Interaction between Technology and Poetry

full name / name of organization: 
John Woznicki
contact email: 
jrwoznicki@gmail.com

Call for Papers

44th Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
March 21-24, 2013
Boston, Massachusetts
Host Institution: Tufts University
http://www.nemla.org/convention/2013/cfp.html

‘I’d Like to Teach the World to Sing’: Interaction between Technology and Poetry

As we enter a new stage in our information age where new mediums and, thus, new industries, dominate the transfer and spread of all information, including art, academics are charged with analyzing the potential ramifications that current technologies might have on the production and reception of art. This panel seeks
papers that examine today’s poetry as it interacts with technology and explores technology’s influence on poetry. For example, has poetry become more democratized or corporatized as a result of technology? Have services like Blogger and Tumblr allowed for emerging voices to develop and rise? Have publishing houses and leading poetry organizations taken control of new mediums (and thus messages)? Has poetry become more didactic or less so? More concrete or more abstract? Has the poetic line become ‘Twitter-fied’? Papers contending with (but not limited to) technology’s influence on the teaching/reading of poetry, on delivery, acceptance, message, form, content, poetics, ownership/copyright, etc. will be considered. Technologies/mediums may include smartphones, tablets, e-readers, blogs, websites, podcasts, text messaging, email, wikis, course management systems, social media such as Twitter, Tumblr, etc.

Abstracts of 300 words or less to John Woznicki, at jrwoznicki@gmail.com

Deadline: September 30, 2011
Please include with your abstract:
Name and Affiliation
Email address
Postal address
Telephone number
A/V requirements (if any; $10 handling fee with registration)

cfp categories: 
humanities_computing_and_the_internet
interdisciplinary
poetry
popular_culture
science_and_culture
theory
twentieth_century_and_beyond