Caribbean Sessions at NeMLA (3/21-24/13; deadline 9/30)

full name / name of organization: 
Northeast.mla@gmail.com
contact email: 
nemlasupport@gmail.com

The NeMLA Board and Tufts University are pleased to announce that Dionne Brand will be the keynote speaker; her presentation is accompanied by 11 Caribbean sessions now accepting abstracts.

Born in Trinidad, Dionne Brand is a renowned Canadian poet, novelist, and essayist. Her writing is notable for the beauty of its language, and for its intense engagement with issues of social justice, including particularly issues of gender and race.

NeMLA is particularly delighted to welcome Dionne Brand as part of our long standing commitment to Caribbean Literatures. 2013 Caribbean sessions:

Travelling Back: History and the Contemporary Moment in the Work of Dionne Brand. Seeking to celebrate Dionne Brand’s keynote address – and to complement the other Caribbean sessions – this panel will take up the ways that Brand brings history (or histories) into a critical and profound engagement with the contemporary moment, on both individual and national levels. Submissions are invited that consider this or related questions in any of Brand’s works. Rachel Mordecai, University of Massachusetts Amherst, .

'To Be a Different Kind of Creature': The 1950s and Caribbean Literature. The 1950s represented a transformative movement in literary creativity in the Caribbean that may be seen now as a cultural Renaissance transcending insular and national boundaries, posing questions about culture, power, and identity that continue to have vital implications for the current 'postcolonial' era. Paper proposals, preferably from comparatist, transnational perspectives, are invited on topics pertaining to all genres of Francophone, Hispanophone, and Anglophone literatures during this crucial period: Christopher.Winks@qc.cuny.edu

Caribbean Film as Witness. This panel focuses on the deployment of the medium of film from and about the Caribbean as a means of witnessing that represents a possibility for changing the contexts in which the witnessing occurs as Paulo Freire says is witnessing's role. Several filmmakers have used their craft to bear witness to the region's violent history and its legacy. This panel aims to provide a forum to critically discuss their efforts. Please submit a 250-300 word abstract to Toni Pressley-Sanon at toni.sanon@gmail.com.

Caribbean Literature and History. Imagining the Past for the Present: This roundtable will consider important ways Caribbean fiction, poetry, drama and theater or creative non-fiction have represented history with reference to the present. Presenters should each focus on a particular case within the period 1950-2010, while engaging in a broad discussion of the role of literature in developing historically informed consciousness about the region and its diasporas. Elaine Savory, The New School

Ethnofuturisms. Spatiotemporal Geographies: This seminar extends Mark Dery's definition of 'Afrofuturism' as a method of expression and critique to include Asian/Asian-American, Pacific Islander, Latino/a, Afro-Caribbean and Indigenous texts. Participants will explore the convergences and divergences between different formulations of 'Ethnofuturism' and their aesthetic and political impetuses. Please submit inquiries and abstracts of no more than 250 words via email to Tzarina T. Prater, Bentley University, tprater@bentley.edu.

From Whose History Excluded: Borders and Bodies in the Caribbean and Americas. Colonization creates borders that move across communities and nations. Bodies move through and around these constructed boundary lines, and in so doing they test the (in)stability and (in)finite nature of them. This panel invites papers that engage and (re)imagine the interaction between bodies and boundaries in the Americas and Caribbean. Papers approaching this topic through a comparative approach are most especially welcome. Please send 250 word abstracts to J. Indigo Eriksen, San Francisco State University, at j.indigo.eriksen@gmail.com.

Home: Domesticity and Nationalism in the Literature of the Caribbean Diaspora. This panel examines the ways in which home is conceptualized in terms of the imagery and rhetoric of domesticity and nationalism in the literature of the Caribbean diaspora. The ability make a home of the diaspora may depend on members of the Caribbean community constructing or claiming domestic spaces either as extensions of the claim to a nation or as symbolic diasporic experience. Please submit 250-500 word abstracts about the intersections between domesticity and nationalism in Caribbean literature to Kim Evelyn at kim_evelyn@my.uri.edu.

Protest and Politics in Latin American Literature. Themes of escape, survival, and resistance run through Latin American literature. From Echeverria's 'The SlaughterHouse' to Ana Lydia Vega's 'Cloud Cover Caribbean', Latin American stories examine and critique the politics of the region. This roundtable would serve to facilitate a discussion of the ways in which classic works as well as modern day stories use the tradition of political and social commentary. Beth Smith

Re-visiting the 'Nation' in Contemporary Narratives by American Women of Color. This panel seeks papers that address the political-economic engagement of the U.S. with different parts of the world that has re-nuanced definitions of Americanness/nationhood/ national belongings in narratives by American women of color from the Caribbean Islands, Latin America, South Asia, and the Middle East. The panel encourages comparativist approaches that read together two or more texts to chime on the possibilities of understanding the notion of the nation as a relational concept. Please send 500-word abstract to dmgomaa@uwm.edu

Travelling Back: History and the Contemporary Moment in the Work of Dionne Brand. Seeking to celebrate Dionne Brand’s keynote address – and to complement the other Caribbean sessions – this panel will take up the ways that Brand brings history (or histories) into a critical and profound engagement with the contemporary moment, on both individual and national levels. Submissions are invited that consider this or related questions in any of Brand’s works. Rachel Mordecai, University of Massachusetts Amherst, .

Women and Writing in the French Caribbean. This panel addresses how women writers from the French Caribbean illustrate writing. How do women represent the act of writing? What are the limits of writing as a tool of self-assertion? What relationships between women and writing emerge as women turn to writing as an instrument that helps stage, subvert, and navigate the tensions between the self and society? Please send 300-word abstract that includes name, contact information, and institutional affiliation to Lisa Connell at lconnell@westga.edu.

44th Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
March 21-24, 2013
Boston, Massachusetts
Host Institution: Tufts University

To review the full 2013 Call for Papers: http://www.nemla.org/convention/2013/cfp.html
Deadline: September 30, 2012
Questions? nemlasupport@gmail.com

cfp categories: 
african-american
american
postcolonial