Multicultural Literature in the Classroom: Politics and Pedagogy (MMLA Confernece Nov. 8-11)

full name / name of organization: 
Melina Vizcaino-Aleman/UNM
contact email: 
mviz@unm.edu

Topic: "Borders and Double-Consciousness in Ethnic American Literature"

This panel addresses the intellectual and epistemological uses of borders and double-consciousness in ethnic American literature. Prospective panelists may explore any type of double-consciousness, and are encouraged to explore geographical and cultural borders; mainstream and marginal texts; men and women. Papers on African, Asian, European, Mexican, and Native American literature (short fiction, poetry, folklore, novels, autobiography, memoir) and all historical periods will be considered. The panel is especially interested in how borders populate and inform ethnic American literature in both historical and contemporary works, and it looks for papers that will construct an intellectual and historical arc for teaching and thinking through race, ethnicity, and American literature.

The panel is especially interested in these questions: How does ethnic American literature make use of borders? What lessons do borders teach us about double-consciousness and ethnic American literature? What are the pedagogical uses of borders and double-consciousness? Why is double-consciousness such a compelling concept, and how do we make use of it as a political platform and pedagogical tool? How do we teach ethnic American literature in mono-cultural and/or multicultural classrooms, and why should it matter to students?

Submit abstracts to Melina Vizcaíno-Alemán at mviz@unm.edu by June 1.

For more information on the MMLA Convention go to the website (http://www.luc.edu/mmla/callforpapers.html).

cfp categories: 
african-american
american
childrens_literature
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
ecocriticism_and_environmental_studies
ethnicity_and_national_identity
gender_studies_and_sexuality
interdisciplinary
modernist studies
poetry
postcolonial
rhetoric_and_composition
theory
twentieth_century_and_beyond