Animal Studies panel at (dis)junctions 2013, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb. 11

full name / name of organization: 
University of Califrornia, Riverside
contact email: 
disjunctions2013@gmail.com

This year’s (dis)junctions conference invites papers for a panel exploring the concept of “encountering” through the perspective of animal or animality studies. Since Derrida’s theorization of the transformative possibilities inherent in an exchange of gazes with an animal other, animal studies has drawn attention to the ways that unanticipated and reciprocal encounters with other species shape our understanding of species difference and interspecies communication. Papers for this panel may address any of the following: the image of the animal in film, television, or advertising; the consumption of animals as meat or as commodities; representations of animals within internet culture and memes, from lolcats to texts from dog, etc.; disease, infection, and intracorporeal encounters with biological others; environmentalism and animals and/as ecology. Papers from any period, genre, disciplinary tradition, or field of study are invited to this panel.

Abstracts of 250-300 words should be submitted at www.disjunctions2013.org or mailed to disjunctions2013@gmail.com no later than February 11th, 2013.

This is a panel call for the 20th Annual (dis)junctions Hunaities and Social Sciences Graduate Conference at the University of California, Riverside. This year’s general theme “encountering with(in) texts,” examines the impact of situatedness, unexpectedness, and/or unpreparedness on “face to text” encounters with media objects, embodied encounters negotiated through or overdetermined by texts, and representations of “encountering” within texts. Please visit www.disjunctions2013.org for more information on this year’s theme, our other subject- and discipline-specific panel calls, and Keynote Speaker Dr. Nicholas Mirzeoff.

cfp categories: 
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
ecocriticism_and_environmental_studies
interdisciplinary
science_and_culture
theory