CFP for Edited Collection: COMMODITY FUTURITIES: INVESTING IN SCIENCE FICTION PREDICTIONS 10/31/2012

full name / name of organization: 
Andy Hageman & Eric Otto
contact email: 
hagean03@luther.edu, eotto@fgcu.edu

CFP for Edited Collection: COMMODITY FUTURITIES: INVESTING IN SCIENCE FICTION PREDICTIONS
Editors: Andrew Hageman (hagean03@luther.edu) and Eric C. Otto (eotto@fgcu.edu)
Abstracts due October 31, 2012
Final essays due May 31, 2013

We are seeking proposals for an edited collection tentatively titled COMMODITY FUTURITIES: INVESTING IN SCIENCE FICTION PREDICTIONS, with completed essays due in XX 2013. We seek contributions that speculate through science fiction on what kinds of commodities, variably defined, will be crucial in the future: which things will become scarce, abundant, lost, valuable, worthless, toxic, panacean, etc.

SF worlds writhe, mutate, bulge, burst, implode with things. Not just world-changing plot-engine “nova,” to use Darko Suvin’s terminology, but also the mundane materials of homes, transportation networks, boots, cafes and coffee, organic and genetically engineered fruits, trash compactors, bookshelf kitsch, kipple, etc.

Contributors to COMMODITY FUTURITIES are invited to engage with nova and/or any range of commodities found in science fiction, from more conventional commodity-things such as water and wool to love or critical thinking, as we hope this collection will provide multiple approaches to extrapolating the futures of commodities through SF.

We deem it vital to open this invitation to diverse approaches, methodologies, and aims.

• Potential chapters might engage in ecological critique of production, circulation, or consumption, or of private/public control of commodities such as water.

• Another approach might deploy science fiction as narratives from which to extrapolate a capital investment program, perhaps in the form of a mutual fund or funds family based upon an author or series: The 80s Cyberpunk Fund, The Neal Stephenson Fund, etc.

• Other chapters could analyze the diegetic and/or extradiegetic futurities of video games, from their narrative roles in something like The Last Starfighter to more earthly, quotidian roles in nano-innovations.

• One more alternative might trace a single commodity through a text, an author, or a constellation of science fictions (e.g., coffee in William Gibson’s writings).

• We also encourage chapters that problematize or disrupt ideologies of commodity-thought by contesting processes of commodification that takes place in SF, illuminating SF resistances to commodification, or undermining commodity-thought ideologies from an Object-Oriented Ontology position, an Appadurai-inflected commodity fetishism analysis, or in the vein of Jonathan Lamb’s The Things Things Say.

Please direct all queries, questions, and submissions to hagean03@luther.edu and eotto@fgcu.edu. Abstracts should be around 250-300 words; submissions should also include contact information and a short biography. Please plan for final essays to range between 4000-6000 words.

cfp categories: 
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
ecocriticism_and_environmental_studies
film_and_television
interdisciplinary
science_and_culture
twentieth_century_and_beyond