One Day in the City: 15 June 2012

full name / name of organization: 
University College London
contact email: 
n.shepley@ucl.ac.uk

The UCL Festival of London and Literature: “One Day in the City”
15 June 2012

CALL FOR PAPERS

This conference – “One Day in the City” – will explore the everyday experience of the city, particularly (though not limited to) London. It is organised by the Department of English and the Bartlett School of Architecture, as part of UCL’s first literary festival, and papers will be welcomed from all disciplines. We expect papers from the fields of architecture, art, the digital humanities, film, history, literature, philosophy, and urban geography, but we are also interested in setting up a dialogue with researchers in neuroscience or psychology, for example. All proposals are encouraged.

Topics might include, but need not be restricted to:

• circadian or one-day novels
• appropriating urban space: skateboarders, parkour, rap
• modes of being in the city
• hours of the day
• the cockney
• (night)walking in the city
• mapping the city
• the City
• visions of the city
• the riotous and rioting city
• the Thames
• Dickens and the city
• suburbia

Please bear in mind that the conference is part of a larger literary festival, which will be open to the general public. It is requested, therefore, that conference papers are accessible to a non-specialist audience and kept to a summary 10 minutes, so that plenty of time is left for discussion.

Keynote speakers are yet to be announced, but our list of contributors include Man Booker Prize Winners Alan Hollinghurst and A.S. Byatt, alongside Andrew O’Hagan, Adam Thirlwell, Ali Smith, Geoff Dyer, Giles Foden, Will Self, and the poets Alan Jenkins, Sarah Maguire, Daljit Nagra, and Mark Ford.

Proposals for short papers (250 words) should be sent, along with a short bio, to: n.shepley@ucl.ac.uk

Deadline for proposals: 31 March 2012

cfp categories: 
eighteenth_century
interdisciplinary
medieval
modernist studies
renaissance
romantic
science_and_culture
twentieth_century_and_beyond
victorian