ACLA Annual Meeting Seminar: "Fictions of Fallen Empires" (University of Toronto, April 4-7, 2013)

full name / name of organization: 
American Comparative Literature Association
contact email: 
schihaya@berkeley.edu, jcrewe@berkeley.edu

"Fictions of Fallen Empires": Faculty and Graduate Student Seminar at the ACLA annual meeting, April 4-7, 2013, University of Toronto (Toronto, Ontario)

Seminar Organizers: Sarah Chihaya and Jessica Crewe, Department of Comparative Literature, UC Berkeley

This seminar will consider the imagined lives and afterlives of empire. From representations of ancient Rome in Shakespeare’s history plays, to Flaubert’s detailed depiction of Carthage in Salammbô, to epic glorifications of feudal Japan in the works of Yoshikawa Eji, images of past imperial formations recur perennially in literary culture. In our particular moment, portrayals of both historical and imaginary dominions are everywhere in popular culture, from Downton Abbey’s fetishized vision of Edwardian life to Game of Thrones’ fantastical world of Westeros.
We welcome submissions that take inspiration from the following questions, among others:
How do nostalgic or romanticized views of earlier conceptions of empire continue to circulate?
What kinds of desires or anxieties might these fictional reengagements with dynasties of the past express?
Why might reaching back to earlier models of political, economic, and cultural expansion be particularly relevant in today’s globalizing world?
How do these fantasies of past empires play upon contemporary fears that categories such as the local, the national, and even the planetary have been eroded?
To apply to this seminar, please visit the ACLA 2013 website: http://www.acla.org/acla2013/fictions-of-fallen-empires/

cfp categories: 
classical_studies
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
eighteenth_century
ethnicity_and_national_identity
film_and_television
general_announcements
graduate_conferences
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