CFP - "Playing at Violence," ATHE [10/27/2012; 8/1-4/2013]

full name / name of organization: 
Lindsay Adamson Livingston

Call for Papers
"Playing at Violence"
The Association for Theatre in Higher Education's 2013 Conference (Orlando, FL; Aug 1-4, 2013)

I am looking for 1-2 more panelists to fill out a possible panel for the
Association for Theatre in Higher Education Conference in 2013. The panel, which will be submitted to the Performance Studies Focus Group, will explore the contours of performances that engage in some way with the ideas of violence, play, and performance. How do these three concepts interact? How is violence (or representations of violence) "playful"? How is violence performed? Possible themes
may include (but are certainly not limited to):

- violent videogames or role-playing
- reenactments of historical acts of violence
- children's playful violence
- gunplay
- thanatourism
- violence as entertainment (film, theatre, music)
- comedic violence
- violent personas or online behaviors

Papers from various historical, critical, theoretical, and geographical
perspectives are welcome. Please send a 200-word abstract and short bio to Lindsay Adamson Livingston (adamson.livingston@gmail.com) ASAP. Feel free to contact Lindsay with questions.

484502013 International Conference on e-Education, e-Business and Information Management (ICEEIM 2013)Science Technology Pressiceeim@163.com1350974460classical_studiesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiestheorytravel_writingvictorianfull name / name of organization: Science Technology Presscontact email: iceeim@163.com

CALL FOR PAPERS

2013 International Conference on e-Education, e-Business and Information Management (ICEEIM 2013)
submited for indexing to Thomson ISI ( ISTP, CPCI, Web of Science), Scopus (by Elsevier) and EI/Compendex
2013年教育信息化、电子商务与信息管理国际学术会议
http://www.iceepsd.org/iceeim2013/

2013 International Conference on e-Education, e-Business and Information Management (ICEEIM 2013) will be held in Beijing, China during March 14-15, 2013. The aim objective of ICEEIM 2013 is to provide a platform for researchers, engineers, academicians as well as industrial professionals from all over the world to present their research results and development activities in Information, Business and Education Technology. This conference provides opportunities for the delegates to exchange new ideas and application experiences face to face, to establish business or research relations and to find global partners for future collaboration.
ICEEIM 2013 ONLY accepts unpublished research papers. Submitted conference papers will be reviewed by technical committees of the Conference. All accepted papers will be published in the conference proceeding by Atlantis Press and be online available in full text via the publication platform, then be submited for indexing to Thomson ISI ( ISTP, CPCI, Web of Science), Scopus (by Elsevier) and EI/Compendex. The excellent papers presented at the conference will be selected for publishing in some International Journals which are indexed by Scopus, SCI or EI.
Some excellent papers(after extension) will be recommended to International Journals:
Future Internet (ISSN 1999-5903) , indexed by EI
Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292) , indexed by EI, Scopus and SCI
Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220) , indexed by Scopus, SCI, Impact Factor: 2.060 (2011) Important Date
Paper Submission (Full Paper) Before November 30, 2012
Notification of Acceptance On December 15, 2012
Final Paper Submission Before December 30, 2012
Conference Dates March 14-15, 2013
SUBMISSION METHODS:
Email: iceeim@163.com ( .pdf and .doc)
Topics:
2013 International Conference on e-Education, e-Business and Information Management (ICEEIM 2013) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances and research results in the fields of e-Education, e-Business and Information Management. The conference is soliciting state-of-the-art research papers in the following areas of interest:
e-Education, e-Business, e-Management and e-Learning, e-Health Technologies, Emerging Technologies ,Entrepreneurship, Environmental Technology Management, Financing and commercializing innovation, Global Production Network, Green Technologies, Human Resource Management, Human resource management issues in innovation, Industrial and Manufacturing System Technologies, Industrial and Systems Engineering ,Industrial Engineering, Industrial, Mechanical, Systems Science and Engineering, Information and Communication Technology Management ,Innovation and management issues within multinational corporations, Innovation and Management of Renewable Resources, Innovation for low-income markets and social innovation, Innovation for sustainable development, Innovation in services, logistics and supply-chain management, Innovation Policy and Management, Innovation, Management and Technology, Intellectual property and knowledge management, Intellectual Property Right and Patent, IT Management: e-Government, Health Informatics, e-Commerce, Key (converging) technologies (nano-, bio-, ICT technology) , Knowledge Management, Logistics and Scheduling, Machinery and Machine Design, Manufacturing and Production Processes, Manufacturing Engineering, Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Management of Innovation and Technology, Management of Nuclear / Energy Technologies, Management of Technology Education and Research, Management of Technology for the Knowledge Economy, Management of Technology in Developing Countries, Managing collaborative innovation, Managing IT and E-Commerce, National and Regional Systems of Innovation, New Product / Service Development, New Product Development, Organizational innovation, Process Innovation, Project and Program Management, Project Management, Research and Development Management, Regional innovation systems, clusters and industrial networks, Risk and Security Management, Risk Management, Semantic Web and Ontology Management Technology, Service Science and Innovation, Six Sigma and Quality Management, Small and Medium Enterprises, Social impact of technology development, Supply Chain Management, Sustainable Development, Sustainable Innovation and Technology Incubation, Technological Alliances, Mergers and Acquisitions, Technological innovation, product innovation and industrial innovation, Technology Foresight and Forecasting, Technology in the Financial / Services Sector, Technology Intelligence and Planning, Technology Strategy, Technology Transfer, Marketing and Commercialization, Telecommunications Technology, Health Services, and Technology Assessment, Telemedicine Technologies and Telehealth Services, The Integration of Technology and Business Strategies, Theory of Technology, Water Desalination Technologies, Web Technologies and Information Management, Information Technology, Computer Science, Communication Technology, Education Science, Sports Education , Information Management

Conference General Contact
E-mail: iceeim@163.com
Tel: +86-13146590575

cfp categories: classical_studiesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiestheorytravel_writingvictorian 48451"William Carlos Williams as Emersonian" ALA conference, Boston, May 23- 26, 2013.Submission deadline: Friday, January 4th, 2013.William Carlos Williams Societycopers@gmail.com1350983022americanmodernist studiespoetryromantictwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: William Carlos Williams Societycontact email: copers@gmail.com

CFP by the Williams Carlos Williams Society for the
American Literature Association's 24th annual conference,
Boston, May 23- 26, 2013

Panel entitled "William Carlos Williams as Emersonian"

Chair: Ian Copestake, Editor, William Carlos Williams Review
Please submit your proposal of 200 words outlining your 20 minute panel paper to Ian Copestake at copers@gmail.com by Friday, January 4th, 2013.

cfp categories: americanmodernist studiespoetryromantictwentieth_century_and_beyond 48454[UPDATE] In Momentum: Literature, Travel, and Alterity; LSU Mardi Gras Conference: Feb. 7-8, 2013; Submissions Due: Dec. 1, 2012Louisiana State University English Graduate Student Associationmardigrasconference2013@gmail.com1350996298african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Louisiana State University English Graduate Student Associationcontact email: mardigrasconference2013@gmail.com

In Momentum: Literature, Travel, and Alterity
The 23rd Annual Graduate Student Mardi Gras Conference
Louisiana State University
February 7th and 8th, 2013
Keynote Speaker: Dr. Katherine McKittrick

This year, which marked the centennial of the Titanic's tragic maiden voyage, has witnessed a continuing interest in travel, the related discourses of globalization, migration, space, and place, and connected issues regarding alterity. In response to discourses emphasizing travel's complicity in the imperialistic construction of racial and cultural otherness, scholars such as Myriam J. A. Chancy have suggested re-envisioning postcolonial approaches that not only expose travel writing's cultural imperialism but also locate its potential for cultural critique and self-reflexivity. Such potential carries on a tradition of rethinking the possibilities of travel and travel writing--a tradition including Kwame Anthony Appiah's Cosmopolitanism which argues that such an -ism is not a solution but a challenge, and that "it begins with the simple idea that in a human community, as in national communities, we need to develop habits of coexistence: conversation in its older meaning, of living together, association." Likewise, Alexandra Peat has augmented E. Alan Morinis's four-fold model of pilgrimage—the initiatory, instrumental, wandering, and imaginary—by examining ethics, faith, otherness, and the sacred as fundamental to modernist exile, tourism, and travel literature. Most recently, Ginger Strand's Killer on the Road delves into the issue of travel's immorality by exploring the cultural connections between anonymity, criminality, and the American Interstate System.

The 23rd annual Mardi Gras Conference seeks to investigate travel in all forms. Theories of travel are in constant movement and, through this conference, we hope to map the various ways travel, literature, and alterity intersect and to chart a course for future scholarship in the field.

Paper and panel topics include but are not limited to:
- Genre studies of travel writing, guidebooks, pilgrimage narratives, topographical histories, children's and adolescent adventure tales, etc.
- Themes such as migration, immigration, settlement, borderland, time-travel, cosmopolitanism; characters such as the mariner, the flâneur, the expatriate, the hobo; settings such as the road, the sea, the train station, etc.
- Travel and/as quest, conquest, escape, exile, wanderlust, and tourism (including ecotourism and slum/disaster tourism)
- Relationship between travel and criminality
- Memory and trauma in relation to movement inward and outward
- Displaced identities (i.e. home and homelessness; borderlands and liminality)
- Migrant labor markets, outsourcing, and transnational circuits
- Cartography in literature, cinema, music, and visual art
- Gendered, classed, racialized, and sexualized spaces, including the corporeal as geographical place
- Modernism, postmodernism, and discourses of movement, displacement, and post-tourism

Our keynote will be Dr. Katherine McKittrick, associate professor of gender and cultural studies at Queen's University. Dr. McKittrick's research focuses on social and spatial justice and she has published numerous articles on racial geographies in Canadian and African American literature and culture. Her most recent books include Demonic Grounds: Black Women and the Cartographies of Struggle and a volume of essays she edited with Clyde Woods entitled Black Geographies and the Politics of Place.

We encourage papers from a variety of disciplines. Proposals for individual papers as well as panel proposals organized by topic will be considered. By December 1st, please submit an abstract of 250 words (including a working title) as an attachment along with contact information, including name, institutional affiliation, degree level, email address, and phone number to mardigrasconference2013@gmail.com.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 48455Call for Student Papers, The Association for Gravestone Studies Annual Meeting and Conference, June 18-23, 2013The Association for Gravestone Studiesinfo@gravestonestudies.org1350999937african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinarypopular_culturereligionfull name / name of organization: The Association for Gravestone Studiescontact email: info@gravestonestudies.org

Students

Earn a chance to attend The Association for Gravestone Studies Conference and Annual Meeting as a guest of AGS. Enter the AGS Student Paper Competition.

The 2013 Conference will be held June 18-23 at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon

Requirements: The applicant must either be a graduate or undergraduate student at an accredited college or university, as well as a member of the AGS.

Application: The application will consist of the title, abstract and text for a scholarly paper suitable for presentation at the Friday Lecture Session. The entry should be in the exact form that it will be delivered at the conference, including visuals. It should be a twenty-minute presentation. PowerPoint is the preferred presentation medium.

The award will cover registration, plus room and board for the full conference (about $525) and will also include a cash prize of $300, which will be presented at the conference.

The recipient of this award will be expected to present the paper during the Friday evening lecture session, June 21, 2013.

Deadline: March 31, 2013

Your entry should consist of a cover letter with a PDF attachment, emailed to Bob Drinkwater c/o info@gravestonestudies.org.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinarypopular_culturereligion 48456Jameson's Spatial Dialectic as Global Positioning System [ACLA, Toronoto, April 4-7, 2013]Koonyong Kimkoonyong.kim@gmail.com1351004933americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Koonyong Kimcontact email: koonyong.kim@gmail.com

Michel Foucault once remarked that "I believe that the anxiety of our era has to do fundamentally with space, no doubt a great deal more than with time." Indeed, there is a strong sense in which space has become one of the most privileged loci of economic, social, and cultural production in the age of globalization. Though many contemporary thinkers have addressed this postmodern "spatial turn," Fredric Jameson's theoretical discourse is remarkable for its insistence on space as a cultural dominant in the world today. From his theorization of "cognitive mapping" and his critique of the "prison-house" of (post)structuralist epistemology, to his intervention into the architectonics of postmodern culture, to his cartography of utopia, his oeuvre can be understood as a series of sustained attempts to map diverse spatial phenomena and tendencies under late capitalism.

This panel aims to cast new light on Jameson's work as a kind of global positioning system or a spatial mode of thinking that seeks to locate, map, and contest the spatial/spatializing logic of late capitalism and its contemporary cultural formations. We welcome any proposals that address the importance of space qua history in Jameson's theoretical discourse. We are particularly interested in papers that address the following topics:

1) Jameson's symptomatic readings of contemporary spatial forms, including, most notably, the city, architecture, cyberpunk, video art, and film

2) Jameson's spatial dialectic in comparison with spatial dimensions in other thinkers (e.g. Lacan's Imaginary/Symbolic/Real, Derrida's deconstruction, Deleuze's deterritorialization, Lefebvre's social space, Bhabha's interstitial space)

3) Jameson's cartographic imagination and its relevance for theorizing transnational networks of globalization that are increasingly facilitated and underpinned by cybernetics and digital technology

If you are interested in participating in the seminar, please submit your paper proposal (Max. 250 words) and short bio (50 words) by midnight, November 15, 2012 (Pacific Standard Time) on the following website:
http://acla.org/submit/index.php

Please feel free to contact me at koonyong.kim@gmail.com should you have any questions about this seminar.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 48457Of Human Bondage: Literatures of Constraint - March 1-2, 2013University of Montrealegssconference@gmail.com1351010175african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: University of Montrealcontact email: egssconference@gmail.com

9th Annual Université de Montréal English Graduate Conference
March 1 and 2, 2013

OF HUMAN BONDAGE: LITERATURES OF CONSTRAINT

Keynote Speaker: Sherry Simon (Concordia University)

Whether employed as a literary trope or as a thematic exploration of circumstance, literature has always examined or been subjected to varying forms of constraint. On the Island of Buru, Pramoedya Ananta Toer composed his Buru Quartet. Georges Perec's novel, A Void, is written entirely without the letter "e". Christian Bök's Eunoia features univocalic chapters, as well as thematic, metric, and rhythmic limitations. Eldridge Cleaver wrote his ground breaking Soul on Ice while imprisoned in California, while Assata Shakur composed her autobiography Assata while in exile from the United States in Cuba.

The 9th annual graduate conference at the Université de Montréal proposes to investigate the stakes of representation and/or utilization of constraint in literature. From American slave narratives, to the experimental poetics of Oulipo, to current political climates of state oppression, constraint, in some form or another, has always been present in literary history.

This colloquium seeks to ask: What is the socially transformative work of literature under pressure? How do literatures about constraint orient our political conscious towards institutions of imprisonment and captivity; systems and languages of oppression; formal conventions; modes of literary production; social etiquette and behaviour; normativity; intersections of race, age, mobility, ability, sex, gender, and sexual orientation? We welcome paper proposals that address the conscious theme through lenses such as:

● Prison literature (fiction, memoir, etc.), literature of captivity
● Slave narratives
● Exile writing
● Narratives of disability and impeded mobility, disability theory
● Migration, exile
● Intersections of racial, sexual and gendered identity
● "Passing" or opacity
● Experimental writing, constraint-based writing, conceptual writing
● Dystopia
● Anti-colonialisms, post-colonialisms
● Mental health, asylums and hospitalization
● Nationalism and language, minority languages in literature, literature of / theories of exiguity
● Translation in literature / literature in translation, translation theory
● "Captive readership"
● Discourse of violence/violence of discourse
● Restrictions of archival and museum spaces
● Banned literature; publishing and editorial constraints

Please send 250-300 word abstracts to egssconference [at] gmail [dot] com. Include your name, affiliation, email address, and a short bio of no more than 75 words. Deadline for submission is January 16, 2013.

Organizing chairs:
Prathna Lor (MA)
Kelly McDevitt (MA)
Alexandra Grenier (PhD)

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 48458HISTOIRE(S): 18-19-20 October 2013Association des Études Françaises et Francophones d'Irlandeadeffi.conference@yahoo.ie1351023984bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Association des Études Françaises et Francophones d'Irlandecontact email: adeffi.conference@yahoo.ie

Histoire(s)

National University of Ireland, Maynooth
18-19-20 October 2013

- Narrative strategies
- History and fiction in historical novels
- Writers and History
- Autofiction and autobiography
- Revisionism and historiography
- Myths, tales and legends
- Individual and collective histories
- History and memory
- Micro-histories
- Hidden histories
- Forgetting/forgotten history
- Literary history
- Historians and literature
- The history of Readership and reception
- French Literary Canon
- La politique et l'Histoire
- History and identity
- His-stories/Her-stories
- 1913-2013, centenaries and commemorations

Above are some suggested sub-themes for the 15th annual conference of the Irish Association for French & Francophone Studies (ADEFFI, www.adeffi.ie), which takes as its focus the theme of 'Histoire(s)'. The conference will take place on 18, 19 and 20 October 2013, and is to be held on the beautiful campus of the University of Maynooth, on the outskirts of Dublin.

Proposals for papers should be sent via e-mail to adeffi.conference@yahoo.ie on or before 18 March 2013 (format MS Word). Proposals should be no more than 300 words and may be written in French or English.

cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 48459Acting (on) the text: the case of new media Synthesis 7 (2014) (Deadline 15/01/2013)http://synthesis.enl.uoa.gr/e.m.kalyva@gmail.com1351027312humanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryfull name / name of organization: http://synthesis.enl.uoa.gr/contact email: e.m.kalyva@gmail.com

Synthesis 7 (2014) Call for Papers
Acting (on) the text: the case of new media

There is a tendency with new media technologies towards information exchange via interaction. With applications such as hypertexts, pervasive games, and social network sites, new media are characterised by flexibility in data morphology and manipulation, including generating, structuring, storing, and sharing data. While the reader becomes user (and often co-author) rather than recipient, new technologies not only transform the materiality of the text as a container of information, but also the activity of reading and writing and its theorisation in new (meta)spaces.
The rise of new media calls for reconsiderations of binaries such as author/reader, producer/consumer, and source centre/periphery, the role of the participating audience, and the nature of information exchange. Such re-articulation(s) could further be situated in relation to the political impetus of technological developments and the new ways of engaging and performing the world that these enable. Put differently, new media alter the material applications and critical potential of the networks of production and dissemination of information, as well as the communities within which these operate and help create. As such, the activity of reading/writing in new media becomes a particular material and social practice that can open up and create new, more democratic spaces.
This guest issue of Synthesis invites a critical discussion of new media aiming to re-examine the relations across information, user, and medium under a new paradigm of interactivity, and the pressing questions of ethics and responsibility as a digital divide persists in our globalised age. What is the social value of these new reading/writing activities and the spaces that they create? What is the role of the user from literary, cultural, and sociological perspectives? How does the dialectic between materiality and virtuality affect our conceptualisation of literary and artistic practice? With special focus on cultural, societal, and political implications, we invite reflections on the modes, effects, and theorisations of acting (on) the text in new media. As a practice, this leads to a new kind of collective: from collective production to the enhancing and shaping of communities, and to collective action.
Possible topics include, but are not limited to:
• Digital cultures: reading/writing as a social activity and the rhetoric of participation
• Who owns the open text? Co-authoring, appropriation, and activism
• The multimodal text: trans-media adaptations, sociological approaches to the performativity of the text, cognition, and perception
• Hybrid spaces across the private and public sphere: from information exchange to social interaction
• Pervasive games, augmented reality, and the societal impact of new technologies
• Art's social practices, community projects, and formulations of identity
• Re-articulation(s) of the audience, medium, and the space of information exchange, and their critical and political potential
• The power of new media technologies as instruments of propaganda and control, and the centre/periphery binary
• Neoliberal virtualisation of 'choice': how real are the end-user's choices?
Article proposals of 800-1000 words, including a biographical note of 300 words, should be sent to the issue editors Eve Kalyva (e.m.kalyva@gmail.com) and Christos Physentzides (christosphy@gmail.com) by 15 January 2013. Authors will be notified by 1 March 2013, and full articles of 6000-7000 words should be submitted by 15 October 2013. For further information, including submission guidelines, see the Synthesis website, http://synthesis.enl.uoa.gr.

cfp categories: humanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinary 48460"Re-visioning Alcott: Her Impact on the Work of Later Writers and Artists," Annual conference of the American Literature AssociaBeverly Lyon Clark / The Louisa May Alcott Societybclark@wheatonma.edu1351038243americanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfull name / name of organization: Beverly Lyon Clark / The Louisa May Alcott Societycontact email: bclark@wheatonma.edu

Writers as esteemed and influential as Gertrude Stein, Adrienne Rich, Cynthia Ozick, and J. K. Rowling have acknowledged a debt to Louisa May Alcott. References to and re-visionings of Alcott's writing and life have appeared in the work of such authors as Joyce Carol Oates, Barbara Kingsolver, Geraldine Brooks, Lynda Barry, and many others. Alcott's work has also been translated to stage and screen, in such forms as musicals, mini-series, and anime. And dozens of artists have created illustrations, including May Alcott, Frank Merrill, Jessie Willcox Smith, Norman Rockwell, Barbara Cooney, and Tasha Tudor. This session will seek to trace Alcott's impact on the work of writers and artists who have come after, and will consider how engagement with her work—fleeting or substantial—makes meaning in these later settings and perhaps revises our thinking about Alcott. Please send 200-300 word abstracts electronically to Bev Clark at bclark@wheatonma.edu. The deadline for proposals is Monday, January 21, 2013. Early submissions welcome.

cfp categories: americanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approaches 48461"Celebrating the Sesquicentennial of Louisa May Alcott's Hospital Sketches: A Teaching Round Table," Annual conference of the AmSandra Petrulionis / The Louisa May Alcott Society shp2@psu.edu1351038430african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityvictorianfull name / name of organization: Sandra Petrulionis / The Louisa May Alcott Societycontact email:  shp2@psu.edu

Published in 1863 to immediate success as the Civil War sloughed into its second year, _Hospital Sketches_ is now available in several paperback editions, most with excellent introductions detailing its relevance in a variety of classrooms—from literature and history in general to women's, gender, African American, and disability studies in particular. We seek abstracts describing successful classroom strategies that feature _Hospital Sketches_ or that present Alcott as an important figure in antislavery reform, women's history, and popular literature of the Civil War. In which kinds of classrooms is _Hospital Sketches_ an effective springboard for examining the development of the Women's Central Association of Relief as an arm of the US Sanitary Commission, and for calling attention to the need for post-war freedmen's education? How does Nurse Periwinkle's increasing ambivalence toward the war enable us to provide students with a more realistic grasp of the human cost of this still too-often romanticized military conflict? How does Alcott's treatment of racial themes in this text compare with similar considerations in her other work? How does _Hospital Sketches_ usefully complement themes observable in other works that treat the Civil War, not only in Alcott's writings but in those authored by other (and later) writers? Please send brief abstracts to Sandy Petrulionis at shp2@psu.edu, by January 21, 2013.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityvictorian 48462Trans-Scripts CFP: "Thinking Activism" (Deadline: Jan. 1, 2013)Trans-Scripts, an interdisciplinary online journal in the Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of California, Irvine transscriptsjournal@gmail.com1351040108african-americanamericanclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Trans-Scripts, an interdisciplinary online journal in the Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of California, Irvine contact email: transscriptsjournal@gmail.com

Trans-Scripts – an interdisciplinary online journal in the Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of California, Irvine – invites graduate students to submit their work for publication. The theme of the third volume is "Thinking Activism."

In "The Location of Culture", Homi Bhabha reflects, "There are many forms of political writing whose different effects are obscured when they are divided between the 'theoretical' and the 'activist'." Scholars in the humanities and social sciences have long struggled to position their own subjective experiences and investments in relation to the scholarship they produce. Some choose to situate their research between two competing poles of theory and activism. Others, like Bhabha, argue against constructing an arbitrary distinction between the two, positing instead that scholarship is activism, and vice-versa.

Activism can take many forms; as an intellectual labor, it challenges current structures of knowledge production and has the potential to reinvent the university's role within and against the cultures that sponsor it. To that end, we seek submissions in the humanities and social sciences that focus on the productive intersections of scholarship (what some might call "theory") and activism (what some might call "practice"), as well as submissions that address the differences between these two modes of thinking and doing.

The popular democratic protests of the last few years make it all the more crucial that we address the ways in which our own positionality or privilege is enabled by systems of power that actively work to dispossess people. It is important, now more than ever, for academic scholarship to address its relationship to activism, in an attempt to provide new meaning to the purpose and direction of academic research. The concerns outlined here have produced and are productive of critical scholarship in a vast range of disciplines, including literature, law, medicine, rhetoric, anthropology, gender studies, sociology, English, economics, history, political science, and critical race studies, to name a few.

Possible paper topics include, but are not limited to:

• Historical or theoretical examinations of activist movements, strategies, and tactics
• Coalition building across time, space, and issue areas; transnational networks of scholars and activists
• Post-recession governmental austerity measures and their social effects
• The privatization of higher education and student (financial) dispossession in the United States as well as abroad, where student movements, like the Chilean student protests (2011-2012), continue to demand educational reform.
• Conservative activism (i.e. the Tea Party) and the academy
• Social media (i.e. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube) and social justice
• Prison-Industrial Complex and/or Criminal Justice
• Police brutality, including the limits and potentialities of law enforcement reform
• Radical visions for peace and public safety
• Rhetoric and democratic participation
• Immigration policy and reform
• Sexual violence
• Gender (in)equality, particularly in light of recent attempts to legislate women's bodies and healthcare in the United States, as well as its instantiations in different local contexts abroad.
• Marriage (in)equality, LGBT rights, and other homonormative forms of inclusion
• Significant budget cuts to social services, like those we have seen in the UK
• Religious discrimination and violence
• The relationship between text and critic
• The move towards public writing in Composition Studies
• Anthropology's reflexive turn and other questions regarding the ethics of participant-observation (ethnography)
• Action-research methodologies
• Poverty and homelessness, particularly in light of recession-era global increases
• Death penalty debates
• Affirmative Action debates
• The personal as political, and other phenomenological extensions of feminist theory
• Protest as performance (and vice versa)
• Identity politics and its critiques
• Medical-Industrial Complex and/or Patient Advocacy
• Ability as a category of analysis/ The rise of Disability Studies
• Public space and free speech
• Critical Pedagogy and its discontents
• An examination of what is or should be the relationship between the community and the university
• Broad trends of anti-intellectualism or (conversely) academic exceptionalism
• Academic publication and the public sphere (i.e. academic freedom in publicly-funded universities)
• Thought crimes – the (literal) policing of radical ideology, both inside and outside of institutionalized educational environments

Trans-Scripts welcomes all submissions that engage topics related to activist-scholarship or activism more broadly. They may, but certainly need not, address the examples listed above. Submissions need not conform to any disciplinary or methodological criteria. They need only be original, well researched, and properly cited in MLA style. English language contributions from all universities in all countries will be considered. In addition, we welcome contributions from independent scholars who are not affiliated with any formal institution.

Faculty Contributors

In addition to selected student work, renowned academics will contribute editorial pieces, offering students the chance to place their work in conversation with experts in various fields. Past contributors have included Étienne Balibar, Hortense Spillers, Lee Edelman, and Roderick Ferguson.

Submission Guidelines and Review Process

The deadline for submission is Tuesday, January 1, 2013. All submissions should be written in English. The total word count should be between 3,000 and 12,000 words, including footnotes. Explanatory footnotes should be kept to a minimum. Submissions should employ the MLA style of citation (for further information on the journal's submission guidelines and mission statement, see the journal website at http://www.humanities.uci.edu/collective/hctr/trans-scripts/index.html).

All pieces should be submitted as a Word document attached in an email to transscriptsjournal@ gmail.com. The email should include your name, institution (if you have one), program/department, and an email address at which you can be contacted. Please also include a short abstract of less than 300 words describing the content and argument of the piece.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 48464UPDATE: VISUAL CULTURE at SW/TX PCA/ACA deadline November 16, 2012SW/TX PCA/ACAvictoria.grieve@usu.edu1351079940popular_culturefull name / name of organization: SW/TX PCA/ACAcontact email: victoria.grieve@usu.edu

The Visual Culture Area seeks research in all aspects of visual culture concerning the American experience, past and present. Visual Culture studies recognizes the predominance of visual forms of media, communication, and information in the postmodern world, including popular and "low" cultural forms, media and communications, and the "high" cultural forms or fine art, design, and architecture.

We welcome research in the following areas:
• print images and graphic design
• TV and cable TV
• film and video in all interfaces
• computer interfaces and software design
• Internet/Web as a visual platform
• digital multimedia
• advertising in all media
• fine art and photography
• fashion
• architecture, design, and urban design
• indigenous art
• museum exhibitions
• public art and memorials
• maps

The submission deadline for the SW/TX PCA/ACA is November 16, 2013. All presenters must enter their own information and proposals into the conference database: conference2013.swtxpca.org.
Email questions for the Visual Culture Area to area chair Victoria Grieve (Dept of History, Utah State University) at victoria.grieve@usu.edu.
Professors, independent scholars, teachers, and professionals are encouraged to participate. Graduate students are particularly welcome at the conference. Please note that the SW/TX PCA/ACA does not accept previously presented or published papers. Further, it permits only one presentation per person per year. The conference features numerous individual subject areas, each with its own Area Chair, and each typically including multiple conference panels. Please consult the area list on the SW/TX PCA/ACA website to determine whether the Visual Culture area is the appropriate area to receive your proposal.

Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Association 34th Annual Conference
"Celebrating Popular/American Culture(s) in a Global Context"
February 13-16, 2013
Albuquerque NM
http://www.swtxpca.org

Proposal submission deadline: November 16, 2012

Conference hotel: Albuquerque Hyatt Regency Hotel and Conference Center
330 Tijeras Avenue Northwest , Albuquerque, NM 87102
(505) 842-1234

cfp categories: popular_culture 48465"The Technologies of Starlings, Parrots, and Other Mocking 'Birds': Parroting, Parody, and Paralanguage."ACLAmholm2@fordham.edu1351082645african-americanchildrens_literatureecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespostcolonialromanticscience_and_culturetravel_writingvictorianfull name / name of organization: ACLAcontact email: mholm2@fordham.edu

Because of their natural ability to imitate and improvise upon the songs and sounds of others, starlings exemplify the powers, the problems, and pleasures of mimesis. The mimicry of starlings, like that of parrots, raises many questions about the techniques of art, artifice, and paralinguistic performance within a comparative literary and cultural perspective. How do starling tropes orient classical texts from Dante to Shakespeare, Sterne to Austen, Mozart to Messiaen? How does the mimicry of the European starling compare to that of the parrot? How does it reorient colonial and postcolonial locations of culture, mimicry, and the (post)human? How do starlings and parrots, caged or uncaged, track the global positioning of cultures and languages?

This seminar invites papers that address the creative and/or imitative agency of any such starling acts or analogous technologies.

Some possible issues papers might address include:
-the narrative/poetic function of starlings, parrots, or caged birds in individual -works from any historical moment or linguistic tradition
-mechanical birds and other imitative automatons
-starling technologies in music (the significance, for example, of Mozart's starling)
-the starling as a figure for migratory patterns
-the starling and/or parrot and the technologies of exoticism
-scientific taxonomies and representations
-starlings and print technologies (e.g. The Ornithology of Francis Willoughby, -Bewick's History of British Birds, Audubon's Birds of America)
-Skylarks and Nightingales in Romantic poetry

The annual American Comparative Literature Conference which will be held in Toronto, Canada, April 4 - 7, 2013. The abstracts need to be submitted on the ACLA website: by November 15, 2012.

cfp categories: african-americanchildrens_literatureecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespostcolonialromanticscience_and_culturetravel_writingvictorian 48466[UPDATE] Directing in the Performing Arts Summit - Date Change: Expanded to 4 daysAcadia University, Dalhousie University, Humber School of Creative & Performing Artsanna.migliarisi@acadiau.ca1351085132film_and_televisiontheatrefull name / name of organization: Acadia University, Dalhousie University, Humber School of Creative & Performing Artscontact email: anna.migliarisi@acadiau.ca

Second CALL

"SUBMIT TO THE SUMMIT"
ON DIRECTING

An Invitation to an International Performing Arts Summit

In Collaboration With
ACADIA UNIVERSITY & DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY & HUMBER COLLEGE

June 15 to 18, 2013
Humber College Lakeshore Campus
Toronto, Canada

This International SUMMIT will explore DIRECTING as a uniquely interdisciplinary art form. We invite proposals from artists and researchers for papers, practical presentations and conversations. Our focus is on DIRECTING across the disciplines, from theatre to film/TV to dance to musical drama to new media. Topics include, but are not limited to:

• Directing in new media
• Director as: writer,actor, producer,designer
• Collaborations: Director-Performer
• Women Directors
• History of Directing

Keynote Presenter
CHARLES MAROWITZ
Universally acclaimed director/playwright/critic

Please submit brief proposals and bio' by 31 October, 2012
Email: anna.migliarisi@acadiau.ca

cfp categories: film_and_televisiontheatre 484676th Global Conference: Diasporas (July 2013; Oxford, United Kingdom)Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netdias6@inter-disciplinary.net1351086630african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: dias6@inter-disciplinary.net

6th Global Conference
Diasporas

Saturday 6th July – Monday 8th July 2013
Mansfield College, Oxford

Call for Presentations
This inter- and multi-disciplinary project seeks to explore the contemporary experience of Diasporas – communities who conceive of themselves as a national, ethnic, linguistic or other form of cultural and political construction of collective membership living outside of their 'home lands.' Diaspora is a concept which is far from being definitional. Despite problems and limitations in terminology, this notion may be defined with issues attached to it for a more complete understanding. Such a term which may have its roots in Greek, is used customarily to apply to a historical phenomenon that has now passed to a period that usually supposes that diasporans are those who are settled forever in a country other than the one in which they were born and thus this term loses its dimension of irreversibility and of exile.

In order to increase our understanding of Diasporas and their impact on both the receiving countries and their respective homes left behind, key issues will be addressed related to Diaspora cultural expression and interests. In addition, the conference will address the questions: Do Diasporas continue to exist? How do they evolve? What is the footprint or limit of Diaspora? Is the global economy, media and policies sending different messages about diaspora to future generations?

Presentatiosn, papers, performances, workshops, presentations and pre-formed panels are invited on any of the following themes:

Queering Diaspora
Diasporic identities and practices invariably position heterosexuality as central to the past (the imagined homeland) and the future survival of the diasporic community through implicit and explicit norms, traditions, and expectations. How do members of diasporic communities who identify with subordinated forms of sexuality such as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered or other queer identities negotiate hetero-normativity in their communities? Do questions of diasporic cultural and social survival heighten homophobia? Or conversely, are diasporic spaces more easily queered? We welcome papers that address how LGBTQ members negotiate sexuality and diasporic identities, and consider the implications for intersectional theories of diaspora.

Diaspora, Sex, and Gender
If heteronormativity can shape diasporic identities, so too can historical norms of patriarchal power and the practices and social infrastructure associated with them. How, for instance, are diasporas and diasporic communities complicit in the general social practices that buttress inequalities or abuses? Do differences between sexes produce different perspectives on what constitutes diasporic identity? Does this disparity result in the co-existence of competing diasporic identities or 'imaginaries' that are tied to sex and gender identity? Or, on the other hand, does diaspora offer opportunities for change or for alternate social performances of sex and gender to arise? Does the distance between the home/land left behind and the new home offer an opportunity to break with the past and with tradition? To what extent can we speak of 'gendered' diasporas?

Visible Diasporas
Cinema, television, youtube and other mass media, and the visual arts are instrumental in representing diaspora or making diaspora visible both to itself and to others beyond the diasporic community. In then case of cinema, the presence and impact of displaced / globalised populations of audiences, spectators and producers of new mainstream /Hollywood /Bollywood cinema are crucial to the emergence of this post-diasporic cinema, as these narratives from texts to screen constitute a fundamental challenge for the negotiation of complex diasporic issues. How does the visual language of these various media shape or define diaspora? Those presenting on this topic and whose papers focus on cinema and other visual narratives/media are encouraged to show short excerpts or clips from their primary texts or to provide handouts rather than simply to describe the visual media. Long, descriptive summaries of film, for instance, are discouraged.

Invisible Diasporas
While there are multiple ways in which diaspora is made visible, what are the ways in which diasporas are made invisible? How do diasporas escape the attention of, or are actively made invisible by, the global media the collective institutional consciousness of such bodies as state governments and organisations such as the United Nations, etc.? Are these diasporas invisible because of their relatively small size or because they exist within other diasporas or in the shadow of other, larger visible diasporas? Is their invisibilty the result of a lack of awareness or documentation? Ignorance and apathy? Or are they forced into silence and invisibility due to the exigencies of power? That is to say, is their visibility actively repressed? Or do these diasporas engage in making themselves strategically invisible as a kind of self-defensive cloaking or masking mechanism necessary to survival? Do discrimination, assimilationist ideology or other forces ensure that this takes place either actively or passively over the course of time?

e-Diasporas and Technology
Technology has changed the way we think about diaspora. The internet, youtube, email, skype, social media, etc. have produced what has become known as the virtual diaspora and has had a profound effect on the way that diasporic communities interact with 'home/land' and each other. When communication can take place in such an immediate way, distances are shrunk and the boundaries between 'here' and 'there' are problematised or made more porous if not actually erased. Such connectivity only intensifies the interstitiality or cross-border mobility of diasporans who are able to engage virtually in more than one social environment. In a discussion of so-called e-diasporas, questions of access, mobility, connectivity ultimately lead to questions of privilege. Who is able to connect and who is not? And how does technology and the connections it provides allow the diaspora to reshape 'home' from a distance and vice versa?

The Limits of Diaspora — Problematising 'Diaspora'
What are the 'limits' of diaspora? What is its 'footprint'? What are the inter-generational issues that cause diasporas to evolve over time, to move toward or away from assimilation in then mainstream culture of the present home? How and why do diasporas redefine themselves? In what ways does 'diaporic identity' perform a gate-keeping function that includes but also excludes? How are diasporic identities contested? What are some of the ways to identity and define the subject in changing political boundaries where cultural interactions are amplified? What are the processes of social formation and reformation of diasporas in an age of increasing globalisation? What are the circumstances that give diasporas a window of opportunity to redefine their social position in both the place of origin and the current place of residence? How do we 'problematise' or critique diaspora?

The Evolution of the Critical lLnguage of Diaspora
This topic is related to the previous one but focuses more specifically on the discipline of diaspora studies itself. What new cross-'ethnoscapes' and cross-'ideoscapes' are emerging and what new methods can be used to theorise the web of forces that influences Diasporas? Rogers Brubaker posits the current phenomenon of a diaspora 'diaspora' or an increasing dispersal of the concept and the ways that diaspora is represented, understood, and theorised. Stéphane Dufoix discusses the need to "go beyond 'diaspora' in the same way that Rogers Brubaker and Frederick Cooper have shown it is useful to go beyond 'identity'" (Diaspora. Berkeley: U of California P, 2008. 108). What is the current state of diaspora studies and what is the trajectory of its evolution? How does globalisation affect the ways in which we understand diaspora? In what ways are the realities of contemporary diasporas posing challenges to the critical language of the discipline? What's next?

The Steering Group particularly welcomes the submission of pre-formed panel proposals. Papers will also be considered on any related theme.

What to Send:
300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 8th February 2013. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 10th May 2013. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to both Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract, f) up to 10 keywords.
E-mails should be entitled: DIAS6 Abstract Submission.

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). Please note that a Book of Abstracts is planned for the end of the year. We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Organising Chairs

Ram Vemuri & Rob Fisher: dias6@inter-disciplinary.net
Jonathan Rollins: jrollins@arts.ryerson.ca

The conference is part of the 'Diversity and Recognition' series of research projects, which in turn belong to the At the Interface programmes of ID.Net. All papers accepted for and presented at the conference will be published in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be invited to go forward for development into 20-25 page chapters for publication in a themed dialogic ISBN hard copy volume.

For further details of the conference, please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/at-the-interface/diversity-recognition...

Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 48468UPDATE: Philological Association of the Carolinas ConferenceGary Ettari/Philological Association of the Carolinasgettari@unca.edu, KKiely@fmarion.edu1351090416african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromantictheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Gary Ettari/Philological Association of the Carolinascontact email: gettari@unca.edu, KKiely@fmarion.edu

* Note new deadline*

Call for Papers and Panels
37th Annual PAC Conference
21 - 23 March 2013
University of North Carolina at Asheville

We welcome papers and panels on any topic of interest to literature and language scholars. Past sessions have focused on English, American, world and multiethnic literatures, as well as on linguistics, composition, and pedagogy.

Email proposals along with a brief abstract and CV by 30 November 2012:

American / British Topics:

Dr. Gary Ettari (gettari@unca.edu)
Associate Professor of Literature and Language
University of North Carolina at Asheville

Foreign / Comparative / Linguistics / Pedagogy Topics:

Dr. Kristin Kiely (KKiely@fmarion.edu)
Assistant Professor of Modern Languages
Francis Marion University

Panel proposals must include a formal proposal along with the session title; brief abstracts in English of all proposed papers; and the names, email addresses, and institutional affiliation of all participants.

Postscript (pachome.org/wp) is the peer-reviewed journal of the organization, which publishes scholarly papers, provided contributors become PAC members.

The Philological Association of the Carolinas www.pachome.org

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromantictheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 48469[UPDATE] Wyndham Lewis: Networks, Dialogues and CommunitiesNathan Waddell and Louise Kane / Institute of English Studies / Wyndham Lewis Societywyndhamlewis2012@hotmail.co.uk1351092875african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Nathan Waddell and Louise Kane / Institute of English Studies / Wyndham Lewis Societycontact email: wyndhamlewis2012@hotmail.co.uk

REGISTRATION FOR THIS EVENT HAS NOW OPENED.

To register for the conference please go here:

http://wl2012.weebly.com/registration.html

A draft programme (subject to change) for the conference can be found here:

http://wl2012.weebly.com/programme.html

We look forward to welcoming you to the conference in November.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 48470Radical Proposals in Basque Studies: January 31st 2013452°F Journal of Literary Theory and Comparative Literatureredaccion@452f.com1351092956cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturepostcolonialscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: 452°F Journal of Literary Theory and Comparative Literaturecontact email: redaccion@452f.com

The monographic section will bring together a body of texts characterised by their critical capacity and their ability to bring new perspectives to the field of Basque Literary and Cultural Studies. Possible lines of investigation, though not an exhaustive list, may include:

a) Basque academia and the relationship between knowledge and power
b) Investigation of scientific discourse and its performative ability: epistemic and symbolic violence
c) Analysis of the Basque literary system and criticism thereof
d) Theoretical and methodological proposals for strategic reading
e) Analysis of literary texts and other texts as areas of ideological resistance/reproduction.

All other articles will constitute the miscellaneous section. The deadline for submissions is January 31st 2013. Articles for publication should be sent to redaccion@452f.com.

452F is also accepting book reviews for a section of the journal devoted to newly published books. Please send your proposals to reviews452f@gmail.com.

More information: http://www.452f.com/en/convocatoria09.html

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturepostcolonialscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 48471"Victorian Play(s): Excess and Expression" , 27 April 2013Victorian Studies Association of Ontariomrowlins@uwo.ca1351092969cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinarypoetrytheatrevictorianfull name / name of organization: Victorian Studies Association of Ontariocontact email: mrowlins@uwo.ca

The VSAO executive invites proposals for 20-minute papers to be presented at the Association's 46th annual conference on 27 April 2013. The conference theme will be "Victorian Play(s): Excess and Expression." The venue will be Glendon College, York University, Toronto.

Victorian acting, playacting, acting out; posing, positing, and performing; divinity and fabulousness: considerations of any aspect of Victorian life or culture connected to the theme are welcome. Please send electronic copies of proposals (300-500 words) and a brief biographical statement to Matthew Rowlinson mrowlins@uwo.ca by 30 January 2013. Association website: http://www.yorku.ca/vsao/

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinarypoetrytheatrevictorian 48472CSUF Acacia Conference 2012: Mediated Selves, March 1-2, 2013The Acacia Grouptheacaciagroup.csuf@gmail.com1351099960cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarypopular_culturescience_and_culturefull name / name of organization: The Acacia Groupcontact email: theacaciagroup.csuf@gmail.com

Conference dates: March 1-2, 2013
Abstracts due: December 15, 2012

In recent society technology and the rise of social media have changed the way we form out identities. While this has become increasingly prevalent today, media has been used to express the self since its inception. This can be seen in a myriad of forms including but not limited to: writing (both fiction and non-fiction), visual arts, performance, journalism, advertising, and popular fashion. California State University, Fullerton's Acacia Group and Creative Writing Club are looking for thoughtful interdisciplinary undergraduate, graduate, and professional-level papers that interact with the concepts of identity and the media in literature, critical theory, or culture. We welcome submissions that engage the aforementioned topics through different scholarly approaches either either directly or tangentially related to the conference theme. Additionally, we are accepting creative submissions: short emphatic works of fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, or hybrid text which pertain to identity and the media. The participation of undergraduates is greatly encouraged.

For both critical and creative papers, please submit a 250-300 word abstract to:
theacaciagroup.csuf@gmail.com
Please denote either "Criticism" or "Creative" in the headline

Potential schools of theory/topics:
Technology
The Self
The Body
Television
Print Media
Radio
Film
Photography

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarypopular_culturescience_and_culture 48473Critical Disability Discourse - Journal - Deadline: February 1, 2013Critical Disability Discourse/Discours Critiques dans le Champ du Handicapcdsj@yorku.ca1351101693african-americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalpopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissancescience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Critical Disability Discourse/Discours Critiques dans le Champ du Handicapcontact email: cdsj@yorku.ca

Call for Papers

York University's Critical Disability Studies Graduate Student Program launched an academic journal in November 2009. Critical Disability Discourse is a bilingual, interdisciplinary journal, publishing articles that focus on experiences of disability from a critical perspective. The journal considers articles from graduate scholars in a variety of academic fields, but undergraduate students, activists, and community members/organizers are also invited to contribute. Critical Disability Discourse's goals are to provide emerging scholars an opportunity to contribute to the expanding field of critical disability studies and to gain exposure for their work in the public sphere.

Submission deadline is February 1, 2013.

Possible topics can include but are not limited to the following:
• Critical theory and disability: feminism, post-modernism, postcolonial theory, transnational analysis, Marxism, etc.

• History of disability: Antiquity, Middle Ages, Victorian Age, Industrial Age, etc.

• Law and public policy, and disability

• Qualitative and quantitative research pertaining to disability
• Education and disability

• Culture: disability-related popular culture, television, videos, blogs, arts, literature and film analysis

• Employment, market, workforce, and income security in relation to disability

• Disability-related topics in social sciences: psychology, sociology, geography, political science

• Assessment of accessibility accommodations

• Technology and disability

Submission guidelines are as follows:

1. Articles must critically address a question about an aspect of disability and offer a new angle of thought and insight; they should contribute to scholarship in the field of Critical Disability Studies. Articles must involve a critical argument, rather than be only descriptive.

2. Articles must be submitted in either English of French. Authors must consent to the translation of their articles for publication.

3. In submitting a manuscript, authors affirm that the research is original and unpublished, is not in press or under consideration elsewhere, and will not be submitted elsewhere while under consideration by the Journal.

4. Articles must be 3,000-7,000 words (including quotations, references, footnotes, tables, figures, diagrams, and illustrations).

5. In promoting inclusion and accessibility, the journal accepts and encourages tables, figures, diagrams, and illustrations within the article. However, all tables, figures, diagrams, and illustrations must include detailed written descriptions.

6. An abstract of 100-150 words should summarize the main arguments and themes of the article, the methods and results obtained, if the author's own research was conducted, and the conclusions reached. A list of 5-7 keywords should also be included after the abstract.

7. We ask that authors are mindful of their language choices pertaining to disability and that they justify the use of controversial words.

8. Articles are peer-reviewed. Authors' names and other identifying information must be removed in order to be sent to reviewers.

9. Authors are responsible for ethics approval for manuscripts by receiving approval from their own institutions. Proof of ethics approval (if applicable) should be provided to the Journal.

10. The Journal's style generally follows the most recent edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association; English spelling follows the most recent edition of the Canadian Oxford Dictionary.

11. Manuscripts must be entirely double-spaced (including quotations, notes, references) in 12-point Times New Roman font.

12. The Journal accepts footnotes, but only sparingly.

To submit, register as an author on our website https://pi.library.yorku.ca/ojs/index.php/cdd and undergo the submission process. Registration is free.

If you have any questions, contact CDD Managerial Editor, Elisabeth Harrison, at cdsj@yorku.ca

For more information and updates, please visit http://cdssa.wordpress.com/

cfp categories: african-americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalpopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissancescience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 48474Appalachian Studies Panel March 27-30, 2013Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association National Conferencelworthington@gadsdenstate.edu1351104111african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarypoetrypopular_culturereligionrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheatretravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association National Conferencecontact email: lworthington@gadsdenstate.edu

Appalachian Studies

Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association National Conference
Washington, DC – March 27-30, 2013

The Appalachian Studies Area of the PCA/ACA National Conference seeks to further understanding of this unique and interesting location within the United States and welcomes presentations covering a broad area of study.

Possible subject areas include but are not limited to the following:

Literature
Art
Photography
Music
History
Education
Ecology
Film, Television and other Media
Heritage
Culture
Gender
Ethnicity
Native American Cultures
Celtic Influences
Economics

Presentations should be developed for a 15-minute reading. Please submit a 250-word abstract to the PCA database.

ALL PROPOSALS AND ABSTRACTS MUST BE SUBMITTED THROUGH THE PCA DATABASE.

Also send your proposal as an email attachment to Dr. Leslie Worthington, lworthington@gadsdenstate.edu, by November 30, 2012. Contributors will be notified by email in December. The Association requires that proposals be submitted to only one subject area at a time. Please include the following contact information in your email: name, affiliation, home address, email address, and phone number.
The 2013 conference will be held at the Wardman Park Marriott in Washington, DC.

Deadline for proposal submissions is 30 November 2012.

Information about membership, registration, and hotel reservations can be found at the PCA/ACA website, www.pcaaca.org, under the menu title National Conference. Also feel free to contact Dr. Worthington if you have questions or require additional information.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarypoetrypopular_culturereligionrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheatretravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 48475Symposium to Honor the Legacy of William Apess -- December 6, 2012Amherst Collegelbrooks@amherst.edu1351107253african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitypostcolonialfull name / name of organization: Amherst Collegecontact email: lbrooks@amherst.edu

CALL FOR PAPERS AND PARTICIPANTS

On Our Own Grounds: the Legacy of William Apess, a Pequot
A Symposium
Amherst College
December 6, 2012

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:
Robert Warrior (Osage), University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Jean O'Brien (Anishinaabe), University of Minnesota
Ramona Peters, Tribal Historic Preservation Officer, Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe
with Special Address by Barry O'Connell, Amherst College

2012 marks the 20th anniversary of On Our Own Ground: The Collected Works of William Apess, a Pequot, edited by Amherst College professor Barry O'Connell. Since the publication, Apess has emerged as "an intellectual beacon" (Robert Warrior, The People and the Word) for the twenty-first century, an indigenous intellectual and political visionary who is even now enabling scholars, students, tribal leaders and activists to envision strategies for revitalization, resistance and survival. We would like to take this opportunity to honor the continuing legacy of William Apess with a day-long gathering at Amherst College, at a crossroads between his birthplace of Colrain, Massachusetts and his home community of Mashantucket Pequot.

We invite papers that reflect new and emerging work on William Apess's writing, his influences, his multifaceted history, and his intellectual and political vision. Graduate students are especially encouraged to submit proposals. We also invite participants who would like to share, in a roundtable/circle format, how Apess has influenced themselves or their communities, the impact this work has had on their teaching, research, writing, activism and/or leadership. Community-based scholars are likewise encouraged to participate, with either formal papers or informal comments.

We look forward to gathering with you to celebrate the legacy of William Apess.

• To submit a proposal for a paper, please send an abstract (1 page or less) and cv by email to Lisa Brooks at lbrooks@amherst.edu by November 15, 2012.

• To participate in the roundtable/circle, please send a brief (1-2 paragraph) summary of your work, your community or institutional affiliation, and the contribution you wish to make to the discussion. We will make our best effort to include as many voices as possible. Please send your information by email to Lisa Brooks at lbrooks@amherst.edu by November 20, 2012.

Any questions about this call or the conference may be directed to Lisa Brooks at Amherst College.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitypostcolonial 484764th annual University of Louisville Graduate Conference in HumanitiesPhD in Humanities and Association of Humanities Academics at the University of Louisvilleahalouisville@gmail.com 1351110607african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: PhD in Humanities and Association of Humanities Academics at the University of Louisvillecontact email: ahalouisville@gmail.com

The PhD in Humanities and the Association of Humanities Academics at the University of Louisville announce the 4th annual University of Louisville Graduate Conference in Humanities on Friday, March 22, 2013. The theme for this year's conference is "Global Humanities."

Keynote speakers are Qwo-Li Driskill, co-editor of Queer Indigenous Studies; Critical Interventions in Theory, Politics and Literature (2011) and Peter Van Buren, a former employee of the U.S. Foreign Service and author of We Meant Well: How I Helped Lose the Battle for the Hearts and Minds of the Iraqi People (2011).

We invite both critical and creative submissions that exhibit a multi- or inter-disciplinary approach to examining issues central to the study of the Humanities on a global level. We are particularly interested in discussions that address the political, social, and institutional significance of global culture beyond (and in between) the traditional disciplinary boundaries, as well as those that fortify existing connections within and across them. The conference is open to both graduate students and professionals, and in addition to individual paper submissions, panel proposals (of up to four 10-15 minute presentations) are highly encouraged.

Submissions may address (but are not limited to) the following themes, concepts and topics:
• Cultural geographies and topographies
• Postcolonial identities and the arts
• Literary cartography
• Cosmopolitanism and nationalism
• Global feminist activism
• Linguistic mapping and lexical ex/change
• Liminality and border studies
• Indigenous studies
• Regional subcultures
• Ecocriticism, ecopoetics, and globalization
• Global social networks and communications
• Migration and diaspora
• Cultural ownership, dissemination, and misappropriation
• New media, television, and radio
• Politics of sustenance
• Labor movements in the global south
• Cultural and political responses to AIDS/HIV
• Transnational identities
• Fashion, identity, and performance
• Alternative travel narrative
• Marginalized peoples, diaspora, and refuge

Presenters should submit abstracts of 300 words by December 15, 2012 to ahalouisville@gmail.com. Please include your name, affiliation, mailing address, and paper title in your email, and please attach an abstract with title only for blind review. For panel proposals please submit all of the requested information and paper abstracts for each individual presenter as well as a 200-300 word panel abstract outlining the theme of your panel.

Notification of acceptance will be issued no later than February 1, 2013. The cost for registration is $30.00. Late registration ($40.00) begins March 15th and will be accepted through March 22, 2013.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 48477Literature, Politics, and Aesthetics: The Production of Knowledge and the Future of the UniversiThe Sixth Annual Comparative Literature Graduate Conference Binghamton University (SUNY)thefutureuniversity@gmail.com1351113327african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarypopular_culturepostcolonialrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: The Sixth Annual Comparative Literature Graduate Conference Binghamton University (SUNY)contact email: thefutureuniversity@gmail.com

Neoliberal policies have restructured the university, disciplinary knowledge, and the disciplines themselves. With the formation of the 'for-profit' university, profit-bearing disciplines are valorized, student loans increase drastically, and humanities departments are pressured to redefine themselves in the face of intrusive economic demands. But where does this leave the humanities? What is the status of knowledge production given economic deregulation and privatization shaping the present and future of the university?

These transformations have manifested in the dissolution and elimination of departments in the humanities, and thereby the loss of certain types of knowledge from the university. Perhaps because, or in spite of, these very same processes, spaces for new knowledges open up. For instance, humanities centers are formed to house conversations between traditional disciplines as interdisciplinary programs are dissolved. These transformations refer to but also move beyond questions as they appear in Jacques Derrida's "The University Without Condition," Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak's Death of a Discipline, or Edu-factory's Toward a Global Autonomous University.

We seek papers that address the following questions:

What trends and approaches exist in literary criticism today? Are they connected to the broader restructurings mentioned? If so, how? For instance, how do feminist, postcolonial, queer, and other approaches to literature address questions concerning the production of knowledge?
What political problems do neoliberal policies pose at the university level, the disciplinary level, and beyond the university?
How do we define research today within comparative literature, language departments, visual studies, media studies, cultural studies, and other interdisciplinary programs? What methods and theories can legitimately be used within the disciplinary purview of today's humanities departments? What does this mean for disciplinary boundaries themselves?
Ultimately, is literary criticism still relevant to knowledge production within the university? How does the analysis of a specific literary movement, period, or narrative reflect these broader developments?

Please send your 300-500 word abstract to Isabella To at thefutureuniversity@gmail.com by December 14th, 2012.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarypopular_culturepostcolonialrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 48478At the Mercy of the Masses? - Popular Culture and Academia (Deadline 12/20/2012)School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures - University of Marylandsllcgradconference@gmail.com1351119900graduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturefull name / name of organization: School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures - University of Marylandcontact email: sllcgradconference@gmail.com

Popular culture makes up a large part of our society, from bestsellers, graphic novels and video games, to social media and wildly popular television series and movies. Critical scholars have viewed popular culture as an area of negotiation, in which meaning is both constructed and contested. This conference seeks to address these and other complexities in the study of popular culture.

For this interdisciplinary conference, the graduate students of the School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures at the University of Maryland invite papers that examine and/or challenge the role of popular culture within society, history, literature, and the classroom. Papers that deal with popular culture during all historical periods and from all theoretical perspectives and departments are welcome. We especially encourage panel submissions. All abstracts and papers must be written in English. Please send abstracts of 250 words by December 20th to

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

- (Re)Defining popular culture, subculture, and mass culture

- The politics and ideologies of popular culture

- Popular culture through the centuries: A historical perspective

- Popular culture and Cultural Studies: Challenging the parameter

- Literature these days: The success of crime, romance, and fantasy

- Popular but frowned upon: The two sides of pop music

- Popular Culture and sociolinguistics

- Popular culture and its audience

- Popular culture and identity formation

- Popular culture in the context of cultural globalization

- Teaching popular culture

- Popular culture and the electronic age

- Love, Sex, Drugs, and Rock'n'Roll: Top themes of popular culture

- Pop culture within popular culture

cfp categories: graduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarypopular_culture 48479Shifting Tides, Anxious Borders: A Graduate Student Conference in Transnational American Studies (Apr 19-20, 2013)Binghamton University - English Departmentshiftingborders@gmail.com1351122161african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Binghamton University - English Departmentcontact email: shiftingborders@gmail.com

Conference Title: Shifting Tides, Anxious Borders: A Graduate Student Conference in Transnational American Studies (4th Annual)

Theme: "Historicizing Difference in Globalized Subjectivities"

Dates: April 19th & 20th, 2013

Location: Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY

Keynote Speaker: Branka Arsic, Columbia University
Second Speaker, TBA

Roundtable Discussion: Branka Arsic, Columbia University
Susan Strehle, Binghamton University
Third Panelist TBA

"Shifting Tides, Anxious Borders" is an interdisciplinary graduate student conference dedicated to exploring the changing contours of the sphere of American Studies, including the crisscrossing currents between areas previously demarcated in separate disciplines. This year's focus, "Historicizing Difference in Global Subjectivities," examines the historical, temporal, and geopolitical foundations of identity and subject formation and the locations of their contestation. We aim to unearth and interrogate emerging perspectives on not only the histories of various formulations of difference, but also methods for reinterpreting or reimagining their deployments with and through each other. Taking as a premise the constant recurrence of the "global" within discourses of historical intersections between cultures, we are interested in the ways in which the concept of "difference" is constructed, packaged, disbursed, and consumed within a wide variety of discursive structures, and how that concept contributes to the construction of subjectivities. In seeking to interrogate the processes of formulating differences of subjectivity over time, this conference also draws on a variety of methodologies for imagining history, of theorizing the global, and the in/accuracies of the very concept of "subjectivity." Such a focus also brings into the foreground histories of the present, and possible modes of understanding contemporary global communities as both constitutive of, and constructing, history.

This conference will focus on these intersectional concepts with an eye toward the transnational, looking beyond simple formulations of difference and identity and expanding the range of narratives used to describe the emergence of difference. Such an aim emerges out of the call of transnational critics to analyze various historical instantiations of the concept of the "global." These methodological and content-based concerns produce a number of critical questions: What are the relationships between identities and difference across time? Are historical fluxes determined by constructions of the global, or do they direct those constructions? What are the limits to expressing and understanding any particular subjectivity insofar as it is conditioned or influenced by the historical moment and global positioning? Are there historical subjectivities more or less determined by global perspectives? We invite submissions that engage these and other questions and critiques about the emergence of difference within global contexts. In particular, this conference seeks papers that interrogate the methods of imagining history and subjectivity at the various sites of subjectivity, and strive to acknowledge the interplay between individual histories, geopolitical spaces, and the fluxes proper to each.

To submit, please email shiftingborders@gmail.com with your name, school, and a 300-word abstract.

Submission deadline: March 1st, 2013

Please visit "Shifting Tides, Anxious Borders" on Facebook for further updates.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:
Border Politics and the Production of Trans-Border Identities
The (De) Construction of National Identity
War, Stability, and the Impossibility of Subjectivity
The Exchange of Subjectivity and Global Capital
The Construction of Post- and Anti- Colonial Subjectivities
Differentiating Racial Identity
The Globalization of Gender Norms
The Policing of Global Subjectivity
American Exceptionalism and the Production of National Identity
The Arab Spring and the Deployment of Subjectivity
The Transoceanic Slave Trade
Queering National Subjectivity
Global Governance, the European Union, and the Construction of Transnational Sovereignty
The Nation State in Opposition to Globalization
The Global/ Local of Citizenship and its Impacts on Communities
Technology and the Production of Global Community
Global English and Literary Production
Sexual and National Instabilities
Global Diasporas and the Limits of Subjectivity
Transnational States and Hybrid Subjectivities
Poly-lingual Subjects and National Identity
Global Racial Histories
Multi-lingual Literature and the Construction of History
The Emergence of the Literary and the Emergence of the Global

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 48480On Our Own Grounds: The Legacy of William Apess, December 6, 2012Lisa Brookslbrooks@amherst.edu1351125623americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfull name / name of organization: Lisa Brookscontact email: lbrooks@amherst.edu

CALL FOR PAPERS AND PARTICIPANTS

On Our Own Grounds: the Legacy of William Apess, a Pequot
A Symposium
Amherst College
December 6, 2012

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:
Robert Warrior (Osage), University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Jean O'Brien (Anishinaabe), University of Minnesota
Ramona Peters, Tribal Historic Preservation Officer, Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe
with Special Address by Barry O'Connell, Amherst College

2012 marks the 20th anniversary of On Our Own Ground: The Collected Works of William Apess, a Pequot, edited by Amherst College professor Barry O'Connell. Since the publication, Apess has emerged as "an intellectual beacon" (Robert Warrior, The People and the Word) for the twenty-first century, an indigenous intellectual and political visionary who is even now enabling scholars, students, tribal leaders and activists to envision strategies forrevitalization, resistance and survival. We would like to take this opportunity to honor the continuing legacy of William Apess with a day-long gathering at Amherst College, at a crossroads between his birthplace of Colrain, Massachusetts and his home community of Mashantucket Pequot.

We invite papers that reflect new and emerging work on William Apess's writing, his influences, his multifaceted history, and his intellectual and political vision. Graduate students are especially encouraged to submit proposals. Wealso invite participants who would like to share, in a roundtable/circle format, how Apess has influenced themselves or their communities, the impact this work has had on their teaching, research, writing, activism and/or leadership. Community-based scholars are likewise encouraged to participate, with either formal papers or informal comments.

We look forward to gathering with you to celebrate the legacy of William Apess.

v To submit a proposal for a paper, please send an abstract (1 page or less) and cv by email to Lisa Brooks at lbrooks@amherst.edu by November 15, 2012.

v To participate in the roundtable/circle, please send a brief (1-2 paragraph) summary of your work, your community or institutional affiliation, and the contribution you wish to make to the discussion. We will make our best effort to include as many voices as possible. Please send your information by email to Lisa Brooks at lbrooks@amherst.edu by November 20, 2012.

Any questions about this call or the conference may be directed to Lisa Brooks at Amherst College.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approaches 48481Apocalyptic Politics: Framing the PresentVillanova University Philosophy Graduate Student Unionvillanovaphilosophy@gmail.com1351130335cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinaryreligiontheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Villanova University Philosophy Graduate Student Unioncontact email: villanovaphilosophy@gmail.com

Call for Papers:
The Villanova Philosophy Graduate Student Union's 18th annual Philosophy Conference

Apocalyptic Politics: Framing the Present

Villanova University, Friday April 12-Saturday April 13, 2013
Confirmed Speakers: Mladen Dolar, Slavoj Žižek, Alenka Zupančič

The present is often characterized as a critical moment that totters between possibilities of irresolvable catastrophe and redemptive restoration. Such claims involve prophecies of an end. Whether consisting in theological predictions of a messianic end, political predictions of a revolutionary end, or historical predictions of an epochal end, claims on the future charge the present with immediate significance through the ethical and political demands they place on it. This is to say, an anticipated end, which in a way is not-yet, is also always enacted in the present. Apocalyptic futures clearly enter into the structure of contemporary subjects - of their desires and drives, on the planes of fantasy and of theory - but these relations call for clarification. The multiplicity of ways in which prophecy can be received, for instance - whether the foretold end is interpreted as already-accomplished, imminent, or in the indeterminate future, whether the end is met with a spirit of fear or hopeful anticipation, or whether it is understood as necessary and irrevocable or as contingent and preventable, etc. - invites fundamental inquiry into the conscious and unconscious relations of the subject to history and its ruptures.

Possible topics may include but are not limited to the following: the end/temporality of history (Hegel, Marx, Kojeve); political theology and the Messianic: the legacy of Paul in political theology, kariological temporality and klesis (Agamben, Derrida, Benjamin, Bloch); early modern political philosophy: the role of prophecy in shaping societal affects (Hobbes, Machiavelli, Spinoza); phenomenological relationality to the future; revolutionary politics; apocalyptic cinema, science fiction, and art.

The Department of Philosophy at Villanova University welcomes high quality submissions from graduate students and faculty. Abstracts and papers are welcome for review; papers should not exceed 3500 words.

Submission Deadline: February 1st, 2013
Please send submissions formatted for blind review to
Rachel Aumiller and Chris Drain at villanovaphilosophy@gmail.com

We strongly encourage submissions from women and other under-represented groups.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinaryreligiontheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 48482Politicized (Re)Productions of GenderReconstruction: Studies in Contemporary Culturereconstruction.submissions@gmail.com1351131903african-americanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Reconstruction: Studies in Contemporary Culturecontact email: reconstruction.submissions@gmail.com

Politicized (Re)Productions of Gender
Reconstruction: Studies in Contemporary Culture, Vol. 13 No. 3, 2013
Michael Johnson Jr. and Bruce Drushel (Eds.)

For this special issue of Reconstruction we are looking for authors to contribute article length essays to answer the question "How has gender evolved in contemporary American society, and if so, in what unique, specific ways is it (re)produced?" As critical cultural scholars, the examination of how gender is performed, perpetuated, and interpellated in today's politically fragmented environment is desperately necessary and timely. The editors are interested in the distinctly different, but parallel issues of how masculinity and femininity (in their hegemonic and non-normative examples) are (re)produced in contemporary American society. This special issue encourages authors to examine linkages between historical, geographical and current movements for change, and to capitalize on a new momentum that has emerged in relation to discourses of gender and power. We encourage authors to think anew about the ways in which cisgendered constructions and bodies have influenced attempts to renegotiate power paradigms and to consider how our historical past informs the future as we extend our concepts of freedom within the context of our nation. Potential themes for papers include, but are not limited to: labor activism, civil rights, environmental activism, developments in feminist theory, participants in government, foreign policy, protest organizations, LGBTQ activism, religious and spiritual interests, reproductive rights, anti-war activity or pacifism, and the development of gendered strategies against sexualized and racialized violence.

Thus, this special issue solicits both new and established authors, across all disciplinary origins, using both hybrid and collaborative methodologies who are willing to commit to seriously analyze both the issues above and corollary subjects germane to the question posed. Authors are requested to submit a 500 word abstract first, with complete contact information to: mjohnso9@wsu.edu. Submission of an abstract indicates a commitment to publish an essay of no less than 2000 words (though more is welcome), conforming to the formatting and citation style requirements of the journal. Abstracts will be accepted until we have achieved our publication target, but no later than November 24th, 2012. Complete drafts will be due by May 24th, 2012 with an anticipated publication date of July 13th, 2013.

"Reconstruction: Studies in Contemporary Culture (ISSN: 1547-4348) is an innovative cultural studies journal dedicated to fostering an intellectual community composed of scholars and their audience, granting them all the ability to share thoughts and opinions on the most important and influential work in contemporary interdisciplinary studies. Reconstruction publishes one open issue and three themed issues quarterly. Reconstruction is indexed in the MLA International Bibliography."

Michael Johnson Jr. Bruce E. Drushel, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Ronald E. McNair Fellow 140 Williams Hall
Critical Culture, Gender, and Race Studies Department of Communication
Washington State University Miami University
Wilson-Short Hall 111 Oxford OH 45056
Pullman, WA 99164-4010

cfp categories: african-americanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 48483ATHE 2013 Roundtable: "Playful Memories" [10/28/12; 8/1-4/12]Andrea Gunoeamgunoe@hotmail.com1351138185cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinarytheatretheoryfull name / name of organization: Andrea Gunoecontact email: amgunoe@hotmail.com

CALL for Roundtable Participants for 2013 ATHE Conference

Playful Memories

I am seeking participants for a round table discussion entitled Playful Memories on the topic of play in memory both in communities and for individuals and how this play surfaces in life, entertainment, and art. Possible questions or topics could be:

How does the body function in memory play (in both staging memory, creating memory, and recall)?
How does the act of play in memory change the event itself?
How does the act of play in remembering/memorializing affect cultural memory on a grand scale?
How does the act of remembering become playful in community? Is it possible to interact with memory playfully from an individual perspective?

If you are interested please contact Andrea at amgunoe@hotmail.com by Oct. 28th with the following information:
Short Bio with contact information
Title of brief paper/presentation with a 25-word description

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinarytheatretheory 48484Her Own Worst Enemy: The Eternal Internal Gender Wars of Our Sisters (UPDATE - Abstracts by Nov 16, Papers by Dec 16) Dr. Monique Ferrell & Dr. Julian Williams - New York City College of Technology, City University of New YorkDr. Monique Ferrell - mferrell@CityTech.Cuny.Edu and/or Dr. Julian Williams - JWilliams@CityTech.Cuny.Edu 1351140917african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromantictheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr. Monique Ferrell & Dr. Julian Williams - New York City College of Technology, City University of New Yorkcontact email: Dr. Monique Ferrell - mferrell@CityTech.Cuny.Edu and/or Dr. Julian Williams - JWilliams@CityTech.Cuny.Edu

Dr. Monique Ferrell - mferrell@CityTech.Cuny.Edu and/or Dr. Julian Williams - JWilliams@CityTech.Cuny.Edu
The Editors are seeking essays that examine the ways that women from around the world have served as the oppressive hand in the lives of other women. In this new feminist theory text entitled Her Own Worst Enemy: The Eternal Internal Gender Wars of Our Sisters, the book's ultimate goal is to discuss, explain, and explore the following areas of concern: how women were prevented from being helpful to their sisters; how they may have been encouraged to dismiss woman-centered calls for equality, political clout, or sexual power; or when and how some women were actually forced to turn their backs on their sisters as a means of protecting themselves and what little power they actually possessed. The book will address these concepts in the following categories: religion, race, politics, literature, popular culture, music, media, and history.

Essays submitted should clearly identify with one of the above areas of concern and explore its position(s) through one of the aforementioned categories. Authors are allowed to submit in more than one category.

Submission Guidelines

All Abstracts must:
Be no more than 250 words
Include a Bio and/or Vitae
Be submitted on or before November 16th, 2012

All Essays must:
Use primary and secondary sources
Use MLA Writing Style
Be 10-25 pages in length, doubled spaced
Include a Bio and/or Vitae
Be submitted on or before December 16th, 2012

The Received By deadline for all essay submissions is December 16th, 2012. Completed essays can be submitted to: mferrell@citytech.cuny.edu or jwilliams@citytech.cuny.edu.

The Editors will also accept snail mail submissions:
Dr. Julian Williams/Dr. Monique Ferrell
New York City College of Technology
English Department: 503 Namm
300 Jay Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromantictheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 484856th Global Conference: Forgiveness (July 2013; Oxford, United Kingdom)Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netfor6@inter-disciplinary.net1351148457african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: for6@inter-disciplinary.net

6th Global Conference
Forgiveness

Saturday 6th July – Monday 8th July 2013
Mansfield College, Oxford

Call for Presentations
Mahatma Gandhi said that 'the weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is an attribute of the strong.' It is usually held that Forgiveness is a process (or the result of a process) that involves a change in emotion and attitude regarding an offender. Some scholars view this as an intentional and voluntary process, driven by a deliberate decision to forgive. The process results in decreased motivation to retaliate or maintain estrangement from an offender despite his or her actions, and requires a deliberate — or as Gandhi put it, 'strong' — letting go of negative emotions toward the offender. Theorists differ in the extent to which they believe forgiveness also implies replacing the negative emotions with positive attitudes including benevolence and compassion. There also differ on these questions: When, if ever, should hatred be overcome by sympathy or compassion? What are forgiveness and mercy and to what degree do they require — both conceptually and morally — the overcoming of certain passions and the motivation by other passions? If forgiveness and mercy indeed are moral virtues, what role, if any, should they play in the law?

This interdisciplinary conference project seeks to investigate and explore the nature, significance, and practices of forgiveness. Forgiveness raises a variety of questions that touch on a vast array of academic disciplines — anthropology, psychoanalysis, literature, history, philosophy, psychology, political economy, etc. In cases of significant transgressions, social tensions, and even international conflicts there are questions of what counts as forgiveness and how it moves from the level of individual to community, national and international relationships. This conference will examine full range of this complexity. To encourage innovative trans-disciplinary dialogues, we welcome papers from all disciplines, professions, and vocations.

Presentations, papers, performances, reports and workshops are invited on issues on or broadly related to any of the following themes:

1. Questions of Definition
~ What is forgiveness
~ Are all definitions of forgiveness culturally relative? When or how is it possible to speak of it in universal terms?
~ What sorts of behaviour require people to seek forgiveness?
~ Who can grant forgiveness? Can there be meaningful third party forgiveness?
~ Who benefits from forgiveness and how?
~ Can forgiveness be required of someone? Can it ever be wrong to offer forgiveness?
~ Can we forgive an ongoing evil?

2. Psychological Perspectives
~ The emotional effect of victimization and the role forgiveness can play in either exacerbating or mitigating such feelings
~ The nature of self-forgiveness
~ Barriers to people's ability to forgive transgressors
~ How a willingness (or unwillingness) to forgive can be a measure of self-worth or self-respect
~ What happens after the forgiveness is granted?

3. Legal and Political Perspectives
~ Forgiveness for past crimes of individuals — rehabilitation, second chances, and pardons
~ How forgiveness can play a role in criminal legal proceedings
~ Is there is Marxist notion of forgiveness?
~ Forgiveness as a part of social reconstruction following civil wars or systematic social injustices
~ How forgiveness can be required or granted in relationships between nations
~ Seeking forgiveness on behalf of others: righting historic wrongs
~ Difficulties connected with political forgiveness: collectiveness, performative meaning of forgiveness declarations, etc.

4. Social, Cultural and Literary Perspectives
~ The role forgiveness plays in different cultures
~ Differences in perceptions of the importance of forgiveness in different societies
~ Forgiveness ceremonies as important cultural practices
~ How questions of forgiveness are used in literature
~ Forgiveness in cinema, film, tv, radio and theatre
~ The role of the arts as catalyst or hindrance for actual cases of forgiveness
~ Forgiveness and the media

5. Religion and Forgiveness
~ Distinctions between secular and religious notions of forgiveness
~ The role of forgiveness in religious practices
~ How religious beliefs can promote forgiveness
~ How religions can be barriers to forgiveness
~ Rituals of forgiveness and their importance

6. Issues, Connections and Relations
~ The relationship between forgiveness and restitution
~ The relationship between forgiveness and retribution
~ The relationship between forgiveness and compassion, mercy or pity
~ The relationship between forgiveness and reconciliation
~ The relationship between forgiveness and personal growth

The Steering Group particularly welcomes the submission of pre-formed panel proposals.

What to send:
300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 8th February 2013. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 10th May 2013. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to both Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract, f) up to 10 key words
E-mails should be entitled: FOR6 Abstract Submission.

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Joint Organising Chairs:

Charles W. Nuckolls: administrator@utahvalleycommons.com
Rob Fisher: for6@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the Probing the Boundaries programme of research projects. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and exciting. All papers accepted for and presented at this conference will be eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers maybe invited for development for publication in a themed hard copy volume(s)

For further details of the conference, please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/persons/forgive...

Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 48486 2nd Global Conference: Apocalypse: Imagining the End (July 2013; Oxford, United Kingdom)Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netapoc2@inter-disciplinary.net1351153209african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: apoc2@inter-disciplinary.net

2nd Global Conference
Apocalypse: Imagining the End

Wednesday 10th July – Friday 12th July 2013
Mansfield College, Oxford

Call for Presentation
From Christian concept of the 'Apocalypse' to the Hindu notions of the Kali Yuga, visions of destruction and fantasies of the 'end times' have a long history. In the last few years, public media, especially in the West, have been suffused with images of the end times and afterward, from the zombie apocalypse (the AMC series The Walking Dead) to life after the collapse of civilization (the NBC series Revolution.) Several popular television series and video games (Deep Earth Bunker) are now based on preparing for and surviving the end of the world. Once a fringe activity, 'survivalism' has gone mainstream, and a growing industry supplies 'doomsday preppers' with all they need to the post-apocalyptic chaos. One purpose of the conference is to explore these ideas by situating them in context — psychological, historical, literary, cultural, political, and economic. The second aim of conference is to examine today's widespread fascination the apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic thought, and to understand its rising appeal across broad sections of contemporary society around the world.

This interdisciplinary project welcomes presentations from all disciplines and research areas, including anthropology, psychoanalysis, political economy, psychology, area studies, communal studies, environmental studies, history, sociology, religion, theology, and gender studies.

Presentations,papers, performances, reports, work-in-progress, workshops and pre-formed panels are invited on issues related to (but not limited to) the following themes:

- Decline, Collapse, Decay, Disease, Mass Death
- Survivalism and Doomsday Preppers
- Revolution
- Theories of Social Change
- Peak Oil, Resource Depletion, Global Warming, Economic Collapse
- The Second Coming/Millenarianism/Rapture
- The Hindu Kali Yuga
- Sex and Gender at the End of Time
- Ironic and/or Anti-Apocalyptic Thinking
- Utopia and Dystopia
- Intentional Communities as Communities of the End Times
- Selling the Apocalypse, Commodifying Disaster, and Marketing the End Times
- Death Tourism and Disaster Capitalism
- The Age of Terror
- Zombies, Vampires, and Werewolves in Post-Apocalyptic Fiction
- Disaster Fiction/Movies/Video Games
- History as Apocalypse
- Remembering and Reliving the Collapse of the Western Roman Empire

What to send:
300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 8th February 2013. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 10th May 2013. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to both Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract, f) up to 10 keywords.
E-mails should be entitled: Apocalypse2 Abstract Submission.

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Organising Chairs

Charles W. Nuckolls: administrator@utahvalleycommons.com
Rob Fisher: apoc2@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the 'Ethos' series of research projects, which in turn belong to the Critical Issues programmes of ID.Net. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and challenging. All papers accepted for and presented at the conference will be published in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be invited to go forward for development into 20-25 page chapters for publication in a themed dialogic ISBN hard copy volume.

For further details of the conference, please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/critical-issues/ethos/apocalypse-imagi...

Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 4848712th Global Conference: Environmental Justice and Citizenship (July 2013; Oxford, United Kingdom)Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netejgc12@inter-disciplinary.net1351155862african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: ejgc12@inter-disciplinary.net

12th Global Conference
Environmental Justice and Citizenship

Wednesday 10th July – Friday 12th July 2013
Mansfield College, Oxford

Call for Presentations
This inter-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary conference aims to explore the role of environmental thinking in the context of contemporary society and international affairs, and assess the implications for our understandings of fairness, justice and citizenship. 'Environmental justice' is conceived broadly as reflecting not only justice in the context of human communities but also towards other species, ecosystems, habitats, landscapes, succeeding generations and the environment as a whole. 'Citizenship' is understood as an awareness of individual's relative responsibilities in the global context.

Within this framework the 12th Conference of Environmental Justice and Citizenship will explore models, approaches and context necessary to solve the problems impeding environmental justice and living justly. We request contributions which explore technological, political or economic solutions to these problems, or those antecedents, agents, processes and institutions that support development of such solutions. The conference provides opportunities for scholars and practitioners in different disciplines to share examples and proposals for reducing the barriers to environmental justice and citizenship.

Presentations, papers, performances, reports and workshops are invited on any of the following indicative themes:

- Boundaries: reach and limitations of judicial and political systems in contributing to solving problems of environmental justice and citizenship,
- Media and knowledge: generating, vetting and disseminating information related to environmental justice and citizenship; sources and channels
- Education: approaches to environmental education
- Hegemony and diversity: resolving problems involving differences in moral and legal frameworks
- Sustainable communities: lessons to be learned from communities that have implemented standards for environmental justice
- Hope: the roles of emotions in shaping behavior and practices; how hope for environmental justice and citizenship develops and is sustained.
- Critical thinking: skills, assumptions, perspectives and habits of mind essential to environmental justice and citizenship

Perspectives are sought from all disciplines including:

- The natural and social sciences, and those engaged in actor network theory, agriculture and agricultural economics, the built environment and urban studies, conflict and dispute resolution, critical geography, environmental studies, human and sustainable development, industrial relations, law, philosophy and ethics, political science and international affairs, public policy and politics, sociology and communication of science, theology, cultural studies and anthropology.
- People in the public and private sectors who are involved in planning and project development, policy-making and implementation, and negotiation and mediation at national and international levels
- People in Governmental, inter-governmental and non-governmental organisations, voluntary sector bodies, environmental charities and groups, business and professional associations

The Steering Group welcomes the submission of pre-formed panel proposals. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 8th February 2013. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 10th May 2013.

300 word abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to all Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract.f) up to 10 keywords

E-mails should be entitled: EJGC12 Abstract Submission.

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline).We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Organising Chairs:

Ram Vemuri & Rob Fisher: ejgc12@inter-disciplinary.net
Karen Druffel:kdruffel@framingham.edu

The conference is part of the Critical Issues series of research projects run by Inter-Disciplinary.Net. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and challenging. All papers accepted for and presented at the conference are eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be invited to go forward for development into 20-25 page chapters for publication in a themed dialogic ISBN hard copy volume.

For further details of the conference, please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/critical-issues/ethos/environmental-ju...

Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 484884th Global Conference: Revenge (July 2013; Oxford, United Kingdom)Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netrev4@inter-disciplinary.net1351161832african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: rev4@inter-disciplinary.net

4th Global Conference
Revenge

Sunday 14th July – Tuesday 16th July 2013
Mansfield College, Oxford

Call for Presentations
Confucius is said to have remarked, 'Before you embark on a journey of revenge, dig two graves,' implying that revenge cannot be undertaken without recursive deleterious effects on the revenging agent. This is the view that revenge is at best counterproductive, or that seeking it runs counter to the ethical mandate that one turn the other cheek. Does that mean that vengeful motives are out of place in seeking justice for real wrongs? Should the law attempt to exclude vengeance-seeking? Do some economic or political systems tolerate, or even require, elaborate systems of revenge? Not all societies, of course, would agree that revenge is ethically problematic; some would define revenge as a necessary component in social relationships, even as a method for connecting people across time or over distances. Traditional grudges are commonplace in places as cultural different from each as the Swat Valley (Pakistan) and the American Southeast. Given all this, is is even possible to come up with a universally relevant concept of revenge that would make comparison possible?

This multi-disciplinary research and publications project seeks to explore the different ideas, actions, and cultural traditions of vengeance or revenge. The project explores the nature of revenge, its relationship with issues of justice, economy, and social organization, and its manifestation in the actions of individuals, cultures, communities and nations. We will also consider the history and political economy of revenge, its 'legitimacy,' the 'scale' of vengeful actions, and whether or not revenge has (or should have) 'limits.' Representations of revenge in film, literature, law, television, and cultural performances will be analysed; cultural 'traditions' of retaliation and revenge will be considered. And the role of mercy, forgiveness and pardon will be assessed.

Presentations will be considered on the following or related themes:
- Philosophies of revenge
- Revenge and political economy
- Revenge in the philsophies of East and South Asia: Confucian and Hindu perspectives
- Revenge in Maori culture
- Vengeance and gender
- Vengeance in history, literature, and popular culture
- Revenge cross-culturally
- Is there any proper and improper time for revenge? Can an act of revenge be carried across generations?
- Revenge, vengeance, retaliation
- Justice and revenge
- Betrayal, humiliation, shame, resentment, and revenge
- Revenge and the individual; revenge and the group; revenge and the nation; revenge and capitalism
- Revenge in music and the arts
- Revenge in television, film, radio and theatre
- Relationship between revenge and mercy, forgiveness, pardon
- Revenge case-studies: individual, cultural, and historical

The Steering Group particularly welcomes the submission of pre-formed panel proposals.

What to send:
300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 8th February 2013. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 10th May 2013. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to both Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract, f) up to 10 key words
E-mails should be entitled: REV4 Abstract Submission.

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Joint Organising Chairs:

Charles W. Nuckolls: administrator@utahvalleycommons.com
Rob Fisher: rev4@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the Probing the Boundaries programme of research projects. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and exciting. All papers accepted for and presented at this conference will be eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers maybe invited for development for publication in a themed hard copy volume(s)

For further details of the conference, please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/persons/revenge...

Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 48489The Seventh Century: Continuity or Discontinuity? The 2013 Edinburgh University Seventh Century Colloquium 28 – 29 May 2013Edinburgh Seventh Century Colloquiumedinburgh7th@gmail.com1351164264classical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalreligionfull name / name of organization: Edinburgh Seventh Century Colloquiumcontact email: edinburgh7th@gmail.com

The Seventh Century: Continuity or Discontinuity?
The 2013 Edinburgh University Seventh Century Colloquium
28 – 29 May 2013
Call for papers
We are pleased to announce a call for papers for the 2013 Edinburgh University Seventh Century Colloquium, 28 – 29 May 2013.
The colloquium is a two-day interdisciplinary conference for postgraduate students and early career researchers. The colloquium brings together scholars from different disciplines studying the seventh century in order to promote discussion and the cross-fertilisation of ideas. We will explore how wider perspectives can be used to formulate new approaches to source material, drawing out fresh perspectives on both the familiar and unfamiliar.
Our general theme will be an examination of whether the seventh century can be studied as a unit across regions or whether the period represents a break in the longue durée. What was the level of discontinuity between the 'long sixth' and 'long eighth' centuries?
We invite those working in archaeology, art history, history, literature, numismatics, and religion, as well as in fields including Byzantine, Celtic, Classics, Islamic, and Late Antique studies to submit abstracts for papers of approximately 15 to 20 minutes that engage with all aspects of the long seventh century.
Possible topics for papers might include, but are by no means limited to:
 The seventh century 'world crisis' and its ramifications
 The development of new economic relations in the North Sea
 The Christianisation of western Europe
 The Transformation of the Byzantine Empire
 The Emergence of Islam
 The transformation of ancient cities to those of the Middle Ages
 Historiography of the seventh century
Additionally, poster presentations will be considered.
Our organisational structure is designed to encourage collaboration and cross-fertilisation of ideas; we will have no parallel sessions as we believe that everything will be useful to all of us. To build collaboration, we will be adopting an innovative structure for the conference. The sessions will be structured as follows:
 Each person will be paired with another scholar working on similar issues prior to the colloquium.
 The second will have read a written version of the first's paper in advance and will have prepared a detailed response prior to the colloquium.
 After the delivery of the paper, the second will give a response before opening the floor to general discussion.
We hope that such methods will not only inspire genuine collaboration between the two involved but will encourage debate and discussion more widely. Similarly, we hope that all involved will feel encouraged to debate, discuss, and occasionally disagree. We believe that through such methods all of us will advance as scholars.
Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words to the organising committee at edinburgh7th@gmail.com.
The deadline for submission is 31 December 2012. Early submissions are encouraged.

cfp categories: classical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalreligion 48490[UPDATE] Nature in the Renaissance (CEA April 4-6; Abstract due Nov. 1)Lynne M. Simpson, College English Associationlsimpson@presby.edu1351166231renaissancefull name / name of organization: Lynne M. Simpson, College English Associationcontact email: lsimpson@presby.edu

Call for Papers: The Nature of the Renaissance at CEA 2013
April 4-6, 2013 | Savannah, Georgia

CEA 2013 will be held at the Savannah Riverfront Marriott:
100 General McIntosh Boulevard, Savannah, Georgia 31401.
Phone (912) 233-7722; Fax (912) 233-3765.

The College English Association, a collegial gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations on "Nature in the Renaissance" for our 44th annual conference. Essays might usefully explore the construction of human nature in 16th and 17th century British literature or the "nature" of the period itself or its rich and varied literature. How is the natural world represented? What is the nature of familial or social bonds? What constitutes "natural" and therefore normative behavior, belief, or philosophy?
Submit your proposal at http://www.cea-web.org

Conference Theme: Nature
In earlier centuries, "Nature" set the parameters, as Philip Round states, "of conversations about everything from church doctrine to village order." Often discussions of gender, character, authorship, and even civil discourse turned to questions of "customary precedent and natural law." By the twentieth century "nature" was used to delineate the new literary study of "nature writing," while also used in broader terms to question the changing nature of our society with the onset of the digital age, postmodernism, new views of gender and race construction, and even changes within academia. What is the "nature" of the academia today? How has the "nature" of publishing and authorship changed with the digital age? How has the "nature" of our profession changed? In what ways does "nature" define us? Or do we define "nature?"

For our 2013 meeting, CEA invites papers and panels that explore the literary, the pedagogical, and the professional "nature" of our field.

Submission Deadline: November 1, 2012

For more information on how to submit, please see the full CFP at
http://www.cea-web.org

Membership:
All presenters at the 2013 CEA conference must become members of CEA by January 1, 2013. To join CEA, please go to http://www.cea-web.org

Other questions? Please email me at lsimpson@presby.edu or contact CEA directly at cea.english@gmail.com.
Thank you for your interest,
Lynne

Lynne M. Simpson, Ph.D.
CEA Board Member and
Professor of English
Presbyterian College
503 South Broad Street
Clinton, SC 29325
lsimpson@presby.edu

cfp categories: renaissance 484913rd Global Conference:Images of Whiteness (July 2013; Oxford, United Kingdom)Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netwhite3@inter-disciplinary.net1351169540african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: white3@inter-disciplinary.net

3rd Global Conference
Images of Whiteness

Monday 22nd July – Wednesday 24th July 2013
Mansfield College, Oxford

Call for Presentations
In recent years academics from a range of positions have increasingly turned their critical attention to the subject of racial whiteness. Publications include historical accounts detailing the emergence of whiteness as a racial category, cultural studies exploring the meaning of whiteness across a variety of locations, film and television scholars examining narratives about white people, reflecting white themes, white obsessions, and white anxieties. Consistent with the shift in critical studies away from minority identity formations to consider 'normative' identities, the study of whiteness is increasingly understood as central to understanding the operation of 'race' as a form of social categorisation.

Inter-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary perspectives are sought from those engaged in any field relevant to the study of whiteness including media and film studies, performance and creative writing, cultural theory, sociology, psychology and medical.

Papers, presentations, workshops and pre-formed panels are invited on issues related to any of the following themes:

- Appropriation of racial 'otherness' within white culture
- Images of whiteness in serial television
- Nationally-specific formations of white identity
- Whiteness and multiculturalism
- Constructions of whiteness in painting, photography and the visual arts
- Performances of/performing 'whiteness'
- Writing whiteness in fiction/non-fiction
- The politics and ethics of White Studies
- Racial whiteness, fashion and cosmetics industries
- Whiteness and absence, emptiness and death
- Teaching whiteness
- Intersections between whiteness, gender and sexuality
- Conceptions of whiteness in non-white cultures
- Images of whiteness in non-white cultures
- Whiteness and consumer culture
- Music and music videos and whiteness

Presentations will also be considered on any related theme.

What to Send:
300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 8th February 2013 If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 10th May 2013. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to both Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract, f) up to 10 keywords.
E-mails should be entitled: Whiteness3 Abstract Submission.

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Organising Chairs

Ewan Kirkland: ekirklanduk@yahoo.co.uk
Colette Balmain: cb@inter-disciplinary.net
Rob Fisher: white3@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the 'Ethos' series of research projects, which in turn belong to the Critical Issues programmes of ID.Net. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and challenging. All papers accepted for and presented at the conference will be published in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be invited to go forward for development into 20-25 page chapters for publication in a themed dialogic ISBN hard copy volume.

For further details of the conference, please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/critical-issues/ethos/whiteness/call-f...

Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 48492[UPDATE] CFP American Studies SW TX PCA/ACA Albuquerque Feb. 13-16, 2013Southwest Texas Popular Culture American Culture Associationhavenl@ohio.edu1351171480african-americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturepostcolonialtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Southwest Texas Popular Culture American Culture Associationcontact email: havenl@ohio.edu

Call for Papers: American Studies Area
34th Annual Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Association Conference, "Celebrating Popular/American Culture(s) in a Global Context," February 13-16, 2013
Albuquerque, NM
http://www.swtxpca.org

Proposal submission deadline: November 16, 2012

Conference hotel:
Hyatt Regency Albuquerque
300 Tijeras Avenue NW
Albuquerque, NM 87102
Further conference details are available at http://www.swtxpca.org

Panels are now being formed in the American Studies area. Scholars, researchers, professionals, teachers, graduate students and others interested in this area are encouraged to submit an abstract. Graduate students are especially encouraged and will be assisted in accessing any and all award opportunities the conference and/or associations provide. The full list of awards for graduate students can be found at http://www.swtxpca.org/documents/48.html.

American Studies is a broad area and one that MUST be interdisciplinary. While the area is one that should be centered in the cultures of the Americas, especially the United States, a particularly vibrant area of inquiry is increasingly found in the transnational, intra-¬¬national and global considerations of these cultures. Topics offering multiple perspectives in this vein on the American Southwest are especially welcome. Listed below are several possible topics, however, these should not be considered either prescriptive or limiting in regards to your creativity in this area.

• Empire and Conquest in 21st century America
• American Remnants and Ruins
• The International Metaphor of the Western Frontier
• 21st-Century Post-¬¬Borderlands
• Domestic Racial and Post-Racial Ideologies
• American Popular Culture and the Crisis of the Subprime
• America's Role in Trans-national Bio-politics
• American Advertising and Nationalism
• American Freethinkers
• The Role of Humor in American Identity
• The Trouble with Citizenship: Community, Resistance, Migration
• American Studies in the Classroom/Inter-American Studies outside the US

Email 250-¬¬word abstracts for individual presentations or 500-¬¬word abstracts for panel proposals to Area Chair Lisa Haven (English Department, Ohio University Zanesville) at havenl@ohio.edu AND submit your proposal directly into the database at http://conference2013.swtxpca.org/. It will have to be submitted there eventually anyway. Upon acceptance, all presenters must register by December 31, 2012.

Check us out on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/SwtxpcaAmericanStudies and on Twitter @SWTXPCAAMStudie.

Lisa Haven
Area Chair: American Studies havenl@ohio.edu
Ohio University Zanesville
Visit the website: http://swtxpca.org

cfp categories: african-americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturepostcolonialtwentieth_century_and_beyond 48493Health, Mental Health, and Literature - March 9thBoston College English Graduate Conferencedailym@bc.edu1351178577americancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centurygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymedievalpopular_culturerenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Boston College English Graduate Conferencecontact email: dailym@bc.edu

The Boston College English Graduate Conference seeks abstracts for papers that consider the intersection between health, mental health, and literature.

Considering recent interdisciplinary developments in the field of "medical humanities," we are interested in exploring the ways in which literature and other creative arts have attempted to represent or otherwise understand health, which is so often analyzed from a clinical or scientific perspective. We seek papers that work to synthesize clinical approaches and literary approaches to the mind and body. What can be gained by merging literary and scientific analyses?

Possible topics might include, but are certainly not limited to:
• Representations of mental illness in literature, pop culture, or historical texts
• The role of rhetoric, language, and creativity in medical writing
• Representations of the healthy or sick body in literature
• The ethics of "diagnosing" literary or historical figures
• Literature's role in normalizing, otherizing, or popularizing mental or physical ailments
• Literary analyses of psychological writing or scientific writing

Joshua Wolf Shenk, author of the critically acclaimed book Lincoln's Melancholy, will deliver our keynote address.

Our conference will be held on Saturday, March 9 at Boston College. Boston College is located in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts and is easily accessible to downtown Boston. See www.bc.edu for additional campus information.

For questions and submissions, please contact dailym@bc.edu.

Submissions are due by Tuesday, January 15th.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centurygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymedievalpopular_culturerenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 48494The Landscape of the West/PCA/ACA (March 27-30, 2013)Tina Arduini / Bowling Green State Universitytarduin@bgsu.edu1351179375americanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisionpopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositiontheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Tina Arduini / Bowling Green State Universitycontact email: tarduin@bgsu.edu

Call for Papers: The Landscape of the West
PCA/ACA (March 27-30, 2013)
Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association
For Conference details go to: http://pcaaca.org/national-conference-2/

The Western landscape is notorious for rolling prairies, wide open skies, barren desert, and more. It defines our American concepts about "the frontier" by providing us with glimpses that go beyond the horizon and engage with the cultural constructs of Manifest Destiny and imperialism. From notions of the ³Wild West² to records of and experiences from Native American Reservations, the West helps to create a sense of our national identity that is both proud and culpable. Popular media has glamorized, demonized, and recognized this setting as a part of our shared history, leaving us to ask the question, "why?" What is it about the geography of the American West that appeals to our society and has maintained "the Western" as a profitable and popular genre?

Because the frontier landscape frequently juxtaposes ideas about desolation and beauty, survival and hope, or violence and pleasure, we are left with a fractured notion about what the West really means. We invite contributions from scholars who seek to situate themselves within these Western tropes that deal with physical or metaphorical landscapes. High value will be given to papers that deal with the following media: television, novels, comic books, graphic novels, and other visual images outside of film and videogames.

If interested in this panel, please submit a 150-word proposal to April Conway or Tina Arduini by November 5.

cfp categories: americanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisionpopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositiontheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 48495Undocumented Migration in Literature, Film, and Popular Culture (ACLA, Toronto, April 4-7, 2013)Claudia Hoffmann / University of Toronto Scarboroughclaudia.hoffmann@utoronto.ca1351182652cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturetheoryfull name / name of organization: Claudia Hoffmann / University of Toronto Scarboroughcontact email: claudia.hoffmann@utoronto.ca

CFP for the annual American Comparative Literature Conference in Toronto, Canada, April 4 - 7, 2013.

Please submit your abstracts on the ACLA website: http://www.acla.org/acla2013 by November 15, 2012.

Feel free to contact me with any questions or comments!

Undocumented Migration in Literature, Film, and Popular Culture

Seminar Organizer(s):

Claudia Hoffman (University of Toronto, Scarborough)

In this seminar we want to explore the diverse representations of undocumented migration in fiction, drama, poetry, film, popular culture, art, and other genres. Since the 1990s, filmmakers from around the world have cinematically recreated issues of clandestine migration in films such as El Norte, Dirty Pretty Things, and Frozen River, just to name a few. At the same time, literary works such as Amma Darko's Beyond the Horizon, T.C. Boyle's The Tortilla Curtain, and Reyna Grande's Across a Hundred Mountains, among others, address issues such as trafficking, undocumented labor, and border crossings. Cinematic and literary characters cross oceans, deserts, forests, frozen lakes, and other landscapes. Authors and filmmakers recreate spaces of undocumented labor on farms, on construction sites, in restaurants and dry cleaners, and in the sex trade. These fictional migrants travel from, to, and within the United States, Canada, Mexico, Germany, England, Spain, Italy, Turkey, Iraq, China, Australia, and many other countries. Furthermore, many undocumented youth have turned to blogs and creative writing as a means of expressing themselves. This increasingly diverse body of films, literature, and popular culture about undocumented migrant character provides an exciting opportunity for discussions spanning a range of genres, geographical regions, and topics and for rethinking contemporary cartographies, global positioning(s), and border politics.

Papers might address:

Clandestine border crossings
Gendered migration
Clandestine landscapes
Undocumented labor
Labor exploitation
Detention centers and deportation
Immigration equality
Immigrant and anti-immigrant blogs

SEMINAR KEYWORDS: undocumented migration, clandestine migration, immigrant, border crossing, border politics, undocumented labor, interdisciplinary, diaspora, transnational

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturetheory 48496[UPDATE] Apocalyptic Politics: Framing the Present April 12-13 2013Villanova University Department of Philosophydrain.chris@gmail.com1351185162cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinaryreligiontheoryfull name / name of organization: Villanova University Department of Philosophycontact email: drain.chris@gmail.com

Call for Papers:
The 18th annual Villanova Philosophy Conference

Apocalyptic Politics: Framing the Present

Villanova University, Friday April 12-Saturday April 13, 2013
Confirmed Speakers: Mladen Dolar, Slavoj Žižek, Alenka Zupančič

The present is often characterized as a critical moment that totters between possibilities of irresolvable catastrophe and redemptive restoration. Such claims involve prophecies of an end. Whether consisting in theological predictions of a messianic end, political predictions of a revolutionary end, or historical predictions of an epochal end, claims on the future charge the present with immediate significance through the ethical and political demands they place on it. This is to say, an anticipated end, which in a way is not-yet, is also always enacted in the present. Apocalyptic futures clearly enter into the structure of contemporary subjects - of their desires and drives, on the planes of fantasy and of theory - but these relations call for clarification. The multiplicity of ways in which prophecy can be received, for instance - whether the foretold end is interpreted as already-accomplished, imminent, or in the indeterminate future, whether the end is met with a spirit of fear or hopeful anticipation, or whether it is understood as necessary and irrevocable or as contingent and preventable, etc. - invites fundamental inquiry into the conscious and unconscious relations of the subject to history and its ruptures.

Possible topics may include but are not limited to the following: the end/temporality of history (Hegel, Marx, Kojeve); political theology and the Messianic: the legacy of Paul in political theology, kariological temporality and klesis (Agamben, Derrida, Benjamin, Bloch); early modern political philosophy: the role of prophecy in shaping societal affects (Hobbes, Machiavelli, Spinoza); phenomenological relationality to the future; revolutionary politics; apocalyptic cinema, science fiction, and art.

The Philosophy Graduate Student Union at Villanova University welcomes high quality submissions from graduate students and faculty. Abstracts and papers are welcome for review; papers should not exceed 3500 words.

Submission Deadline: February 1st, 2013
Please send submissions formatted for blind review to
Rachel Aumiller and Chris Drain at villanovaphilosophy@gmail.com

We strongly encourage submissions from women and other under-represented groups.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinaryreligiontheory 48497CFP: ACLA 2013 Seminar, Contested Cartographies of ConsentKeja Valens, Salem State University and Jordana Greenblatt, Justus Liebig Universitat Giessenkvalens@salemstate.edu1351185343cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarypostcolonialtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Keja Valens, Salem State University and Jordana Greenblatt, Justus Liebig Universitat Giessencontact email: kvalens@salemstate.edu

This is a call for papers for the annual American Comparative Literature Conference which will be held in Toronto, Canada, April 4 - 7, 2013. The abstracts need to be submitted by November 15, 2012 on the ACLA website, specifying that is is for the Contested Cartographies of Consent Seminar, at < http://www.acla.org/acla2013/>.

Contested Cartographies of Consent
Consent is a protean construct in literary, cultural, legal, medical, and social discourses. Although we tend to assume that we understand it on the level common sense as that which differentiates desired from unwanted interactions, consent is a dynamically shifting construct that serves to position bodies and desires in various kinds of cultural intelligibility. For Kant, consent delineates ethical interaction. The social contract places consent as the decisive act of citizenship even as the social construction of consent operates to produce contested cartographies of desire, mapping certain desires as incompatible with the acceptable social subject. For example, in rejecting the appeal of the defendants in the Spanner case, in which a group of gay male sadomasochists were successfully prosecuted for assault (against the objections of their willing sexual partners), Lord Templeman of the British House of Lords famously wrote: "Pleasure derived from the infliction of pain is an evil thing. Cruelty is uncivilized." However, progressive political projects have been no less inclined to map and to regulate the borders of acceptable desire than the state. While sadomasochism has historically been a particularly contested issue within feminist discourse, multiple political projects deploy concepts of false consciousness that serve equally to construct limits to what one can consent to and who can grant consent that end up excluding certain subjects from "civilization." Consent risks collapsing, or extending into one another, the private and the public and, as Elaine Scarry, notes, the active and the passive. In this seminar, we particularly seek projects that theorize consent, in all its dramatic malleability, as a social, legal, cultural, and/or literary construct that serves actively to produce and to reinforce borders between categories of social activity and of acceptable and unacceptable desires and social subjects. We are particularly interested in the ways in which it is used to map and regulate sexual desire, gender relationships, global positions, and literary interactions (Joan Didion claims, in "Why I Write," "that setting words on paper is the tactic of a secret bully, an invasion, an imposition of the writers sensibility on the readers most private space"). Areas of focus might include: Contested sexualities (sadomasochism, sex work, pornography, etc); Relations between and across imperial and postcolonial positions; Literature and the consent of the reader; Intersections between legal and cultural constructions of consent; Censorship; Feminism and consent; Childhood sexuality and the age of consent.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarypostcolonialtwentieth_century_and_beyond 48498Other Britains: Special Issue of Postcolonial Studies Association newsletterPostcolonial Studies Associationn.abram@pgr.reading.ac.uk; l.c.moore@lancaster.ac.uk1351189356african-americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspostcolonialtheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Postcolonial Studies Associationcontact email: n.abram@pgr.reading.ac.uk; l.c.moore@lancaster.ac.uk

Following this year of the Queen's Jubilee and the London Olympics, we invite reflections on Britain as a postcolonial site.

:: What discourses and practices of nation and nationality are operative in Britain today?
:: Which hidden histories of Britain remain untold, or unheard?
:: How are literary, dramatic, and artistic representations re-shaping the nation?
:: What fruitful directions might future postcolonial studies of Britain take?

We welcome submissions from across the full spectrum of scholarly disciplines, and encourage interdisciplinary research. We also invite reports on relevant conferences or cultural activities, and details of appropriate degree courses, study centres, and recent publications.

To make an enquiry, or to register your intention to submit a feature, please contact the editors Nicola Abram and Lindsey Moore as soon as possible. Final contributions should be between 300-1200 words long, and should be sent as .doc files by the end of February 2013, along with the author's bio.

[Image Competition]

We particularly welcome submissions of photographs and other artwork that responds to the theme of the forthcoming Special Issue: Other Britains. Submissions deemed suitable may be chosen to feature throughout the Issue. The image deemed by the editors to best capture the theme will be selected for the front page, and the artist invited to submit a blurb and biography. Please send high resolution images via email to the editors, as above.

cfp categories: african-americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspostcolonialtheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 48499"Mark Twain and History": Annual American Literature Association ConferenceMark Twain Circle of Americalamorris@ucdavis.edu1351190702americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfull name / name of organization: Mark Twain Circle of Americacontact email: lamorris@ucdavis.edu

This topic may be broadly considered including, but not limited to, Mark Twain's writings about historical events, his writing set in earlier historical periods, his place in history, or his works in relation to other historical figures. Send proposal abstract no later than January 15.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approaches 48501Mark Twain and William Dean Howells: Annual American Literature Association ConferenceMark Twain Circle of America and the William Dean Howells Societylamorris@ucdavis.edu; DanielmMrozowski@trincoll.edu1351191231americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfull name / name of organization: Mark Twain Circle of America and the William Dean Howells Societycontact email: lamorris@ucdavis.edu; DanielmMrozowski@trincoll.edu

Papers may be on any topic relating to both Mark Twain and William Dean Howells: biographical, literary, or cultural. Send proposed abstracts to both contacts listed above by January 15.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approaches 48502[UPDATE] British Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies Conference - February 15-16, 2013British Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies Conferencejpellegrino@georgiasouthern.edu1351194816cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionscience_and_culturetheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: British Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies Conferencecontact email: jpellegrino@georgiasouthern.edu

CALL FOR PAPERS
22nd Annual British Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies Conference
February 15-16 2013
Hilton Savannah DeSoto, Savannah GA

The British Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies Conference, inaugurated in 1992, is the oldest and longest-running annual meeting of its kind in the United States. It encompasses colonial and postcolonial histories, literatures, creative and performing arts, politics, economics, and all other aspects of the countries formerly colonized by Britain and other European powers.

KEYNOTE SPEAKER
Jahan Ramazani is the Edgar F. Shannon Professor of English and Department Chair at the University of Virginia. He is the author of The Hybrid Muse: Postcolonial Poetry in English; Poetry of Mourning: The Modern Elegy from Hardy to Heaney (a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award); and Yeats and the Poetry of Death. He edited the most recent edition of The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry and, with Jon Stallworthy, The Twentieth Century and After, in The Norton Anthology of English Literature. He is a recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, an NEH Fellowship, a Rhodes Scholarship, and the William Riley Parker Prize.

SEE FULL CONFERENCE DETAILS
Online at http://class.georgiasouthern.edu/litphi/bcpsc/
OR http://goo.gl/TIUrb

PAPERS ACCEPTED
The aim of the conference is to be interdisciplinary and cross-cultural, and to offer scholars and researchers, teachers and students, the opportunity to disseminate and discuss their knowledge and understanding of the dynamic, important field of postcolonial studies.

We invite proposals in both thematic (migration, diaspora studies, etc.) and geographic (Eurabia, South Asia, etc.) areas:

Bioethics, Ecology, and Ecocriticism
Migration, Diaspora, Hybridity, and Borders
Region, Religion, Politics, and Culture
Literature, Arts, and the Media
History and Historiography
War and Terrorism
Race, Racism, Class, Gender, Sexuality, and Ethnicity
Ethics, Economics, and Globalization
Pedagogy and the Disciplines
Intersections of Francophone and Anglophone Literatures
Postcolonial and the Transnational Literatures
Liberation literature from Africa
Health and Wellness
North (excluding the USA), Central, and South America
Europe (Fortress Europe, Eurabia, Londonistan, Ireland)
South Asia (Pakistan, Afghanistan, India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka)
Southeast Asia (Brunei, Burma, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam)
Africa (Nigeria, South Africa, Black Atlantic)
The Middle East
Australia and Oceania
Or any other aspect of the British Commonwealth of nations, or of countries formerly colonized by other European powers.

SUBMISSION PROCESS
Submissions are accepted online at the Conference web site: http://class.georgiasouthern.edu/litphi/bcpsc/
OR http://goo.gl/TIUrb

DEADLINE - DEADLINE EXTENDED
The deadline for proposal submissions is now NOVEMBER 15, 2012.
Notification of acceptance will be completed by December 20, 2012.

INFO FOR POTENTIAL PRESENTERS
Abstracts of 300 words maximum are required via the submission form.
Panels should be designed for 75 minutes; individual papers for 15-minute delivery -- maximum.
Proposals for panels should include an abstract for each paper with complete information on each presenter.

REGISTRATION FEES
Regular Registration (includes all conference events, meals, and receptions): $150.00
Graduate Student / Retiree (includes all conference events, meals, and receptions): $120.00

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionscience_and_culturetheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 48503Arab American/Arab Immigrant -- special topics panel; LSU Mardi Gras Conference; Feb. 7th and 8th; Abstract deadline Dec. 1stLouisiana State University English Graduate Student Associationarabimmigrant@gmail.com1351195216americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygraduate_conferencespostcolonialtravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Louisiana State University English Graduate Student Associationcontact email: arabimmigrant@gmail.com

For Louisiana State University's upcoming graduate student conference on the theme of "In Momentum: Literature, Travel, and Alterity," this panel seeks to explore the exciting field of Arab American/immigrant literature. Of particular interest are the ways immigrant writers have approached American culture in their writings (Arabic and English), given the fact that their cultural background is rich with values, principle, ideals, and so on. We invite students and scholars who are interested in Arab American/immigrant literature to submit conference paper abstracts that discuss the Arab literary presentation of American (and western) cultures.
How do Arab immigrant writers understand American culture and how do they respond to its demands? Can we see any resistance to the perceived American culture? How do Arab writers situate or position themselves within American culture? And does such a potential positioning involve altering or adapting one's cultural ideals to fit into the "new" culture? As well, in what ways do second-generation immigrants struggle with some of the concerns encountered by first-generation immigrant writers (writers born and raised in the "Arab Home")? How would the former approach these cultural issues differently? Any discussions of how perceptions might vary from first to second generations are welcome as well.
The LSU graduate student Mardi Gras Conference will take place on February 7th and 8th, 2013. By December 1st, please submit an abstract of 250 words and a working title as an attachment along with contact information, including name, institutional affiliation, degree level, email address, and phone number to: arabimmigrant@gmail.com

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygraduate_conferencespostcolonialtravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 48504Renovation: A Regional Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference, March 1-2, 2013University of Nevada, Renounr.grad.conference@gmail.com1351198012african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: University of Nevada, Renocontact email: unr.grad.conference@gmail.com

At the turn of the 20th century, Ezra Pound declared the need to "make it new." His call inspired numerous artists, creators, critics, and theorists to push the boundaries of their fields, to discover and invent original forms and technologies, to develop new modes of thinking about ourselves and our worlds—in short, to innovate. Nationally, this translated to the renovation of cities and borders and significant innovations in travel and technology. In the academy, scholars reconceptualized disciplines and established new canons, methodologies, and theoretical models. The drive to innovate to make things new is one of the 20th century's most noted legacies.

In this forward push, however, we sometimes discard or overlook useful texts and approaches, and we often fail to acknowledge that many so-called innovations are in fact renovations—rifts on earlier works, forms, theories, or concepts. Since the turn of the 21st century, our economic, political, social, cultural, and academic climate has drastically shifted. Should innovation continue to be the dominant discourse of our society and of the academy? Rather than innovation, we suggest that renovation—the cultural work of repairing, reworking, refashioning, revamping, recycling and/or reusing for a different purpose—might be a project that could better serve us in the 21st century.

With this understanding of renovation in mind, we invite graduate and final-year undergraduate students in the humanities, the social sciences, the arts, and related fields to present work that can offer perspectives on the question: How can the academy in the 21st century renovate ideas and methodologies to respond to the challenges presented by the contemporary need for perpetual innovation?

We encourage submission of proposals and/or panels that relate to any of the following themes:

  • Criticism and Theory: What are the theoretical and practical distinctions between innovation and renovation? What does it mean to have a "new wave" within a field?
  • Gender, Race, and Identity: How do terms of identity change? What violence is inherent in identity re-formations or re-conceptualizations?
  • Class and Economy: How have economic markets generated the need for new understandings of class? In what ways has class status determined cultural innovation?
  • Space, Place, and Locale: How does the landscape—rural, urban or otherwise—influence local or global visions of change? What are the ecological implications of renovation?
  • Media and Technology: How have technological innovations produced renovations in daily life? What problems are implicit in media depictions of change?
  • Politics of the Academy and Disciplinarity: What are the ramifications of renovation for an academic discipline? What innovative revisions are (not) occurring and why?
  • Pedagogy: In what ways have the philosophy and practice of teaching changed? What renovations have occurred in your experience and/or seem imminent in the near future?
  • Creative Response: We encourage artists of all genres and mediums to submit work that renovates a form, field, and/or the work of another artist.

For academic papers, please submit a 250-word abstract for a 15-minute presentation. For creative work, please submit a 150-word overview of the work and a brief excerpt or sample of the work. Submission of panels is welcomed. All submissions should be accompanied by a brief bio that includes your name, affiliation, contact details, and AV requirements. Submissions are due December 1, 2012. For more information and to submit your materials, please visit the conference webpage: http://www.unr.edu/cla/engl/renovation/

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 48505Being Undisciplined: An Interdisciplinary Graduate Student ConferenceUniversity of Cincinnati English Composition Programbeingundisciplineduc@gmail.com1351217420general_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryfull name / name of organization: University of Cincinnati English Composition Programcontact email: beingundisciplineduc@gmail.com

"New knowledge arises out of taking radically different conceptual blocs, rubbing them together and making revolutionary fire."
-David Harvey

The University of Cincinnati Composition Program invites proposals for the fourth annual interdisciplinary graduate student conference to be held at the University of Cincinnati on Saturday, April 6, 2013. Our emphasis this year focuses on being undisciplined: breaking down walls, bending rules, and questioning the rigid structure of our fields. In every discipline, divisions and gaps are present and are in fact necessary to generate innovation and creative thinking.

We are interested in exploring these gaps and unearthing the projects that only interdisciplinary collaboration makes possible. Being able to swap, borrow, and alter the tools of other disciplines for use in our own is an important aspect of academic growth going forward in the 21st century.
In the spirit of being undisciplined, we invite researchers from all academic disciplines to submit proposals in the hopes of disrupting boundaries and destabilizing the whole notion of discipline-specific research.

We invite proposals (individual or panel submissions) that address the theme of being undisciplined. The following questions are of particular interest to us, though we're eager to consider others as well:
• In what ways is your work undisciplined? How might your work reflect an unruly stance or reject traditional categorizations?
• What is the value or function of disciplinary boundaries in your own research?
• How does your research reinforce, reject, or draw from multiple disciplines or approaches?
• How are fields of inquiry historically situated? In what ways are 'undisciplined' groups or figures essential for changing or challenging social structures?
• How are genres being employed or rejected in scientific and sociological research, works of music, art, or literature? To what effect?
• What is the relationship between disciplinary knowledge in your field and new media? How are technologies influencing or challenging our disciplinary practices?
• What does interdisciplinary research contribute to Digital Composition or Digital Humanities? Or vice versa, how are digital humanities forcing us to take a different perspective on traditional disciplines?

As an extension of breaking down divisions between disciplines, we especially encourage alternative approaches to the traditional conference paper, such as posters, film, various kinds of art, performance, and audience participation. There will be no fee to attend or present at this graduate student conference.

Deadline for submissions: December 30, 2012

Please send proposals, questions, or comments to beingundisciplineduc@gmail.com.

Visit our conference site at www.beingundisciplineduc.wordpress.com for detailed submission information.

cfp categories: general_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinary 48506[UPDATE] Being Undisciplined: An Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference- April 6, 2013University of Cincinnati English Composition Programbeingundisciplineduc@gmail.com1351217522general_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryfull name / name of organization: University of Cincinnati English Composition Programcontact email: beingundisciplineduc@gmail.com

"New knowledge arises out of taking radically different conceptual blocs, rubbing them together and making revolutionary fire."
-David Harvey

The University of Cincinnati Composition Program invites proposals for the fourth annual interdisciplinary graduate student conference to be held at the University of Cincinnati on Saturday, April 6, 2013. Our emphasis this year focuses on being undisciplined: breaking down walls, bending rules, and questioning the rigid structure of our fields. In every discipline, divisions and gaps are present and are in fact necessary to generate innovation and creative thinking.

We are interested in exploring these gaps and unearthing the projects that only interdisciplinary collaboration makes possible. Being able to swap, borrow, and alter the tools of other disciplines for use in our own is an important aspect of academic growth going forward in the 21st century.
In the spirit of being undisciplined, we invite researchers from all academic disciplines to submit proposals in the hopes of disrupting boundaries and destabilizing the whole notion of discipline-specific research.

We invite proposals (individual or panel submissions) that address the theme of being undisciplined. The following questions are of particular interest to us, though we're eager to consider others as well:
• In what ways is your work undisciplined? How might your work reflect an unruly stance or reject traditional categorizations?
• What is the value or function of disciplinary boundaries in your own research?
• How does your research reinforce, reject, or draw from multiple disciplines or approaches?
• How are fields of inquiry historically situated? In what ways are 'undisciplined' groups or figures essential for changing or challenging social structures?
• How are genres being employed or rejected in scientific and sociological research, works of music, art, or literature? To what effect?
• What is the relationship between disciplinary knowledge in your field and new media? How are technologies influencing or challenging our disciplinary practices?
• What does interdisciplinary research contribute to Digital Composition or Digital Humanities? Or vice versa, how are digital humanities forcing us to take a different perspective on traditional disciplines?

As an extension of breaking down divisions between disciplines, we especially encourage alternative approaches to the traditional conference paper, such as posters, film, various kinds of art, performance, and audience participation. There will be no fee to attend or present at this graduate student conference.

Deadline for submissions: December 30, 2012

Please send proposals, questions, or comments to beingundisciplineduc@gmail.com.

Visit our conference site at www.beingundisciplineduc.wordpress.com for detailed submission information.

cfp categories: general_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinary 48507Fandom, Fantasy, and Fitness: The 2nd Annual Rockford College Sports Studies SymposiumRockford CollegeSSS13@Rockford.edu1351230425americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositionfull name / name of organization: Rockford Collegecontact email: SSS13@Rockford.edu

Call for Abstracts

Fandom, Fantasy, and Fitness
The 2nd Annual Rockford College Sports Studies Symposium
Date: April 19, 2013

Grace Roper Lounge
Rockford College
5050 E. State. St.
Rockford, IL 61108

Fans play a central role at all levels and within various aspects of sport, so any study of sport would do well to consider their influences in connection to fandom, fantasy, and fitness. A specific and growing area of fandom, fantasy sports, illustrates a concrete and complex way fans relate to and even affect sport. Moreover, the implicit and explicit connection of sport to fitness offers another important way that fans interact with sport. This year's symposium seeks to explore and examine these aspects of the relationship between fan and sport.

We invite scholars from all disciplines to submit an abstract on these themes. This symposium will then bring together several panels of scholars to discuss these themes. The focus of each panel will depend, in part, on the submitted abstracts. Each presenter on a panel will have 20 minutes for their presentation. This will be followed by 30 minutes of a combined Q&A.

Abstract Submission:
Submissions are welcome on this theme of Fandom, Fantasy, and Fitness, or other related issues arising in the study of Sport. Abstract should be 300-500 words. Send via email (as PDF) to SSS13@Rockford.edu

Deadline: Friday, January 25th, 2013.
Notification of Acceptance: Monday, February 4th, 2013.

If you have any questions, please email SSS13@Rockford.edu, contact Shawn Klein (Assistant Professor, Philosophy Department) at 815-226-4115, or Michael Perry (Assistant Professor, English Department) at 815-226-4098.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturerhetoric_and_composition 48508[Singapore] Transcultural Imaginaries: Making New, Making Strange. A Moving Worlds Conference (& Dept of English NTU)Moving Worlds Journal & Dept of English, NTU, Singaporemovingworlds@ntu.edu.sg1351233762bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialtheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Moving Worlds Journal & Dept of English, NTU, Singaporecontact email: movingworlds@ntu.edu.sg

Transcultural Imaginaries: Making New, Making Strange
A Moving Worlds Conference in collaboration with the Dept. of English, NTU, Singapore

Venue: School of Humanities and Social Sciences, NTU, Singapore
Dates: 14-- 17 June 2013

Organizing Committee:
Shirley Chew, Neil Murphy, Jennifer Crawford, Daniel Jernigan, Lim Lee Ching, Bede Scott

Transcultural Imaginaries, a multidisciplinary conference, celebrates Moving Worlds: A Journal of Transcultural Writings. Devoted to creative work as well as criticism, literary as well as visual forms of representation from different cultural traditions, writing in scholarly and more personal modes, in English and translations into English, the Journal began life in 2001 in Leeds and the UK, and has, since 2011 and in rhizome fashion, put down fresh roots in Singapore. Co-published today by the University of Leeds and Nanyang Technological University, Moving Worlds is sustained by more than a dozen years of established and significant connections; at the same time, with its current proximity to Asia, South and Southeast Asia, and the Pacific region, it looks forward to representing new work, perspectives, and issues, and the exciting challenges this will bring.
Taking a cue from the Journal's title, the central theme of the Conference is the transcultural, that is, the movement of cultures across regional, national, and international boundaries, and the diverse and rich transformations resulting from these crisscrossings. It explores newness and experimentation in areas such as literature, theatre, film, visual and practical arts, music, architecture; and the political, social, and economic contexts of these transcultural achievements. It investigates key issues such as the extent to which globalization has made possible significant innovations in the arts; the interrelationship between the indigenous and the global; the continuing claims of the past and tradition upon interpretations of our present world and lives. It speaks critically to specific literary texts/films/artworks; and to individual writers, artists, film-makers, and relevant theorists.

We invite papers and proposals for panels (of 3-4 papers). Suggested topics include, but are not restricted to, the following:

Translation and transcreation
Interregional exchange -- the Indian Ocean, the Pacific Ocean
Forms in Architecture
Rewriting diaspora
The transport of styles
Postcolonial aesthetics
Technology and visual arts and media
Inventing Asia
Travelling theory
Sustainability: contesting paradigms
Contact zones and linguistic identity
Transcultural cities

Abstracts of 250 words to be sent by email to movingworlds@ntu.edu.sg by 15 January 2013.

cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialtheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 48509TV Fangdom: A Conference on Television VampiresTV Fangdom: A Conference on Television Vampires (the University of Northampton) lorna.jowett@northampton.ac.uk1351236446film_and_televisioninternational_conferencespopular_culturefull name / name of organization: TV Fangdom: A Conference on Television Vampires (the University of Northampton)contact email:  lorna.jowett@northampton.ac.uk

TV Fangdom: A Conference on Television Vampires
7-8 June 2013
The University of Northampton

Vampires have always made charismatic characters and with the rise of the VILF and the fangbanger they are more popular than ever. This conference aims to explore the vampire particularly in relation to its presence on television. From Barnabas Collins to the Count von Count, from Mona the Vampire to True Blood's Pam, vampires appear everywhere on television schedules and in television history, whether in serials, made-for-TV movies, adaptations of gothic novels, adverts or children's TV. How has the vampire mythos been tailored for TV? Does the vampire's appearance on a domestic medium like television blunt its fangs and tame its hypersexuality? What kind of audience have TV vampires attracted and how has their popularity been exploited? In what ways has the vampire been remade for different eras of television, different TV genres, or different national contexts?

Keynote and featured speakers:
• Brigid Cherry, editor of True Blood: Investigating Vampires and Southern Gothic and author of Horror (Routledge Film Guidebook)
• Marcus Recht, author of Der Sympatische Vampir
• Catherine Spooner, author of Contemporary Gothic

Proposals are invited on (but not limited to) the following topics:
• TV's development and appropriation of the reluctant vampire
• Vampire hunters on TV
• The vampire as allegory
• Issues of gender and sexuality
• Narrative and structure
• Different formats (miniseries, animation, made-for-TV movie)
• Adaptation
• Visual style
• Sound and music
• Special effects
• Scheduling
• Marketing and advertising
• New media, ancillary materials and extended narratives
• Intersection with other media (novels, films, comics, video games, music)
• Audience and consumption (including fandom)
• Genre hybridity
• The vampire and children's television
• Inter/national variants
• Translation and dubbing
We will be particularly interested in proposals on older TV shows, on those that have rarely been considered as vampire fictions, and on analysis of international vampire TV. The conference organisers welcome contributions from scholars within and outside universities, including research students, and perspectives are invited from different disciplines.

Please send proposals (250 words) for 20 minute papers plus a brief biography (100 words) to all three organisers by 16th December 2012.
s.abbott@roehampton.ac.uk
lorna.jowett@northampton.ac.uk
mike.starr@northampton.ac.uk

Conference Website: http://tvfangdom.wordpress.com/

This conference is run in collaboration with the Centre for Contemporary Narrative and Cultural Theory at the University of Northampton and the Centre for Research in Film and Audiovisual Cultures at the University of Roehampton.

cfp categories: film_and_televisioninternational_conferencespopular_culture 485108th Global Conference: Visions of Humanity in Cyberculture, Cyberspace and Science Fiction (July 2013; Oxford, United Kingdom)Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netvisions8@inter-disciplinary.net1351241225african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: visions8@inter-disciplinary.net

8th Global Conference
Visions of Humanity in Cyberculture, Cyberspace and Science Fiction

Thursday 18th July – Saturday 20th July 2013
Mansfield College, Oxford, United Kingdom

Call for Presentations
This inter-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary project aims to explore what it is to be human and the nature of human community in cyberculture, cyberspace and science fiction. In particular, the project will explore the possibilities offered by these contexts for creative thinking about persons and the challenges posed to the nature and future of national, international, and global communities.

Presentations, papers, performances, and workshops are invited on issues related to any of the following themes;

- the relationship between cyberculture, cyberspace, science fiction
- cyberculture, cyberpunk and the near future: utopias vs. dystopias
- technologies of the future today: equality and access
- science fiction and cyberpunk as a medium for exploring the nature of persons
- humans and cyborgs; the synergy of humans and technology; changing views of the body
- human and post-human concepts in digital arts and cinema
- digital artistic practices and aesthetics
- mobile media, place and the telematic body
- bodies in cyberculture; body modifications; from apes to androids – electronic evolution; biotechnical advances and the impact of life, death, and social existence
- artificial intelligence, robotics and biomedia: self-organization as a cultural logic
- gender and cyberspace: new gender, new feminisms, new masculinities
- cyberculture of virtual worlds and videogames
- interactive storytelling, emergent narratives, transmedia storytelling, alternate reality games
- nature, enhancing nature, and artificial intelligence; artificial life, life and information systems
- networked living in future city, new urban lifestyles
- human and post-human politics; cyborg citizenship and rights; influence of political technologies
- boundaries, frontiers and taboos in cyberculture

The Steering Group particularly welcomes the submission of pre-formed panel proposals. Papers will also be considered on any related theme. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 8th February 2013. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 10th May 2013. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to both Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract, f) up to 10 key words
E-mails should be entitled: VISIONS8 Abstract Submission.

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Joint Organising Chairs:

Daniel Riha: rihad@inter-disciplinary.net
Rob Fisher: visions8@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the 'Critical Issues' series of research projects run by Inter-Disciplinary.Net. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and challenging. All papers accepted for and presented at the conference are eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be invited to go forward for development into 20-25 page chapters for publication in a themed dialogic ISBN hard copy volume.

For further details of the conference, please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/critical-issues/cyber/visions-of-human...

Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 485115th Global Conference: Videogame Cultures & the Future of Interactive Entertainment (July 2013; Oxford, United Kingdom)Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netvg5@inter-disciplinary.net1351247441african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Netcontact email: vg5@inter-disciplinary.net

5th Global Conference
Videogame Cultures & the Future of Interactive Entertainment

Sunday 14th July – Tuesday 16th July 2013
Mansfield College, Oxford

Call for Presentations
This inter- and multi-disciplinary conference aims to examine, explore and critically engage with the issues and implications created by the mass use of computers and videogames for human entertainment and focus on the impact of innovative videogame titles and interfaces for human communication and ludic culture. In particular the conference will encourage equally theoretical and practical debates which surround the cultural contexts within which videogames flourish.

Presentations, papers, performances, workshops and reports are invited on any of the following themes:

1. Videogames and Gaming
Theories and Concepts of Gaming. Identifying Key Features and Issues.
Videogames as Text. Videogames as Interactive Image. Multidisciplinary Approaches to Videogame Analysis. Film, Literary, Art Studies and Cultural Studies Approaches to the Analysis of Videogames.

2. Videogame Cultures
Emerging Practices in Online and Offline Gaming. Games as Cultural Artifacts.
Pervasive Gaming, Convergence and the Integration of Videogames. Videogames as Art, Fan Cultures.

3. Games and Society
Ethical Issues in Videogames, Videogame Controversy – Rating, Violence, Sex, Morality and their relation to Maturity. Videogames and Politics. Propaganda Games. Censorship.

4. Immersion and Embodiment
New Forms of Interaction, Immersion and Collaboration in Videogames. Sound, Music, Touch, and Game Space. Evolution of Gaming. The Role of Innovative Interfaces.

5. Games with Meaning?
The Relationship between Game and Gamer. Social Impact Simulations. Educational Use of Videogames. Serious Games. News and Documentary Videogames.

5. Reception, Temporality and Videogames
Player Generations. Old Originals vs. Retro games. Indie Games and Low-Tech Aesthetics. Innovations in Independent Game Movements.

6. Works in Progress
Games in Development. Approaches to Game Design. Discussion Workshops on Games under Production. Best Practice and Know-How Exchange.

A presentation with a quick demo of the game and workshop proposals are strongly encouraged. We might offer 2 hour slot for 1-3 intensive workshops on design methodologies and media comparative sessions. Delegates presenting in the frame of workshops are eligible for publishing in special track of Videogames 5 ebook on methodologies.

The Steering Group particularly welcomes the submission of pre-formed panel proposals. Papers will also be considered on any related theme. A presentation with a quick demo of the game and workshop proposals are strongly encouraged. We may offer a 2 hour slot for 1-3 intensive workshops on design methodologies and media comparative sessions. Delegates presenting in the frame of workshops are eligible for publishing in special track of Videogames 3 ebook on methodologies.

300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 8th February 2013. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 10th May 2013. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to both Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract, f) up to 10 keywords
E-mails should be entitled: VG5 Abstract Submission.

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Joint Organising Chairs:

Daniel Riha: rihad@inter-disciplinary.net
Rob Fisher: vg5@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the 'Critical Issues' series of research projects run by Inter-Disciplinary.Net. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and challenging. All papers accepted for and presented at the conference are eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be invited to go forward for development into 20-25 page chapters for publication in a themed dialogic ISBN hard copy volume.

For further details of the conference, please visit:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/critical-issues/cyber/videogame-cultur...

Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 48512[Akademeia] Multidisciplinary Peer-Reviewed Journal - Call for papers (Submit by 05-31-13 for next issue)Akademeiaeic@akademeia.ca1351260114classical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysscience_and_culturetheoryfull name / name of organization: Akademeiacontact email: eic@akademeia.ca

Akademeia is a multidisciplinary peer-reviewed journal that is free to authors and readers. Prospective authors should consult the website, www.akademeia.ca. We are currently accepting submissions from the sciences and liberal arts.All submissions (either in the form of research articles, essays, literature, hypotheses, or reviews) are subjected to double-blinded peer review.

cfp categories: classical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysscience_and_culturetheory 48513Changing Plains in the Late 1800s -- ASLE 2013 -- 10/31Benjamin Vogtenfrancais@att.net1351278869african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturereligionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingfull name / name of organization: Benjamin Vogtcontact email: enfrancais@att.net

Changing Plains in the Late 1800s, panel proposal for the ASLE Tenth Biennial Conference, May 28-June 1, University of Kansas, Lawrence KS.

This panel will explore the changing face of the central Great Plains during the post war decades up until the last major land runs in Oklahoma Territory (1860s-1890s). For our purposes, the central Plains is roughly Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, and Oklahoma (give or take half a state). This will be a diverse and eclectic panel including perspectives from different fields on various topics concerning migrations, energies, and limits in the late 1800s.

General topics to consider are:
European immigration
Advertising land and opportunity abroad in Europe and Eurasia
Transcontinental railroad
Mennonites in Kansas and Oklahoma
Indian boarding schools
Missionaries and missions
Native American removal to Indian Territory
Native American culture and changing ceremonies on the rez
Military policy and the Indian Wars
Agriculture on the Plains
Pressure on prairie ecosystems, flora and fauna
Early conservation efforts
Technological advances that sped settlement, like barbed wire
The new culture of oil
Land runs, boomers and sooners, Native American headrights (and swindling of)
The literature of the frontier (dime novels, etc.)
Outlaws, gangs, desperados, cattlemen
Wild west myths and legends / the sentimental image of bucolic yeoman farmers

Please submit a 250-word proposal and a 1 page c.v. to Benjamin Vogt at bervogt@gmail.com by Wednesday, October 31, 2012.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturereligionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writing 48514CFP UPDATE the quintthe quint: an interdisciplinary quarterly from the northjbutler@ucn.ca1351279775americanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingvictorianfull name / name of organization: the quint: an interdisciplinary quarterly from the northcontact email: jbutler@ucn.ca

Catalogued at the National Library in Ottawa, Canada, the quint: an interdisciplinary quarterly from the north is now in its fifth year of publication. Publishing top quality academic articles, poetry, fiction, reviews, and art, the quint welcomes a diversity of disciplines and methodologies from the humanities and social sciences. The quint's seventeenth issue is issuing a call for theoretically informed and historically grounded submissions of scholarly interest—as well as creative writing, original art, interviews, and reviews of books. The deadline for this call is 15th November 2012—but please note that we accept manu/digi-scripts at any time. Links to the quint are accessible at www.ucn.ca.

All contributions to the quint will be forwarded to a member of the editorial board for consideration. Manuscripts must not be previously published or submitted for publication elsewhere while being reviewed by the quint's editors or outside readers.

Hard copies of manuscripts with short biographies can be sent to Dr. John Butler or Dr. Sue Matheson at the quint, University College of the North, P.O. Box 3000, The Pas, Manitoba, Canada, R9A 1M7. We are happy to receive your artwork in digital format, PDF preferred. Email copies of manuscripts, Word or RTF preferred, should be sent to either jbutler@ucn.ca or smatheson@ucn.ca.

Essays should range between 15 and 25 pages of double-spaced text, including all images and source citations. Longer and shorter submissions also will be considered. Bibliographic citation should be the standard disciplinary format.

cfp categories: americanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingvictorian 48515[UPDATE] Representing social classes in films on television and in cinema in English-speaking countriesUniversity of Rennes 2, Francenicole.cloarec@univ-rennes1.fr, Delphine.Letort@univ-lemans.fr, david_haigron@yahoo.fr, renee.dickason@orange.fr1351344073african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialromantictheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: University of Rennes 2, Francecontact email: nicole.cloarec@univ-rennes1.fr, Delphine.Letort@univ-lemans.fr, david_haigron@yahoo.fr, renee.dickason@orange.fr

Representing social classes in films on television and in cinema in English-speaking countries
University of Rennes 2, France - 10-11 October 2013
An international conference organised by Rennes 2 University (Research unit ACE - EA 1796, 3L.AM - EA n°4335 and HCTI)

Thursday 10th and Friday 11th October 2013.

Confirmed keynote speakers:
Jonathan Bignell, Professor of Television and Film, University of Reading, UK
Richard Butsch, Professor of Sociology & American Studies, Rider University, New Jersey, US
Michael T Martin, Professor of American Studies, Communication and Culture, Indiana University, Bloomington, US
Andy Medhurst, Senior Lecturer in Media, Film and Cultural Studies, University of Sussex, UK

On becoming Prime Minister in 1990, John Major promised to build a "genuinely classless society". This aspiration sounds all the more daunting and surprising since the British have always appeared so obsessed with class. The notion of social class is now defined not only by someone's occupation and the expression of their social status in language for instance, but also by their lifestyle, their social connections and their habits of cultural consumption (Bourdieu's notion of habitus). The recent advent of David Cameron and Nick Clegg at the head of the government has been described as the "return of the toffs", as both leaders hail from upper class families and have attended prestigious public schools and universities. Conversely, journalists and sociologists have documented the emergence of a new social category called the "chavs", loud, aggressive working class youth. Unsurprisingly, both television and cinema films bear witness to this enduring fascination for class distinctions: from the lasting popular success of television series such as Upstairs, Downstairs (LWT, 1971-1975, updated in 2010 by the BBC) or the multi-award-winning Downton Abbey (ITV, 2010) to the character of Vicky Pollard in Little Britain (BBC, 2003-06), from the nostalgic indulgence of heritage films to the scathing criticisms of films following Ken Loach's social realism, films have shaped and challenged stereotypes that articulate the ideological discourse on class.
In stark contrast to the British class system, other English-speaking countries are geared towards a classless society. In the United States, the American dream and the myth of the self-made man hold the promise of an open society where people have the same opportunity to climb the social ladder. As a tremendous dream machine that has also permitted spectacular social achievements, Hollywood nourishes and sustains the myth of an open society while generally eschewing realistic representation of working class living conditions. Some films do take into account workers' issues. Nevertheless, images of the middle class have prevailed along with racial and political discourses that contribute to marginalizing other classes - be they the ruling dynasties or the underclass. Indeed, cinema and television dramas more often than not mirror the mainstream ideology by extolling the virtues of the middle class, their social aspirations and their conservative values. However, archetypal figures of success have also been parodied or subverted in films produced in times of economic crises or by minority filmmakers.
The aim of the conference is to explore representations of social classes in fiction and non-fiction cinema and television films made in English-speaking countries. Our purpose is to study how films document a social reality that in return seeps into their narrative, how they contribute to building a collective and stereotypical representation of social groups, or how they question and undermine these representations.
Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:
- The representation of class in different types of medium (cinema / television) and genres (fiction and nonfiction films)
- The representations of social groups and their ideological underpinning
- The representation of class cultures
- Spectatorship, film reception and social classes
- The relationship between the aesthetics of kitsch and class
- The representation of labour conflicts and social unrest
- The relations between class and gender, class and generations, class and ethnic minorities
Proposals (250 words) along with a short biography should be sent by March 1st 2013 to: nicole.cloarec@univ-rennes1.fr Delphine.Letort@univ-lemans.fr david_haigron@yahoo.fr renee.dickason@orange.fr

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialromantictheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 48516Performing Arts Management Today 2013IUGTEiugte.projects@gmail.com1351344839cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturetheatrefull name / name of organization: IUGTEcontact email: iugte.projects@gmail.com

International Conference
Performing Arts Management Today
December 17 - 21, 2013

at Retzhof Castle Educational Institute
in Leitring bei Leibnitz, Austria!

"Performing Arts Management Today" is the professional conference open to arts managers, arts administrators, arts management educators and consultants, arts entrepreneurs, fundraisers, producers, arts agents and talent managers working in various artistic disciplines from all over the world interested in the research of topical questions and processes in contemporary performing arts administration and training.

The conference meeting is a great opportunity to meet potential collaborators and partners - performers from different creative genres and techniques, actors, dancers, directors, choreographers, musicians; casting directors, artists, authors, theatre managers, festival organizers and arts publishers from different countries.

The main tasks of the conference are to gain important insights into today's best management strategies for arts and cultural organizations of various sizes and scale, to consider relevant questions in contemporary arts management education and training, to establish new contacts, to exchange experiences with colleagues from different countries and to lay the foundation for future networking and collaboration.
The conference working language is English.

You are welcome to take part in the conference as a Speaker, Presenter, Participant, Observer!
At the moment the conference is accepting presentation proposals!

Presentation formats: reading/lecture, paper presentation, practical workshop/master class, video/photo demonstration, other way of demonstration offered by Speaker/Presenter can be considered. Submission guidelines and practical details: http://www.iugte.com/projects/performingartsmanagement

Welcome to our Photo Gallery http://picasaweb.google.com/globtheatre
and Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/iugte

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturetheatre 48517CINEMATIC MELODRAMA April 11-14, 2013 AAIS 2013 Annual Conference - University of Oregon, Eugene – April 11-14, 2013 maria.catrickes@yale.edu1351353581americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturereligiontheatretravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: AAIS 2013 Annual Conference - University of Oregon, Eugene – April 11-14, 2013 contact email: maria.catrickes@yale.edu

Cinematic Melodrama

This panel will explore cinematic melodrama in relation to literature, visual arts, opera, politics, morality, or religion. Papers that analyze specific use of posture, gesture, and spatial and musical categories are encouraged. All theoretical approaches are welcome. Please send a 250-300 word abstract and brief biographical note by November 15, 2012 to maria.catrickes@yale.edu.

Organizer: Maria Alexandra Catrickes, Yale University, maria.catrickes@yale.edu

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturereligiontheatretravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 48518[UPDATE] The Difference of Joyce The VI James Joyce Italian Foundation Conference in Rome - February 1-2 2013 James Joyce Italian Foundationjoycefoundation@uniroma3.it1351441789cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: James Joyce Italian Foundationcontact email: joycefoundation@uniroma3.it

Conference Date: February 1-2 2013
Abstracts due: December 9, 2012

The James Joyce Italian Foundation invites proposals for our sixth annual conference, "The Difference of Joyce." This international conference will be hosted by the Department of Comparative Literatures at the Università Roma Tre, on February 1 and 2 2012, to celebrate Joyce's 131th birthday. Plenary speakers: Fritz Senn, Geert Lernout, Daniel Ferrer, Jacques Aubert.
A Joycean birthday party will be held on February 1, 2012.
The conference will be the occasion to present unpublished papers and works in progress on Joyce to an international audience. Scholars are invited to send proposals for a 20-minute contribution on current trends in Joyce and modernist scholarship.
The general theme of the conference is "The Difference of Joyce". Related topics include but are not limited to:
- Joyce and today's fiction
- Joyce and the internal monologue tradition
- Interior/exterior monologue in Joyce
- Joyce in popular culture
- Prophecy in Joyce
- Joyce among his contemporaries
- Genetic and/or historicist approaches to Joyce
- Irish or international Joyce?
- Multigeneric rewritings: cinematic/theatrical/musical Joyce
- Joyce vs Joyce in translation
- Classic/Romantic Joyce
- Joyce as Homer
- Myth in Joyce
- Style vs plot in Joyce

Selected papers will be recommended for publication in JSI - Joyce Studies in Italy. Please send abstracts, 250-500 words in length, along with a short bio to joycefoundation@uniroma3.it
Deadline for proposals: December 9, 2012.
Successful applicants will be notified by December 15, 2012.
On arrival, participants will be expected to sign up for membership of The James Joyce Italian Foundation (Students: 25 Euro; Faculty: 35 Euro).
Contact: joycefoundation@uniroma3.it
James Joyce Italian Foundation website: http://thejamesjoyceitalianfoundation.wordpress.com/

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 48519"The Peaceable Kingdom? Cultural and language communities in Canada and the rule of law",5-7 April 2013Polish Association for Canadian Studies/Faculty of English, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Polandpacs.2013@gmail.com1351448707cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespostcolonialtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Polish Association for Canadian Studies/Faculty of English, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Polandcontact email: pacs.2013@gmail.com

It is with pleasure that we invite you to participate in the 6th Congress of Polish Canadianists, which will take place between 5th and 7th of April 2013 in Poznań, Poland. Congress presentations will focus on the often disturbed or destabilized relations among linguistic, literary and cultural communities of Canada in the context of the political and legal framework within which they exist. We hope to draw scholars from a variety of disciplines within the Canadian Studies and beyond who want to reflect on the emergence of multidisciplinary links among the political, the social and the cultural within Canada. Results of initial research into those areas carried over the last ten years indicate that, whether one takes a socio-political, cultural or literary perspective, it is no longer possible to ignore tensions between differing views regarding the nature of the above mentioned links and interdependencies. Canada, though apparently faithful to the principles of multidisciplinarity and multiculturalism, still has to face and deal with intense conflicts that go beyond the limits of academic discourse. How can one define or think about relationships between cultural and linguistic communities of Canada and the rule of law in relation to this complex interaction between dialogue and the apparent exclusion and silencing?
The organizers invite you to consider the specificity of the three major kinds of tensions occurring in contemporary Canadian society, i.e. negotiations-negations-antagonisms, from the point of view of the law, economy, politics, sociology, culture, literature, linguistics and translation studies.
Potential proposals may include, but are not limited, to the following topics:

• jurisprudence in the context of official bilingualism and multilingual practice; is it in the service of the humanist ideal that aims to create a common culture? or, does it serve instead to strengthen the cultural divisions by highlighting breakdowns of communication and broken links between groups that constitute the multicultural context?;
• official languages of Canada and official translation;
• the impact of the official bilingualism on the policy and practice of translation
• the impact of the relations between cultural and linguistic communities in Canada and the rule of law on national identity;
• the role of the English language in everyday life in comparison to its legal status (ideological framework);
• publication laws and the dissemination of Canadian minority literatures;
• the impact of legal translation on literary themes and devices
• promotion policy of the official languages;
• official bilingualism and the rule of law;
• legal and political developments in relation to language issues
• language laws: federal and provincial;
• linguistic diversity and the economic integration of Canadian provinces ;
• redefinition of the relations between the two official languages and minority languages;
• the impact of the change of the legal status of a given language on the restructuring of the linguistic and economic markets;
• the impact of provincial and regional specificity on legislation related to cultural and linguistic issues;
• literary and critical reflection on the Canadian "pastoral ideal" and pastoral tradition in support of/against Northrop Frye's claims of its centrality for the concept of Canada as "a Peaceable Kingdom"
• idealistic impulses in Canadian social and literary tradition versus social and cultural practice
• links between Canadian literary markets and legal regulations/cultural policies of the Canadian government today and in the past;
• anglophone and francophone literatures in Canada: historical and contemporary interdependencies, dialogues, conflicts; how are these facilitated or not by the legal framework?
• banned and challenged books: censorship in Canada today and in the past;
• majority and minority Canadian literatures (ethnic, racial, class, gender);
• legal, political and literary responses to othering, excluding, stigmatizing of individuals and communities;
• gender and sexuality within the multicultural framework;
• First Nations literatures and cultures in the "Peaceable Kingdom."

The deadline for paper or panel proposals is Friday 30 November 2012.

Enquiries and proposals in English or French to:
Dagmara Drewniak and Malgorzata Palaniuk (conference secretaries)
Email: pacs.2013@gmail.com

Email abstract(s) of 200–300 words and brief CV (please do not exceed one side of A4) which must include your title, institutional affiliation, email and mailing address by 30 November 2012. Submissions will be acknowledged by email.

Conference organisers:
Agnieszka Rzepa
Alicja Zuchelkowska

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespostcolonialtwentieth_century_and_beyond 48520The Poetics of Multilingualism – La Poétique du plurilinguisme International Colloquium, ELTE, Budapest, 4-5-6Centre des Hautes Études de la Renaissance, University Eötvös Loránd (ELTE), Hungarypoeticsofmultilingualism@gmail.com1351450680cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesmedievalpoetryrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositiontheoryfull name / name of organization: Centre des Hautes Études de la Renaissance, University Eötvös Loránd (ELTE), Hungarycontact email: poeticsofmultilingualism@gmail.com

The Poetics of Multilingualism – La Poétique du plurilinguisme
International Colloquium, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary 4-5-6 April 2013.

The goal of the conference is to focus on poetical, metrical, and linguistic principles in bilingual and multilingual texts. It aims to present the interactions of different literary traditions with their specific constraints, as well as the way multilingual texts obey or oppose established compositional rules and principles.

Topics include, but are not limited to:
multilingualism and the birth of vernacular literatures
poetical code-switching in multilingual texts
rhythmic, metrical, and poetic imitation in multilingual poems
generic classification of multilingual texts in poetical treatises
multilingualism and polyphonic music
multilingualism and glossolalia
adopting foreign poetical patterns by integrating foreign languages
oral performance of multilingual texts and reading out multilingual texts
multilingualism and formulaic language
multilingualism as a formal constraint: the Oulipo and the plurality of languages

We welcome submissions on all literary periods and languages; special attention will be paid to medieval, early modern, and contemporary European literature.

Keynote speakers:
Jacqueline Cerquiglini-Toulet (Universite de Paris-Sorbonne)
Jacques Roubaud (Oulipo)
Ivan Horvath (Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest)
Dominique Billy (Universite de Toulouse – Le Mirail)

Abstracts are invited for 40 minute presentations followed by 10-minute question periods. One-page (including references and examples) abstracts in both .doc and .pdf format should be sent to poeticsofmultilingualism@gmail.com by 31 December 2012.

Submission deadline: 31 December 2012
Notification of acceptance: 30 January 2013
Registration deadline: 15 February 2013.
-
Conference fee: none
-
Organising committee: Levente Seláf (Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, mail to selaf.levente[at]btk.elte.hu) and Patrizia Noel (Otto Friedrich-Universität, Bamberg, mail to patrizia.noel[at]uni-bamberg.de)

Conference Web Site:
http://www.uni-bamberg.de/germ-ling1/the-poetics-of-multilingualism-la-p....

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesmedievalpoetryrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositiontheory 48521Sacred Sites, Secular Spaces: Scenes, Sounds, and Signs in Humanistic, Artistic, and Technological Culture March 20-23 2013Humanities Education and Research Asociation [HERA]mgreen@sfsu.edu1351454672general_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesfull name / name of organization: Humanities Education and Research Asociation [HERA]contact email: mgreen@sfsu.edu

In keeping with HERA's mission of promoting the study of the humanities across a wide range of disciplines and interdisciplines, we invite presentations for the 2013 conference. The wide range of disciplines and areas of study for the conference include but are not limited to Aesthetics, Anthropology, Architecture, Art, Classics, Communication Studies, Composition, Cultural Studies, Dance, Design, Digital Technology, Education, Environmental Issues, Ethics, Ethnic Studies, Family, Film Studies, Gender Studies, Geography, Geology, Globalization, History, Languages, Literature, Media, Museum Studies, Music, Performance Studies, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Religious Studies, Sexuality, Sociology, Theater and all sciences relevant to the topic.

Creative presentations, readings, and exhibitions are also welcomed. Submissions are encouraged from educators at all levels (including advanced graduate students) as well as all those with an interest in the arts and humanities.

cfp categories: general_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferences 48522UPDATE: SW/TX PCA/ACA Children's/Young Adult Literature and Culture Area (11/16/12; 2/13/13-2/16/12)Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Association Conferencegypsyscholar@rgv.rr.com1351467417americanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturefull name / name of organization: Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Association Conferencecontact email: gypsyscholar@rgv.rr.com

34th Annual Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Association Conference
February 13 – 16, 2013
Albuquerque, NM
http://www.swtxpca.org

Get those papers in – time is getting short!
Proposal submission deadline: November 16, 2012
Submit proposals to: http://conference2013.swtxpca.org

Conference hotel:
Hyatt Regency Albuquerque
300 Tijeras Avenue NW
Albuquerque, NM 87102
Further conference details are available at http://www.swtxpca.org

This year, our 34th, we are "Celebrating Popular/American Culture(s) in a Global Context." In keeping with this conference theme, the Children's and Young Adult Literature and Culture area solicits proposals dealing with journeys, quests, voyages, and globetrotting activities in children's and young adult literature and culture. Papers may address these ideas from literal, physical, metaphorical, psychological, spiritual, or ideological perspectives. We highly encourage "thinking outside the box" with this theme. While papers addressing the conference or area theme will be given preference, papers addressing other aspects in children's and young adult literature and culture will be read with interest.

Scholars, researchers, professionals, teachers, graduate students and others interested in this area are encouraged to submit an abstract. Graduate students are especially encouraged and will be assisted in accessing any and all award opportunities the conference and/or associations provide. Award categories can be found here: http://www.swtxpca.org/documents/48.html. Upon acceptance of a proposal, I send out information on which awards would be most suited to the subject matter of the presentation.

Again, given our conference theme this year, we would like to encourage scholars and students outside of the United States to submit proposals. However, all potential presenters need to be aware that our conference rules state that participants must present their papers in person at the conference. Given the more complex nature of international travel these days, we encourage international proposals be submitted as early as possible so as to provide enough time to make those travel arrangements.

All proposals need to be submitted using our conference submission database at http://conference2013.swtxpca.org. This database is used to send out acceptance notifications, organize panels, and put the conference program together. It is important for all submitters to enter their contact information and presentation proposal information into the database to avoid confusion.

This area covers a wide variety of possible mediums: traditional book/literature culture, but also comics, graphic novels, film, television, music, video games, toys, internet environment, fan fiction, advertising, marketing tie-ins to books and films, just to name a few. Proposals on fiction, non-fiction, poetry, or cross-genre topics are welcome. Interdisciplinary approaches are especially welcome, as are presentations that go beyond the traditional scholarly paper format.

Please submit proposals of 250 words and a brief bio (100 words) for individual presentations or 500 words for full panels (3-4 people on a panel – please submit contact and brief bio for each person on the panel) to our conference database at http://conference2013.swtxpca.org.

Proposal submission deadline: November 16, 2012.

All accepted presenters will have to register for the conference by December 31, 2012.

For questions or if you encounter problems with submitting proposals to the database, please contact Diana Dominguez, Area Chair. Please put SWTX in the subject line so I can filter the messages effectively.

Contact info:
Diana Dominguez
Area Chair: Children's and Young Adult Literature and Culture
gypsyscholar@rgv.rr.com
The University of Texas at Brownsville

Please visit the Conference website for information on registration, accommodations, transportation options, graduate student paper awards, and audio-visual arrangements.

http://www.swtxpca.org

cfp categories: americanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarypopular_culture