How to STEM: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Education in Libraries

full name / name of organization: 
Carol Smallwood, editor
contact email: 
smallwood@tm.net

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

Carol Smallwood, educator, librarian; co-editor Preserving Local Writers, Genealogy, Photographs, Newspapers and Related Materials, (Scarecrow Press 2012); editor Pre- & Post-Retirement Tips for Librarians, (ALA Editions, 2012); co-editor How to Thrive as a Solo Librarian, (Scarecrow Press, 2012)

Vera Gubnitskaia, Orange County Library System librarian, Orlando, Florida; co-editor: Continuing Education for Librarians: Workshops, Conferences, College, and Other Ways (McFarland, forthcoming); co-editor Marketing Your Library: Tips and Tools That Work, (McFarland & Company, 2012)

During the past few years, groups like the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, and Center for Education, have been placing great emphasis on the significance of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) education. The curricula has been revised in many institutions and school districts across the country. Chapters sought for an anthology by practicing academic, public, school, special librarians, LIS faculty in the United States, Canada, and others sharing practical how-to chapters on: grant writing, community partnerships, outreach, research, and programming activities. Creative methods are sought that apply to various types of libraries and job positions.

Concise, how-to chapters words based on experience to help colleagues. Your nuts and bolts article should total 3000-3500 words. No previously published or simultaneously submitted material. One or two authors per chapter; complimentary copy as compensation, discount on more.

Please e-mail titles of 2-3 topics, each briefly described separately by September 30, 2012 with short biography sketch(s); place STEM/Last Name on the subject line to: smallwood@tm.net

cfp categories: 
interdisciplinary
professional_topics
science_and_culture