Teaching Over-looked, Non-Traditional Medieval & Renaissance Texts

full name / name of organization: 
This Rough Magic / www.thisroughmagic.org
contact email: 
boechem@sunysuffolk.edu

This Rough Magic (www.thisroughmagic.org) is a journal dedicated to the art of teaching Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

All too often, the same canonical works and authors find their way into Medieval and Renaissance Literature courses. While canonical literature is extremely important and not to be avoided, a great many authors (i.e., Cyril Tourneur) and texts (i.e., Life of St. Margaret of Antioch) go un-noticed. We are therefore looking for short essays (i.e., 5-10 pages) that encourage readers to try non-traditional, over-looked, teachable texts inside their classrooms. Essays should answer the following:

•How can the author/text in question be used in a particular class?

•What audience (undergraduate/graduate) should the author/text in question be geared towards?

•What themes/ideas can one cover using the author/text in question?

It is important to try new things; submissions to "Short Essays: Teaching Non-Traditional Text" should encourage faculty to do just that.

Submission deadline for our Winter 2012 issue is currently October 1st, 2012.

For more information, please visit our website www.thisroughmagic.org or contact Michael Boecherer: boechem@sunysuffolk.edu

Faculty and Graduate Students are encouraged to submit.

This Rough Magic's editorial board members are affiliated with the following academic institutions and organizations:

· The American Shakespeare Center
· Bridgewater State University
· California State University, San Bernardino
· The Catholic University of America
· Fitchburg State University
· Newman University
· State University of New York - Stony Brook
· Suffolk County Community College
· University of Connecticut
· Vassar College

cfp categories: 
classical_studies
general_announcements
humanities_computing_and_the_internet
interdisciplinary
journals_and_collections_of_essays
medieval
poetry
religion
renaissance
rhetoric_and_composition
theatre
theory