3rd International Akşit Göktürk Conference: Humour in Literature, 11-12 October 2012, İstanbul [UPDATE]

full name / name of organization: 
English Language and Literature, İstanbul University
contact email: 
iagc@istanbul.edu.tr

Humour in Literature

Humour is widely regarded as the tendency to provoke laughter and provide enjoyment, yet when we are amused, laugh or smile at something we regard to be funny, the context of the object in question is often not funny at all, but rather sad and to be pitied. Although humour may be often associated with ‘mere comedy’ and thus, with a lower form of literature, it is striking to note the great number of great works of literature that indeed use humour. Throughout the ages, humour has always remained a popular approach of many authors who desire to provoke a reaction in their readers or audiences. The seriousness we attribute to humour is certainly underscored by the following remark made by Frank Moore Colby: “Men will confess to treason, murder, arson, false teeth, or a wig. How many of them will own up to a lack of humour?”

This inter-disciplinary conference seeks to investigate and explore the nature and significance of humour and its impact on diverse fields of art such as literature, drama, film or painting.

To encourage innovative dialogues, we warmly welcome papers from diverse disciplines and professions.

Suggested topics:

Black Humour

Humour as Defense Mechanism

Humour and the Carnivalesque

Laughter and Psychology

The Use of Satire

Farce

Puns and Verbal Ambiguity

Irony

PROPOSALS SHOULD BE SUBMITTED NO LATER THAN 20 JUNE 2012

NOTIFICATION OF ACCEPTANCE WILL BE SENT 30 JUNE 2012

http://www.istanbul.edu.tr/edebiyat/ide/iagc2012.html

cfp categories: 
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
ecocriticism_and_environmental_studies
eighteenth_century
ethnicity_and_national_identity
gender_studies_and_sexuality
interdisciplinary
international_conferences
medieval
modernist studies
poetry
popular_culture
postcolonial
renaissance
rhetoric_and_composition
romantic
theatre
theory
travel_writing
twentieth_century_and_beyond
victorian