted papers will be proposed as part of a panel to the MSA.

cfp categories: interdisciplinarymodernist studiestheatretwentieth_century_and_beyond 45126Queer (In)Security @ UC Davis May 3-4 | DEADLINE March 15UC Davis Militarization and Gender Research Cluster and Queer, Feminist, Trans Studies Research Clusterqueermilitarizationsymposium@gmail.com1329326194african-americanamericanethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturepostcolonialtheoryfull name / name of organization: UC Davis Militarization and Gender Research Cluster and Queer, Feminist, Trans Studies Research Clustercontact email: queermilitarizationsymposium@gmail.com

The Militarization and Gender Research Cluster and the Queer, Feminist, Trans Studies Research Cluster of UC Davis are pleased to announce a joint conference, "Queer (In)Security," to be held May 3-4, 2012 at the University of California, Davis.

The conference topic emerges from campus-wide discussions about the role of a militarized police force on the UC campuses, highlighted by violent responses to the Occupy movement. At the same time, the neoliberal university, precipitated by budget cuts and calls for privatization, has destabilized institutional forms of resistance like queer studies, women's studies, and ethnic studies.

As the US declares the "end" to the war in Iraq, and responds to crises in increasingly neoliberal and militarized ways, we want to interrogate the definition of security itself. What does it mean to be secure -- at home? on campus? as a nation? How does the financial crisis -- based, in part, on toxic financial instruments that were vetted as "secure" -- create a more insecure world for all of us? How does the discourse of security regulate gendered bodies and produce precarious conditions for many?

In this light, the conference interrogates the intersections between Queer Studies/queer theory, policing, and surveillance. Areas of inquiry include the policing of differently gendered bodies, the (in)security of Queer Studies within the academy, and the role of the police on a university campus. We invite scholarship from a broad range of disciplines, especially interdisciplinary work in queer theory and transgender theory that critically engages mutually constitutive articulations of race, class, sexuality, ability, gender, citizenship, religion, and nationality. Papers that engage activism and community organizing are particularly welcome.

We invite proposals for papers, workshops, or performances. Undergraduate submissions are also encouraged.

This year's keynote speaker is:

Elizabeth Povinelli (Columbia University, Anthropology and Gender Studies)

Elizabeth Povinelli's work focuses on "developing a critical theory of late liberalism that would support an anthropology of the otherwise." Her most recent book, Economies of Abandonment: Social Belonging and Endurance in Late Liberalism (2011) presents new ways of conceptualizing formations of power in late liberalism—the shape that liberal governmentality has taken as it has responded to a series of legitimacy crises in the wake of anticolonial and new social movements and, more recently, the "clash of civilizations" after September 11. Based on longstanding ethnographic work in Australia and the United States, as well as critical readings of legal, academic, and activist texts, Povinelli examines how alternative social worlds and projects generate new possibilities of life in the context of ordinary and extraordinary acts of neglect and surveillance. (Duke University Press)

Possible topics include (but are not limited to):
● Reframing the issue of campus safety and security
● The role of protest/occupy movements on campuses
● International students and student activism
● Military recruitment on campuses
● Hate crimes: student and official responses
● Policing of transbodies in single-sex institutions
● The body and science
● Feminization of prison populations
● Gendering of prison spaces
● The discourse of occupation
● Occupy/Decolonize Movements
● Security culture in activist communities
● Anti-security activism
● Social & Financial Security
● War on Terror after Iraq
● security and the home

If you are interested in presenting, sharing, or discussing, please send an email to: queermilitarizationsymposium@gmail.com and indicate whether you would like to:

1. present a paper (if so, please include a word document (.doc) with a title and brief abstract (250 words max)

2. share your work-in-progress in a roundtable workshop (if so, please summarize your line of inquiry or interests in 250 words max), or

3. present a performance (if so, please include a title, brief description of performance and website if applicable)

Submissions deadline: March 15, 2012.
Notifications will be emailed during the first week of April.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturepostcolonialtheory 45127 Call for Papers - Panel: Digital Transitions, 28-30 June, 2012, Cork, IrelandComparative Literature Association of Irelandnina.shiel3@mail.dcu.ie1329326672humanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencestheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Comparative Literature Association of Irelandcontact email: nina.shiel3@mail.dcu.ie

Call for Papers
Panel: Digital Transitions

Comparative Literature Association of Ireland, First International Conference, Transitions in Comparative Studies; 28-30 June 2012, University College Cork, Ireland

In the wake of the explosive arrival of the internet and associated new media in the general public consciousness and use during the past decade, comparatists find themselves presented with a vast number of new possibilities, but also with new challenges. Visual art is no longer confined to forms such as painting and sculpture, but can now also be produced digitally. Virtual worlds call for questions about our understanding of space. Electronic literature weaves word and image together in new, innovative ways. New forms of storytelling take place in video games, on interactive websites and on social media. As an example, in 2010, the Royal Shakespeare Company, together with the production company Mudlark, staged a modern adaptation of Romeo and Juliet on the micro-blogging site Twitter.

Despite the surge of such experimentations and developments, the comparative field has been slow to respond to them. Cultural and communication studies have addressed the digital worlds, but literary studies in particular have mostly refrained from engaging with them. This panel situates the encounter of the digital by/with/in literary scholarship in the wider context of intermediality, with its issues and challenges.

This panel welcomes papers on both theory and practice of digital intermediality. It invites comparative analyses of intermedial works such as interactive narratives, video/online games, electronic literature or digital art, or the representation of the above in literature. Equally, it encourages more theoretical approaches to the topic. Examples of potential frameworks might include applications of narratology, relationship between word and image, space theory, the role of comparative literature in digital studies, and issues of availability and approachability of the digital world.

Please submit your abstract of 300 words and a short biography to Ms Nina Shiel at nina.shiel3@mail.dcu.ie by 16 March 2012. More information about the conference is available at http://www.complit.org/cfp.html .

cfp categories: humanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencestheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 45128[UPDATE] AWP 2013 - The End of Postmodernism in the Digital AgeRuben Quesadarubenquesada@gmail.com1329327003americanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Ruben Quesadacontact email: rubenquesada@gmail.com

Seeking proposals for a panel (& book project) on "The End of Postmodernism in the Digital Age." I am interested in a broad spectrum of approaches focusing on creative writing, including: poetry, fiction, nonfiction, drama, and film. I welcome abstracts from convergent and divergent perspectives.

Concept: In reaction to the Modernist objective reality, the postmodern movement championed the subjective voice. Exemplified by poets like Allen Ginsberg, Robert Hayden, Sylvia Plath, and Adrienne Rich, these poets opened the door for what was anachronistically a multicultural perspective. Though, creative writing has evolved into what it originally intended to react against with a distinctive subjective trait now dominating the literary experience. The splintering of the subjective voice in the Digital Age of late-twentieth century writing now reflects the abundant populace of global identities, but it fails to present an objective reality of the contemporary human condition. The subjective voice marginalizes the ordinary, quotidian human experience that flourishes between life and death.

A writer must remember that she/he is one among billions on this planet and therefore must embody this global sensibility when presenting their view of humanity.

Contact: rubenquesada [at] gmail [dot] com

cfp categories: americanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 45129[UPDATE] Composting Culture ASLE-UKI 2012 ConferenceAssociation for the Study of Literature and Environmentj.parham@worc.ac.uk1329327620cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialromanticscience_and_culturetheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Association for the Study of Literature and Environmentcontact email: j.parham@worc.ac.uk

Composting Culture: Literature, Nature, Popular Culture, Science – ASLE – UKI Biennial Conference, Wednesday 5th – Friday 7th September 2012

The website for this conference is now online with registration details to follow: www.worcester.ac.uk/compostingculture . Please note revised conference dates. The deadline for proposals for papers is 29th February 2012.

Keynote speakers include:
Thierry Bardini, Université de Montréal, author of Junkware, examining 'junk' in nature (DNA) and culture (science fiction) alike.
Jed Rasula, Helen S. Lanier Distinguished Professor at the University of Georgia, author of This Compost: Ecological Imperatives in American Poetry.
Molly Scott-Cato, University of Wales Institute, Cardiff, Green Party UK Speaker on Economics, author of Green Economics.

About the Conference:
ASLE-UKI – the UK-Ireland branch of the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment – invites proposals for its 2012 biennial conference. The conference will take place between Wednesday 5th – Sunday 9th September, 2012 at the University of Worcester, supported by the University's Institute of Humanities and Creative Arts.

Recent work in ecocriticism largely recognises the complexity of ecological science and philosophy and its social and political dimensions. This has resulted in an increased emphasis on paradigms and perspectives that embrace that complexity: posthumanism; biosemiotics; discordance; consilience etc. Consequently, with regard to its objects of study, ecocriticism might increasingly be characterised as a multidisciplinary act of ecological intervention that has fermented an array of possible reference points – globalisation, science, neuroscience, spirituality etc – into an expanding range of cultural texts, stretching far beyond the literary canon of romantic nature writing that shaped ecocriticism in its early years.

This conference will explore the extent to which correspondences between more complex ecological understanding and cultural forms might be evident, most particularly, in non-canonical texts, or previously unexplored linkages between theories and texts, or in the upcycling of established literary or cultural forms, movements, writers etc. Conceptualised by Jed Rasula as a process of composting where 'interanimating tendencies' converge into the possible emergence 'of newness, of the unpredicted', this 'nutritive sensibility' has recently traversed cultural theory and practice: in Harriet Tarlo's identification of a conjunction between experimental poetics and radical landscape poetry; in the 'new nature writing' of 'Edgelands' (Paul Farley and Michael Symmons Roberts), or places like Essex, which acknowledges the blurring of human-nonhuman, rural and urban; even in popular culture, for example in a recognition of technology's perhaps paradoxical ability to inculcate both deep ecological awareness and a scientific sense of nature as process (as aspired to in Bjork's recent Biophilia project).
Along these lines, we now invite papers and proposals that can offer, most particularly, a focus on hitherto neglected or unexplored interconnections between authors, texts, genres, and cultural forms. These might relate, but are not restricted to, the following themes:

-Recycling, composting, fermenting, or junk as cultural tropes
-'New nature writing'
-Green media and popular culture
-Posthumanism
-Biosemiotics and Zoosemiotics
-Ecological discordance or complexity
-The canon and ideas of cultural value etc
-Environmental (in)justice
-Toxicity -Consilience: ecological science and cultural/literary texts
-New perspectives on Romanticism
-Ecopoetics/landscape poetry
-Postcolonialism or globalisation
-Biotechnology and ecotechnology
-'Edgelands'
-Rhetoric, metaphor or narrative
-Nature, post-nature, 'second nature'
-'Social Ecologies of the Imagination'

Individual papers should be 20 minutes. Please send a title and 250 word abstract to David Arnold: d.arnold@worc.ac.uk and John Parham j.parham@worc.ac.uk by the deadline, Wednesday 29 February 2012. Further details – including registration costs and accommodation – will be posted here in the Spring. Our intention is to offer video conferencing, allowing for the participation of international delegates unable or reluctant to travel.

Further information:
The conference is to be located in the historic City of Worcester and accommodation will be reserved at one of the University's two campuses. The University is in easy reach of diverse landscapes: the Geopark Way, which explores 700 million years of geological history; or the River Severn floodplain grasslands and rare meadows. Considering the interaction between human settlement and environment, one might take a walk on the Worcester and Birmingham canal; or visit the Malvern Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty with its rich acid grassland and grazing sites, views of the Welsh Marches, iron-age earthworks, commons, and ancient semi-natural woodlands; or the local ancient orchards maintained by volunteers. With this in mind, at least one half day excursion, with a choice of locations, will be included in the conference schedule. There will also be a conference dinner at The Fold, a local eco café and arts and design centre, and the focus for a range of activities relating to sustainable development.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialromanticscience_and_culturetheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 45130Poetry, Community, and Formal InnovationMeta DuEwa Jones and Chad Bennett, The University of Texas at Austintiltspoetsandscholars@gmail.com1329328723african-americangender_studies_and_sexualitymodernist studiespoetrytheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Meta DuEwa Jones and Chad Bennett, The University of Texas at Austincontact email: tiltspoetsandscholars@gmail.com

Poetry, Community, and Formal Innovation

This proposed university press collection, inspired by and developed from a year-long series of poetry readings and poetics symposia at the University of Texas at Austin, will investigate form and formal innovation in and across diverse poetic communities and traditions. In the 1980s, some feminist, queer, and African-American poets spoke of traditional poetic form as "the master's tools," in Audre Lorde's memorable phrase. Debates within feminist, queer, and multi-ethnic studies about the nature of traditional formal artistry, formal "mastery," and experimentalism have evolved since that time. The new ways that various communities of writers continue to redefine both poetic form and social identity have allowed other, often generative perspectives on the status of form. At the same time, the now well established contributions of the last decades' major critical movements—ranging from post-structuralism to cultural studies to New Historicism—together make possible an integrated kind of scholarship, one attentive to poetics and politics in strong, mutual relation. We seek to engage and extend recent critical and creative work on community and poetic practice, and welcome proposals for essays that explore community as both a set of material and social practices and an aesthetic category. Emphasis will go to the poetry of the present, but we expect that will require strong engagement with literary pasts.

The collection will reflect intersections of poetic and scholarly communities; it will include poems, interviews, and roundtable discussions as well as scholarly essays. We especially welcome proposals for essays that innovate within that genre or integrate elements of others.

Possible topics include (but are not limited to):

—new definitions of form, formalism, and/or formal innovation
—influences of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and/or sexuality on formal choices and practices
—poetic forms within and across distinctive ethnic cultural traditions (e.g. the ghazal, bop, blues, décima)
—histories, reclaimings, and futures of particular received forms
—community and social practices as a source of form
—poetic practices, forms, and traditions associated with particular contemporary or historic poetry communities (e.g. Cave Canem, VONA, Nuyorican Poets Collective, Cante Mundo)
—poetic form and affective histories, or form and counter-archives
—poetries of witness, speaking for communities (others' or one's own)
—translation, including translation of forms; translation and diasporic or transnational poetics
—the poet-scholar
—new media and formal innovation; digital communities and digital poetries

Please send abstracts of up to 500 words and an abbreviated (two page) vita by June 15 to Meta DuEwa Jones and Chad Bennett at tiltspoetsandscholars@gmail.com.

cfp categories: african-americangender_studies_and_sexualitymodernist studiespoetrytheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 45131Echo/LogicsMedia Fields Journalsubmissions@mediafieldsjournal.org1329329964cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfilm_and_televisioninterdisciplinarypopular_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Media Fields Journalcontact email: submissions@mediafieldsjournal.org

Media Fields: Echo/Logics
Submission Deadline: April 15th, 2012
http://www.mediafieldsjournal.org/

Media Fields Journal is pleased to announce a forthcoming special issue dedicated to sound and space. Sound, discussed by thinkers as diverse as Theodor Adorno, Michel Chion, and Jonathan Sterne, has recently emerged as a crucial site for interdisciplinary examinations of media. Caught within disciplinary boundaries, sound runs the risk of becoming restricted; music is divorced from non-music, and noise, as a chaotic force, stands outside or disrupts either system. By asking how sound constructs, expands, and transforms space, we invite contributions from across disciplines, cultures, and media platforms that explore the wide range of sound's intersections with spatial studies. The title of our issue invokes the Greek myth of Echo to emphasize the nymph's ability not to sound, but to re-sound or reverberate. What is the relationship between sounding and resounding, spontaneous occurrence and recorded sound?

We are interested both in historical treatments that examine innovations in sound technology and in the theoretical and aesthetic analysis of aural montage, rhythm, and synchronicity/asynchronicity. We also seek to include works that address the construction of ideological and geographical boundaries through language and voice. Contributors are invited to explore acoustic architecture and ecology, and to examine how sound mediates our relationship with our immediate environment. In this issue, we want to engage lasting questions in film and cultural studies regarding the voice as embodied signifier, the gendered primacy of visuality, or ocular-centrism, in media, and the role of sound as interruption or subversion.

We hope the issue will reflect the following questions and areas of interest, without becoming limited by them:

Does the study of sound cause a rethinking of space and time? If, following Henri Lefèbvre, rhythm comes from the interaction of a time, a place, and an expenditure of energy, does its quantification affect linear history? How does oral history restructure archival thinking? How are sound, the city, and architecture connected, and what is the role of noise pollution?

How do different sound technologies construct viewing space? How is viewing space constructed by live music or commentary (piano/orchestral accompaniment, benshi, live-tweeting, etc.)? How is sound embodied in space (the human voice)? How does recording the voice shift our understanding of language as embodiment? How do voices construct political or geographic space (speeches at protest events, GPS navigations systems)?

Does the history of animation require a different approach to the question of sound, particularly when visuals are synchronized to pre-existing sound? How have alternative animation traditions referencing sound as "visual music" been linked to sound technologies?
Submissions might also address the role of new technologies of sound recording, distribution, editing, and storage, as well as fan-constructed alternative soundtracks and official DVD commentary tracks.

We invite essays of 1500-2500 words, digital art projects, and audio or video interviews exploring possible relations between sound and space. We encourage approaches to this topic from scholars in cinema and media studies, anthropology, architecture, art and art history, communication, geography, musicology, sociology, and other fields.

Feel free to contact issue co-editors, Maria Corrigan and Diana Pozo, with proposals and inquiries. Email submissions, proposals, and inquiries to submissions@mediafieldsjournal.org

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfilm_and_televisioninterdisciplinarypopular_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 45132Special issue of Frontiers--Reproductive Technologies and Reproductive Justice. Deadline 6/15/12Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studiesfrontiers@osu.edu1329336129cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysfull name / name of organization: Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studiescontact email: frontiers@osu.edu

Frontiers: A Journal of Women's Studies invites submissions for a special issue on reproductive technologies and reproductive justice. In commemoration of the fortieth anniversary of Roe v. Wade and the legacies of that decision, we welcome scholarly and creative works that analyze the contested terrains of reproduction in local, national, or transnational contexts. We are especially interested in the intersections between varied technologies to regulate, manage, or facilitate reproduction (e.g. abortion, contraception, surrogacy, population control, reproductive health, adoption), and claims for reproductive justice. We encourage submissions that conceptualize reproductive issues in broad terms, and which further the journal's commitment to scholarship on women of color, third world and transnational women's movements, and gender and race.

An inter- and multidisciplinary journal, Frontiers welcomes submissions of creative works such as artwork, fiction, and poetry, as well as scholarly papers. Works must be original, and not published or under consideration for publication elsewhere. For submission guidelines, please consult the websites sponsored by the University of Nebraska Press and Arizona State University, where Frontiers is currently housed:
http://www.nebraskapress.unl.edu/product/Frontiers,673226.aspx
http://www.asu.edu/clas/asuhistory2/frontiers/

All special issue submissions and questions should be directed to frontiers@osu.edu. The guest editor for this special issue, Mytheli Sreenivas, and the new editors of Frontiers, Guisela Latorre and Judy Tzu-Chun Wu also can be reached at the following address:
Editors of Frontiers
Department of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Ohio State University
286 University Hall
230 North Oval Mall
Columbus, OH 43210

Submission Date for Special Issue: June 15, 2012
All other submissions, not related to the Special Issue, should be directed to Arizona State University before May 11, 2012. After May 12, 2012, all submissions should be sent to Ohio State University.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essays 45133[UPDATE] Anxieties and InnovationsUniversity of Rhode Island Graduate English Departmenturigradconference@etal.uri.edu1329344045americanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: University of Rhode Island Graduate English Departmentcontact email: urigradconference@etal.uri.edu

Innovations and Anxieties
Saturday, March 31, 2012

A graduate conference hosted by the Graduate Program in English at the University of Rhode Island (Kingston, RI)

Innovations cross a multitude of interdependent fields: aesthetic, scientific, technological, historical, informational, educational, political, and ethical. Across these fields, innovation cleaves fault lines between, for instance, the hope for cosmopolitan betterment and the politico-economic success of an isolated few; between the possible formation of open, more egalitarian social relations and the breakdown or deformation of normative modes of relation; between the anticipation of solutions to pressing problems and the inequalities, violences, and injustices caused by these solutions. This year the URI Graduate Conference title, Innovations and Anxieties, captures the dynamic negotiations that are and have been possible within and across these fault lines. We ask:

●What have innovations enabled or disabled?
●What traces or tracks do innovations leave behind?
●What sort of futures might innovation prefigure?
●What histories or continuities will have been possible in the wake of innovation?
●How might innovations inspire praise and critique, hope and fear, promise and imbalance, progress and diversion, quietude and combat, tranquility and anxiety?

We invite graduate students to submit papers, panels, or creative works that attend to these and other questions in a variety of fields: history, film, philosophy, languages, literature, political science, rhetoric and composition, communications, cultural studies, psychology, sociology, anthropology, biology, medicine, women's studies, technology, visual and media studies, library and information studies, (though not limited to these fields).

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:
●adaptation, serialization
●digital humanities
●gender and transexuality
●digitization
●workplace technologies
●robotics, cyborgs
●social networking
●citizen journalism
●scientific breakthrough
●globalization
●sustainability
●cybernetics
●revolution
●disability technologies
●multiliteracies
●online media
●textiles and manufacturing
●neuroscience, medical innovation
●graphic novels, web comics
●outsourcing
●transnationalism
●cosmopolitanism
●information sharing
●artificial intelligence
●organic, local movements
●E-books
●E-learning
●critical theories
●architecture, planning design
●modernization, invention

INDIVIDUAL PAPERS: Please submit an abstract of 250-350 words. Include full name, title of your work, contact info, a brief bio, and institutional affiliation.

PANEL PROPOSALS: Please submit abstracts of 250-350 words for each presentation/presenter. A panel will consist of 3-4 presenters. In addition to the required contact and biographical information, please include title of the panel on each submission. You may choose to provide your own panel chair.

CREATIVE SUBMISSIONS: We welcome proposals for creative works, including creative writing, visual art, music, video production, and dramatic performance. Please submit an abstract of 250-350 words describing your project and its connection to the conference theme, as well as the required contact and biographical information.

SUBMISSION DIRECTIONS: Please submit all abstracts and proposals via our website at www.urigradconference.org by clicking on the Submit Your Abstract link. Direct all questions regarding submissions and conference details to urigradconference@etal.uri.edu. Visit our website at www.urigradconference.org for more information.

**DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF PROPOSALS IS WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2012**

cfp categories: americanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 45134CFP Edited Collection: Southern Gothic; 3/1 Queries; 3/15 AbstractsJay Ellis / University of Coloradojay.ellis@colorado.edu1329357863americanjournals_and_collections_of_essaysfull name / name of organization: Jay Ellis / University of Coloradocontact email: jay.ellis@colorado.edu

CFP for Edited Collection: Southern Gothic

• Target audience of advanced High School to College classrooms, some graduate-level and scholars (i.e. keep the jargon down, a good idea anyway).
• One 5,000-word "Cultural and Historical Context" chapter on Southern Gothic fiction, connections to contemporary culture welcome.
• One 5,000-word "Critical Reception" chapter surveying major criticism and major aspects of Southern Gothic.
• One 5,000-word "Compare and Contrast" chapter on two to three works by different authors, contrast especially welcome here (ex. a lesser-known work connected to one firmly fitting the genre, or connection of solidly Gothic novel(s) to a long-arc television series or film).
• Nine 7,000-word essays of literary criticism, each centering on an individual author, multiple works okay, or book and film okay.
• If interested in any of the 5,000-word chapters, please query first _with C.V._.

Regards,

Jay Ellis
University of Colorado

cfp categories: americanjournals_and_collections_of_essays 45135ATHE Theatre History Focus Group Debut Panel CFPAmerican Association for Theatre in Higher Education Theatre History Focus Groupcmcivor@scu.edu1329360281african-americanamericanclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespostcolonialreligionrenaissancetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: American Association for Theatre in Higher Education Theatre History Focus Groupcontact email: cmcivor@scu.edu

ATHE
Theatre History Focus Group
Debut Panel 2012

The Theatre History Focus Group (THFG) of the Association for Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE) invites submissions for its debut panel from scholars who have neither published articles nor previously presented at ATHE. The deadline for submissions is March 15, 2012.

Papers must address the history of theatre practice, but the parameters are broad. Active engagement with historiographical methodologies, theory, and/or dramatic literature is encouraged. Papers engaging explicitly with the conference theme "Performance As/Is Civil Engagement" and incorporating transnational or non-Western perspectives are especially desired. THFG remains committed to giving voice to a diversity of methodological approaches and geographical emphases.

Submissions will be evaluated by a jury of three theatre scholars and the top three papers will be presented at the national conference in Washington, D.C. Papers should be standard conference length for a twenty-minute presentation (8-10 pages). Those selected should plan to attend the conference in Washington, D.C. this August. More information may be found at http://www.athe.org.

Please send your paper as a .pdf email attachment to THFG Vice-Chair Charlotte McIvor at cmcivor@scu.edu with "THFG Debut Panel" in the subject line. Please do NOT put your name on the paper. However, in the body of your email message please indicate the title of your paper, your name, institution, address, telephone, and e-mail address. Winners will be notified by May 30.

Panelists will receive a $150 honorarium to help defray the cost of conference attendance.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespostcolonialreligionrenaissancetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 45136New Perspectives on German Ecocritical Prose, Due 03/01/2012128th MLA Convention, January 3–6, 2013, in Boston, Massachusettspichugin@sas.upenn.edu1329369639childrens_literatureecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: 128th MLA Convention, January 3–6, 2013, in Boston, Massachusettscontact email: pichugin@sas.upenn.edu

The rise of the ecologically-oriented approaches to literature and the development of ecocriticism as a scholarly discipline in the 1970s did not remain very long the prerogative of the Anglo-American literature and scholarship. Other national literatures and literary studies have been rapidly developing their views on the connections between literature and ecology; these are oftem based on different premises and follow their own respective literary traditions.

The German ecocritical approach of today is characterized by a number of general theoretical paradigms, such as the system-theoretical approach of Hofer (2007) and the cultural ecology of Zapf (2002, 2008). At the same time, an active revision of the established literary canon is in full swing; it proceeds in two directions: more and more new literary works and their authors are recognized and studied as ecocritical; at the same time, established works and genres, such as nature poetry, and even whole literary movements, such as Romanticism, are approached from the ecocritical perspective.

This panel seeks to understand the dynamics of the recent developments in both modern ecologically-oriented German-language prose and German ecocritical scholarship. We invite abstracts for papers exploring works of modern German-language literature from the ecocritical perspective. The possible topics include, but are not limited to, historical approaches to German ecocriticism, theoretical and methodological approaches (post-colonial studies, feminism, critical theory, cultural ecology, etc.), different aspects of ecocriticism (cultural, economic, political, aesthetical), as well as analyses of modern German-language prose works from the ecocritical perspective.

Abstracts of 300-500 words may be submitted electronically as MS Word or PDF attachments by March 1 to:

Alexander E. Pichugin, pichugin@sas.upenn.edu

Earlier submissions are encouraged. Selected papers will be presented at the MLA Convention January 3–6, 2013, in Boston. All submissions will be considered for a proposed anthology.

cfp categories: childrens_literatureecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 45137Crossing Linguistic Borders in Post-colonial Anglophone AfricaValentine N. Ubanakovalentineubanako@yahoo.com or ubaval@yahoo.com1329370168african-americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essayspostcolonialfull name / name of organization: Valentine N. Ubanakocontact email: valentineubanako@yahoo.com or ubaval@yahoo.com

CALL FOR PAPERS
Theme: CROSSING LINGUISTIC BORDERS IN POST-COLONIAL ANGLOPHONE AFRICA
Editor: Valentine Njende UBANAKO, PhD
Department of Bilingual Studies (English/French), University of Yaounde 1, Cameroon.
Out of the estimated 6200 languages and dialects in the world, 2582 languages and 1382 dialects are found in Africa. The colonial legacy (language and culture) in Africa varies from one country to another as at different periods, different African nations experienced colonization from different colonial powers. The linguistic map of Africa today can be divided in to Anglophone, francophone, luzophone, arabiphone and swahiliphone parts. As linguistic and geographic maps were being drawn and re-drawn, many people and their languages were displaced. The national boundaries which were drawn arbitrarily in conferences in Europe without the presence of a single African, did not take into account the cultural, historical or linguistic affinities of the Africans. English happens to be the most widespread of all the colonial languages during the 19th century European colonialism. It is used by many countries as an official or semi official language and is taught in most African countries either as a Second or a Foreign Language. The receiving communities have not been indifferent. They have been able, through different strategies, to adapt the language to suit their different linguistic and environmental realities. As English has co-existed for several centuries alongside African languages, it has influenced the African languages and these languages have in turn influenced English at all the different levels of linguistic analyses. What remains evident is that, these communities, their linguistic colonial legacies notwithstanding, interact with one another at national, sub regional, regional and international levels. With the globalization spirit which culminates in the breaking down of linguistic, cultural and economic barriers, it is indisputable that there will be more movement of people to new linguistic situations with the result of this movement being the learning of new languages, contact with new varieties, re-definition of linguistic identities etc.
This publication aims at examining the different language situations in post-colonial Anglophone Africa in order to understand and account for the mechanisms that can facilitate or have facilitated linguistic integration in a global and globalizing world since regional and sub regional intergration of communities within this linguistic block will inevitably bring about movements and breaking down linguistic barriers. Submissions should address but not limited to the following:
Linguistic decolonization
Linguistic and minority rights
Language and identity
Language in the age of globalisation
Language policy and planning in post colonial societies
Language varieties
Language contact in post colonial societies
Language and culture
Multilingualism as a resource or a threat
Linguistic hybridity
Intelligibility/communication breakdown
Bilingual/ Immersion education
Translation and interpretation.
Submission Procedure: Papers are invited from researchers in the area of sociolinguistics, geolinguistics and contact linguistics. Chapter proposals of not more than 2 pages should be submitted in Microsoft Word or Rich Text Formats by May 30 2012. Authors of accepted proposals will be notified on July 10 2012. Upon acceptance of proposals, guidelines for preparing chapters will be sent to authors and they will be expected to send their chapters of between 5000 and 6000 words before October 10 2012. Accepted or rejected chapters will be made known on December 30 2012. The editor is currently discussing with Cambridge Scholars Publishing and De Gruyter on the possibility of publishing the book. Professor Salikoko Mufwene of the University of Chicago has accepted to write the post-script chapter.
All enquiries and proposal submissions should be addressed to: valentineubanako@yahoo.com or ubaval@yahoo.com

cfp categories: african-americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essayspostcolonial 451382nd Global Conference: Conflict and CommunicationDr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcc2@inter-disciplinary.net1329378504african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: cc2@inter-disciplinary.net

2nd Global Conference
Conflict and Communication

Sunday 4th November – Tuesday 6th November 2012
Salzburg, Austria

Call For Papers:

Our ability to communicate successfully affects so many aspects of our lives. Difficulties, indeed failures, or breakdowns in communication can play a major role in hostility, conflict and war. Communication problems can also lead to personal frustration and desired outcomes not being realised.

The nature of our communications can raise larger contextual issues about human learning, exchange of knowledge and the nature of humanity. How can we communicate where those involved have quite different languages, specialisations and views of the world? How can we avoid conflict when we strongly disagree based on the great differences in how we perceive things? How can we appreciate and consider highly divergent views from our own? How can we still communicate effectively when the conceptual gap is so large? How can we make good decisions and complete tasks when communication is difficult?

Wars may be started and sustained by communication difficulties. When we communicate we are not just stating facts, but also emotions and personal positions that may underlie them. In the cut and thrust of everyday life, being able to recognise, track, and respond to the varied levels in communication can be challenging. It may require us to appreciate knowledge and realities vastly different than our own; bridging communication gaps may place us well outside our comfort zone.

This new inter- and multi-disciplinary conference project seeks to explore these and other topics and create dialogue about communicationand conflict. We seek submissions from a range of disciplines including communication studies, journalism, public affair's, public relations, philosophy, psychology, literature, management, business studies, information technology, science, the visual and creative arts, music, politics and also actively encourage practitioners and non-academics with an interest in the topic to participate.

We welcome traditional papers, preformed panels of papers, workshop proposals and other forms of performance recognising that different disciplines express themselves in different mediums. Submissions are sought on any aspect of Communications including the following:

1. Non-violent, or compassionate, communication (NVC)
*Honest self- expression
*Empathy
*Spiritual Connections
*Active Listening

2. Communication and Conflict
*Workplace
*Domestic
*International Relations
*Cultural
*Spiritual
*War
*Terrorism

3 . Communication breakdowns and breakthroughs
*Breakdowns (e.g. language and gender differences, misinterpretations,mental illness, failure to notice, to listen, effects of complexity, & disagreements etc.)
*Breakthroughs (Creative responses such in music, drama, literature, art, humour, etc.)

4 . Dehumanising Communication
*Reification
*Alienation
*Portraying others, strangers, the enemy
*Effects of technology (electronic communication)

5. Dialogue
*Friendship
*Philosophy
*Dialogical Relationships
*Counselling
*Teaching
*Respect and recognition

6. Communication in Health and Illness
*Stories and symptoms
*Communicating meaning
*Role of communication in treatment
*Communicating identity and experience
*Communicating care

7. Communication and decision making
*Role of communication in making decisions, (group decisions)
*Conflicting opinions and views
*Group think

The Steering Group particularly welcomes the submission of pre-formed panel proposals. Papers will also be considered on any related theme. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 4th May 2012. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 23rd September 2011.

300 word abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to both Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract, f) up to 10 keywords.
E-mails should be entitled: Communication2 Abstract Submission

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). Please note that a Book of Abstracts is planned for the end of the year. All accepted abstracts will be included in this publication.We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Organising Chairs:

Paul James
Project Leader, IP Australia
Australia
Email: pj@inter-disciplinary.net
.
Rob Fisher
Network Founder and Leader,Inter-Disciplinary.Net,
Freeland, Oxfordshire,
United Kingdom
Email: cc2@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the Probing the Boundaries programme of research projects. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and exciting. All papers accepted for and presented at the conference will be eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be developed for publication in a themed hard copy volume(s).

For further details of the project, please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/hostility-and-v...

For further details of the conference, please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/hostility-and-v...

Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 451394th Global Conference: Bullying and the Abuse of Power (November 2012, Salzburg, Austria)Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netbully4@inter-disciplinary.net1329383674african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: bully4@inter-disciplinary.net

4th Global Conference
Bullying and the Abuse of Power

Sunday 4th November – Tuesday 6th November 2012
Salzburg, Austria

Call For Papers
Bullying is a global problem. Whether it takes place in the schoolyard; the board room; the corridors of academe; a detention centre for alleged terrorists; a government office, or cyber space; and whether it involves insult, physical assault or manipulation of the environment with the intention of making another person's life intolerable, bullying involves the abuse of power. Everyone is affected by it, whether directly or indirectly.

All of us know people who are bullied, and all of us know bullies, though we may be unaware that we do. After all, bullies may seem, on the surface, to be kind, caring and supportive human beings, interested in nurturing others. And if they have been kind to us, we may fail to perceive their unkindness to others.

Bullying goes on at every level, often goes on behind closed doors; inside private emails, and in actions that might appear innocuous. It grows out of the ability that many (and perhaps most) people have, to find enjoyment and fulfilment in exerting power over others. It depends for its existence either on a lack of empathy and human feeling, or on the developed ability to suspend empathy. It can ruin lives, and it can end lives. We should not allow ourselves to believe that because it is not open to view, bullying is not present.

In the first two years of Bullying and the abuse of power, a number of themes have emrged. Two of these – bullying in schools and bullying in the workplace (including universities) are unsurprising and have featured strongly in both earlier conferences. Alongside these, and other themes with a practical focus, such as cyber bullying, participants have wrestled with the problem of saying exactly what is to count as bullying, and how far its boundaries extend.

Abstracts are now invited for Bullying and the Abuse of Power 3, for individual contributions or for symposia of three papers. Abstracts that illuminate and comment on more than one sphere in which bullying manifests itself, are especially welcomed, as are abstracts that draw together insights from more than one academic, professional or vocational area, or that draw from more than one cultural or theoretical perspective. Abstracts are also especially welcomed that focus on bullying in areas where the abuse of power is less commonly thought of in this way, including the ill treatment of elders; genocide; human trafficking, and bullying in international relations and international trade.

1. Bullying in School/in the Workplace
~ Bullying of older people/disabled people
~ Sexual bullying
~ Racial bullying
~ Religious intolerance

2. From Playground Bullying to Genocide/Bullying: How Far Can it Go?
~ Human Rights abuses
~ Genocide
~ The Holocaust
~ Human trafficking

3. International Relations
~ Cultural intolerance
~ Terrorism as a means of persuasion
~ Imposition of the wishes of the developed world on developing countries
~ Bullying of Indigenous people

4. Multinationals, Impoverished Nations and Corner Shops
~ The effects of globalisation on business
~ Changing patterns of shopping: corner shops vs superstores
~ Advertising and vulnerable consumers
~ Cut price goods and low pay for workers

Papers will be considered on any related theme. Abstracts should be written in simple language and for individual contributions should be no longer than 300 words, while for symposia they should include a 150 word overview for each contribution and a 200 word overview for the whole session (please take these word limits seriously). Abstracts should be submitted by Friday 4th May 2012. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 3rd August 2012.

Abstracts should be submitted to the Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats, following this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract, f) up to 10 keywords.
E-mails should be entitled: BULLY4 Abstract Submission

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). Please note that a Book of Abstracts is planned for the end of the year. All accepted abstracts will be included in this publication. We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Organising Chairs
Gavin J Fairbairn
Professor of Ethics and Language
Leeds Metropolitan University
Leeds
United Kingdom
Email: G.Fairbairn@leedsmet.ac.uk

Rob Fisher
Inter-Disciplinary.Net
Priory House, Wroslyn Road
Freeland, Oxfordshire OX29 8HR
Email: bully4@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the Ethos Hub series of ongoing research and publications projects conferences, run within the Critical Issues domain which aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore innovative and challenging routes of intellectual and academic exploration. All papers accepted for and presented at the conference will be eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be developed for publication in a themed hard copy volume.

For further details of the project, please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/critical-issues/ethos/bullying-and-the...

For further details of the conference, please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/critical-issues/ethos/bullying-and-the...

Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 45140CFP: 9th Global Conference: Making Sense Of: Dying and Death (November 2012, Salzburg, Austria)Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netdd9@inter-disciplinary.net1329388759african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: dd9@inter-disciplinary.net

9th Global Conference
Making Sense Of: Dying and Death

Saturday 10th November – Monday 12th November 2012
Salzburg, Austria

Call For Papers:
This inter- and multi-disciplinary conference explores dying and death and the ways culture impacts care for the dying, the overall experience of dying, and ways the dead are remembered. Over the past three decades, scholarship in thanatology has increased dramatically. This particular conference seeks a broad array of perspectives that explore, analyze, and/or interpret the myriad interrelations and interactions that exist between death and culture. Culture not only presents and portrays ideas about "a good death" and norms that seek to achieve it, culture also operates as both a vehicle and medium through which meaning about death is communicated and understood. Sadly, too, culture sometimes facilitates death through violence.

Submissions might be imagined in any (or none) of the following ways: "death" as an expression of doctrinal beliefs and/or core values, death and dying as an on-going movement between an individual or community and a larger socio-cultural matrix, or death as essentially a cultural construction. Investigations that engage cultural studies from a variety of perspective are certainly encouraged. We also welcome perspectives that interrogate the stability of meaning(s) assigned to such terms ("culture," "death," "dignity," "care," etc.) and their complex inter-relations.

Specifically, submissions should be framed with at least one of the following four rubrics in mind: death/dying within culture, culture within death/dying, death/dying as popular culture (and vice versa), or death/dying in tension with culture.

We welcome submissions that produce conversations engaging historical, ethnographic, normative, literary, anthropological, philosophical, artistic, political or other terms that elaborate a relationship between death and culture. For example, submissions might investigate death and dying in relation to any of the following realms of culture:

* music
* literature
* film
* broadcast media
* religious broadcasting
* journalism
* athletics
* comic books
* novels / poetry / short story
* television
* radio
* print media
* internet / technology
* popular art / architecture
* sacred vs. profane space
* advertising
* consumerism
* new religious movements/religious subcultures

Papers will be considered on any related theme. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 4th May 2012. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 3rd August 2012.

300 word abstracts should be submitted to the Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats, following this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract, f) up to 10 keywords
E-mails should be entitled: DD9 Abstract Submission

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline).Please note that a Book of Abstracts is planned for the end of the year. All accepted abstracts will be included in this publication. We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Organising Chairs

Nate Hinerman
Nursing/Theology and Religious Studies
University of San Francisco
San Francisco, USA
E-mail: nphinerman@usfca.edu

Rob Fisher
Network Leader
Inter-Disciplinary.Net,
Freeland, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
E-Mail: dd9@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the Making Sense Of: series of research projects, which in turn belong to the Probing the Boundaries programmes of Inter-Disciplinary.Net. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore discussions which are innovative and challenging. All papers accepted for and presented at this conference are eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be invited to go forward for development into a themed ISBN hard copy volume.

For further details of the project, please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/making-sense-of...

For further details of the conference, please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/making-sense-of...

Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence. on.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 45141[UPDATE] DEADLINE EXTENDED Entity and Identity, Paris International Conference (ENTIDENTIC 2012)Ars Identitatis Cultural Research Associationregistration@identitatis.org1329389409african-americanecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturereligionscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Ars Identitatis Cultural Research Associationcontact email: registration@identitatis.org

New communication and entertainment technology supports this ideal. In a world dominated by the ideas of securing the comfort of the individual and of the perfection of the human being, minority categories of disabled persons seem threatened by a large majority of normal persons. The purpose of this conference is to engage researchers with different cultural, political, philosophical, religious backgrounds in a debate on the close relation between entity and identity in bioethics. Proceedings will be published. Please send your abstracts (450 words in length) by Feb 25 to Ionut Untea, Andrada Maran at registration@identitatis.org. The conference will take place at Ecole Polytechnique, Paris, from 23 to 24 April, 2012. For more information and updates, please visit http://www.ars.identitatis.org/
Keywords: (non-exhaustive list): bioethics, entity, identity, public stigmatization, miraculous healings, biobanks, DNA, substantial identity, self-consciousness, future of value and identity, persistent vegetative state, anencephalic infants, female circumcision, harmful traditional practices in general, exorcism, the child's right to identity, pre-embryos, experimentation and genetic engineering, drugs and medicalization, artificial life (alife), artificial intelligence (AI), posthuman, communication and biotechnologies, cyborg, conjoined twins, eugenics, euthanasia, end of life questions, prenatal diagnosis, bioethics and film, bioethics and literature, disabled people, ethnic conceptions, ageing, deafness, cochlear implantation, surrogate mother, family by choice, LGBT, 'nature' and 'nurture', self-demand amputation, philosophical and religious traditions on bioethics, reproductive liberty, fetus, ''intentional'' family, transsexualism, insemination, transplant and identity transfer, etc.

cfp categories: african-americanecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturereligionscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 45142Special Issue on: "The Role of Environmental Management in Industrial EcologyZoe Wongzykwong@gmail.com1329393823ecocriticism_and_environmental_studieshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturefull name / name of organization: Zoe Wongcontact email: zykwong@gmail.com

Call for Papers

Progress in Industrial Ecology, An International Journal (PIE)
ISSN (Online): 1478-8764 - ISSN (Print): 1476-8917

Special Issue on:

"The Role of Environmental Management in Industrial Ecology"

Guest Editor: Zoe Wong

Sustainable development has evolved into one of the most important strategic issues facing organisations worldwide. Incorporating principles of sustainable development within organisational policies and processes is a critical issue in addressing global environmental problems. Over the period 2009 to 2014, the compound annual growth rate in business spending on sustainability projects will be approximately 19% across all OECD countries (Verdantix,2010). The ongoing industrialization and urbanisation of both the developed and developing world, and the environmental, social and economic impacts that ensue, have led to a greater awareness of the need to re-engineer organisational policies, processes and systems in order to facilitate sustainable development. This special issue is particularly interested in the area of business strategy, environmental management and industrial ecology.

Subject Coverage

The central focused of this issue is on the role of environmental management in industrial ecology. Within the scope of the special issue, papers including industry case studies and applications, on the following topics but not limited to, are encouraged:
· Organisational, corporate governance, policy, legislation and leadership issues arising from ecologically sustainable development and environmental management
· Business strategy related to sustainable ecological development in industry
· Sustainable development and environmental management in information, technology innovation & adoption
· Sustainable development and environmental management in the value chain (procurement), stakeholder, social network and information systems
· Risk and quality control through sustainability mechanisms
· Use of sustainable development concepts in project management, organisational restructuring and corporate social responsibility
· Measurement, performance and reporting of environmental management
· Sustainable management solutions for ecosystem services; agriculture and the environment; soil and water management; and climate change mitigation and adaptation.
· Sustainable development in education and training

Notes for Prospective Authors

Submitted papers should not have been previously published nor be currently under consideration for publication elsewhere. (N.B. Conference papers may only be submitted if the paper was not originally copyrighted and if it has been completely re-written).

All papers are refereed through a peer review process. A guide for authors, sample copies and other relevant information for submitting papers are available on the Author Guidelines page

Important Dates

Paper Submission: 15 June, 2012

First Round Review Complete and Notification: 15 September, 2012

Second Round Submission: 15 November, 2012

Final Submission: 15 January, 2013

Editor and Notes

You may send one copy in the form of an MS Word file attached to an e-mail (details in Author Guidelines) to the following:

Zoe Wong
Macquarie University
Griffith University
Email: zykwong@gmail.com or z.wong@griffith.edu.au
http://www.drzoewong.blogspot.com.au/2012/02/call-for-paper-ranked-era-l...

cfp categories: ecocriticism_and_environmental_studieshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysprofessional_topicsscience_and_culture 451433rd Global Conference: Making Sense Of: Suicide (November 2012, Salzburg, Austria)Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netsui3@inter-disciplinary.net1329394370african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: sui3@inter-disciplinary.net

3rd Global Conference
Making Sense Of: Suicide

Saturday 10th November – Monday 12th November 2012
Salzburg, Austria

Call For Papers:
\Suicide, the deliberate and intentional act of ending one's life, is an assault on our ideas of what living is about. Whether we believe that we have the right to end our own life because we no longer wish to live, or that suicide is never morally permissible, the fact that people can arrange their deaths and that some do, challenges us to think about the nature of life, and of death.

Suicide is a global problem. For some people it seems like a sensible solution to the problems of living, or at least it seems to them that in some circumstances, it can be a rational and morally acceptable thing to kill oneself. To others this seems absurd because, although suicide may solve the problems that the suicider has been experiencing, it does so at the expense of their experiencing anything at all. What's more, it does so at the expense of friends, loved ones, and others who are affected, including those who have to deal practically with its aftermath.

At the inaugural conference of Making Sense Of: Suicide, we had many vigorous discussions, which addressed suicide from a wide range of perspectives, including psychology, sociology, anthropology, philosophy, psychiatry and the law. Abstracts are now invited for Making Sense Of: Suicide 2, for individual contributions or for symposia of three papers. They should be written in simple language and for individual contributions should be no longer than 250 words, while for symposia they should include a 150 word overview for each contribution and a 200 word overview for the whole session. (Please take these word limits seriously)

Abstracts are especially welcomed that take seriously the ways in which thinking about and responding to the human act of suicide may be enhanced by viewing it from more than one disciplinary perspective. They may address a wide range of topics which are hinted at by following questions:

* Is all deliberate self killing, suicide? Is suicide always about the desire to be dead? Or does it sometimes have other meanings? Is suicide always fatal?
* What's the point of suicide? (Why do people do it?) Is suicide ever a rational choice? Can suicide be an act of love? Is it ever an act of hate?
* Why do people suicide in different ways? What explains the differences in suicide rate, in different populations? How can we best reduce the rate of suicide?
* Is suicide harmful, and if so, who does it harm – the suicider; his friends and relatives; onlookers and those who become involved in his death or in its aftermath? How are people affected by the suicide of someone they knew or loved? Does it matter how well they knew him?
* How does suicide relate to other apparently similar human acts, such as euthanasia and self harm? Is 'attempted suicide' always about the wish to die? Or is it sometimes about the atempt to change the world, or to escape from it for a time? Are euthanasia and assisted suicide the same? (If not, how do they differ?) Is it ever OK to assist another to die? Does the suicider's motivations, intentions and wishes make a difference to whether it is OK to assist him in arranging his death?
* Is suicide ever a valid form of political protest? If a person kills himself to make a political point, is his death necessarily suicide? Is suicide bombing, really about suicide?
* Should the desire to suicide be regarded as an indication that one needs psychiatric or psychological treatment? Are all suicidal people, by definition, suffering with a mental illness? Or can suicide be the result of a rational choice? If so, in what circumstances is it rational to want to die?
* How is suicide addressed in literature, fine art, music, theatre and film? What, if anything, can clinicians learn from literary authors, including novelists, poets and playwrights; artists, musicians and directors in theatre and film?

Papers will also be considered on any related theme. Abstracts should be submitted by Friday 4th May 2012. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 3rd August 2012.

Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to both Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract, f) up to 10 keywords
E-mails should be entitled: Suicide3 Abstract Submission

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). Please note that a Book of Abstracts is planned for the end of the year. All accepted abstracts will be included in this publication. We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Organising Chairs:

Gavin Fairbairn
Leeds Metropolitan University,
Leeds, United Kingdom.
Email: G.Fairbairn@leedsmet.ac.uk

Rob Fisher
Network Founder and Leader, Inter-Disciplinary.Net,
Freeland, Oxfordshire,
United Kingdom
Email: sui3@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the Making Sense Of: series of research projects, which in turn belong to the Probing the Boundaries programmes of Inter-Disciplinary.Net. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore discussions which are innovative and challenging. All papers accepted for and presented at this conference are eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be invited to go forward for development into a themed ISBN hard copy volume.

For further details of the project, please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/making-sense-of...

For further details of the conference, please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/making-sense-of...

Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 45144[UPDATE] Spatial Perspectives: Literature and Architecture, 1850 – PresentUniversity of Oxford, Terri Mullholland and Nicole Sierraliterature.architecture@gmail.com 1329395818interdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiestwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: University of Oxford, Terri Mullholland and Nicole Sierracontact email: literature.architecture@gmail.com

Spatial Perspectives: Literature and Architecture, 1850 – Present

Friday 22nd June 2012
University of Oxford, Faculty of English Language and Literature

Website: http://spatialperspectives.wordpress.com/

The deadline for the Call For Papers has been extended to Friday 16th March 2012.

We are delighted to announce Deyan Sudjic, Director of the Design Museum London will be a keynote speaker along with Professor Douglas Tallack, Professor of American Studies and Pro-Vice-Chancellor at the University of Leicester.

Registration opens on the website on Thursday 1st March 2012 and there will be a special Early Bird registration fee of £25 until 27th April 2012.

This interdisciplinary conference seeks to foster a dialogue between literature and architecture by bringing together papers that encompass the diversity of thinking about these two disciplines and the ways in which they engage and interact.

We warmly encourage contributions from practising architects, architectural historians, creative writers, and scholars of literature. An edited collection of conference proceedings is planned.

Papers are invited that address, but are not limited to, the following broad themes:

Textual spaces / spatial texts
The language of built space / narrative and architecture
Mapping the city
Icons and meaning
Interart analogues
Visual cultures
Literature and architectural discourse
Form, representation, and poetry
Writing the architect
Writers that build
Interiors and design
Architecture and Utopias / dystopias

Please send abstracts of 300 words for 20 minute papers to literature.architecture@gmail.com by Friday 16th March 2012.

cfp categories: interdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiestwentieth_century_and_beyond 45145Community and Belonging in Post-9/11 US-American Literature (MLA Convention 2013, Boston) [Abstracts due March 12]David Rose and Karolina Golimowskarosed@u.washington.edu; golimoka@staff.hu-berlin.de1329409991americanfull name / name of organization: David Rose and Karolina Golimowskacontact email: rosed@u.washington.edu; golimoka@staff.hu-berlin.de

This CfP is to solicit abstracts for a proposal of a Special Session at the 2013 MLA Convention (Jan 3-6). Please refer to the entry on the MLA website for details: http://www.mla.org/cfp_detail_4847

cfp categories: american 45146New Book Series at Rodopi. Critical Plant Studies: Philosophy, Literature, CultureMichael Mardermichael.marder@gmail.com1329411551cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturereligionromantictwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Michael Mardercontact email: michael.marder@gmail.com

Manuscripts and proposals solicited for CRITICAL PLANT STUDIES: PHILOSOPHY, LITERATURE, CULTURE BOOK SERIES (RODOPI PRESS)

Series Editor: Michael Marder (IKERBASQUE / The University of the Basque Country, Vitoria)

The goal of the Critical Plant Studies, a new book series at Rodopi Press, is to initiate an interdisciplinary dialogue, whereby philosophy and literature would learn from each other to think about, imagine, and describe, vegetal life with critical awareness, conceptual rigor, and ethical sensitivity. Literary works featuring plant imagery may be analyzed with reference to philosophical frameworks, while philosophical discussions of the meanings of vegetal life may be enriched and supported with the tools of literary criticism. Another dialogic dimension of the series entails a sustained engagement between Western and non-Western philosophies and religious traditions, representative of the human attitudes to plants. This "cross-pollination" of different fields of knowledge and experience will become possible thanks to the fundamental role plants play in human life, regardless of their backgrounding or neglect.

Ethically stated, the aim of the book series is to encourage an incremental shift of cultural attitudes from a purely instrumental to a respectful approach to vegetal beings. This is particularly important at the current time of the global environmental crisis, when massive de-forestation, seed patenting, and profit-driven agriculture threaten the very future of life on the planet. Not only will works included in the series shed light on the being of plants, but they will also assist us in critically thinking through the crucial issues and challenges of the contemporary world. Bioethics and genetic engineering, of which plants were the first examples; the role of spirituality and holism in the techno-scientific age; the reliance of our imagination and creativity on elements of the "natural" world; global food shortages and sustainable agricultural practices; the roots of our thinking and writing in other-than-human, vegetal processes, such as growth and decay, germination and branching out, fecundation and fruition—books included in Critical Plant Studies will, in one way or another, touch upon these and related themes central to the philosophy, literature, and culture of the twenty-first century.

This, we are looking to publish a mix of specialized manuscripts and introductory texts on the theory, literary criticism, and religious or aesthetic appreciation of plant life. Each title in the series will combine at least two of the disciplines listed above, with preference given to cutting-edge methodologies in comparative literature, comparative philosophy, comparative religious studies, etc., and trans-disciplinary approaches. Analyses of plant-related writings and artworks from any historical period and geographical area will be welcome.

Please, forward all queries and proposals to michael.marder@gmail.com

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturereligionromantictwentieth_century_and_beyond 45147What is the Next Thing? Postmodern Pedagogies in the Composition ClassroomModern Language Associationeschwartz@deltacollege.edu1329413177humanities_computing_and_the_internetprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_compositionfull name / name of organization: Modern Language Associationcontact email: eschwartz@deltacollege.edu

This session explores alternatives to the research paper, innovative pedagogy, and classroom best practices. 250-word abstracts by 15 March 2012. Organized by the Two-Year College Discussion Group at the MLA.

cfp categories: humanities_computing_and_the_internetprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_composition 45148M(other) Tongues: The Case for BiliteracyModern Language Associationeschwartz@deltacollege.edu1329413435ethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinaryfull name / name of organization: Modern Language Associationcontact email: eschwartz@deltacollege.edu

How can we promote what has traditionally been seen as a deficit? 250-word abstracts by 15 March 2012 to Elizabeth Schwartz, eschwartz@deltacollege.edu. Organized by the Two-Year College Discussion Group at the MLA.

cfp categories: ethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinary 45149Marxian Cartographies: Mapping/Re-drawing the TraceAnthony C. Cooke/The Marxist Literary Groupacooke2@emory.edu1329418442african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Anthony C. Cooke/The Marxist Literary Groupcontact email: acooke2@emory.edu

This panel will consider Marxism in all of its various manifestations over time, as well as attempts to imagine how it might travel and take on new shapes in the future. How has Marxism traveled, via fiction, poetry, or as an ideology, over time? What sort of geographical or theoretical traces has it left behind, particularly where it is proclaimed that we are "beyond" Marxism? Does memory, whether in the present or as hope for the future, play a role? Is it possible to construct an atlas of Marxism? Can one claim Marxism in any of its forms (Post-Marxism, New Historicism, and so on) in an era of increasing corporatization of the academy? How can Marxism become relevant as a pedagogical tool even as administrations force educational practices towards high capitalist models? How might Marxists make use of Digital Humanities? Can a reparative roadmap be drawn between "classical" Marxists and Post-Marxists, or between Marxists, Post-Marxists, and other theoretical frameworks?

By June 29, please send 250-300 word abstracts to Anthony C. Cooke, Emory University, acooke2@emory.edu

Anthony C. Cooke
Department of English
Emory University
Atlanta, GA 30317

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 451502013 MLA in Boston: Kierkegaard's LegaciesDiscussion Group on Scandinavian Languages & Literatureslindqvis@fas.harvard.edu1329421229cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarymodernist studiesreligionrhetoric_and_compositionromantictheoryfull name / name of organization: Discussion Group on Scandinavian Languages & Literaturescontact email: lindqvis@fas.harvard.edu

In the bicentennial year of the great Danish philosopher's birth, MLA's Discussion Group on Scandinavian Languages and Literatures invites papers that consider Kierkegaard's legacy in a variety of intellectual and comparative contexts. These can include literary studies, philosophy, political science, religious studies, rhetoric, psychology and others; submissions comparative across language and historical period are particularly welcome. Send a 250-350-word abstract to lindqvis@fas.harvard.edu, subject heading KIERKEGAARD, by March 15; we will respond by April 1. Those included in the panel must become members of the MLA by April 7, 2012.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarymodernist studiesreligionrhetoric_and_compositionromantictheory 45151Call for Contributors Fan Phenomena: Batman - 12 March 2012Fan Phenomena: Batmanliam.burke@nuigalway.ie 1329424354childrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisionpopular_culturefull name / name of organization: Fan Phenomena: Batmancontact email: liam.burke@nuigalway.ie

Call for Contributors Fan Phenomena: Batman

On the eve of Christopher Nolan's trilogy-closer The Dark Knight Rises, Intellect is seeking contributors for Fan Phenomena: Batman. This new series, Fan Phenomena, is prompted by a growing appetite for books that tap into the fascination we have with what constitutes an iconic or cultish phenomenon and how a particular person, TV show or film character/film infiltrates their way into the public consciousness. The series will look at particular examples of 'fan culture' and approach the subject in an accessible manner aimed at both fans and those interested in the cultural and social aspects of these fascinating – and often unusual – 'universes'.

Papers are invited that discuss any aspect of Batman and Fandom, including, but not limited to, the following:

FAN MEDIA
From widely distributed fan films such as Batman: Dead End to slash fiction that imagines Batman and Robin as more than just crime-fighting colleagues, fan responses to Batman frequently broaden the scope of the source material. Topics might include: fan art and fiction, fan films, mashups, machinima as well as issues surrounding authorship and copyright.

ADAPTATIONS and INFLUENCE
Although Batman may have his origin in comics, the Dark Knight has cast his shadow over a number of media and entertainments. Batman fans also migrate between media, often bringing their expectations and habits with them. Papers are invited which consider the interaction between Batman, adaptations and fans. Topics might include: Online fandom, Fan criticism of adaptations, viral marketing such as The Dark Knight, Comic-Conventions, Transmedia Storytelling and Convergence Culture.

FASHION
From Bat-Symbol emblazoned T-shirts to full on cosplay, Batman's ionic status has inspired many fashion choices. Papers are invited which consider this relationship. Topics might include: Merchandise, Escapism, Fashion Trends and Cultural Impact of Style.

REPRESENTATIONS OF FANS
Papers are invited which discuss representations of "fans" in Batman texts such as the "Beware the Gray Ghost" episode of Batman: The Animated Series in which Bruce Wayne meets his childhood icon, or The Dark Knight in which Batman inspires like-minded vigilantes.

ECONOMICS AND POPULARITY
Despite occasional dips in popularity, Batman has been an important force in popular culture for over seventy years. Papers are invited which consider the role fans have played in sustaining the hero's recognition.

Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words, an academic bio and contact details (either in the body of a mail or as a single attachment) to Liam Burke at liam.burke@nuigalway.ie by 12 March 2012. Final papers will be 3,000 - 3,500 words and will be need to be submitted no later than 31 May 2012.

cfp categories: childrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisionpopular_culture 45152[UPDATE] Literature and Religion (DEADLINE 3/1/12) Rocky Mountain Modern Language Associationttucker@usc.edu1329425280americancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarypopular_culturereligiontwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Rocky Mountain Modern Language Associationcontact email: ttucker@usc.edu

The Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association invites the submission of proposals for individual papers to its Literature and Religion session. Papers may engage a wide range of religious and literary traditions, historical periods, and theoretical approaches. You might consider the intersection between literature, religion, and any of the following issues:

- Gender/sexuality/race
- Nation
- The family
- Modernity
- Secularization
- Fundamentalism
- Revolution
- Representations of the messianic or the apocalyptic

Presentations should be 15 to 20 minutes long (approximately 8 doubled-spaced pages).

The deadline for paper proposals is MARCH 1, 2012.

The 2012 RMMLA Convention will be held from October 11-13 in beautiful Boulder, Colorado. For more information, please visit
http://rmmla.wsu.edu/conferences/default.asp

Please submit a proposal of 200-350 words to Trisha Tucker at ttucker@usc.edu (include RMMLA 2012 in the subject line). Please submit your proposal as a .doc or .pdf attachment.

Be sure to include your name, phone number, mailing address, and
institutional affiliation.

All applicants will be contacted about the status of their applications by MARCH 15, 2012.

Non-RMMLA members may propose a paper but membership in RMMLA is required of all presenters by April 1, 2012.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarypopular_culturereligiontwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 45153Reminder: Philologist, Journal of Language, Literary and Cultural StudiesUniversity of Banja Luka, Faculty of Philologyfilolog@unibl.rs1329430021americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryfilm_and_televisionjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypostcolonialrenaissancetheatretheoryfull name / name of organization: University of Banja Luka, Faculty of Philologycontact email: filolog@unibl.rs

We are calling for papers dealing with contemporary literary, cultural, and language theories and/or their applications to particular works for the third issue of our journal. We would also welcome papers dealing with meta-theories and their significance for the human and social sciences, as well as reviews of the most recent books in the field of cultural, language and literary theories and criticism.

Papers should be a maximum of 7.000 words, and use the New Harvard Citation System. Papers must include abstracts and key words. Authors should also provide a short bio (up to 20 lines).

Papers in Word format, using Times New Roman 12 font, with 1.5 line spacing, should be sent to the following email addresses: filolog@unibl.rs
The deadline for submissions is March 31st.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryfilm_and_televisionjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypostcolonialrenaissancetheatretheory 4515435th Annual International Conference on the Psychology of the SelfInternational Association for Psychoanalytic Self Psychologyself@libraryofsocialscience.com1329430180graduate_conferencesprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturefull name / name of organization: International Association for Psychoanalytic Self Psychologycontact email: self@libraryofsocialscience.com

CALL-FOR-PAPERS: Please submit your proposal before March 26, 2012—to
present a paper at this exciting conference on the psychology of the
self. For complete information on how to submit a proposal, please click
here:

http://www.libraryofsocialscience.com/cfps/cfp-2012_iapsp.html

=======================================================================

35th Annual Int'l. Conference on the Psychology of the Self:

"Is Self an Illusion?"

Presented by the International Association for
Psychoanalytic Self Psychology (IAPSP)

Thursday, October 18 - Sunday, October 21, 2012

Washington Marriott — Washington, DC, USA

=======================================================================

Dear Colleague,

We are pleased to invite you to submit a proposal for the 35th Annual
Conference on the Psychology of the Self, coming up October 18, 2012, in
Washington, D.C. While IAPSP's foundational purpose is the study,
research, development and practice of self psychology as developed by
Heinz Kohut, their Annual Conference also explores self psychology in
its relationship to infant research, neurobiology, philosophy and other
psychoanalytic theories.

IAPSP's conference brings together psychoanalysts, psychiatrists,
psychologists, social workers, scholars, psychiatric nurses, family
therapists, and professional counselors in a dialogue between their
fields and the theory of self psychology. The IAPSP's collegial
atmosphere provides maximum opportunity for dialogue between audience
and presenters.

We welcome proposals on the conference theme, and on all topics relevant
to Self Psychology and Psychoanalysis.

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The deadline is March 26, 2012, but we will be grateful if you can
submit your materials as soon as possible—to facilitate conference
planning. For complete information on how to submit a proposal, please
click here:

http://www.libraryofsocialscience.com/cfps/cfp-2012_iapsp.html

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Among panels and papers presented at the 2011 IAPSP conference: When
Therapy Works – And When It Doesn't; Applying Self Psychology to
Couples Therapy; Clinical Generosity: A Deeply Embedded Attitude of
Contemporary Self Psychology; A Creative Clash of Cultures: the
Dialectical Tensions between Self Psychological and Relational
Sensibilities; Psychoanalysis and Motivational Systems; Psychoanalysis
and Combat Trauma; Blues and Emotional Trauma: a Musical Tribute to
Kohut's Observations on the Psychological Functions of Music; Why It
Is Good to Be Good: Ethics, Kohut's Self Psychology, and Modern
Society; Experiencing Gender: A Systems View; Psychoanalysis, Culture,
and the Legacy of Individualism; Interplay between
Intersubjective-Systems Theory and Heidegger's Existential Philosophy

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Buddha on Self: "Where self is, truth is not. Self is the fleeting
error of samsara; it is individual separateness and that egoism which
begets envy and hatred."

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To see the 2011 conference brochure—including the complete
program—please click here:

http://www.iapsp.org/conference/2011_Conference_Brochure.pdf

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We hope you will consider submitting a proposal and/or attending this
exciting meeting.

With regards,
Orion Anderson, Communications Director
Library of Social Science
718-393-1104

P. S. For questions and additional information, please call Conference Manager
Nilou Mostofi at 858-270-3503.

cfp categories: graduate_conferencesprofessional_topicsscience_and_culture 45155CALL FOR PAPERS: InterDISCIPLINARY Journal of Portuguese Diaspora Studies (IJPDS)Anderson Universitydmscott@anderson.edu, iblayer@brocku.cacarlos.teixeira@ubc.ca1329433147african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Anderson Universitycontact email: dmscott@anderson.edu, iblayer@brocku.cacarlos.teixeira@ubc.ca

The InterDISCIPLINARY Journal of Portuguese Diaspora Studies (IJPDS) is an online, as well as printed, peer-reviewed academic journal, to be published annually, and in affiliation with Anderson University, Indiana. The first volume of the journal is scheduled for fall 2012. The editors of the IJPDS welcome contributions from scholars in the humanities and social sciences, as well as writers and poets working in areas of the Portuguese diaspora within a transnational sense of community and self. We are particularly interested in proposals from a wide array of scholarly proveniences, approaches and perspectives that embrace a construct of Portuguese diaspora identity whose discourses and ideas travel across time and space. Under the rubric of 'diaspora' we also encourage papers that engage in the exploration of the Portuguese diaspora in a global context. Papers for this volume may focus on a wide range of topics related to the Portuguese diaspora, including, but not limited to: return migration and deportation; emergence of transnational communities; processes of integration into host societies; ethnic entrepreneurship; reproduction of ancestral cultural contexts; diaspora and linguistic practices; education; identity and diaspora discourse; diaspora in literature, the arts, and the media. Creative work in the form of poetry and short stories will also be considered for publication. IJPDS accepts papers on an ongoing basis, however prospective contributors for the first issue of the journal are invited to submit papers in final form by April 30th, 2012. For submission guidelines follow the instructions at: http://portuguese-diaspora-studies.com
The InterDISCIPLINARY Journal of Portuguese Diaspora Studies (IJPDS) aims to provide a multidisciplinary, intercontinental, and polyphonic forum, which will permit dialogue among Portuguese and non-Portuguese scholars involved in research and creative work related to the Portuguese diaspora throughout the world. The journal publishes original research, evaluation studies, case reports, review articles, and book reviews. We also accept narratives representative of the Portuguese diaspora and whose message is conveyed in visual texts (photography), and/or creative/fictional writing (such as poetry and short stories). The works to be submitted may be written in English, Portuguese, Spanish, or French.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 45156PUBLIC #47: Parallax: Stereoscopic 3D in moving images and visual art (Publication: Spring 2013) Janine Marchessault, Dan Adler and Sanja Obradovic (York University)sanjao@yorku.ca1329434145cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisioninterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturescience_and_culturetheoryfull name / name of organization: Janine Marchessault, Dan Adler and Sanja Obradovic (York University)contact email: sanjao@yorku.ca

CALL FOR PROPOSALS
PUBLIC #47: Parallax: Stereoscopic 3D in moving images and visual art
(Publication: Spring 2013)

The most recent revival of stereoscopic 3D (S3D) moving images, from cinema and television to video games and cell phone applications, signifies a new development in global screen cultures and media technologies. As the stereoscopic technology becomes more available and more studio productions are scheduled for release in S3D format, scholars, artists and industry professionals require a common language for discussing the aesthetics and industry of S3D that goes beyond the current largely technical terminology. Moreover, independent S3D works of art require careful examination in the context of the most recent resurgence of the medium within the mainstream mediascapes.

This special issue of PUBLIC journal will critically analyze the dynamics and significance of the current, as well as the past and the future developments. The essays in this issue will explore the aesthetic, economic and cultural implications of using stereoscopic images in the context of contemporary art, media and technology. Interdisciplinary perspectives and artists' projects are welcome.

Potential topics:

- hitherto uncharted history of stereoscopic 3D
- language and aesthetics of stereoscopic moving images
- stereoscopy and new media art
- stereo 3D in video game design and environments
- case studies of stereoscopic artworks
- use of sound in combination with stereoscopic visual content
- non-entertainment use of stereoscopic media
- stereo 3D military applications, cartography, medical/scientific imaging in artistic practices
- artistic projects

Proposal deadline (250 words): April 1st, 2012

Text and project deadline (3-6,000 words): July 1st, 2012

Edited by Janine Marchessault, Dan Adler and Sanja Obradovic

Please send proposal, c.v. and bio to: sanjao@yorku.ca

Janine Marchessault, author of Marshall McLuhan: Cosmic Media (2005) and co-editor of Fluid Screens, Expanded Cinema (2007) is Canada Research Chair in Art, Digital Media, and Globalization, York University, Canada. She is the director of the Visible City Project + Archive which is examining new practices of media in a variety of urban contexts. She is also a co-founder of the Future Cinema Lab, a joint research project in the Faculty of Fine Arts at York University.

Dan Adler is assistant professor of modern and contemporary art history at York University. A specialist in the history of art writing and the aesthetics of installation art, he is the author of Hanne Darboven: Cultural History (Afterall Books/MIT Press, 2009) and co-editor of the volume Beyond Formalism:
German Art History and Scientic Thought (Ashgate Press, 2012).

Sanja Obradovic is a PhD candidate in the Joint Graduate Program in Communication and Culture at York and Ryerson Universities. Her dissertation research focuses on the transnational history of stereoscopic 3-D moving images.

PUBLIC is a peer-reviewed journal that explores the intersection of visual culture and critical studies. Since 1988, it has served as an intellectual and creative forum that focuses on how aesthetic, theoretical and critical issues intermix. In each themed issue, PUBLIC encourages a broad range of dialogue by bringing together artists, theorists, curators, philosophers, creative writers and historians. For further information, visit www.publicjournal.ca

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisioninterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturescience_and_culturetheory 45157Craft Essays on Characterization- Deadline May 15thMason's Road Literary Journalhttp://www.masonsroad.com/about-2/submission-guidelines/1329447923general_announcementsjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrytheoryfull name / name of organization: Mason's Road Literary Journalcontact email: http://www.masonsroad.com/about-2/submission-guidelines/

Mason's Road, an online literary journal sponsored by Fairfield University's MFA in Creative Writing program with an emphasis on teaching, is seeking craft essay submissions for our upcoming issue. The theme for our fifth issue is "characterization." We are interested in craft essays on a variety of forms that explore what makes characters' voices, behaviors and thoughts resonate and shine. Mason's Road is especially well-suited for MFA students in programs across the country.

Our submissions guidelines are available at: http://www.masonsroad.com/about-2/submission-guidelines/.

The journal is at: http://masonsroad.com.

cfp categories: general_announcementsjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrytheory 45158CFP: Puerto Rican Print Cultures (MLA 2013, Boston, MA. Jan 3-6, abstracts due March 15)Discussion Group on Puerto Rican Literature and Culturetunoel@albany.edu1329451072cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryfull name / name of organization: Discussion Group on Puerto Rican Literature and Culturecontact email: tunoel@albany.edu

The Discussion Group on Puerto Rican Literature and Culture invites submission of abstracts for its next meeting, which will take place at the Modern Language Association convention in Boston, January 3-6, 2013. The theme for the session is "Puerto Rican Print Cultures," understood in its broadest sense as encompassing the forms, technologies, ideologies, and practices of the printed word both on the island and in the diaspora. Potential areas of inquiry include, but are not limited to:

- Questions of circulation, distribution,and readership
- Print cultures and the public sphere (politics, advertising, etc.)
- Newspapers, periodicals, magazines, and print journalism in its many forms
- Printed ephemera (pamphlets, flyers, broadsides, letters, manifestos, etc.)
- Hybrid forms (illustrated books, comics, artist's books, graphic novels, art catalogs, etc.)
- Alternative forms of publishing (independent magazines, small presses, self-publication, etc.)
- Emerging print cultures in the digital era (blogs, e-books, online journals, Internet fora, social networking sites, etc.)
- Print cultures in translocal, transnational, and/or diasporic contexts

Send abstracts in English or Spanish (up to 300 words) by March 15, 2012; Tomás Urayoán Noel (tunoel@albany.edu).

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinary 45159[UPDATE] David Jones: Culture & ArtificeWashington Adventist University Honors Program & Department of Englishwauhonors@wau.edu1329455739bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespoetryreligiontwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Washington Adventist University Honors Program & Department of Englishcontact email: wauhonors@wau.edu

This interdisciplinary conference will explore Jones's cultural theory, and how his creative works confront the challenges of modern culture. Along with presentations by Jones experts from the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada, the conference will feature special events, such as an exhibition of Jones's major wood and copper engravings from the 1920's, the screening of a new feature length documentary on his life during the interwar period, and a programmed reading of his poetic works with musical interludes by the Perry Conticchio Quartet.

Registration is now open for this conference.

Information regarding the conference and associated events may be found on the conference website:

www.wauhonorsprogram.org/davidjones2012.html

cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespoetryreligiontwentieth_century_and_beyond 45160CFP - International Journal of Image Processing (IJIP)Computer Science Journals (CSC Journals)cfp@cscjournals.org1329459832americangeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiesprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturetheoryfull name / name of organization: Computer Science Journals (CSC Journals)contact email: cfp@cscjournals.org

Computer Science Journals (CSC Journals) invites researchers, editors, scientists & scholars to publish their scientific research papers in an International Journal of Image Processing (IJIP) Volume 6, Issue 3.

The International Journal of Image Processing (IJIP) aims to be an effective forum for interchange of high quality theoretical and applied research in the Image Processing domain from basic research to application development. It emphasizes on efficient and effective image technologies, and provides a central forum for a deeper understanding in the discipline by encouraging the quantitative comparison and performance evaluation of the emerging components of image processing.

We welcome scientists, researchers, engineers and vendors from different disciplines to exchange ideas, identify problems, investigate relevant issues, share common interests, explore new approaches, and initiate possible collaborative research and system development.

CSC Journals anticipate and invite papers on any of the following topics:

Active vision and robotic systems

Architecture of imaging and vision systems

Autonomous vehicles

Character and handwritten text recognition

Chemical and spectral sensitization

Chemistry of photosensitive materials

Coating technologiesPhysics and chemistry of AgX

Coding and transmission

Cognitive aspects of image understanding

Color imaging

Communication of visual data

Data fusion from multiple sensor inputs

Display and printing

Document image understanding

Generation and display

Holography

Image analysis and interpretation

Image capturing

Image databases

Image generation

Image manipulation

Image permanence

Image processing

Image processing applications

Image processing: coding analysis and recognition

Image representation

Image sensing

Imaging systems and image scanning

Implementation and architectures

Latent image

Materials for electro-photography

Monitoring and surveillance

Network architecture for real-time video transport

New visual services over ATM/packet network

Non-impact printing technologies

Object modeling and knowledge acquisition

Photoconductors

Photographic emulsions

Photopolymers

Prepress and printing technologies

Processing and analysis

Protocols for packet video

Remote image sensing

Retrieval and multimedia

Scene modeling

Signal-processing aspects of image processing

Storage and transmission

Video coding algorithms and technologies for ATM/p

Visual inspection

Important Dates - IJIP CFP - Volume 6, Issue 3.
Paper Submission: March 31, 2012
Author Notification: May 15, 2012
Issue Publication: June 2012

For complete details about IJIP archives publications, abstracting/indexing, editorial board and other important information, please refer to IJIP homepage.

We look forward to receive your valuable papers. If you have further questions please do not hesitate to contact us at cscpress@cscjournals.org. Our team is committed to provide a quick and supportive service throughout the publication process.

A complete list of journals can be found at http://www.cscjournals.org/csc/bysubject.php

cfp categories: americangeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiesprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturetheory 45161CFP - International Journal of Security (IJS)Computer Science Journals (CSC Journals)cfp@cscjournals.org1329460004americangeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiesprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturetheoryfull name / name of organization: Computer Science Journals (CSC Journals)contact email: cfp@cscjournals.org

Computer Science Journals (CSC Journals) invites researchers, editors, scientists & scholars to publish their scientific research papers in an International Journal of Security (IJS) Volume 6, Issue 3.

Information Security is an important aspect of protecting the information society from a wide variety of threats. The International Journal of Security (IJS) presents publications and research that builds on computer security and cryptography and also reaches out to other branches of the information sciences. Our aim is to provide research and development results of lasting significance in the theory, design, implementation, analysis, and application of secure computer systems.

IJS provides a platform to computer security experts, practitioners, executives, information security managers, academics, security consultants and graduate students to publish original, innovative and time-critical articles and other information describing research and good practices of important technical work in information security, whether theoretical, applicable, or related to implementation. It is also a platform for the sharing of ideas about the meaning and implications of security and privacy, particularly those with important consequences for the technical community. We welcome contributions towards the precise understanding of security policies through modeling, as well as the design and analysis of mechanisms for enforcing them, and the architectural principles of software and hardware system implementing them.

CSC Journals anticipate and invite papers on any of the following topics:

Access control and audit

Anonymity

Anonymity and pseudonymity

Attacks, security mechanisms, and security service

Authentication

Authorisation

Biometrics

Cellular/wireless/mobile/satellite networks securi

Code security, including mobile code security

Computer forensics

Confidentiality, privacy, integrity, authenticatio

Cryptography and cryptanalysis

Data confidentiality issues

Data integrity issues

Data recovery

Database security

Denial of service

Denial of service attacks and countermeasures

Dependability and reliability

Design or analysis of security protocols

Distributed access control

Distributed and parallel systems security

Electronic commerce

Formal security analyses

Fraudulent usage

Information flow

Information hiding and watermarking

Intellectual property protection

Intrusion detection

Key management

Multicast security

Network and Internet security

Network forensics

Network security performance evaluation

Non-repudiation

Peer-to-peer security

Prevention of traffic analysis

Privacy protection

Public key cryptography and key management

Revocation of malicious parties

Risk assessment and management

Secure location determination

Secure PHY/MAC/routing protocols

Secure routing protocols

Security group communications

Security in ad hoc networks

Security in cellular networks (2G, 2.5G, 3G, B3G,

Security in communications

Security in content-delivery networks

Security in distributed systems

Security in domain name service

Security in e-mail

Security in high-speed networks

Security in integrated networks

Security in integrated wireless networks

Security in internet and WWW

Security in IP networks

Security in mobile IP

Security in optical systems and networks

Security in peer-to-peer networks

Security in satellite networks

Security in sensor networks

Security in VoIP

Security in wired and wireless integrated networks

Security in Wired Networks

Security in wireless communications

Security in wireless internet

Security in wireless LANs (IEEE 802.11 WLAN, WiFi,

Security in wireless MANs (IEEE 802.16 and WiMAX)

Security in wireless PANs (Bluetooth and IEEE 802.

Security policies

Security specification techniques

Security standards

Tradeoff analysis between performance and security

Trust establishment

Viruses worms and other malicious code

WLAN and Bluetooth security

Important Dates - IJS CFP - Volume 6, Issue 3.
Paper Submission: March 31, 2012
Author Notification: May 15, 2012
Issue Publication: June 2012

For complete details about IJS archives publications, abstracting/indexing, editorial board and other important information, please refer to IJS homepage.

We look forward to receive your valuable papers. If you have further questions please do not hesitate to contact us at cscpress@cscjournals.org. Our team is committed to provide a quick and supportive service throughout the publication process.

A complete list of journals can be found at http://www.cscjournals.org/csc/bysubject.php

cfp categories: americangeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiesprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturetheory 45162CFP - Signal Processing: An International Journal (SPIJ)Computer Science Journals (CSC Journals)cfp@cscjournals.org1329460203americangeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiesprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturetheoryfull name / name of organization: Computer Science Journals (CSC Journals)contact email: cfp@cscjournals.org

Computer Science Journals (CSC Journals) invites researchers, editors, scientists & scholars to publish their scientific research papers in a Signal Processing: An International Journal (SPIJ) Volume 6, Issue 3.

The International Journal of Signal Processing (SPIJ) lays emphasis on all aspects of the theory and practice of signal processing (analogue and digital) in new and emerging technologies. It features original research work, review articles, and accounts of practical developments. It is intended for a rapid dissemination of knowledge and experience to engineers and scientists working in the research, development, practical application or design and analysis of signal processing, algorithms and architecture performance analysis (including measurement, modeling, and simulation) of signal processing systems.

As SPIJ is directed as much at the practicing engineer as at the academic researcher, we encourage practicing electronic, electrical, mechanical, systems, sensor, instrumentation, chemical engineers, researchers in advanced control systems and signal processing, applied mathematicians, computer scientists among others, to express their views and ideas on the current trends, challenges, implementation problems and state of the art technologies.

CSC Journals anticipate and invite papers on any of the following topics:

Acoustic and Vibration Signal Processing

Biomedical Signal Processing

Communication Signal Processing

Data Processing

Detection and Estimation

Digital Signal Processing

Earth Resources Signal Processing

Geophysical and Astrophysical Signal Processing

Industrial Applications

Multi-dimensional Signal Processing

Optical Signal Processing

Pattern Recognition

Radar Signal Processing

Remote Sensing

Signal Filtering

Signal Processing Systems

Signal Processing Technology

Signal Theory

Software Developments

Sonar Signal Processing

Spectral Analysis

Speech Processing

Stochastic Processes

Important Dates - SPIJ CFP - Volume 6, Issue 3.
Paper Submission: March 31, 2012
Author Notification: May 15, 2012
Issue Publication: June 2012

For complete details about SPIJ archives publications, abstracting/indexing, editorial board and other important information, please refer to SPIJ homepage.

We look forward to receive your valuable papers. If you have further questions please do not hesitate to contact us at cscpress@cscjournals.org. Our team is committed to provide a quick and supportive service throughout the publication process.

A complete list of journals can be found at http://www.cscjournals.org/csc/bysubject.php

cfp categories: americangeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiesprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturetheory 451641st Global Conference: Sport (November 2012, Salzburg, Austria)Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netsport1@inter-disciplinary.net1329462477african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: sport1@inter-disciplinary.net

1st Global Conference
Sport

Wednesday 7th November – Friday 9th November 2012
Salzburg, Austria

Call For Papers:
Sport has a chimeric value in modern life. On the one hand, millions of people choose to play sports or become supporters of sports. For these people, sport is a social good, something which brings people together for a common purpose, provides a sense of security and belonging, and enjoyment and excitement; and for participants a sense of fulfilment, well-being and physical fitness. On the other hand, there is an increasingly vocal backlash against sport: by people in communities affected by the demolishing of homes to make way for facilities for mega sports event; by sports journalists weary of the doping and the match-fixing and the behaviour of elite athletes; by fans sickened by the way their sports have become tainted with the evil of global commerce; and by scholars and others critical of the importance given to sport in modern times. This project aims to bring together scholars from a wide range of disciplines – sociology, cultural studies, philosophy, history, political studies, urban studies, geography, and psychology and sport science – who are interested in exploring the Janus face of sport, to try to better understand the status of sport in our everyday lives. The project is for cheerleaders of sport, critics of sport, and all those in-between who would like to make a contribution to this inter-disciplinary approach to understanding sport.

We would be interested in research or theory papers on the following themes:

● Sport and social identity
● Ontology of sport
● Ethics and sport
● Anti-sport social movements
● Commercialization and sport
● Sport and place
● Problems in sport science
● History of modern sport
● Measuring the value of sport
● Sport and popular culture
● Sport and celebrities
● The politics of sport
● Sports fandom

The Steering Group particularly welcomes the submission of pre-formed panel proposals. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 4th May 2012. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 3rd August 2012.

300 word abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to both Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract, f) up to 10 keywords.
E-mails should be entitled: SPORT Abstract Submission.

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). Please note that a Book of Abstracts is planned for the end of the year.
All accepted abstracts will be included in this publication. We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Joint Organising Chairs:
Karl Spracklen
Leeds Metropolitan University,
United Kingdom
Email: K.Spracklen@leedsmet.ac.uk

Rob Fisher
Network Founder and Leader
Inter-Disciplinary.Net
Freeland, Oxfordshire,
United Kingdom
Email: sport1@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the Probing the Boundaries programme of research projects. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and exciting.

Multiple eBooks and volumes of themed papers have been published or are in press from the previous conference meetings of this project. All papers accepted for and presented at the conference will be eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be developed for publication in a themed hard copy volume

For further details of the project, please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/persons/sport/

For further details of the conference, please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/persons/sport/c...

Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 45165KOME journal - Call for Papers - Basic researches on communication & media (10th May 2012)KOME - An International Journal of Pure Communication Inquiry kome@komejournal.com1329462647cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisioninterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysreligiontheoryfull name / name of organization: KOME - An International Journal of Pure Communication Inquiry contact email: kome@komejournal.com

Call for papers

KOME, a new peer-reviewed scholarly journal published by the Hungarian Communication Society is currently seeking articles for its early issues. The journal aims to create a platform for an innovative interdisciplinary discourse in the field of communication studies, with a focal point on pure communication inquiry.

Since its formation, there has been a wide debate on the (in)famous first axiom of pragmatics which states that "one cannot not communicate". Questions of whether the subsuming of any and all kind of information processing in a category called "communication" results in a viable approach towards actions performed by various entities, or simply suits in the flow of the inflation of concepts so precious concerning human existence and co-existences are rarely answered, if even posed in the field of communication and media studies. Nowadays, applied communication researches seems not to care much about the fact that no researches on communication and media can be carried out without having preconceptions about the nature of the phenomenon constituting its object. Which, considering their disciplinal boundaries, would be perfectly acceptable if not only a marginal fraction of theories, serving as the basis for those researches had linked their assertions on communication to the preconceived notions that determine the demarcation of the domain of communication and media studies through the selection and organization of different perceptions in a given intellectual framework.

The unidentified nature of such preconceptions is relevant not exclusively in metatheories but it may also make the adequacy of a given theory questionable in additional researches, which results in a situation where these theories can not provide a general answer to a couple of the most basic questions, namely, "what is communication" "what is media" "who is able to communicate" etc. Therefore KOME welcomes researches and discussions with an eye toward defining and theorizing communication and the media, and invite authors to submit manuscripts exploring basic questions of the field with plausible reasoning, but regardless of the theoretical framework or the chosen methodology.

For submission send your paper to the

Editorial Office kome@komejournal.com

Please visit our webpage
http://www.komejournal.com

and follow KOME's instructions for authors. http://www.komejournal.com/for-authors.html

DEADLINE: MAY 10, 2012

Marton Demeter & Janos Toth, editors

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisioninterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysreligiontheory 45166Hospitality & SocietyPaul Lynch, Co-Editor of Hospitality & Society, an Intellect Journalhospitalityandsociety@googlemail.com1329473758cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespostcolonialtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Paul Lynch, Co-Editor of Hospitality & Society, an Intellect Journalcontact email: hospitalityandsociety@googlemail.com

Hospitality & Society is an international multidisciplinary social sciences journal focusing upon academic perspectives on hospitality, and addresses all aspects of hospitality and its connections with wider social and cultural processes and structures.
Aims & Scope
- To consider issues associated with hospitality leading to its advancement and understanding, including developing new approaches to the study of hospitality.
- To serve as a multidisciplinary forum encouraging interdisciplinarity with contributors coming from a wide variety of disciplinary bases.
- To be international in scope and inclusive in its coverage addressing hospitality from the macro to the micro level.
Article Submissions
Articles should be 5-8000 words long but can be longer in exceptional cases. The journal will publish empirical and conceptual research articles, state-of-the-art reviews, discussion papers, shorter research notes, viewpoints, letters to the editor, book reviews, and reports on conferences. Conference proceedings and other reports should be up to 1,000 words long and include both a description and a critical analysis. The journal welcomes reviewers at all stages of their careers to write single book reviews (c.800 words in length) and multiple book reviews of up to three books (c.2500 words in length).
Editors' email: hospitalityandsociety@googlemail.com Controversies and reviews editor: plugosi@brookes.ac.uk
http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Journal,id=194/ view,page=2/
Submissions for Volume 2 Issue 2 must be received by 30 April 2012.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespostcolonialtwentieth_century_and_beyond 45167Comics, Religion & Politics, 4th & 5th September 2012, Lancaster University [Update]Emily Laycock, Lancaster Universitye.laycock@lancaster.ac.uk1329488934bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturereligiontwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Emily Laycock, Lancaster Universitycontact email: e.laycock@lancaster.ac.uk

Alongside the continued popularity of political themes in comics recent years have also seen the rise of religious themes entering into the medium. The aim of this two day conference is to explore the relationship between comics, religion and politics in greater depth, to show how through the unique properties of the medium comics have the ability to be as thought-provoking as they are entertaining. The conference will examine the history and impact of religious and political themes, their relationship to audiences, and consider the future of such themes in all forms of sequential art narrative.

We invite papers that address religious and/or political themes in comic strips, comic books, graphic novels, or manga. Papers working at the interface of these two areas are particularly encouraged. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

- Comics as social, religious, political text
- Use of religious imagery and themes
- Fan culture
- Political cartoons and cartoonists
- Gothic comics
- Comics and magic
- Representation of politics, religion, spirituality
- Religious or political rhetoric of comics and their authors
- Myths, legends, fables
- Depiction of religious figures or politicians as comic characters
- Comics and science fiction
- Comics and propaganda
- Comics and conspiracy theories
- Representation of apocalypse, utopia, dystopia
- Representation of war
- Superheroes and religious, political identity
- Theoretical approaches to the study of religion, politics in comics

Contributions are sought from researchers at any stage of their careers. Abstracts (300 words) for papers 20 minutes in length should be sent with a short biography to Emily Laycock at e.laycock@lancaster.ac.uk

Deadline for abstracts: 31st May 2012

Website: http://www.lancs.ac.uk/fass/ppr/event/3960/

cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturereligiontwentieth_century_and_beyond 45168Early-Modern Contemporary, MLA 2013, Boston, 3-6 JanAnton Vander Zeevanderzeeal@cofc.edu1329490453americanpoetryrenaissancetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Anton Vander Zeecontact email: vanderzeeal@cofc.edu

Early Modern Contemporary

Browning waxed Shakespearean; Eliot got metaphysical; Rich composed her own valediction. How, then, has recent poetry engaged the early modern imaginary--its politics and materialities, its new science and old weather, its generic conventions and characters.

Submission requirements: 250-word abstracts from critics and/or poets. Depending on the number of submissions, this might be either a round-table or a panel session.

Deadline for submissions: 17 March 2012

cfp categories: americanpoetryrenaissancetwentieth_century_and_beyond 45169Digital Shakespeares - The Shakespearean International Yearbook, 10 April 2012The Shakespearean International Yearbookbrett.hirsch@uwa.edu.au1329492722african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissancescience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: The Shakespearean International Yearbookcontact email: brett.hirsch@uwa.edu.au

Digital Shakespeares: Innovations, Interventions, Mediations

A Special Issue of The Shakespearean International Yearbook

Edited by Hugh Craig and Brett D. Hirsch

If data is "the next big idea in language, history and the arts", as Patricia Cohen has suggested, where are we now in Shakespeare studies? Are we being "digital" yet?

The guest editors of this special issue of The Shakespearean
International Yearbook invite papers to critically explore digital innovations, interventions, and mediations in Shakespeare studies, in particular, the application of digital technologies and methodologies -- such as computational stylistics, data mining and visualization, 3D virtual modelling, electronic publishing, etc. -- and their impact on Shakespeare research, performance, and pedagogy.

Papers theorizing "digital", "networked", or "new media" Shakespeares, as well as papers interrogating the ways in which the digital influences the performance of Shakespeare on both stage and screen, are also welcomed.

Edited by Alex Huang (George Washington University) and Tom Bishop (University of Auckland), The Shakespearean International Yearbook (http://www.ashgate.com/Default.aspx?page=2875) surveys the present state of Shakespeare studies, addressing issues that are fundamental to our interpretive encounter with Shakespeare's work and his time, across the whole spectrum of his literary output. Each issue includes a special section under the guidance of a specialist Guest Editor, as well as a production diary or record of a notable Shakespeare performance.

Abstracts of c.200 words should be emailed to Hugh Craig
and Brett D. Hirsch
by 10 April 2012. Full articles of accepted abstracts will be expected by August 2012 to allow for review, revision, and publication in 2013.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissancescience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 45170Neo-Victorianism and Marginal Voices (MLA 2013, Boston, January 3-6)(MLA 2013, Boston, January 3-6)Cameron Bushnell (cbushne@clemson.edu) and Elizabeth McClure (emcclure@umd.edu)1329497148postcolonialtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: (MLA 2013, Boston, January 3-6)contact email: Cameron Bushnell (cbushne@clemson.edu) and Elizabeth McClure (emcclure@umd.edu)

This panel seeks papers that explore the parameters of neo-Victorian literature from a variety of historical, formal, or theoretical approaches. Questions addressed might include (but are certainly not limited to) the following:

• What is neo-Victorian literature? What are the genre's boundaries? What are its defining characteristics? Are there exemplary texts?
• What is "new" about neo-Victorian literature? Form? Subject positioning? Narrative technique? The alignment of readers' sympathies? Something else?
• How has it developed as a genre? From where does it come, and where might we expect it to go?
• How does neo-Victorian literature provide a site for marginal voices to address issues of identity, subjectivity, politics, race, class, etc.? How does it work in establishing alternative histories?
• What do these texts aim to do? Do they (or must they) have political agendas? In what way do they question ideologies or ideas of history or given knowledge in other epistemological categories like science or sexuality? Do they always represent an alternative to the dominant cultural narrative?
• What relationships does this literature depict between the metropolitan center and the colonial margins? Must it be set in one or the other? As a genre, does it represent a particular subject position? Must it address the colonial experience?
• Is neo-Victorian literature best understood as a subset of postcolonial literature, or is it a distinct genre?
• What time period forms the boundaries of neo-Victorian literature? When can it be written, and when must it be set?
• Where should neo-Victorian literature be taught? In courses on Victorian literature or the Victorian novel? Postcolonial courses? Twentieth-century Anglophone courses? Elsewhere? And what might be the point of teaching these texts?
• What do neo-Victorian texts tell us about the Victorians? What do they tell us about ourselves in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries?

Papers that contextualize neo-Victorian texts, the issues they raise, or their creators or consumers are welcome.

Please send 250-word abstracts to Cameron Bushnell (cbushne@clemson.edu) and Elizabeth McClure (emcclure@umd.edu) no later than March 15, 2012.

cfp categories: postcolonialtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 45171General issue: 2012-13 Neo-Victorian Studiesneovictorianstudies@swansea.ac.uk1329497499african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization:  Neo-Victorian Studiescontact email: neovictorianstudies@swansea.ac.uk

Neo-Victorian Studies is currently soliciting scholarly and creative work for its 2012/13 general issue. The editors welcome articles from established and early career scholars and creative artists on any topic related to the exploration of nineteenth-century legacies from twentieth/twenty-first-century perspectives. We encourage papers that push the understanding or cultural memory of the 'Victorian' beyond its usual temporal and geographical boundaries, investigating the politics of memorialisation, appropriation, adaptation and revision within inter-disciplinary frameworks and across multimedia. We seek work that expands current theoretical concepts of neo-Victorianism and actively interrogates the conditions under which the nineteenth century re-appears in and continues to inform our globalised present. We welcome work on issues as diverse as historical trauma; nationalism and legacies of empire; the politics of nostalgia; 'the repressive hypothesis'; cultural and economic neo-colonialism/reverse colonisation; aesthetic and political ideologies; the 'neo-Victorian' as hybrid genre, mode, or trace; and the 'after-lives' of Victorian figures, texts and artworks. We invite projects that explore the different genres, cultures and spaces of re-doing the nineteenth century or that examine the neo-Victorian as style, performance and practice.

In addition to:
- scholarly theoretical/critical articles of 6000-8000 words (plus bibliography)
- creative pieces (any genre of creative writing or creative arts)
NVS also invites:
- polemical pieces
- interviews
- notices of work in progress
- reviews of relevant critical/creative publications in the field
- critical/creative responses to previous contributions

Please direct enquiries and send electronic submissions via email with Word Document attachment to the General & Founding Editor, Marie-Luise Kohlke at neovictorianstudies@swansea.ac.uk. Please consult our submission guidelines, prior to submission.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 45172MLA Boston 2012: Remembering or Forgetting the Past in Contemporary SpainJavier Venturiventurij@elms.edu1329502337cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Javier Venturicontact email: venturij@elms.edu

Papers discussing the portrayal of historical memory, amnesia, fear and reconciliation in Spanish literature and cinema. 250 word abstracts in Spanish or English by 14 March 2012.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarytwentieth_century_and_beyond 45173MLA Boston January 2013: Remembering or Forgetting the Past in Contemporary SpainJavier Venturiventurij@elms.edu1329503748film_and_televisiontwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Javier Venturicontact email: venturij@elms.edu

Papers discussing the portrayal of historical memory, amnesia, fear and reconciliation in Spanish literature and cinema. Please submit a 250 word abstract in Spanish or English by 14 March 2012.

cfp categories: film_and_televisiontwentieth_century_and_beyond 45174Everyday Romanticism (Special Session, MLA Boston 2013)William Galperin, Rutgers University; Michael Hardy, Rutgers Universitywilliam.galperin@gmail.com, mhardy@eden.rutgers.edu1329506285americancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centurypoetryromantictheoryfull name / name of organization: William Galperin, Rutgers University; Michael Hardy, Rutgers Universitycontact email: william.galperin@gmail.com, mhardy@eden.rutgers.edu

Papers that examine the category of 'the everyday' in transnational Romantic-era writing are welcome. Topics might range from the treatment of common, ordinary subjects in works like Lyrical Ballads and Leaves of Grass to attempts to theorize the everyday in light of industrialization, imperialism, and world war. Also welcome are papers that address the conjunction/disjunction of the everyday with new discourses of statistics, probability, and normalization in the emerging social sciences. Submit 300-word abstracts by March 15, 2012.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centurypoetryromantictheory 45175due date March 20, 2012 "Modernism and the Circus" panel for Modernist Studies Association Oct 18-20, 2012 Las VegasPatricia E. Chu University at Albany-SUNYpchu@albany.edu1329507973modernist studiestwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Patricia E. Chu University at Albany-SUNYcontact email: pchu@albany.edu

MSA14 "Modernism and Spectacle"
October 18-20, 2012 Las Vegas
http://msa.press.jhu.edu/conferences/msa14/cfp.html

"Modernism and the Circus"
In keeping with the MSA 14 theme, this is a CFP for a panel on the significance of the circus to modernism. The circus has become almost synonymous with empty spectacle, disorganized activity, sensational distortions of human and animal form and popular amusement. At the same time the transport and organization required for moving a circus from town to town also seems to exemplify modernity's capacities for rationalization and its penetration of provincial regionalisms. The massive 3-ring American form emerged roughly in the late 1880s and peaked in the mid-1920s. In England and Europe, the development of the modern circus emerged from smaller and different traditions around the same time. The circus is referenced across the modernist arts, but to what end? How is the form or content of the circus spectacle part of modernism's modernity? Issues might include but are not limited to:
-the combination of modern performance technologies with older arts from vaudeville or music hall
-the combination of abstraction and specificity in the circus
-artificiality and performance; "freaks" and fake science
-"high" and "low" culture
-the circus in modernist visual arts and literatures
-circus in relation to rise of cinema
-animal and human forms and behaviors
-construction of the ethnic, racial and colonial

Please send *detailed* proposals with contact information by March 20, 2012 to pchu@albany.edu
Patricia E. Chu
University at Albany-SUNY

cfp categories: modernist studiestwentieth_century_and_beyond 45176[UPDATE]Transitions in Comparative Literature, Cork, Ireland, 28-30 June 2012Comparative Literature Association of Ireland/University College Corktransitionsucc2012@gmail.com1329514892americanclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Comparative Literature Association of Ireland/University College Corkcontact email: transitionsucc2012@gmail.com

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE ASSOCIATION OF IRELAND

CLAI

First International Conference
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE CORK
IRELAND
28-30 June 2012

Call for Papers

Transitions
in
Comparative Studies

The comparative gesture performs both the act and the question of transition between the terms compared. Understood as an intercultural practice, comparative literature may thus also be understood as both a transitive and transnational process – creating its own object/form of knowledge as it identifies and analyses lines of relation and exchange between literary cultures. When navigating between languages, it becomes critically engaged with the possibility and methods of such navigation. Meanwhile, interdisciplinary and inter-medial versions of comparative studies likewise centre about transitions which may themselves remain under-analysed.
The very diversity of comparative practices enumerated, and the attendant versions of comparative discourse, indicate a field of study that is itself faced with the reality of transition. As CLAI (Comparative Literature Association of Ireland) establishes a new space for interaction between comparativists of local and global provenance, the possible directions of this transition are of central concern to this first international conference of the Association.
The methodological and definitional nature of transition in comparative literature resonates urgently with the transitional processes both in Ireland and around the world at the present time. As a thematic concern in comparative work, transition is thus also – within whatever historical period or other configuration it is charted and analysed – key to the renewed relevance of comparative literary scholarship and study today.

Proposals are invited for individual papers engaging with transitions in comparative literature at one or more of the levels outlined above. Proposed subjects for panels currently include Day and Night, Animals and Animality, Writing with/and Style, and the transaction between literary and visual cultures.

Deadline:
Individual proposals – 16 March 2012.

Send abstracts of 300 words and a short biography to

TransitionsUCC2012@gmail.com

Please visit the Association webpage: www.complit.org

cfp categories: americanclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 45177Beyond the Essay: Assignment Innovation (MLA Convention - Jan. 3-6, 2013)Tom Keegan and Matt Gilchrist/MLA Special Sessionthomas-keegan@uiowa.edu, matthew-gilchrist@uiowa.edu1329515799film_and_televisionhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarypopular_cultureprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_compositiontheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Tom Keegan and Matt Gilchrist/MLA Special Sessioncontact email: thomas-keegan@uiowa.edu, matthew-gilchrist@uiowa.edu

In this age of technological advancement, does the essay maintain its pedagogical utility? Are there assignment alternatives that better address the kinds of learning (and living) our students need (or desire) in the 21st century? To help answer such questions, we invite paper/presentation proposals that address the development and use of innovative assignments that extend and challenge the scope of the essay in undergraduate or graduate education.

Topics might include: multimedia projects, blogs, text mining, collaborative composition, service-learning, and civic engagement.

300-word abstracts due by March 20, 2012.

cfp categories: film_and_televisionhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarypopular_cultureprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_compositiontheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 45178Edith Wharton Society Research Travel Awards 2012Edith Wharton Societygary.totten@ndsu.edu1329520636americangender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymodernist studiestheoryfull name / name of organization: Edith Wharton Societycontact email: gary.totten@ndsu.edu

The Edith Wharton Society announces two research awards for 2012-13:

1. Edith Wharton Collection Research Award

Deadline: March 15, 2012

Each year the Edith Wharton Society offers an Edith Wharton Collection Research Award of $1500 to enable a scholar to conduct research on the Edith Wharton Collection of materials at the Beinecke Library at Yale University.

Prospective fellows for the 2012-2013 award are asked to submit a research proposal (maximum length 5 single-spaced pages) and a CV by the deadline to

Gary Totten, Gary.Totten@ndsu.edu
English, Dept. #2320
P.O. Box 6050
North Dakota State University
Fargo, ND 58108-6050

The research proposal should detail the overall research project, its particular contribution to Wharton scholarship, the preparation the candidate brings to the project, and the specific relevance that materials at the Beinecke collection have for its completion. The funds need to be used for transportation, lodging, and other expenses related to a stay at the library.

Notification of the award will take place by April 15th and the award can be used from May 1, 2012 until May 1, 2013. A final report will be due June 1, 2013. The Winner will be asked at that point to submit a short report essay to the Edith Wharton Review, which will briefly inform the readers of the EWR of the research done but will not be in the way of the winner publishing a scholarly article elsewhere as well.

2. The Mount Research Award

Deadline: March 15, 2012

This year, the Edith Wharton Society will begin offering a Mount Research Award of $1500 to enable a scholar to conduct research on Edith Wharton's library at the Mount in Lenox, MA.

Prospective fellows for the 2012-2013 award are asked to submit a research proposal (maximum length 5 single-spaced pages) and a CV by the deadline to

Gary Totten, Gary.Totten@ndsu.edu
English, Dept. #2320
P.O. Box 6050
North Dakota State University
Fargo, ND 58108-6050

The research proposal should detail the overall research project, its particular contribution to Wharton scholarship, the preparation the candidate brings to the project, and the specific relevance that materials in Wharton's library at the Mount have for its completion. The funds need to be used for transportation, lodging, and other expenses related to a stay at the Mount.

Notification of the award will take place by April 15th and the award can be used from May 1, 2012 until May 1, 2013. A final report will be due June 1, 2013. The Winner will be asked at that point to submit a short report essay to the Edith Wharton Review, which will briefly inform the readers of the EWR of the research done but will not be in the way of the winner publishing a scholarly article elsewhere as well.

cfp categories: americangender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymodernist studiestheory 45179[UPDATE] Roots and Radicalisms (DEADLINE 29/2/12)Endnotes 2012 Graduate Conference - University of of British Columbiaendnotes.2012@gmail.com 1329540753african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Endnotes 2012 Graduate Conference - University of of British Columbiacontact email: endnotes.2012@gmail.com

Roots and Radicalisms: Literature, Theory and Praxis

Jean Baudrillard's claim from The Illusion of the End (1992) that history "has become a dustbin. It has become its own dustbin, just as the planet itself is becoming its own dustbin" signals a millennialist angst that proclaims the exhaustion of ideas and the end of historical "progress." And yet, as the significant worldwide political upheavals of the past year attest, global citizens are not yet entirely resigned to living in and among dustbins. Is it possible that we are experiencing a widespread reemergence of radical thinking and action?

Roots and Radicalisms: Literature, Theory and Praxis seeks to draw out ideas and generate discussion around the topic of a return to radical thinking and action by excavating the roots of revolutionary thought throughout literary history, and by engaging with the new radicalisms shaping our discipline and global society today. What forms have approaches to revolution and newness taken in the diverse historical and geographical milieus engaged by the study of literature? What new boundaries are being explored and challenged within the discipline of literary and cultural studies which may contribute to social and political change? And how might we embrace the challenges of speed and scale closing in on fronts as diverse and as connected as the technological, the ecological, the geopolitical, and the minutiae of everyday living?

Possible papers might discuss (but are not limited to):

- Transgressive subjects and subjectivities (bodies, identity, gender)
- Space & Place (borders, border crossing, spatiality)
- Citizenship & the Nation (post- and transnationalism, social justice, biopolitics)
- Globalization (cosmopolitics, encounters, migration flows)
- Empire (power politics, capitalism, neocolonialism)
- Beyond the human? (animal studies, ecology, science studies)
- Sexuality (health, orientation, erotics)
- Materiality & objects (Marxism, materialism, conceptualizing matter)
- Newness (novelty, origins, revolutions)
- Technology (new media, techno-bodies, game theory)
- The Avant-garde (experimentation, aesthetics, risk)
- Old books/new approaches (book history, print culture, digital humanities)
- Winners & losers (persecution, vilification, re/writing history)
- Weirdness (drug culture, fringe activity, speculative thought & challenges to realism)

Presentations will be about 20 minutes each (8 pages double-spaced) and will be followed by a moderated discussion. Those wishing to make presentations should send a 300-word abstract, a 50-word bio, and their CV to endnotes.2012@gmail.com by Friday February 29th.

The conference will take place at the UBC Vancouver campus from Friday May 4th to Saturday May 5th, 2012.

This year's Endnotes conference also welcomes creative submissions (poetry, creative/experimental writing, music, art, multimedia, etc.) for an artist's panel to be held the Friday evening of the conference. Submissions exploring formal or conceptual aspects of radical and revolutionary thinking are encouraged.

We look forward to receiving and reading your submissions,

The Endnotes 2012 Team

http://endnotes2012.tumblr.com/

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 45180Call for Papers IJESET- April-2012IJESETeditor@ijeset.com1329544660international_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysscience_and_culturefull name / name of organization: IJESETcontact email: editor@ijeset.com

International Journal of Engineering Sciences and Emerging Technologies (IJESET) is a reputable venue for publishing novel ideas, state-of-the-art research results and fundamental advances in all aspects of emerging technologies in sciences and engineering Systems.
IJESET is a scholarly open access, peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary, bi-monthly and fully refereed international journal focusing on to provide the academic and industrial community a medium for presenting original research and applications related to recent developments in the field of Engineering Sciences and Emerging Technologies. All submitted articles should report original, previously unpublished research results, experimental or theoretical, and will be peer-reviewed.
Manuscripts should follow the style of the journal and are subject to both review and editing. IJESET covers all areas of Engineering sciences and Technology, publishing refereed research articles, survey articles, and technical notes. IJESET ensures timely reviews of papers after submission and publishes accepted article online immediately upon receiving the revised manuscript as per the reviewer's comments and publication charge.

IMPORTANT DATES
Last Date for Paper Submission : 07-03-2012
Last Date for Notification : 15-03-2012
Publication Due Date : 01-04-2012

cfp categories: international_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysscience_and_culture 45181"Spectacle": 20th Annual Conference of the English and American Literature Association, Republic of ChinaEnglish and American Literature Association (EALA) of the Republic of China & English Department, Fu Jen Catholic UniversityG20@mail.fju.edu.tw1329569993americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: English and American Literature Association (EALA) of the Republic of China & English Department, Fu Jen Catholic Universitycontact email: G20@mail.fju.edu.tw

With its etymological roots in the Latin spectare ("to view, to watch") and spectaculum ("a show"), spectacle indicates a vital, if problematic, point of access to reality, identity, and history. Broadly defined, a spectacle is something exhibited to elicit awe, amusement, nostalgia, curiosity, fear, distraction, or other responses from viewers, and thus mediates the relationships between members of society, moments in history and dimensions of self. When in 1904, Henry Adams suggested the continuity between Gothic cathedrals and world's fairs as both were media of "infinite energy," he exposed the diversity and unity of spectacles as cultural forms. Here, while the diversity of the medieval cathedral pointed towards the "unity beyond space," i.e., God, the diversity of the modern expo testified to overwhelming industrial power. But when, in 1967, Guy Debord viewed modern capitalist society as "the society of the spectacle," the unifying force of spectacle was one that both masked and defined the capitalist language of class division.

Does spectacle, then, necessarily build its unity upon stereotyping others, or agglomerating spectators as passive consumers? Can spectacle itself—in a parade of demonstrators, projected images, or words and texts—be deployed to resist social domination? In many fields of Anglophone literature, the idea of spectacle has become more carefully elaborated in terms of theory and history, as it has served as a touchstone for critical debates. From Medieval and Renaissance dramas, to eighteenth- and nineteenth-century travel writing, to Victorian museums, concert halls, and expositions, spectacles establish points of contention as well as convergence between elite and popular cultures, between literature and materiality. While Victorian forms of spectacle have persisted to the twentieth and twenty-first centuries (with the world expos in Shanghai in 2010 and in Yeosu, Korea, in 2012), they are giving way to electronic media that bring an exhilarating but unsettling immediacy to the Shakespearean adage that "all the world's a stage." It comes as no surprise, then, that theorists from Guy Debord to Fredric Jameson have defined the experience of consumer capitalism as fundamentally spectacular, demanding new paradigms for conceptualizing the future.

We welcome papers and panel discussions on spectacle and its relationship to the fields of English and American literature and culture. Possible topics may include (but are not limited to):
--exhibitions and fairs; museums and collections
--imperial and political spectacles: processions, parades, coronations, inaugurations
--spectacles of race, colonialism, and globalization
-- spectacles in theatre, masques, and operas; spectacles in performance studies
--religious spectacles
--urban and architectural spectacles, memorials and parks
--fashion and bodies on display
--spectacles of punishment and suffering
--aesthetics and politics of vision
--photography, film and other visual images
--consumer spectacles
--mass-media spectacles and virtual spectacles
--environmental spectacles
--spectacles of the sublime
--theories of spectacle
--spectacles and the use of electronic media in teaching literature
--other related topics

Proposals for complete panels are welcome. Conference language is either Chinese or English. Interested scholars are invited to submit a 500-word abstract (including keywords) as well as a brief CV to the following address: G20@mail.fju.edu.tw

Important Dates:
● Abstracts due: February 29, 2012
● Confirmation of acceptance: March 5, 2012
● Full papers due: November 3, 2012
● Conference date: November 24, 2012

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 45182[UPDATE] "Spectacle": 20th Annual Conf., English & American Lit. Association, Republic of China (Nov. 24, 2012; due Feb. 29)English and American Literature Association (EALA) of the Republic of China & English Department, Fu Jen Catholic UniversityG20@mail.fju.edu.tw1329571271americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: English and American Literature Association (EALA) of the Republic of China & English Department, Fu Jen Catholic Universitycontact email: G20@mail.fju.edu.tw

With its etymological roots in the Latin spectare ("to view, to watch") and spectaculum ("a show"), spectacle indicates a vital, if problematic, point of access to reality, identity, and history. Broadly defined, a spectacle is something exhibited to elicit awe, amusement, nostalgia, curiosity, fear, distraction, or other responses from viewers, and thus mediates the relationships between members of society, moments in history and dimensions of self. When in 1904, Henry Adams suggested the continuity between Gothic cathedrals and world's fairs as both were media of "infinite energy," he exposed the diversity and unity of spectacles as cultural forms. Here, while the diversity of the medieval cathedral pointed towards the "unity beyond space," i.e., God, the diversity of the modern expo testified to overwhelming industrial power. But when, in 1967, Guy Debord viewed modern capitalist society as "the society of the spectacle," the unifying force of spectacle was one that both masked and defined the capitalist language of class division.

Does spectacle, then, necessarily build its unity upon stereotyping others, or agglomerating spectators as passive consumers? Can spectacle itself—in a parade of demonstrators, projected images, or words and texts—be deployed to resist social domination? In many fields of Anglophone literature, the idea of spectacle has become more carefully elaborated in terms of theory and history, as it has served as a touchstone for critical debates. From Medieval and Renaissance dramas, to eighteenth- and nineteenth-century travel writing, to Victorian museums, concert halls, and expositions, spectacles establish points of contention as well as convergence between elite and popular cultures, between literature and materiality. While Victorian forms of spectacle have persisted to the twentieth and twenty-first centuries (with the world expos in Shanghai in 2010 and in Yeosu, Korea, in 2012), they are giving way to electronic media that bring an exhilarating but unsettling immediacy to the Shakespearean adage that "all the world's a stage." It comes as no surprise, then, that theorists from Guy Debord to Fredric Jameson have defined the experience of consumer capitalism as fundamentally spectacular, demanding new paradigms for conceptualizing the future.

We welcome papers and panel discussions on spectacle and its relationship to the fields of English and American literature and culture. Possible topics may include (but are not limited to):
--exhibitions and fairs; museums and collections
--imperial and political spectacles: processions, parades, coronations, inaugurations
--spectacles of race, colonialism, and globalization
-- spectacles in theatre, masques, and operas; spectacles in performance studies
--religious spectacles
--urban and architectural spectacles, memorials and parks
--fashion and bodies on display
--spectacles of punishment and suffering
--aesthetics and politics of vision
--photography, film and other visual images
--consumer spectacles
--mass-media spectacles and virtual spectacles
--environmental spectacles
--spectacles of the sublime
--theories of spectacle
--spectacles and the use of electronic media in teaching literature
--other related topics

Proposals for complete panels are welcome. Conference language is either Chinese or English. Interested scholars are invited to submit a 500-word abstract (including keywords) as well as a brief CV to the following address: G20@mail.fju.edu.tw
Venue: Fu Jen Catholic University, Hsinchuang, New Taipei City, Taiwan
Important Dates:
● Abstracts due: February 29, 2012
● Confirmation of acceptance: March 5, 2012
● Full papers due: November 3, 2012
● Conference date: November 24, 2012

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 45183[UPDATE] "Gaming the System" - (10/25/12 conference; 5/1/12 deadline)SCLA 38scla38@gmail.com 1329573471americanclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarymedievalpoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: SCLA 38contact email: scla38@gmail.com

http://complit-scla.org/

"Gaming the System: The Global Stakes of Comparative Study"
For the first time in its 38 year history the SCLA is coming to Vegas, October 25-28, 2012 University of Nevada Las Vegas Convention Center

Keynote Speaker: Bruce Clarke
Paul Whitfield Horn Professor of Literature and Science Texas Tech University
"Gaming the Trace Systems Theory for Comparative Literature"

Plenary Speaker: Eric Hayot
Professor of Comparative Literature Penn State University
"Cosmographies: A Theory of Represented Worldedness"

We welcome 250 word paper proposals or 500 word panel proposals on topics including:

Systems in Literature
Systems Theory and Continental Philosophy
Language Games
The Ludic and the Literary
The World Literary System
Literature and Chance
Gaming and Theory
The Repeatable and the Unrepeatable in Science and Literature
The Aesthetics of Spectacle
Postmodernism and the Simulacrum
Economies of Pleasure
Betting Against the System
Gambling with Literature

Proposals should be sent to scla38@gmail.com by May 1, 2012.

Graduate students who wish to be considered for an SCLA Travel Scholarship of $200 should indicate this in their cover letter and include a short vita (2 pages maximum).

cfp categories: americanclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarymedievalpoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 45184LCTC7th Annual International Conference Language and Communication through Cultures.lobanov@rsu.edu.ru1329582946interdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesscience_and_culturetheoryfull name / name of organization: 7th Annual International Conference Language and Communication through Culturecontact email: s.lobanov@rsu.edu.ru

The conference is dedicated to problems of Germanic and Romance languages, general linguistics, discourse linguistics, language pragmatics, cognitive linguistics, language style/register, translation theory, methodology of teaching foreign languages/ESL, general pedagogy, cross-cultural communication and interaction.

The official languages of the conference are Russian and English. Papers are accepted and published in the conference proceedings in either of these languages.

lctcrus.rsu.edu.ru

cfp categories: interdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesscience_and_culturetheory 45185MSA October 2012: Modernist MultilingualismMaria Kager, Rutgers Universtymariakager@yahoo.com1329583329african-americanamericaninternational_conferencesmodernist studiestwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Maria Kager, Rutgers Universtycontact email: mariakager@yahoo.com

Modernist Multilingualism

MSA Conference October 18-21 2012, Las Vegas, NV
Maria Kager, Rutgers University
mariakager@yahoo.com

Literary multilingualism has an ancient and continuous history, yet it experiences an indisputable climax in Modernist fiction. The multilingual explosion of Joyce's Finnegans Wake, the incessant back and forth between English and French of Beckett's writings, and the covert but constant presence of Yiddish and Hebrew in Kafka are but a few examples of multilingual occurrences in some of Modernism's most prominent authors.

This panel aims to discuss the aesthetic elements and political implications of Modernist multilingualism as well as specific examples able to provide relevant models of analysis, and welcomes papers investigating multilingualism as a specific Modernist phenomenon.

Please send detailed abstracts (200-300 words) with contact information and short author bio by March 21 to Maria Kager: mariakager@yahoo.com

cfp categories: african-americanamericaninternational_conferencesmodernist studiestwentieth_century_and_beyond 45186CFP: Queer Conceptions: Modernism and the Possibilities of Pregnancy for MSA 14, Las Vegas, Oct. 18-21, 2012Caitlin Newcomer & Aimee Wilson/Florida State Universitycen09e@my.fsu.edu or aawilson@fsu.edu1329604110americangender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetryscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Caitlin Newcomer & Aimee Wilson/Florida State Universitycontact email: cen09e@my.fsu.edu or aawilson@fsu.edu

In his recent article, "Pregnant Men: Modernism, Disability, and Biofuturity in Djuna Barnes" (2010), Michael Davidson argues, "Modernist cultural representations of the pregnant male foreground the spectacle of reproduction loosed from its putative organic site in the female body and displace it elsewhere—the test tube, the surrogate womb, the male body, and, not insignificantly, the novel." Following the work of Davidson, we are seeking papers for a panel that will explore abnormal, unnatural, futuristic, or queer conceptions in all their modernist iterations. How else do modernist authors reconceptualize or resituate the trope of reproduction? How do modernists revise the classic model that makes writing into a kind of male childbirth? And, apropos of the conference theme, how is the pregnant body spectacular - fascinating, disgusting, curious, enchanting, or performative?

Possible topics may include, but are not limited to the following:

- biotechnology
- eugenics
- gothic or monstrous pregnancies
- pregnancy and queer bodies
- pregnancy and disability
- feminist reconsiderations of pregnancy

Send 300 word abstract and brief CV to Aimee Wilson (aawilson@fsu.edu) or Caitlin Newcomer (cen09e@my.fsu.edu) no later than March 20, 2012.

cfp categories: americangender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetryscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 45187Baby at the Breast: Representations and Discourses of Breastfeeding in Western Culture - MLA, Boston, Jan. 2013Christa Baiadacbaiada@bmcc.cuny.edu1329606282african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarymedievalpopular_culturerenaissancetwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Christa Baiadacontact email: cbaiada@bmcc.cuny.edu

Baby at the Breast: Representations and Discourses of Breastfeeding in Western Culture
MLA 2013 Jan. 3-6 Boston

This proposed session seeks papers that explore depictions of breastfeeding in Western literature, film, art, etc., (any period) and analyze the engagement of these representations with the ever-changing and often contentious discourses of motherhood and womanhood.

Topics, in reference to various cultural forms, might include:
- symbolic associations of breastfeeding
- breastfeeding as racial and/or class marker
- the politics of breastfeeding
- breastfeeding as a measure of a mother
- iconography of the Madonna breastfeeding
- images of celebrities breastfeeding
- breastfeeding vs. bottle-feeding in television or film
depictions of mothering
- feeding the baby in mommy lit
- the wet nurse
- American vs. European depictions of breastfeeding
- breastfeeding in memoirs of motherhood
- breastfeeding narratives in the blogosphere
- sexuality and breastfeeding
- the breast pump and cyborg-mothers
- gender inversions of nursing, i.e. men breastfeeding

Abstracts of 250 words and short cv due March 15th via email to
Christa Baiada, cbaiada@bmcc.cuny.edu

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarymedievalpopular_culturerenaissancetwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 45188Congreso Anual de la AILCFH: Entre la Tierra y el Ciberespacio. Grand Valley State University, Michigan, Nov 8-10, 2012Asociación Internacional de Literatura y cultura femenina hispánicamoretz@gvsu.edu1329629189ecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinternational_conferencesfull name / name of organization: Asociación Internacional de Literatura y cultura femenina hispánicacontact email: moretz@gvsu.edu

A primera vista el ecofeminismo y el ciberfeminismo pudieran parecer tendencias opuestas, de hecho representan modos diferentes de crítica cultural de las presunciones sobre los cuerpos de las mujeres, nuestras vidas y nuestros textos. En conjunto, estas metodologías analíticas nos brindan perspectivas holísticas para analizar la producción cultural de las mujeres en un amplio espectro, desde lo natural y material hasta lo artificial y virtual, y todo lo que se incluye entre ambas categorías. L@s participantes pueden considerar cualquier época en sus ensayos y pueden abordar los siguientes temas:

•Nuevas tecnologías y el mundo virtual
•La construcción del ciborg: cuerpo,género y representación artística.
•Monstruos y monstruosidades.
•Las incursiones de la mujer y su producción artística en la red virtual.
•La alianza entre la mujer y la máquina: nuevas representaciones.
•¿Matriz?/Madre/ "Otr@".
•El hipertexto y la hiperescritura: ¿una escritura de la diferencia?
•La mujer como 'mascarada', ficción, construcción artificial.
•Utopías vs. distopías: ciencia ficción, ficción de horror.
•Ecofeminismo: cuerpo, género y representaciones artísticas.
•La naturaleza del transgénero y sus respresentaciones.
•Daños ambientales: ruinas, desastres ecológicos.
•Nuevas/otras espiritualidades.
•Las prácticas de ruptura como acciones políticas de concienciación.
•Los movimientos sociales y las formas de resistencia en las artes, el cine y la literatura.
•Raza, género y activismo.
•Resistencias indígenas.
•Los feminismos de la Tercer Ola.

cfp categories: ecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinternational_conferences 45189REMINDER - CFP 21st Century British Fiction SymposiumBirkbeck, University of London21stcentury.symposium@gmail.com1329646655cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespostcolonialtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Birkbeck, University of Londoncontact email: 21stcentury.symposium@gmail.com

Twenty-First Century British Fiction – A Symposium
Saturday 12th May 2012, Birkbeck, University of London
Keynote address: Professor Robert Eaglestone (Royal Holloway)

Twenty-First Century British Fiction seeks to consider and promote current perspectives on the fiction of British writers in the twenty-first century. Post-2000 writing has proved itself as arguably wide-ranging and innovative as its predecessors. The post-millennial decade witnessed a new literary generation emerge and establish itself with familiar and less familiar names such as Monica Ali, Nicola Barker, Steven Hall, Philip Hensher, Tom McCarthy, Patrick Neate and Zadie Smith. Concurrently, there have been increasingly sophisticated engagements with genre fiction from Susanna Clarke, David Mitchell, David Peace, China Miéville and Sarah Waters. Meanwhile, already established, now canonical, writers such as such as Amis, Barnes, Byatt, Hollinghurst, Rushdie and Winterson continue to publish work that commands attention. This same period has witnessed the growth of new models of literary production, evolving cultural contexts, and an increasingly transnational planet.

Many of the aforementioned writers have featured on Granta's decennial lists of Best Young British Novelists; with the next list due in 2013, it seems only fitting and appropriate to survey the twenty-first century's first decade of British Fiction. We invite submissions for 20 minute presentations on these and other British writers. Papers on individual authors and single works are welcome, as are essays on broader trends that explore the cultural, historical and stylistic contexts that have produced twenty-first century British fiction. These might include, but are not restricted to, the following topics and themes:

Authenticity – Writing after theory – The waning of postmodernism – Science and medicine in literature – Transnational belonging – Postimperial/global imaginaries – Genre/post-genre fictions – Post-devolution writing – Narrative multiplicity – Provincial/urban voices – Fictions of suburbia – Hysterical Realism – The post-9/11 novel in Britain – Ecocriticism – Digital media and the novel – Graphic fictions – Adaptations and appropriations – Class, power and marginality – Literary inheritances – Fictions of alterity – Children's/young adult literature – Gender, sexuality and feminism – Post-millennial utopian/dystopian spaces…

Please send abstracts of no more than 250 words, with brief details of biography and affiliation, to Bianca Leggett and Tony Venezia at 21stcentury.symposium@gmail.com no later than 15th March 2012. We also welcome proposals for themed panels of three speakers. We are currently in negotiations with an academic publisher interested in publishing a volume based on the proceedings of the symposium. The symposium is sponsored by the School of Arts, Birkbeck, University of London. Follow us on twitter @C21st_symposium.

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/arts/news/twenty-first-century-british-fiction-a-sy...

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespostcolonialtwentieth_century_and_beyond 45190REMINDER - CFP From Akira to Zizek: Comics & Cultural TheoryStudies in Comics journal studiesincomics@googlemail.com1329646844cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Studies in Comics journalcontact email:  studiesincomics@googlemail.com

From Akira to Žižek: Comics and Contemporary Cultural Theory

Papers are invited for Studies in Comics volume 3.2. This special issue seeks to provide a forum for new articulations between comics studies and contemporary cultural theory. The importance and continued relevance of post-structuralist/postmodernist thought, the Frankfurt school's studies of mass culture, McLuhan's media theory and Bourdieu's critical sociology are rightly acknowledged. Such figures dominate theoretical academic discourse on comics, as in other areas of cultural studies, often at the expense of engagement with alternative strands of critical thinking.

Rather than risking stagnation, comics studies needs to critically engage with theoretical paradigms not yet sourced.  Submissions are welcome from scholars and enthusiasts that explore the conjunctions of comics and cultural theory. These could be engagements with the work of specific thinkers or emergent schools including, but not limited to:

Bruno Latour and ANT – Michel Serres – Paul Virilio – eco-criticism – thing theory - N. Katherine Hayles – Teresa de Lauretis - Franco Moretti – Manuel De Landa – Manuel Castells - cognitive capitalism – transmedia narratives – Giorgio Agamben – Édouard Gissant – Jacques Rancière – Friedrich Kittler – non-representational theory - speculative realism/materialism - Alain Badiou – Zygmunt Bauman – Rosi Braidotti – Antonio Negri – Jan van Dijk - affect theory – Lev Manovitch - Kojin Karatani – visual culture studies - Slavoj Žižek...

Articles should be 4,000-8,000 words from any discipline with a strong critical focus. Abstracts should be received by 1st May 2012 in the first instance. Please send 300 word abstracts to studiesincomics@googlemail.com and include the word ARTICLE in the subject heading. Please indicate the intended word count of the article. Completed papers will be required by 15th August 2012. All submissions are peer reviewed and papers must be in English. Reviews of publications and exhibitions are also welcome, as are creative submissions, by the same deadlines indicated above.

Tony Venezia, guest editor

Julia Round and Chris Murray (Editors)
M. Thomas Inge, Bart Beaty and Dean Chan (Associate Editors)
Paul Gravett (Review and Exhibitions Editor) and Roger Sabin (Consulting Editor)
Douglas Noble (Creative Submissions Editor)

Published by Intellect Books
ISSN 2040-3232

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 45191Narrating Value in the Long Eighteenth Century (MLA 2013; abstracts due 3/15)Steve Newman/Department of English, Temple Universitysnewman@temple.edu1329658320cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesromantictheoryfull name / name of organization: Steve Newman/Department of English, Temple Universitycontact email: snewman@temple.edu

How do various ways of valuing objects and people—among them, moral philosophy, aesthetics, and political economy—emerge, conflict with, and complement each other during the Long Eighteenth Century (c. 1660-1830)? More specifically, how are these modes of valuation informed by narrative structures, and to what degree is narrative itself valued or devalued in their formation and/or reception and/or circulation?

By addressing these questions, this panel aims to build on recent work in the histories of discourses during this era (e. g., This is Enlightenment), but also, perhaps, to bring inquiries into this fertile moment in the history of valuation into dialogue with theories of value in the wake of Marx (e. g., "Theory/Value/Crisis" in the Winter 2012 PMLA) or current philosophical debates over value pluralism and the incommensurability or incomparability of values.

Submissions focusing on individual texts or broader trends, and on comparative work within Europe or between European and non-European texts, are all welcome.

Abstracts (500 words max.) to Steve Newman (snewman@temple.edu), Department of English, Temple University, Anderson Hall, 10th Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19122

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesromantictheory 45192Call for papers for Cultura. International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology Cultura. International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiologyjournal.axiology@yahoo.com 1329669590cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinarymodernist studiestwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Cultura. International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiologycontact email: journal.axiology@yahoo.com

Call for papers Cultura. International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology
http://versita.com/cijpca
No. 1/2012 – "Cultural Illusions"
Deadline for paper submissions: March 31, 2012.
No.2/2012 – "Semiotics of World Cultures"
Deadline for paper submissions: August 31, 2012.
In each issue there is a section named "Views upon Ethics, Truth and Language". Therefore, articles that do not fit the topic of our calls for papers, can be submitted to the editors, following the formal rules indicated at: http://versita.com/cijpca/authors/
Submissions can be made via email at journal.axiology@yahoo.com
The editorial board encourages the submission of manuscripts based on original research that are judged to make a novel and important contribution to understanding the values and cultural phenomena in the contemporary world. All submissions will be double peer reviewed.
For guidelines on manuscript preparation and submission, please visit Versita website: http://versita.com/cijpca
The print version of this journal is published by Peter LangVerlag, Frankfurt am Main, Germany, http://www.peterlang.de/
Cultura. International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology is abstracted and indexed in some of the major repositories and electronic databases.
Last issue: http://www.metapress.com/content/122224

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinarymodernist studiestwentieth_century_and_beyond 45193New Approaches to Teaching Langston Hughes's Writings (January 3-6, 2013)The Langston Hughes Society (MLA Convention-Boston, MA)sharon.jones@wright.edu1329669964african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrytheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: The Langston Hughes Society (MLA Convention-Boston, MA)contact email: sharon.jones@wright.edu

Abstracts focusing on innovative ways of teaching Hughes's texts. Presenters must join the Modern Language Association and the Langston Hughes Society. 250 word abstract and CV by 10 March 2012 to Sharon Jones (sharon.jones@wright.edu).

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrytheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 45194UPDATE - 2012 PAMLA Conference - Stage to Screen: Contemporary PlaywrightsBarry Hall / Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Associationbhalltw@gmail.com1329682185african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitypopular_culturepostcolonialtheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Barry Hall / Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Associationcontact email: bhalltw@gmail.com

Papers are sought for an approved PAMLA special session panel: Stage to Screen: Contemporary Playwrights.

While much attention has been paid to film versions of Shakespeare, film adaptations of contemporary playwrights' work have received relatively little scholarly notice. This panel will examine stage-to-screen adaptations of post-1950 dramatic works, and the changes wrought upon them by the possibilities and demands—technical, artistic, and commercial—of the different medium. Topics we are interested in include (but are not limited to):
· adaptations across linguistic, national and cultural boundaries.
· the consequences of commercial imperatives, or the "hollywoodization" of artistic works.
· analyses of stage-to-screen adaptations that illuminate (or blur) the essential boundaries of theatre and cinema.
· the playwright in the film industry.
· how particular stage-to-screen adaptations support or discredit the theories of Eisentsein, Bazin, Truffaut, Sontag, Debord, Deleuze and others.

The conference will take place at Seattle University, Washington from October 19-21, 2012. Submission Deadline: Saturday March 31, 2012.
Proposals should be submitted by March 31, 2012 via the PAMLA website's 2012 conference form available at www.pamla.org. Send complete proposals to Barry Hall at bhalltw@gmail.com.

Participation in the conference requires payment of PAMLA 2012 membership dues by May 1, 2012 and the separate conference registration fee by September 15, 2012. See www.pamla.org for details. The conference program will be posted online by October 1, 2012.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitypopular_culturepostcolonialtheatretwentieth_century_and_beyond 45195[UPDATE] Poetry & Poetics of the 1980s [June 27 - July 1, 2012]National Poetry FoundationNPF_Paideuma@umit.maine.edu1329691540african-americanamericanmodernist studiespoetrytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: National Poetry Foundationcontact email: NPF_Paideuma@umit.maine.edu

The Editorial Collective of the National Poetry Foundation invites paper and panel proposals for the next in our sequence of "decade" conferences, to be devoted to the Poetry and Poetics of the 1980s, American and international, and to be held from Wednesday to Sunday, June 27-July 1, 2012, on the flagship campus of the University of Maine System in Orono, Maine.

The NPF welcomes paper and panel proposals on any and all aspects of poetic practice in the decade of the 1980s. What emerged? What changed? What happened just out of frame? What connections brought poetry into dialog with other fields? What social and political contexts mattered most? What of the present can be traced back to that moment? What poets, poetic formations, tendencies in poetics warrant our continued attention? What accidents of reception might we now revisit and perhaps repair?

Prospective participants are encouraged to draw on the full range of archival resources in conceiving their projects, including the digital audio, digital video, and digital facsimile holdings now widely available on-line.

As with previous NPF conferences, the scholarly presentations and panels will be amply supplemented by a variety of poetry readings, including plenary readings by notable figures associated with the decade being explored.

Paper proposals consisting of a title and a brief (300-500 word) abstract should be directed to the NPF Editorial Collective at NPF_Paideuma@umit.maine.edu. Panel proposals should include, in addition, a brief rationale for the envisioned grouping. Proposals for alternative forms of intellectual practice/presentation, such as roundtables or seminars, will be read with interest.

The extended deadline for proposals is March 15, 2012.

Visit http://npfconferences.wordpress.com/ for documentation of previous NPF conferences.

Queries may be directed to any member of the Editorial Collective:

Carla Billitteri, Associate Professor of English, NPF
Carla_Billitteri@umit.maine.edu

Steve Evans, Associate Professor of English, NPF
Steven.Evans@umit.maine.edu

Benjamin Friedlander, Associate Professor of English, NPF
Ben_Friedlander@umit.maine.edu

cfp categories: african-americanamericanmodernist studiespoetrytwentieth_century_and_beyond