African American Diaspora and Post-Racial Rhetorics panel at (dis)junctions 2013, April 5-6. DEADLINE Feb. 11

full name / name of organization: 
University of California, Riverside
contact email: 
disjunctions2013@gmail.com

Considering this year's (dis)junctions theme, Encounters With(in) Texts, this panel invites papers from various disciplines to include, Sociology, English, Ethnic Studies, Rhetoric, and Political Science that deal with African Diaspora and African American Studies. The genres of African American Studies and African Diaspora Studies, presumed within their own general boundaries, typically offer a glimpse into the lives of its subjects as citizen –subjects within any one text’s given social, economic, and political setting at specific historical moments. Considering the current popular post racial rhetoric encouraged most notably by the election and subsequent re-election of President Barack Obama as the President of the United States, how do these two genres, via various media, suggest encountering with these recent, historical events in the United States? How do these events impact the permissible separation of these two areas in academia when these events seem to reflect international unity, in some capacity, for ancestral persons? How does this inspired post racial rhetoric appear in both genres latest production? How do these events encourage mediation of past texts from these genre blatantly and primarily concerned with racial happenings in the United States and within the continent of Africa?

Abstracts of 250-300 words should be submitted at www.disjunctions2013.org or mailed to disjunctions2013@gmail.com no later than February 11th, 2013.

This is a panel call for the 20th Annual (dis)junctions Hunaities and Social Sciences Graduate Conference at the University of California, Riverside. This year’s general theme “encountering with(in) texts,” examines the impact of situatedness, unexpectedness, and/or unpreparedness on “face to text” encounters with media objects, embodied encounters negotiated through or overdetermined by texts, and representations of “encountering” within texts. Please visit www.disjunctions2013.org for more information on this year’s theme, our other subject- and discipline-specific panel calls, and Keynote Speaker Dr. Nicholas Mirzeoff.

cfp categories: 
african-american
american
rhetoric_and_composition
twentieth_century_and_beyond