[UPDATE] Eaton Journal of Archival Research in Science Fiction Deadline Extended to Feb. 15th

full name / name of organization: 
Eaton Journal of Archival Research in Science Fiction
contact email: 

Eaton Journal of Archival Research in Science Fiction
Deadline Extended for inclusion in our first issue: February 15th, 2013.

We are now soliciting articles for the first issue, scheduled for publication April 10th, 2013, and for subsequent issues of the Eaton Journal of Archival Research in Science Fiction. The Eaton Journal of Archival Research in Science Fiction is a peer-reviewed, open-access, online journal hosted by the University of California at Riverside, affiliated with the UCR Library's Eaton Collection of Science Fiction & Fantasy. Graduate student editors run the Eaton Journal, with scholarly review provided by an interdisciplinary executive board made up of SF scholars, research librarians, and archivists. We are proud to announce the addition of John Rieder, Mark Bould, Catherine Coker, Jess Nevins, Rob Latham, Sherryl Vint, Arthur B. Evans, Roger Luckhurst, and Melissa Conway to our board.

The Eaton Journal creates a space for science fiction scholars to share their findings and their experiences within the several archives dedicated to science fiction found throughout the world. The Eaton Journal is also the only journal dedicated to providing a place for archival librarians to discuss the challenges of managing significant science fiction collections and share their best practices for facilitating as well as conducting archival research in SF.

Each of the journal's bi-annual issues will feature three types of articles, each of which addressing a different aspect of our focus on developing an interdisciplinary dialog around archival research in SF:

Scholarly articles with a significant research component: These articles will not simply be notes and speculations regarding material in an archive, but rather will use archival materials to build critical arguments that go beyond the textual and theoretical claims of conventional literary research. While these articles must still be textually and theoretically sound, we hope to provide a venue for research that makes archival evidence its primary focus.

Methodological/Pedagogical articles: Just as the journal will be a showcase for the best archival research in SF, it will also provide a space where SF scholars, librarians, and archivists can develop innovative and incisive strategies for research within the archive, and for integrating that research into the academic genres of publication, presentation, and dissertation. From a pedagogical standpoint, the journal will be a space to discuss methods for developing, transmitting, and assessing archival research skill-sets within the academy, publishing articles that promote skill-sharing both among faculty and between faculty and graduate students.

Articles spotlighting neglected authors, emerging archives, and other research opportunities: The third type of article featured in the journal is that which identifies newly discovered or undeveloped archival resources, or points to authors whose archival traces offer particularly rich opportunities for scholarship. This will also be a space for articles that seek to expand the bounds of the SF archive, exploring new mediums, materials, or discourses as sites for SF scholarship.

Submission Information:

The Eaton Journal is a refereed and selective journal. All articles submitted to the Eaton Journal pass through a three-stage peer review and revision process: (1) the article is initially reviewed by the graduate student editors of the journal; (2) if it is judged to be potentially publishable, then the article is sent to our executive board for further review; and, (3) if the outside reviews are positive, an Eaton Journal editor is then assigned to work with the author to prepare the article for eventual publication.

The Eaton Journal of Archival Research in Science Fiction accepts contributions with the understanding that: under the author's warranty (1) the article has not been previously published in English, and will not be published elsewhere until after it has been published in the Eaton Journal; (2) that in any subsequent republication of the contribution, the author will acknowledge its first publication in the Eaton Journal of Archival Research in Science Fiction; (3) that the Eaton Journal retains the right to republish the contribution in any issue or reissue of the journal in any form, including a possible future printed edition of the journal, and to reprint the contribution in any anthology sponsored by the Eaton Journal; (4) that the author has obtained all necessary rights and permissions pertaining to media quoted or reproduced in the submission; and, (5) that the author will be financially responsible for any legal action taken against the Eaton Journal by cause of his/her contribution.

The Eaton Journal of Archival Research in Science Fiction will not review article submissions that are under consideration elsewhere or that have been published previously.

FORMATTING GUIDELINES: When submitting an article to the Eaton Journal, please format it according to the following guidelines:
1. Submission must be in MS Word .doc file format.
2. Submissions should be between 5,000-12,000 words.
3. For the text itself: margins at 1", double spaced, font size 12 pt. or smaller.
4. Submissions must use the most recent MLA Style for all documentation.
5. Images and other embedded media should be placed in-text throughout the submission, not located together at the end. All images and figures should be properly captioned according to most recent MLA style. Authors are responsible for securing rights to all images and figures used within their submission. Authors must produce evidence that these rights have been obtained before an image or figure will be published.
6. Submissions must include Notes and Works Cited at the end as regular text. In other words, please do NOT use the "automatic" footnote/endnote function on your word processor to generate these. They sometimes tend to disappear when traveling through cyberspace or when the document is converted. For matters of writing style with respect to endnotes, works cited, and references in running text, contributors should follow the style of the MLA Style Manual, 1999, or newer. Precise information on the following must be provided. For books: the place of publication, publisher, date, page numbers for quoted or paraphrased passages, and (for articles in anthologies) inclusive page numbers. If the edition cited is a later edition, provide also the date of the first edition. For articles in periodicals: volume number or (if there is no volume number) whole number, date of issue cited, page numbers for quoted or paraphrased passages, and inclusive page numbers.
7. In order to ensure blind readings from the Editorial Committee and Editorial Board, authors must remove any identifying information from the content of the submission and from the document's 'properties'.
8. On a separate document, include your name and your postal and e-mail addresses, the title of your essay, and a brief abstract of its contents (3-5 sentences).

Articles submitted for publication in the Eaton Journal should be sent to the editors at: eatonjournal@gmail.com.

Deadline for inclusion in our first issue: February 15th, 2013.

Thank you for your consideration,

Founding Editors

Jeff Hicks
Josh Pearson

49966[UPDATE] -All Irish Issue of Women's Studies: An Interdisciplinary JournalWomen's Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journalmccabeb@cgu.edu1360021185cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionromantictheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Women's Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journalcontact email: mccabeb@cgu.edu

Women's Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal is seeking articulate and well-reasoned articles exploring any element of Irish women's writing and experience. Articles from any discipline are welcome and articles embracing a transdisciplinary methodology are of particular interest. As well, book reviews of academic texts, as well as fiction, poetry, and drama are of interest.

The deadline for submission is March 17th, 2013. Please send either an abstract or full paper. Submissions should be emailed to Brian F. McCabe, Special Editor at mccabeb@cgu.edu.

Women's Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal may be found online, or through your college or university library system at: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/gwst20

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionromantictheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 49967The Burney Performances: Life, Works, WorldBurney Society of North Americaecfriedman@auburn.edu1360034321eighteenth_centuryfull name / name of organization: Burney Society of North Americacontact email: ecfriedman@auburn.edu

The Burney Society of North America will hold its 20th annual general meeting and conference in Montreal on October 9-10, 2014, at McGill University's McCord Museum of History, in coordination with the 2014 Annual General Meeting of the Jane Austen Society of North America. The Burney Society is a group of scholars and serious lay readers interested in Burney's works and dedicated to furthering knowledge about Frances Burney and her family.

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To treat any object, work or product 'as' performance—a painting, a novel, a shoe, or anything at all—means to investigate what the object does, how it interacts with other objects or beings, and how it relates to other objects or beings. Performances exist only as actions, interactions and relationships.
—Richard Schechner

Performance studies is an interdisciplinary field of inquiry that posits that every human action or event can be examined in light of the elements that create it and the effect it has on participants and witnesses.  In addition to the usual things we consider "performance" (theatrical works, dance, musical recitals, etc.), acts and events as various as the Warren Hastings Trial, attendance at Ranalegh, and even the operating table can be understood as containing performative elements worthy of examination.

In the eighteenth century, few authors' surviving bodies of life and work provide a richer field of possible sites for the study of performance than that of Frances Burney and her family.  Growing up in a family of ambitious musicians, dramatists, well-traveled memoirists, and a schoolmaster/priest, Burney herself grew up keenly aware of her every act and how it might be viewed.

With this in mind, the Burney Society invites submissions on any aspect of France Burney or her family's life or work in the context of performance, including papers that focus on Burney in conjunction with her contemporaries.  

Possible papers could assess:
- the performative nature of the journals and life-writing
- prefatory and other material as performances of authorship
- rituals and various mannered performances of the Court years
- elements of performance in the novels
- Charles Burney's career as organist or as producer of theatrical adaptations
- Charles Burney Jr.'s careers as schoolmaster and priest
- Susan Burney's notes on the performance careers of many friends of the Burney family

Please send one-page proposals for papers and panels to Emily Friedman at ecfriedman@auburn.edu by May 30, 2014. Please mention any audio/visual requirements in the proposal, explaining why they are necessary. (Note that it may not be possible to provide such services.) Submissions from graduate students are especially welcome. Participants will be notified by August 1, 2014.
It is not necessary to be a member of the Burney Society to submit a proposal, but presenters at the Conference must be members. For more information about the Burney Society and membership, please visit the Burney Centre website at http://burneycentre.mcgill.ca

cfp categories: eighteenth_century 49968"Langston Hughes's Poetry in Vulnerable Times" ( MLA Convention, Chicago, Illinois, January 9-12, 2014) The Langston Hughes Societysharon.jones@wright.edu1360036234african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: The Langston Hughes Societycontact email: sharon.jones@wright.edu

Abstracts examining the theme of "vulnerable times" in Hughes's texts. Presenters must join the Modern Language Association and Langston Hughes Society. 250 word abstract and CV by 10 March 2013; Sharon Lynette Jones (sharon.jones@wright.edu).

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 49969"The Cultural History of Langston Hughes: an Omni-media Investigation" (SAMLA Convention, Atlanta, GA, November 8-10, 2013)The Langston Hughes Society sharon.jones@wright.edu1360036513african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: The Langston Hughes Society contact email: sharon.jones@wright.edu

2013 South Atlantic Modern Language Association Convention (Atlanta, Georgia)
November 8-10, 2013
The Langston Hughes Society welcomes papers for a special session on  "The Cultural History of Langston Hughes: an Omni-media Investigation." We are seeking papers that examine Langston Hughes's writings within the context of the special session topic. Please email a one page typed abstract, a biographical profile, and contact information to Dr. Sharon Lynette Jones at sharon.jones@wright.edu by June 1, 2013.  Any accepted presenter must join the South Atlantic Modern Language Association and The Langston Hughes Society. Accepted presenters will be notified of the deadline for joining SAMLA and the Langston Hughes Society.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 49970CFP: 2013 International Conference: Migrants and Their MemoriesResearch Center for Humanities / National Sun Yat-sen Universitychsc705@mail.nsysu.edu.tw;1360036586african-americanamericanclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalpopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissancescience_and_culturetheatretravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Research Center for Humanities / National Sun Yat-sen Universitycontact email: chsc705@mail.nsysu.edu.tw;

Scientists recently found that migration was a main factor that shaped human behavior (Don Jones, Nature News). According to John Hines, the most extensive human migration took place in the early Middle Ages, while other large-scale migrations include the Puritan migration, the great Serb migrations, the migrations of the Middle Passage, and the nineteenth and twentieth century migrations of impoverished Europeans to the Americas. Apart from with poverty and religion, migration is also often associated with war; climate change becomes a factor that forces people to become migrants. Migration is a matter of geographic movement (diaspora), but also of human psychology (e.g. un-homing, longing, nostalgia, depression); of human rights (e.g. refugee status, nationhood and statelessness, border control, access to translators and lawyers, [racial] discrimination, [sexual] abuse, access to safe drinking water, food, and medical attention); of economic need (e.g. poverty, international aid, unemployment, dependency). The International Conference on Migration and Memory will be held on October 4-5, 2013 at National Sun Yat-sen University in Kaohsiung, Taiwan and we welcome abstracts from all fields in the humanities. Please send a 200-word abstract as well as a brief curriculum vitae before Feb 28, 2013, to Professor I-Chun Wang, director of the Center for the Humanities, at chsc705@mail.nsysu.edu.tw. National Sun Yat-sen University plans to publish extended, revised, and peer-reviewed versions of selected conference papers.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalpopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissancescience_and_culturetheatretravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 49971The Metaphysical Thriller, 26-27 September 2013, deadline for proposals 16 June 2013Université de Liège, CIPA, Belspoadechene@ulg.ac.be mdelville@ulg.ac.be1360054077americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinternational_conferencestheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Université de Liège, CIPA, Belspocontact email: adechene@ulg.ac.be mdelville@ulg.ac.be

The Metaphysical Thriller
Bilingual Conference (English / French)
Université de Liège, CIPA, Belspo
Liège, Belgique – 26-27 September 2013
Deadline for proposals 16 June 2013

The metaphysical thriller is often considered as a 20th century phenomenon whose heydays came in the last quarter century. It is also generally associated with the development of experimental postmodern fiction. But what exactly is the metaphysical thriller?
The conference will address the "metaphysical" and the "thriller" from a diachronic and/or synchronic perspective, describing the different avatars of the detective story from Poe to Paul Auster and beyond, as well as the genre's capacity to deal with considerations that lie beyond the traditional reaches of the detective story and its various sub-genres.

Elements of metafiction and self-reflexivity are prominent in most recent metaphysical detective stories, an aspect of the genre which calls for a comparison with the more habitual structures of the "traditional" detective story. Such an approach will lead to a reconsideration of the writer-reader contract in an attempt to question the very nature of the "fictional" while making the equally urgent question of the limits of knowledge its main field of speculation and investigation. In the light of such anti-narrative strategies, the very term "metaphysical" will also be examined and confronted with other terminologies.

Despite the paucity of secondary sources on the metaphysical thriller, Patricia Merivale's and Susan Elizabeth Sweeney's Detecting Texts: The Metaphysical Detective Story from Poe to Postmodernism (1999), provides a fundamental groundwork towards a definition of the genre, emphasizing the elements of parody and/or subversion of the basic conventions of "the traditional detective-story" - a notion which is itself problematic given the richness and variety of the history of the genre since the mid-19th century.

Papers on subjects including, but not limited to, the following themes are welcome:

• the metaphysics of fiction and the fiction of metaphysics
• the close readings of writers such as E.A. Poe, Franz Kafka, J.L. Borges, Vladimir Nabokov, Umberto Eco, Alain Robbe-Grillet, Georges Perec, William Faulkner, Paul Auster, …
• the recurrent structures and motives such as the double, the locked room or the labyrinth
• Poe's legacy, the purloined-letter effect and the "man of the crowd"
• the ambiguity or meaninglessness of material clues and evidence
• the elements of metafiction and/or intertextuality
• the defeated detective
• the ontological and epistemological strategies in detective fiction
• the metaphysical thriller as a postmodern phenomenon
• the lost or changed identities
• the non-closure, the narrative circularity and the loop

Please send your 300 words paper proposals for 20 minutes papers to adechene@ulg.ac.be and mdelville@ulg.ac.be by June 16, 2013.

For more information please contact:
Antoine Dechêne, Université de Liège adechene@ulg.ac.be
Michel Delville, Université de Liège mdelville@ulg.ac.be
CIPA website: www.cipa.ulg.ac.be

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinternational_conferencestheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 49972Modernism, Memory and Media: Ireland 1913-1916 National University of Ireland Maynoothoona.frawley@nuim.ie1360058465cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespoetrypostcolonialtheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: National University of Ireland Maynoothcontact email: oona.frawley@nuim.ie

Call for proposals: March 15th deadline
A hundred years ago, Ireland was marked by a series of events that proved fundamental to the making of its modern memory. Those events – from the passing of the Home Rule Bill to the Lock-Out of 1913, from the slaughters on the battlefields of the Great War to the Easter Rising – occurred during a period of unparalleled modernist innovation, and in a mass media age. A subsequent history of national foundation and decolonization can be traced in part to this moment of Irish history, when Ireland's struggles proved paradigmatic of what was to come in other places.
'Modernism, Memory and Media: Ireland 1913-1916', to be held in NUI Maynooth in June 2013, will focus on Irish culture, broadly conceived, during the revolutionary period, attending to literature, cinema, theatre, visual culture and mass media. In particular, the conference will emphasize the innovative and progressive elements in early twentieth-century Irish culture that have been occluded, for a variety of reasons, in the following decades. Close attention will be paid to the uses of historical memory in the art, culture and political writing of the period. The conference will also debate whether present-day commemorations of events in Ireland 1913-1916 have any value in the context of the current national crisis.
Proposals for papers, panels or roundtables are sought for (but are not limited to) the following themes:
*The uses of memory: 1913 in 2013
*The representation of 1913-1916 in literature, drama and film
*Irish visual and consumer culture in the early twentieth century
*Practices of commemoration
*The politics of Irish modernism
*The histories and legacies of Irish anti-imperialism
Plenary speakers:
David Lloyd
Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Southern California; a leading figure in contemporary Irish literary and cultural studies and author of several seminal works including Anomalous States (1993), Ireland After History (1999) and Irish Culture and Colonial Modernity 1800-2000 (2011).
Clair Wills
Professor of Irish Literature at Queen Mary, University of London; distinguished historian of Irish culture whose recent publications include That Neutral Island: A Cultural History of Ireland during the Second World War (2007) and Dublin 1916: The Siege of the GPO (2009).
Jay Winter
Charles J. Stille Professor of History at the University of Yale; an authority on the impact of World War I and of the remembrance of war in the twentieth century; author of many key books on these subjects, including Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning: The Great War in European Cultural History (1995) and Remembering War: The Great War between History and Memory in the Twentieth Century (2006).
Conference Fees: Given the economic climate in Ireland and around the world, the conference fees will, on principle, be kept as low as possible so as to afford the opportunity to attend to all of those who wish to. Though the final fee will be based on the numbers attending, we estimate that registration – including a conference dinner and light lunches – will be no more than 100 euro, and every effort will be made to lessen this fee if possible. Accommodation will be available on campus from as little as 30 euro per night.
Organizing committee: Prof Joe Cleary, Dr Denis Condon, Dr Michael Cronin, Dr Oona Frawley, Prof Luke Gibbons, Dr Sinéad Kennedy, Dr Emer Nolan, Dr Stephanie Rains
Advance enquires and proposals for panels/ papers/ roundtables by March 15th to Dr Oona Frawley, Conference Organizer, School of English, Media and Theatre Studies, NUI Maynooth (oona.frawley@nuim.ie)

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespoetrypostcolonialtheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 49973Extended Deadline: 1 March 2013 - WNM-2013 (4th Intl Workshop on Wireless Networks and Multimedia), Melbourne, AustraliaIEEEwnm.melbourne.2013@gmail.com1360068404international_conferencesprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturetheoryfull name / name of organization: IEEEcontact email: wnm.melbourne.2013@gmail.com

Appologies if you received multiple copies of this WNM-2013 CFP.
---------------------------------------------------------------
CALL FOR PAPERS

Due to multiple requests, paper submission deadline is extended to 1 March 2013

The 4th International Workshop on Wireless Networks and Multimedia (WNM-2013), Melbourne, Australia, 16-18 July, 2013

http://wnm2013.csp.escience.cn/

To be held in conjunction with The 11th IEEE ISPA-2013
The accepted papers from this workshop will be included into the IEEE conference proceedings published by IEEE Computer Society, and will be indexed by EI
Distinguished selected high-quality papers from the workshop, after further significant extensions, will be recommended for submission and possible publication in the Special Issue of an SCI-indexed international journal

INTRODUCTION
The wireless communication technologies have evolved quickly over the past years. As the explosive growth in broadband wireless networks, multimedia applications will dominate the future wireless communication society, resulting in non-trivial problems in terms of available capacity, reliability, quality-of-service, delay, and throughput.

To successfully support wireless multimedia applications, it is necessary to improve the state-of-the-art techniques (such as radio resource management, mobility, handoff, and location management, etc.) in the multimedia transmission over wireless networks in order to provide quality-of-service guarantees between the end-users and achieve a high quality-of-experience for end-users.

This workshop will address the important problems and challenges caused by the transmission of multimedia applications over wireless networks. The workshop aims to bring together computer scientists and engineers in different disciplines to share and exchange their experience and ideas and discuss state-of-the-art and in-progress research on all aspects of wireless networks and multimedia applications.

The topics of particular interest include, but are not limited to:
1. Ultra-Wideband Networks
2. Wireless Ad Hoc and Mesh Networks
3. Wireless Personal Area Networks
4. Wireless Local Area Networks
5. Wireless Sensor Networks
6. Wireless Metropolitan Area Networks
7. Cellular Networks
8. WiMAX
9. Optical Wireless Access Networks
10. Mobile Computing and Wireless Communications
11. Future Wireless Networks and Protocols
12. Multimedia Communications and Services
13. Congestion and Admission Control
14. Wireless MAC Protocols: Design and Analysis
15. Quality of Service Provisioning
16. Wireless Network Trust, Privacy and Security
17. Software Defined Radio & Software Defined Networking
18. Cross-Layer Design and Adaptation
19. Radio Resource Management
20. Mobility, Handoff and Location Management
21. Performance Modeling and Evaluation
22. Wireless and Mobile Network Architecture

IMPORTANT DATES
Submission Deadline: 1 March, 2013
Authors Notification: 1 April, 2013
Final Manuscript Due: 1 May, 2013
Conference Date: 16-18 July, 2013

PAPER SUBMISSION GUIDELINE
Prospective authors are invited to submit manuscripts reporting original unpublished research and recent developments in the topics related to the workshop. The length of the papers should not exceed 6 pages + 2 pages for overlength charges (IEEE Computer Society Proceedings Manuscripts style: two columns, single-spaced, 10-point font), including figures and references.

You can confirm the IEEE Computer Society Proceedings Author Guidelines at the following web page: URL: http://www.computer.org/portal/web/cscps/formatting.

Papers should be submitted through the EasyChair paper submission system (https://www.easychair.org/account/signin.cgi?conf=wnm2013).

WORKSHOP CHAIRS
Yulei Wu, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
Geyong Min, University of Bradford, UK
Ahmed Al-Dubai, Edinburgh Napier University, UK

CONTACT
Please email inquiries concerning WNM-2013 to: Dr. Yulei Wu (yulei DOT frank DOT wu AT gmail DOT com) and the conference organizers (wnm DOT melbourne DOT 2013 AT gmail DOT com).

cfp categories: international_conferencesprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturetheory 49974CFP Reminder: PG Conference "ReVision: Editing Across Disciplines"FORUM Postgraduate Journalforum.conference.edit@gmail.com1360074138eighteenth_centuryfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_compositionfull name / name of organization: FORUM Postgraduate Journalcontact email: forum.conference.edit@gmail.com

FORUM, the University of Edinburgh's Postgraduate Journal of Culture and the Arts, is pleased to announce its third conference which will explore the theme of editing.

This conference invites participants to explore the variety of practices and concepts of editing across disciplines and as they appear in different historical and cultural contexts, as well as to reflect on the opportunities, goals and challenges of contemporary editing and publishing.

*A number of papers by postgraduate participants will be selected to be published in the December 2013 issue of FORUM.*

The dynamic life of cultural products is often masked by illusions of textual stability. Processes of editing have always had a radical impact on the arts and their reception; from Herodotus's 'editing' of history, the editing of Chaucer's brilliant but foul language, Beardsley's censored drawings in Wilde's editions, Luis Buñuel's unique montage editing to the work of Venuti and the rise of disciplines such as History of the Book. Furthermore, current economic pressures and rapid technological changes raise the question of the future of the 'text' in a digital age.

Editing is also constitutive of academic life – whether it be as part of a postgraduate journal, in major projects such as producing critical editions or as a process we all go through in publishing our own research. With this in mind workshops on editorial practice will be organised alongside more conventional talks to provide the opportunity for participants to enhance their employability skills.

We welcome papers from fields across the humanities (including film, music and visual art as we wish to examine text in the broadest sense). Papers may be submitted individually or collectively as themed panels.

Topics for discussion may include, but are not limited to:

- theories and practices of editing in any potential time period
- theories and practices of editing in cross-cultural perspective or in contexts outside Europe
- issues of authorship
- power relations and editorial impact
- editing selves; auto/biographical writing; censorship or self-censorship)
- cultural editing, rewriting, imitation and repetition
- editing as a literary technique (framing narratives, fake forewords, false editing)
- editing and film, music and visual art
- editing manuscripts, critical editions, and archival material - the humanities in a digital age
- biological and computational methods in literary scholarship

Presentations should take the form of 20 minute papers. Please send titled abstracts of up to 300 words along with a brief biographical statement to forum.conference.edit@gmail.com no later than February 18th 2013. Please do not hesitate to email us if you have any questions about the event.

http://www.forumjournal.org/conference/

http://www.forumjournal.org/site/conference-revision-editing-across-disc...

cfp categories: eighteenth_centuryfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_composition 49975[UPDATE] CFP: PG Conference 'ReVision: Editing Across Disciplines'FORUM Postgraduate Journal, The University of Edinburghforum.conference.edit@gmail.com1360075359bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_compositionfull name / name of organization: FORUM Postgraduate Journal, The University of Edinburghcontact email: forum.conference.edit@gmail.com

ReVision: Editing Across Disciplines
Interdisciplinary Conference - CFP
The University of Edinburgh, 15-16 July 2013

FORUM, the University of Edinburgh's Postgraduate Journal of Culture and the Arts, is pleased to announce its third conference which will explore the theme of editing.

This conference invites participants to explore the variety of practices and concepts of editing across disciplines and as they appear in different historical and cultural contexts, as well as to reflect on the opportunities, goals and challenges of contemporary editing and publishing.

*A number of papers by postgraduate participants will be selected to be published in the December 2013 issue of FORUM.*

The dynamic life of cultural products is often masked by illusions of textual stability. Processes of editing have always had a radical impact on the arts and their reception; from Herodotus's 'editing' of history, the editing of Chaucer's brilliant but foul language, Beardsley's censored drawings in Wilde's editions, Luis Buñuel's unique montage editing to the work of Venuti and the rise of disciplines such as History of the Book. Furthermore, current economic pressures and rapid technological changes raise the question of the future of the 'text' in a digital age.

Editing is also constitutive of academic life – whether it be as part of a postgraduate journal, in major projects such as producing critical editions or as a process we all go through in publishing our own research. With this in mind workshops on editorial practice will be organised alongside more conventional talks to provide the opportunity for participants to enhance their employability skills.

We welcome papers from fields across the humanities (including film, music and visual art as we wish to examine text in the broadest sense). Papers may be submitted individually or collectively as themed panels.

Topics for discussion may include, but are not limited to:

- theories and practices of editing in any potential time period
- theories and practices of editing in cross-cultural perspective or in contexts outside Europe
- issues of authorship
- power relations and editorial impact
- editing selves; auto/biographical writing; censorship or self-censorship)
- cultural editing, rewriting, imitation and repetition
- editing as a literary technique (framing narratives, fake forewords, false editing)
- editing and film, music and visual art
- editing manuscripts, critical editions, and archival material - the humanities in a digital age
- biological and computational methods in literary scholarship

Presentations should take the form of 20 minute papers. Please send titled abstracts of up to 300 words along with a brief biographical statement to forum.conference.edit@gmail.com no later than February 18th 2013. Please do not hesitate to email us if you have any questions about the event.

www.forumjournal/conference/
AND
www.forumjournal.org/site/conference-revision-editing-across-disciplines...

cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_composition 49976Urban Fantasy and Paranormal Romance - Essay CollectionNadine Farghaly and Margo Collinsparanormalromance.urbanfantasy@gmail.com1360077544african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturepostcolonialromantictheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Nadine Farghaly and Margo Collinscontact email: paranormalromance.urbanfantasy@gmail.com

Articles about urban fantasy and romance novels are invited for a new, multi-contributor collection.

During the last few decades, urban fantasy and paranormal romance novels have come to the forefront of the publishing world. Normative heroes and heroines have been joined by werewolves, vampires, mermaids, shape-shifters, centaurs and dragons, to name but a few. These magical creatures fill the pages of books and the screens of movie theaters in ever-increasing numbers.

Such a vast industry—one that generated at least 75 million readers in 2008 alone (and has been growing since)—deserves more study. This collection will offer critical examinations of both urban fantasy and paranormal romance.

The following categories suggest possibilities but are by no means exhaustive:
• Gender
• Race
• Sexuality
• Romance
• Desire
• Domesticity
• Power
• Monstrosity
• Witchcraft
• Fandom and/or Reception
• Transformation and/or Adaptation
• Vampires, Shapeshifters, and other Supernatural Creatures
• Hybridity
• Heroism
• Villainy
• Memory

What to Send:

300 - 500 word abstracts (or complete articles, if available) and CVs should be submitted by June 1, 2013. If an abstract is accepted for the collection, a full draft of the essay (5000 – 8000 words) will be required by December 1, 2013.

Abstracts and final articles should be submitted to: paranormalromance.urbanfantasy@gmail.com

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturepostcolonialromantictheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 49977[UPDATE] Final Deadline Extension - The Millennials on Film and Television: the Politics of Popular Culture (edited collection)betty.kaklamanidou@gmail.com & Peggy.Tally@esc.edu betty.kaklamanidou@gmail.com1360077899americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturetheoryfull name / name of organization: betty.kaklamanidou@gmail.com & Peggy.Tally@esc.edu contact email: betty.kaklamanidou@gmail.com

Call for Papers
We are inviting submissions for the final 2-3 chapters of our edited collection on millennials in films and television. We are particularly looking for essays examining the films The Girl in the Dragon Tattoo (2011) and The Social Network (2010) and the television shows 2 Broke Girls (CBS 2011-present), and New Girl (FOX 2011-present), although other ideas will also be considered.
The largest generation in America's history, the millennials or Generation Y or the Net Generation, as they are variously called, is not easy to define, although a number of general characteristics can be drawn; these 20-something young men and women never knew a world without a vast array of technological gadgets at their disposal (internet connection, mobile phones, "apps", etc.); they are at once the most media-saturated, and at the same time, ironic about the very possibility for authentic communication from these media. Moreover, they are the most educated generation in America yet they delay their careers; they view politics and societal norms with skepticism; they tend to marry later in life, and they are aware of the fact that the recent financial crisis and more general economic malaise of the recent past will deter them from acquiring the possessions their parents managed to afford. Downward mobility is a defining feature of this group, which again is a first in recent American history.
The importance of these millennials, not just as a social group but as an active and sometimes unfairly criticized part of US culture makes us wonder how their representations on such diverse films as the thriller/action/adventure The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011), the psychological thriller The Black Swan, the romantic comedies Friends with Benefits (2011), No Strings Attached (2011), and Crazy, Stupid, Love (2011), the dramas Remember Me (2010), A Dangerous Method (2011), and TV shows such as Girls (HBO 2012-present), Two Broke Girls (CBS 2011-present), and New Girl (FOX 2011-present), choose to have millennials deal with issues such as the politics of personal development, work, gender, social class and race, among others.
We believe this study is timely and long overdue since the bibliography regarding the representation of this vast age group as well as its firm delineation is scarce. In addition, we think this demographic is unique in and of themselves, both for their choices as individuals, and for the world they find themselves trying to navigate through.

Contributor guidelines:
1. Abstract (not to exceed 400 words) including theoretical premise, methodology and preliminary bibliography or full papers.
2. Brief one-page CV including affiliation and recent publications for each author(s).
3. Submission deadline for abstracts: March 30 2013. Complete papers are due on May 10 2013.
4. Materials and/or questions should be submitted by e-mail to both betty.kaklamanidou@gmail.com & Peggy.Tally@esc.edu.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturetheory 49978Writing (Beyond) Regionalisms in Northeastern North America, Special Session, MLA Chicago, January 2014Rachel Bryantrachel.bryant@unb.ca1360078066african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identitypostcolonialfull name / name of organization: Rachel Bryantcontact email: rachel.bryant@unb.ca

Seeking papers that consider or challenge the ways in which Atlantic Canadian/New England literatures have been used to reinforce the Canada/U.S. border. This is a special session panel for the 2014 MLA convention in Chicago on the topic of "Writing (Beyond) Regionalisms in Northeastern North America." Inquiries welcome! Submit a 200-300 word abstract by 15 March 2013. rachel.bryant@unb.ca

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identitypostcolonial 49979CFP: New England ASA 2013 Conference, "Repression, Rebellion, and Representation" (9/27-28/2013)New England American Studies Associationbrailton@fitchburgstate.edu1360078389african-americanamericanethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarypopular_culturefull name / name of organization: New England American Studies Associationcontact email: brailton@fitchburgstate.edu

Call for Papers
New England American Studies Association 2013 Conference
Mashantucket, Connecticut
Sept 27th – 28th

Repression, Rebellion, and Representation: Cultural Challenges in New England and Beyond

The Mashantucket Pequot Reservation, established in 1666, is one of the oldest continuously occupied reservations in the United States. The reservation's history of land loss and the reacquisition of lost land by the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation two hundred years later are emblematic of challenges faced by indigenous and minority cultures and also representative of the ways in which indigenous and minority groups challenge hegemonic culture. From the coerced assimilation of Native persons, to searches for religious freedom, the development of free and enslaved African American communities during slavery, the arrival of European ethnic groups, Latino groups, and more contemporary identity politics, New England represents a microcosm of larger North American and now global cultural challenges. These challenges often manifest in the form of repression of non-dominant norms and ideals, rebellion against dominant ideals, and conflict over the representation of indigenous and minority identities in past and present cultural landscapes.

NEASA invites proposals for the 2013 conference, Cultural Challenges in New England, which will combine scholarly, community, and/or artistic investigation of sociocultural, political, economic, and gendered discourses on cultural challenges. There will be a series of panels, workshops, and participatory forums for exploration of these cultural challenges. We also welcome submissions from educators, curators, public historians, and creative artists. In addition to individual paper proposals, we also welcome submissions for roundtable discussions, hands-on workshops, and multimedia sessions including film screenings, online presentations, and lightning shorts.

Proposals should include a 250-word abstract and title, as well as the author's name, address (including email), and institutional or professional affiliation. For panel proposals, please include contact information for all participants, as well as a brief (no more than two page) description of the session topic and format. Submit proposals by April 20th, 2013 to neasaconference13@gmail.com. Proposals or queries may also be sent to:

Akeia Benard, NEASA co-President
Wheelock College
200 The Riverway
Boston, MA 02215

For more information about the conference and NEASA, including an expanded Call for Papers, please visit www.neasa.org.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarypopular_culture 49980CFP: NEASA 2013 Spring Colloquium, "American Studies: What, How, and Why" (5/4/2013)New England American Studies Associationbrailton@fitchburgstate.edu1360078512americaninterdisciplinaryprofessional_topicsfull name / name of organization: New England American Studies Associationcontact email: brailton@fitchburgstate.edu

2013 New England American Studies Association Spring Colloquium
American Studies: What, How, and Why
Saturday May 4th, 10am-1pm
Suffolk University Poetry Center
Boston, MA

The New England American Studies Association Council is excited to announce that NEASA's third annual Spring Colloquium will be held on Saturday, May 4th, between 10am and 1pm in Suffolk University's Poetry Center! The Colloquium will be entitled "American Studies: What, How, and Why," and will focus on defining disciplinary questions of what American Studies is, how we American Studiers do it, and why American Studies is worth supporting and strengthening in this time of educational crisis (and all other times).

As has been the case each year, the Colloquium will feature informal presentations from New England American Studiers, offering an opportunity for regional scholars to share some of their work, interests, and ideas. This year, we're looking for folks interested in taking part in either of two distinct roundtable conversations (each of which will run for about an hour fifteen minutes, with a short break in between):

1) A conversation featuring American Studies program directors, coordinators, administrators, secondary educators, and any and all others who practice American Studies at their institutions and organizations or otherwise seek to pass the discipline on to their peers and communities.

2) A conversation where American Studies scholars will model some of the many ways in which their own work exemplifies the discipline—its focal points and questions, its methodologies and analyses, and the possibilities it offers for 21st century American academic, public, and communal narratives.

If you're interested in adding your voice to either of these roundtables, or have any questions about them or any aspect of the Colloquium, please email Colloquium organizer Ben Railton (brailton@fitchburgstate.edu). But in any case, we very much hope you'll be able to attend the Colloquium, and take part in these important American Studies conversations.

See you in Boston in May!
Ben

cfp categories: americaninterdisciplinaryprofessional_topics 49981Steve Tomasula: The Art and Science of New Media Fiction 4/5/2013David Banash / Western Illinois Universityd-banash@wiu.edu1360086841americanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approacheshumanities_computing_and_the_internetjournals_and_collections_of_essaysscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: David Banash / Western Illinois Universitycontact email: d-banash@wiu.edu

This edited collection will investigate critical approaches to Steve Tomasula's innovative contemporary fiction, non-fiction, criticism, and multimedia art. In books including _IN & OZ_, _VAS: An Opera in Flatland_, _The Book of Portraiture_, and _TOC: A New-Media Novel_, he has reimagined the form of the book and reengineered the possibilities of narrative. Beyond his major books, Tomasula has also published remarkable short fiction, non-fiction, essays, criticism, and original works of music and visual art that develop, explain, or demonstrate new possibilities for the forms of narrative fiction. His major theme is perhaps the evolving relationship between art, science, and being, and his works plot the ways in which contemporary discourses and technologies of science create new problems, meanings, and futures for the forms of humanity, art, and, particularly, the art of fiction.

Possible Topics: This edited collection seeks papers on any aspect of Tomasula's work, from his major novels to his ephemeral performances. These topics include but are not limited to:
*Tomasula, evolution, and biology
*Tomasula and the sciences
*Tomasula, new media, and /or digital life
*Tomasula, epistemology, representation, and constructions of reality
*Tomasula, ontology, and the problem of life
*Tomasula's novels and the book as medium
*Tomasula's fiction and the archeology of language
*Tomasula's fiction and its relation to his nonfiction / criticism, especially bio-art writing
*Tomasula and comics, games, or other forms and genres
*Tomasula and narrative
*Tomasula's short fiction
*Tomasula's critical work
*Tomasula's music or visual arts
*Tomasula's performances

The book will also include an interview with the Tomasula and a complete bibliography / discography / catalogue of his fiction, non-fiction, audio work, and visual art produced to date.

Length: Essays should be between 5,000 and 10,000 words.

Deadlines: Abstracts are due by April 5th, 2013. Send a 500-1000 word abstract and a brief biography to d-banash@wiu.edu

About the editor: David Banash is the author of _Collage Culture: Readymades, Meaning, and the Age of Consumption_ (forthcoming, Rodopi). He is co-editor with Kevin Moist of _Contemporary Collecting: Objects Practices and the Fate of Things_ (forthcoming, Scarecrow). He teaches contemporary literature and film at Western Illinois University.

cfp categories: americanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approacheshumanities_computing_and_the_internetjournals_and_collections_of_essaysscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 49982[UPDATED] Watermark Journal — Submission Deadline Extended: 3/1/2013California State University, Long Beacheditor@watermarkjournal.com1360090401african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: California State University, Long Beachcontact email: editor@watermarkjournal.com

Watermark, an annual scholarly journal published by graduate students in the Department of English at California State University, Long Beach, is now seeking papers for our seventh volume to be published in March 2012. Watermark is dedicated to publishing original critical and theoretical papers concerned with the fields of rhetoric and composition and literature of all genres and periods. As this journal is intended to provide a forum for emerging voices, only student work will be considered.

Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Digital rhetoric in the media age
  • Gendered, cultural, racial, and economic borders and transitions
  • "Green" aesthetics and artistic forms
  • Reconsidering regional and/or sentimental literature
  • Investigations of Medieval and Renaissance texts
  • The construction of minimalism
  • (Re)configuring the colonial experience
  • Dissident ideas and official voices
  • Issues of identity, discipline, and excess
  • The ethnicity of pastiche
  • Critical perspectives on contemporary popular culture

We are also soliciting submissions for a special supplement to coincide with Re/Invention 2013: Hysteria, CSULB's 2nd Annual Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference. Topics for the supplement may include but certainly are not limited to:

  • The Rhetoric of Hysteria
  • Comedic Intersections of Class, Race, & Gender
  • Queer Bodies & the Wandering Womb
  • The Gravitas of Gallows Humor
  • FTM &/or MTF Transitions: The Politics of "Passing"
  • Hypocrisy & the Hippocratic Corpus
  • Mass Hysteria & Mob Mentality
  • The Evolution of the Comic Spirit
  • Comedy as Cultural Critique
  • Interrogating Mental Illness
  • Laughter & the Neurotic
  • (Ir)rationality
  • Idiosyncratic Isolation
  • Humor as Mediation
  • Subversive Stand-Up

The deadline for submissions is Friday, March, 1, 2013.

All submissions should include a cover with your name, phone number, email address, and the title of your essay or book review. All submissions should be approximately 10-15 pages and must be typed in MLA format with a standard 12 pt font. Please do not include your name on the essay itself, as it will be reviewed by a blind peer-review panel.

Email papers and cover letters as separate Word attachments to:
editor@watermarkjournal.com.

Please direct all questions to: editor@watermarkjournal.com
Visit our website: www.watermarkjournal.com

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 49983The Hare - essays and reviews in English renaissance literatureThe Harejeremy.lopez@utoronto.ca1360090585journals_and_collections_of_essaysrenaissancefull name / name of organization: The Harecontact email: jeremy.lopez@utoronto.ca

The Hare is pleased to announce the arrival of its second issue:

http://thehareonline.com/

The Hare is a peer-reviewed, on-line academic journal.

We continue to seek short essays on the poetry, prose, and drama of the English renaissance; and reviews of foundational, seminal, neglected, or overlooked books in the field.

Please see http://thehareonline.com/about or contact the editors, Jeremy Lopez and Paul Menzer, for further information: thehareonline@gmail.com

cfp categories: journals_and_collections_of_essaysrenaissance 49984Essay Collection: SmallvilleNadine Farghaly and Margo Collinssupernaturaltelevision@gmail.com1360091420african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Nadine Farghaly and Margo Collinscontact email: supernaturaltelevision@gmail.com

Articles are invited for an essay collection on Smallville.

Superman has held audiences' attention since his first appearance in 1938. Since then the Man of Steel and his fellow characters have never left the audiences' sight. Multiple reinventions and installments found a highpoint between the years 2001-2011 with the CW´s hit series which not only told the story of Superman´s teenage years for the first time, but also added new characters such as Chloe Sullivan. Moreover, including members of the Justice League and the Justice Society of America opened up the series' universe even more and created an alternate universe in the DC realm like few Superman installments before. After its successful ten-year run, Smallville´s story is far from over and although the actors are ready to move on, their audience is not. The series continuation as a graphic novel leaves more room to experiment with different formatting and even more interesting storylines. Moreover, Smallville's active fan base continues to produce fan fiction and videos online, illustrating the continuing interest in the series.

This collection will examine a variety of issues surrounding this retelling and expansion of the Superman universe(s).

The following categories suggest possibilities but are by no means exhaustive:
• Fandom and/or Reception
• Transformation and/or Adaptation
• Gender
• Race
• Sexuality
• Romance and Desire
• Power
• Monstrosity
• Heroism
• Villainy
• Identify
• Visual Style and practices
• Smallville's usage and representation of known DC Comics characters and stories
• Representations of masculinity, femininity, race, sexuality and family within Smallville

What to Send:

300 - 500 word abstracts (or complete articles, if available) and CVs should be submitted by June 1, 2013. If an abstract is accepted for the collection, a full draft of the essay (5000 – 8000 words) will be required by December 1, 2013.

Abstracts and final articles should be submitted to: supernaturaltelevision@gmail.com and Nadine.Farghaly@gmx.net

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 49985Betrayal: Race, Class and Conscience in the Study of Folklore -- Essay CollectionShelley Ingram, Todd Richardson, and Willow Mullinssingram@louisiana.edu1360093292americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitypopular_culturefull name / name of organization: Shelley Ingram, Todd Richardson, and Willow Mullinscontact email: singram@louisiana.edu

The editors of the collection "Betrayal: Race, Class and Conscience in the Study of Folklore" are soliciting additional proposals for articles and essays that betray conventional notions about proper methods, theories and subjects within folklore and folklore studies. As a whole, this collection interrogates the unspoken assumptions and obligations that shape the types of cultural work deemed "proper" to be carried out by folklorists, whether the folklorists be hobbyists, academics, or in the public sector. We are especially interested in contributions that betray and/or subvert the discipline's conventions by investigating expressive traditions that are generated in and through popular or so-called "normative" cultures.

Please send questions or 400-500 word proposals to Shelley Ingram at singram@louisiana.edu by April 20th, 2013.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitypopular_culture 49986MLA 2014: Class Vulnerabilities in AcademiaMichele Fazio, Sara Appelmichele.fazio@uncp.edu; sea10@duke.edu1360095704general_announcementsfull name / name of organization: Michele Fazio, Sara Appelcontact email: michele.fazio@uncp.edu; sea10@duke.edu

Roundtable on the dangers and potentialities of class as a marker of scholarly, pedagogical, and social vulnerability within the academy. Send 250-word abstracts to Michele or Sara by March 10.

cfp categories: general_announcements 49987HBO's Girls - Edited CollectionPeggy Tally & betty.kaklamanidou Peggy.Tally@esc.edu & betty.kaklamanidou@gmail.com1360099599americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturereligiontwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Peggy Tally & betty.kaklamanidou contact email:  Peggy.Tally@esc.edu & betty.kaklamanidou@gmail.com

HBO's Girls - Edited Collection

We are inviting submissions for an edited collection on the HBO show Girls (2011-present).

Girls has caught the viewers' and the critics' attention ever since it first aired on HBO on April 15, 2012. The romantic/sex entanglements and work troubles of its twenty-something female protagonists were portrayed in a relatively unflattering (especially for the standards of conventional television) light, without the glamour and expensive accessories of such shows as Sex and the City or Gossip Girl. While not challenging the essential tenets of good television writing or narration, Lena Dunham, the show's creator, writer, star and director, has caught the imagination of her increasing viewership, and has managed to honestly address a part of the audience who could relate far better to her low-wage jobs and no-wage internships, as well as her pear shaped body and masochistic relationships with the young men in her life, far better than they ever could to the young women of Sex and the City.

Girls has already made a big splash in contemporary popular culture, and Lena Dunham should be thrilled, as 2013 welcomed her with a series of public honors and accolades. On January 13, she won a Golden Globe in the Best Actress in a Comedy Series category while Girls received the Golden Globe for Best Television Comedy. On February 2, Dunham also won the Directors Guild Award (DGA) for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Comedy Series for the pilot of Girls. Finally, the young artist is also on the cover of this week's Entertainment Weekly in a feature that aims to explain just how she "became the voice of a generation." At the same time, and before it even was put on the air, Girls became the subject of a fierce backlash by the popular press. The show, and by extension, Dunham herself, was accused of offering a solipsistic, anti-feminist track from a privileged set of young women, who nepotistically benefitted from their famous parents as they focused their narrow lens on the experience of a relatively small group of white millenials in Brooklyn.

Whether Girls is either the voice of their generation or alternatively, the smaller voice of a privileged set of a few young women from Brooklyn, remains to be seen. What is true, however, is that Girls has made a big impact already in popular culture, and has generated a large number of discussions (in all forms of press and social media) while attracting both positive and negative spin or "buzz." Girls is culturally and socially important insofar as it is not only conceived and directed by a surprisingly young female artist, but also because it offers, in a series of poignant narratives, a portrait of young people who are caught in a gloomy sociopolitical context they didn't create and are, at the same time, asked to navigate their lives successfully without a moral or social compass from earlier generations.

Essays are requested on the following topics although other subjects will also be considered.
• Femininities/Masculinities
• Narrative
• Friendship
• Body
• Love/Sex/Romance
• Millennial generation
• Consumerism
• Work
• Education
• Gender
• Race
• Star Studies
• Intertextuality
• Power
• History
• Cultural products

Contributor guidelines:
1. Abstract (not to exceed 400 words) including theoretical premise, methodology and preliminary bibliography or full papers.
2. Brief one-page CV including affiliation and recent publications for each author(s).
3. Submission deadline for abstracts: March 30 2013. Complete papers are due on December 10 2013.
4. Materials and/or questions should be submitted by e-mail to both Peggy.Tally@esc.edu & betty.kaklamanidou@gmail.com.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturereligiontwentieth_century_and_beyond 49988Seeking Panelists for NAVSA 2013: "Evidence Gone Wild: Victorian Animality and Sexuality"NAVSA 2013: "Evidence"bbagociu@umail.iu.edu1360099970gender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesscience_and_culturevictorianfull name / name of organization: NAVSA 2013: "Evidence"contact email: bbagociu@umail.iu.edu

Dear Victorian Scholars of Sexuality:

I am a PhD candidate in English literature at Indiana University-Bloomington seeking fellow scholars of Victorian animality and/or sexuality with whom to propose a panel for NAVSA 2013 on Evidence. I would prefer other scholars who have ABD status or who are faculty at universities, but of course exceptions can be made.

The deadline for NAVSA 2013 submissions is March 1, 2013.

Below is a brief and provisional abstract (250 words) on the panel as I see it now (the parameters of the panel are adjustable):

"Evidence Gone Wild: Victorian Animality and Sexuality"

In recent years, Victorian scholars of sexuality have considered embodiment as agential rather than merely reactive in shaping Victorian sexualities. Animal studies, in its focus on embodiment not necessarily mediated through language, has emerged as an important force in the field of Victorian sexualities. The resurgence of Darwin studies since the bicentennial of his birth has kindled interest in Victorian animality, and scholars have emphasized the variation within what might seem homogenous animal populations. Darwin's focus on animal embodiment brought to light differences in animal embodiments; there is no singular animal body, but animal bodies. What Darwin's corpus also brought to the fore was the inextricability between the animal and the sexual: Victorian systematic accounts of the animal appeared nearly coterminously with the first systematic accounts of the sexual in the form of sexology. Animal studies has therefore served as an important partner to Victorian queer studies, as both discover ways in which Victorian sexuality, too, was more diverse and surprising than had been imagined. In light of the conference theme on evidence, this panel examines the ways in which the materiality of Victorian animals – their corporeality, their capacity to be observed, to evade observation, to inspire and thwart observable actions in humans – made and unmade Victorian sexualities. Exploring medical accounts to literature, our panel examines the ways in which writers figured animals, from domestic cats to monstrous beasts, as evidence to condemn and to invent the diversification of sexualities, unsettling the terms of the human that remain unresolved today.

____

If you are looking for fellow NAVSA panelists, and if your work falls within the general parameters of this abstract, I would be very glad to hear from you so that we can move forward in proposing a NAVSA 2013 panel together.

Pasadena, here we come!

Thank you for considering.

Sincerely,
Ben Bagocius

PhD candidate in English literature
Book Review editor, _Victorian Studies_
Indiana University-Bloomington

cfp categories: gender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesscience_and_culturevictorian 49989Time and the Sublime around 1800MLA 2014 (Special Session Proposal)arvietto@eiu.edu1360102519americancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryromanticfull name / name of organization: MLA 2014 (Special Session Proposal)contact email: arvietto@eiu.edu

For a special session proposal for MLA 2014 (Chicago, Jan. 9-12). Seeking proposals for innovative presentations on temporalities in any national literature/culture in the decades surrounding 1800, with special interest in the sublime or other elements of Romantic aesthetics. Topics might include but are not limited to revolutionary time in France or Haiti, time and trauma, queering Romantic senses of time, exceptionalist temporality and American expansionism, kairos and British imperialism, the temporality of the Romantic artist. In keeping with the topic of this proposal and the presidential theme for 2014 ("Vulnerable Times"), this session seeks brief (5-10 minute) talks in innovative styles such as PechaKucha or Lightning Short (proposals for other brief formats are also welcome). Please send a proposal describing both proposed content and format, with a short CV, by March 15 to Angela Vietto .

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryromantic 49990[UPDATE] Giving Voice to the Dead: Haunted Histories and Living Landscapes in LiteraturePCEApenncea@gmail.com1360106755african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypostcolonialrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromantictravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: PCEAcontact email: penncea@gmail.com

[UPDATE] The Pennsylvania College English Assoc. has extended the submission deadline for our 2013 conference. We will accept individual and panel submissions until Feb. 15, 2013.

Giving Voice to the Dead: Haunted Histories and Living Landscapes in Literature
Pennsylvania College English Association Annual Conference
March 14-16, 2013
Eisenhower Hotel & Conference Center
2634 Emmitsburg Rd, Gettysburg, PA

During three days of battle, the landscape of Gettysburg was forever altered. What was once a small town and farming community was transformed into a memorial site that would be haunted by the lives lost and changed in the war. While many of the battlefields have been preserved, the events that took place on them have inscribed deeper meanings into the landscape and left traces that resonate within the American cultural psyche as we project our national narrative onto the landscape itself. The significance of Gettysburg in the American national narrative speaks in part to a question of our relationship to landscapes, both as physical places and as mental topographies shaped by our experiences and our imaginations. This year's theme focuses on stories of our past and present, on the way we engage with history, and on the landscapes we inhabit.

PCEA invites proposals for critical interpretations and original creative works that celebrate any aspect of our theme. We also welcome all proposals related to the study and/or teaching of literature, film, composition and linguistics, as well as creative work.

Proposals are due by February 15, 2013, and should include the following information:
Name
Institutional Affiliation/Position (if applicable)
Mailing Address (including zip code)
Phone number
E-mail address
Title of proposed presentation
250-500 word abstract
A/V equipment needs, if any (Note: We can provide A/V projectors, but presenters must bring their own laptops)
Other special needs, if any

Submit proposals by email to the PCEA Program Chair at penncea@gmail.com.
• Presenters must join PCEA in order to participate.
• To preserve time for discussion, PCEA limits individual critical and creative presentations to 15 minutes.

Please note:
Undergraduate student participation is limited to faculty-organized and led panels. Faculty organizers should submit panel information, including contact information and abstracts to the program chair. Undergraduate students are welcome to attend the conference, but individual undergraduate proposals will not be accepted.

PCEA 2013 Graduate Student Writing Contest
Graduate students who submit an abstract for a presentation at the PCEA 2013 Conference (or who will be part of a pre-arranged panel) are also invited to compete for the PCEA Best Student Paper Awards. Awards are offered in three separate categories:
• Critical Essay
• Creative Poetry
• Creative Prose
These awards carry a small monetary prize. Students who compete must be PCEA members. Award winners will also be considered for publication in PCEA's journal, Pennsylvania English.

Contest Submission Information
To compete, submit the complete work no later than February 15, 2013 to the PCEA Program Chair at penncea@gmail.com.
• Designate "PCEA Contest Entry" in the subject line of the email
• Include the title of the work and the author's name in the email message.
• Remove the author's name from the work itself.
• Submit papers as MS Word documents attached to the email.
Submissions of critical work should be the equivalent of a conference paper, including notes and works cited (max. 12 double-spaced pages), and follow MLA format for documentation and citation. For creative work, submit 8-12 pages of double-spaced prose (fiction or creative non-fiction) or 4-6 poems. No mixed genre submissions, please. Contest entrants must present their papers at the conference to receive prizes.
Critical or creative entries that do not follow submission guidelines and those that are received after the deadline will not be considered.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypostcolonialrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromantictravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 49991Queer Relations: Revising the Victorian Family (proposal deadline: 1 April. 2013)Dr Duc Dau, University of Western Australia and Dr Shale Preston, Macquarie Universityduc.dau@uwa.edu.au and shale.preston@mq.edu.au1360109628americanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligiontheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr Duc Dau, University of Western Australia and Dr Shale Preston, Macquarie Universitycontact email: duc.dau@uwa.edu.au and shale.preston@mq.edu.au

We invite contributions for an upcoming volume of essays which examine the Victorian family through a queer lens. The Victorian family can be taken to mean the nineteenth-century nuclear or extended family, or the family of texts associated with the Victorian period (e.g. nineteenth-century and neo-Victorian texts). We are looking for exciting interrogations into the discourse of the Victorian family. These interrogations can focus on untraditional familial arrangements, non-normative relationships, polyamorous attachments, queer families in disparate communities/locations (e.g. circuses, theaters, brothels, homes for fallen women, monasteries, convents, hospitals, schools, ships, military units, thieving fraternities), homosexual/homosocial utopias, erotic fantasy worlds (e.g. fairy, goblin), etc. Alternatively, the interrogations can examine queer 20th and 21st century texts/domains/mediums that allude to or mash-up the Victorian family of texts (canonical or otherwise) or seek to revise traditional notions of the Victorian family. Focus areas can include but are not limited to the novel, poetry, film, television, theater, auto/biography, periodicals, the internet, steampunk etc.

Please send 300 word proposals and a two-page CV to the editors Dr Duc Dau at duc.dau@uwa.edu.au and Dr Shale Preston at shale.preston@mq.edu.au by 1 April 2013.

Completed chapters of 6,000 - 8,000 words will be due by 1 February 2014.

cfp categories: americanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligiontheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 49992Is It All About the Text? Reading, Writing, Teaching, Technologizing, Theorizing--April 20, 2013Southern Connecticut State University English Departmentneverowv1@southernct.edu1360111427african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromantictheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Southern Connecticut State University English Departmentcontact email: neverowv1@southernct.edu

CALL FOR PAPERS AND PANELS

Is It All About the Text?
Reading, Writing, Teaching, Technologizing, Theorizing

The Annual Graduate English Conference at
Southern Connecticut State University
New Haven, CT

April 20, 2013

9:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
English Department
Engleman Hall
(D-Wing)

Deadline for submissions: March 29, 2013
http://www.home.southernct.edu/~neverowv1/grad_eng_conf_2013_SCSU.html

Approaches:
We are soliciting papers and panel proposals from graduate students in English studies and other related fields. We welcome a range of perspectives including:

African American Studies
Comparative Literature
Composition and Rhetoric
Teaching Technologies
Creative Writing
Critical Theory
Cultural Studies
Disability Studies
Diaspora Studies
Film Studies
Gay/Lesbian/Transgender/Intersex/Queer Studies
Latino/a Studies
Linguistics
Media Studies
Pedagogy
Professional Writing
Secondary Education
Textual Studies
Women's Studies

Topics include but by no means are not limited to:

adaptations of texts
archival research
digital texts
graphic texts
inter-textualities
interpretations of literary texts
literacies
reception of texts
teaching with technologies
translations
visual culture
writing across the curriculum.

Panels will be one and a half hours long. Presentations will be 15-20 minutes long (papers should be 6-8 pages in length maximum).

Guidelines for Submissions to the 2013 Annual SCSU Graduate English Conference:

Submissions for individual papers must include the paper title and the name, email address, phone number and institutional affiliation
Submissions for panels must include the panel title and the titles of the panelists' papers, the panelists' names, email addresses), phone numbers and institutional affiliations.

All proposals must be submitted electronically
Please send submissions by email only to Vara Neverow at: neverowv1@southernct.edu. The submission should be included in the body of the email message AND as an email attachment (in Word .doc, .docx, or RTF format).

A proposal should consist of a 250-350 word abstract with the title and contact information noted above.

A proposal for a panel should consist of an overall description of the panel (approximately 250 words) and a 250-350 word abstract for each paper or presentation with titles and contact information as noted above.

Additional information:
Please also indicate in your email whether you might be willing to chair/moderate a session.

Deadline for receipt of submissions: 5:00 p.m., 29 March 2013.

Notification of Acceptance:
Presenters will be notified of the conference committee's decision by email on or about
8 April 2013

Registration:
There will be a $25 conference pre-registration fee ($10 for Southern CT students and faculty), due by 16 April 2013. Payment can be online via credit card (the website is not yet activated) or by check. Checks must be made payable to SCSUF (Southern CT State University Foundation).
On-site registration fees will be $30 ($15 for Southern CT students and faculty) and may be paid by check or in cash in person.

Registration fees include all food service:
continental breakfast, beverage breaks, luncheon and closing reception.

For more information,
contact Dr. Vara Neverow
neverowv1@southernct.edu
Graduate Conference Organizer
English Department
Southern CT State University
501 Crescent Street
New Haven, CT 06515.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromantictheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 49993CFP--Call for edited collection: Birth, Loss, and Trouble: Women of Color Reflect (deadline May 17, 2013)Editors: Shanna Benjamin, Tanya Clark, and Mendi Obadike fertilitycfp@gmail.com 1360116853african-americanethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityjournals_and_collections_of_essaysprofessional_topicsfull name / name of organization: Editors: Shanna Benjamin, Tanya Clark, and Mendi Obadike contact email: fertilitycfp@gmail.com

Despite statistics that show a staggering number of pregnancies ending in miscarriage, pre-term labor, selective abortion, or stillbirth, the popular imaginary still portrays a healthy child as the inevitable outcome of nine months of pregnancy. For many women of color, the challenge of having a non-normative reproductive experience is coupled with the challenges of finding community or negotiating specific cultural attitudes toward birth. Do we feel isolated from communities where the women are expected to be white? Are we surprised to identify across cultural lines? Do we have specific cultural expectations to meet or overcome? Do our communities prepare us with useful resources for facing difficulties?

To address a dearth in scholarship on how women of color struggle with (in)fertility, difficult pregnancies, and loss, this collection will bring together representative narratives of academic and professional women of color as they reflect on their experiences with assisted reproduction, miscarriage, preterm labor, and adoption, and the impact these experiences and interventions have on their lives and family units. By combining scholarly essays, creative nonfiction, and autobiographical accounts, this collection will appeal to readers seeking informed, well-written, and thoughtful expressions of the complex realities behind baby making for a cadre of women reared to believe that they might, with planning, fortitude, and a healthy ovarian reserve, have it all.

We invite 250- to 300-word abstracts that propose scholarly essays, creative nonfiction, or autobiographical accounts that address the following and related topics:

• (Re)defining motherhood for women who have experienced miscarriage and preterm labor
• (Re)defining the language and meaning of pregnancy, fertility/infertility, and loss
• Pregnancy: popular culture vs. material realities
• Culture, conception, and loss
• Finding community across cultural lines
• Faith
• Cultural resources for facing loss and other troubles
• Adoption
• Pregnancy after 35
• Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART)
• Tenure clock vs. biological clock
• Surrogacy (traditional and/or gestational)
• Sexuality, pregnancy, and motherhood

Please send submissions and queries to:
fertilitycfp@gmail.com

All submissions must be submitted in .docx or .rtf format by 17 May 2013

cfp categories: african-americanethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityjournals_and_collections_of_essaysprofessional_topics 49994Third Annual Gender and Sexuality Postgraduate Research Conference, Birmingham, May 10 2013Roles Gender and Sexuality Forum, University of Birminghamhpp209@1360144351african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Roles Gender and Sexuality Forum, University of Birminghamcontact email: hpp209@

Roles: A Gender and Sexuality Forum

Third Annual Gender and Sexuality Conference

University of Birmingham,
10th May 2013

Key Note Speaker: Dr. Nadine Muller

This one-day interdisciplinary conference offers postgraduates the opportunity to present their research in a friendly and supportive environment. We invite applications for twenty-minute papers from researchers working within the fields of gender and sexuality studies. Suggestions for presentations may address, but are not limited to, the following topics:

- social policy, government legislation, and matters of the law

- cultural products: film / music / art / TV / literature

- media, representation, and social images

- sexuality, otherness, erotic practice

- the body: subject, object, identity

- theory, methodology, practice

- feminism and postfeminism: representation and invisibility

- queer and trans*: changing images of femininity and masculinity

Please send an abstract, including a short bio, of no more than 300 words to g.roles@hotmail.com by 10th March 2013.

Roles is an interdisciplinary research forum hosted by researchers at the University of Birmingham for the purpose of fostering discussion and debate. We hold regular seminars as well as our annual conference, and can be followed online: T: @groles, F: /roles-a-gender-and-sexuality-forum, W: groles.wordpress.com, E: g.roles@hotmail.com.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 49995STARGATE Collection of Essay CFP Deadline: June 1st Nadine Farghaly, Martina KressNadine.Farghaly@gmx.net 1360156625cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Nadine Farghaly, Martina Kresscontact email: Nadine.Farghaly@gmx.net

STARGATE Collection of Essay CFP

The 28th of October 1994 marked the beginning of one of the most successful franchises in television history. It was the day Roland Emmerich released the first Stargate movie to the cinemas. Little did he know that was laying the foundation for one of TV's longest and most successful TV shows. Only three years later Brad Wright and Jonathan Glassner decided to create a TV show that would pick up exactly where the movie blockbuster ended. Stargate SG-1 was born and ran for ten successful seasons. Moreover, two spinoffs originated from Stargate SG-1, Stargate Atlantis which ran for five seasons, as well as Stargate Universe which ran for two seasons. After the end of Stargate SG-1 it became clear that the audience was not ready to part with their favourite TV show and two more movies were released. The Stargate franchise was even further enriched by the incorporation of books, video games, an animated series, audio plays, and graphic novels.

The Stargate universe covers an enormous range of academic topics. Starting with aspects of slavery (most Jaffa seem to be of non-Caucasian origin), and the importance of free will, to the implications of multiple personality disorders, fundamental ethical questions (if a body is inhabited by a symbiote, which is unable to live without it, would extracting it be murder? Can an individual host body be responsible for the acts of the symbiote? Would it be morally justified to sacrifice a few thousand people in order to save billions? Is there some kind of ethical and moral obligation to help other species? What gives humans the right to boycott and overthrow other cultures?), to mankind's own fears (What would we do if we actually encountered alien beings? What gives the U.S. military the right to act as ambassadors for all of mankind? Should the SGC have started an intergalactic war and kept the rest of mankind in the dark about it? Will the nations of the world ever life in harmony?). The range of topics covered in the Stargate franchise seems to be almost limitless. And the success of this franchise demonstrates that many of the topics must have resonated with the audience.
This publication aims to examine Stargate in literature, art, and other media to questions concerning sexuality, gender, identity, social change and feminism. It will provide an interdisciplinary stage for the development of innovative and creative research and examine this vital and complex American production in all their various manifestations and cultural meanings.

The following categories suggest possibilities but are by no means exhaustive:
• Fandom and/or Reception
• Transformation and/or Adaptation
• Gender
• Culture and Cultural Adaptations/Appropriations
• Race
• Sexuality
• Romance and Desire
• Power
• Monstrosity
• Heroism
• Villainy
• Identify
• Visual Style and practices

What to Send:
300 - 500 word abstracts (or complete articles, if available) and CVs should be submitted by June 1, 2013. If an abstract is accepted for the collection, a full draft of the essay (5000 – 8000 words) will be required by December 1, 2013.

Abstracts and final articles should be submitted to: sausephon@googlemail.com (Martina Kress) and Nadine.Farghaly@gmx.net receipt of the abstracts will be send within one week. In case you do not receive an email, please resend your proposal.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 49996Trauma & Memory: the Holocaust in Contemporary Culture, 12th & 13th July 2013University of Portsmouth, UKchristine.berberich@port.ac.uk1360156978cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisioninterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencestwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: University of Portsmouth, UKcontact email: christine.berberich@port.ac.uk

Trauma & Memory: the Holocaust in Contemporary Culture

12 & 13th July 2013
University of Portsmouth, UK

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:
Phyllis Lassner, Northwestern University, USA
Sue Vice, University of Sheffield
Alan Marcus, University of Aberdeen
Shonaleigh Cumbers, Storyteller

This two-day interdisciplinary conference hosted by the Centre for Studies in Literature at the University of Portsmouth aims to explore the impact of the Holocaust on contemporary culture. Over the past decades, the memory of the Holocaust has not only become a common cultural consciousness but also a cultural property shared by people all over the world. As the critic Terrence Des Pres puts it, 'the image of the Holocaust is with us – a memory which haunts, a sounding board for all subsequent evil – in the back of the mind … for all of us now living: we, the inheritors.' In addition to the accounts of the survivors, the trauma and memories of the Holocaust are now explored in a wide variety of ways: in literature, in film, in Social, Historical and Cultural Studies. The conference aims to assess the role of Holocaust remembrance in contemporary culture. Topics under discussion might include:

- Memory, Postmemory, Prosthetic Memory
- Trauma Theories
- Perpetrator Writing
- Second- and Third-Generation Engagement with the Holocaust
- the Holocaust in Literature and in Film
- Teaching the Holocaust
- The 'Institutionalization' of the Holocaust through Museums and Memorials
- German Väterliteratur and Second-Generation Guilt by Association

Please send abstracts of 250 words by 10th March 2013 to Christine Berberich, Christine.berberich@port.ac.uk

Conference Website: http://www.port.ac.uk/research/csl/literatureevents/conferences/traumaan...

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisioninterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencestwentieth_century_and_beyond 49997[UPDATE] Literatures and Linguistics Undergraduate Colloquium (LLUC) at Gordon CollegeGordon CollegeEmmanuelle.Vanborre@gordon.edu1360167296cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryinterdisciplinarypostcolonialreligionrhetoric_and_compositiontheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Gordon Collegecontact email: Emmanuelle.Vanborre@gordon.edu

Literatures and Linguistics Undergraduate Colloquium (LLUC) at Gordon College

Saturday, April 6, 2013

The Department of English Language and Literature and the Department of Languages and Linguistics at Gordon College invite paper submissions for their fourth annual Literatures and Linguistics Undergraduate Colloquium (LLUC). Undergraduate students from all colleges and universities are encouraged to submit 8-10 page papers in English dealing with any linguistic or literary topic. Please provide a 100-200 word summary (abstract) of your essay in addition to your completed paper. Presentations should not exceed 20 minutes. The submission deadline is February 1, 2013.

Gordon College is located on Boston's historic North Shore, just 25 miles north of Boston.

Please send an electronic copy of your paper and your abstract, as well as inquiries about the colloquium to LLUC@gordon.edu

Submission Deadline: February 15, 2013

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryinterdisciplinarypostcolonialreligionrhetoric_and_compositiontheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 49998MLA 2014: 'I've Known Rivers': Water in African Diasporic Literary ConsciousnessKameelah Martin; Folashade Alaokmsamuel@uh.edu; alaof@mailbox.sc.edu1360168444african-americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identitypostcolonialtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Kameelah Martin; Folashade Alaocontact email: kmsamuel@uh.edu; alaof@mailbox.sc.edu

We seek innovative proposals for a special session on the trope of water in black literary consciousness at the 2014 MLA Convention in Chicago. We are particularly interested in research that engages water through the lens of migration, memory and access in the literature and cultures of the African diaspora. This includes, but is not limited to such topics as transatlantic crossings, water and black spirituality, and eco-criticism in addition to the excess of or limited access to water.

Kindly submit an abstract of 350 words and CV to BOTH organizers: Kameelah Martin (kmsamuel@uh.edu) and Folashade Alao (Alaof@mailbox.sc.edu) by March 15, 2013.

cfp categories: african-americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identitypostcolonialtwentieth_century_and_beyond 49999Servant38th Macromarketing Conference, University of York, Toronto, 7-9 June 2013norah.campbell@tcd.ie1360169081african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfull name / name of organization: 38th Macromarketing Conference, University of York, Toronto, 7-9 June 2013contact email: norah.campbell@tcd.ie

38th Annual Macromarketing Conference June 5– June 7, 2013

Paper track on servants, servitude and the philosophy of service
The study of 'service' in marketing has heretofore concentrated on the managerial use of service for profit-maximizing purposes. In this track, we invite philosophical, critical, sociological, ecological, and economic papers on the relation between service and market. We particularly welcome papers that deal with issues in the following areas:

What can philosophy tell us about service? (Marx, Hegel, Agamben, Aquinas)

(Global) slavery in different industry sectors (sex, house-keeping, construction, fashion)

Service-dominant logic, services marketing, Nordic marketing, and critiques thereof

Financial services

Historical/feminist perspectives on servants (the shopgirl, geisha, prostitution)

Internationalization of service training, service scripts, and service-centric culture

Non-human servants from historical or contemporary viewpoints (robotic servants, robotics of

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studies 50000Call for papers: Blackfriars Conference, 23-27 October 2013, Staunton, VirginiaThe American Shakespeare Centersarahe@americanshakespearecenter.com1360173632bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookgender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryrenaissancetheatrefull name / name of organization: The American Shakespeare Centercontact email: sarahe@americanshakespearecenter.com

23 - 27 October 2013, Seventh Blackfriars Conference

On odd numbered years since the first October the Blackfriars Playhouse opened, scholars from around the world have gathered in Staunton, during the height of the Shenandoah Valley's famed Fall colors, to hear lectures, see plays, and learn about early modern theatre. In 2013, the American Shakespeare Center's Education and Research Department will once again host Shakespeareans, scholars and practitioners alike, to explore Shakespeare in the study and Shakespeare on the stage and to find ways that these two worlds – sometime in collision – can collaborate. Past conferences have included such notable scholars as Andrew Gurr, the "godfather" of the Blackfriars Playhouse, Tiffany Stern, Russ McDonald, Gary Taylor, Stephen Greenblatt, Roz Knutson, Tina Packer, Scott Kaiser, Stephen Booth, George T. Wright, and many more in five days full of activities.

Except for banquets, all events – papers, plays, workshops, – take place in the world's only re-creation of Shakespeare's indoor theatre, the Blackfriars Playhouse. This conference distinguishes itself from saner conferences in a variety of other ways. First, to model the kind of collaboration we think possible we encourage presenters to feature actors as partners in the demonstration of their theses. For instance, in 2009, Gary Taylor's keynote presentation "Lyrical Middleton" featured ASC actors singing and dancing to the songs in Middleton's plays. Second, we limit each paper session to six short papers (10 minutes for solo presentations, 13 minutes for presentations with actors). Third, we enforce this rule by ursine fiat – a bear chases from the stage those speakers who go over their allotted time.

Delegates also attend all of the plays in the ASC 2013 Fall Season – Romeo and Juliet, All's Well that Ends Well, Troilus and Cressida, Oliver Goldsmith's She Stoops to Conquer, and Bob Carlton's Return to the Forbidden Planet, – and, for the past several conferences, bonus plays written by their colleagues and performed by actors in the Mary Baldwin College MFA in Shakespeare in Performance program. The spirit of fun that imbues the conference manifests itself in the annual Truancy Award, for the sensible conferee who – visiting the Shenandoah Valley at the height of Fall – has the good sense to miss the most sessions.

The 2013 gathering will honor George Walton Williams IV and will include keynote addresses from Russ McDonald, Ann Thompson, Peter Holland, and Abigail Rokison.

ASC Education and Research extends this call for papers on any matters to do with the performance of early modern drama (historical, architectural, political, dramatical, sartorial, medical, linguistical, comical, pastoral) to all interested parties for our biennial conference to be held at the Blackfriars Playhouse in Staunton, Virginia, 23-27 October 2013. The deadline to submit your abstract is 31 May 2013.

Submit an Abstract for consideration(http://www.formstack.com/forms/?1007217-Fa8fydC0oQ); Deadline: May 31st, 2013.
or, for more information, please email Sarah Enloe, Director of Education, at sarahe@americanshakespearecenter.com.

cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookgender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryrenaissancetheatre 50001DASH Literary Journal 2013 Edition, Cal State Fullerton's Official Literary Magazine (Deadline: March 1, 2013)DASH Literary JournalDASHliteraryjournal@gmail.com1360176885interdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: DASH Literary Journalcontact email: DASHliteraryjournal@gmail.com

DASH, Cal State Fullerton's annual literary journal, seeks submissions for its 2013 issue. It is our mission to publish works of poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, criticism, and art (as well as hybrid texts) that push the boundaries of short, emphatic expression. We aim to communicate more with less. Waste not, want not. Submit.

NB: DASH is a student-produced journal that emphasizes artistic and editorial integrity throughout the production process. All entries are 100% blind, peer-reviewed (No favors for friends).

Boundaries (push at your own risk):

Poems
33 lines or fewer. Submit up to 5.

Fiction, Nonfiction, Criticism:
2013 words or fewer, double-spaced.
Limit: 1 submission per category.

Art:
Digital images, 300 dpi.
Email as TIFF or JPEG attachment.
Do not send original artwork.

Hybrid:
Surprise us.

Considerations (check yourself before you wreck yourself):
Deadline: March 1, 2013.


Simultaneous submissions: OK.
Previously published work: not OK.


Bio: 6 words or fewer.

Email submissions preferred: DASHliteraryjournal@gmail.com

Writers: attach as Word document (.doc preferred).
Artists: see above.

Snail mail (if you must):
DASH Journal,
Department of English & Comparative Literature,
California State University, Fullerton,
P.O. Box 6848,
Fullerton, CA 92834-6848

(Include SASE for response.)

DASH obtains First North American Serial Rights: i.e., we obtain rights to publish your work in our journal or on our website; following publication, these rights revert back to you. We ask, however, that DASH be acknowledged in any subsequent publication. We offer one journal issue as payment.

cfp categories: interdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 50002DASH Literary Journal Poetry Contest (Deadline March 1, 2013)DASH Literary JournalDASHliteraryjournal@gmail.com1360177068journals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: DASH Literary Journalcontact email: DASHliteraryjournal@gmail.com

DASH Journal welcomes submissions to its first annual poetry contest. To celebrate our love of competition, we're handing out a $1,000 prize for best poem.

Send up to 3 unpublished poems per entry (max 33 lines each). Include name and contact information on coversheet only.

Fee: $10
...or $15 for contest plus one-year subscription.
Check payable to DASH Journal.

Deadline: March 1
All poems blind-reviewed by a panel of editors. Finalists will be published in our 2013 issue.
Contests are hard copy only.

Submit to:

DASH Journal
Department of English and Comparative Literature
California State University Fullerton
800 N. State College Blvd.
Fullerton, CA 92831.

cfp categories: journals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrytwentieth_century_and_beyond 50003Token: A Journal of English Linguistics (Vol. 2, 2013)Jan Kochanowski University of Kielce, Polandsylwester.lodej@gmail.com1360177068cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryfull name / name of organization: Jan Kochanowski University of Kielce, Polandcontact email: sylwester.lodej@gmail.com

Call Deadline: 31-May-2013

Editors:
Sylwester Łodej, Jan Kochanowski University of Kielce
John G. Newman, University of Texas at Brownsville

http://www.ujk.edu.pl/token

Token: A Journal of English Linguistics focuses on English linguistics in a broad sense, and accepts both diachronic and synchronic work, grammatical as well as lexical studies. Token publishes original research papers on topics of significance to English linguistics. That being said, the journal favors empirical research. Jan Kochanowski University (Kielce, Poland) publishes Token once annually, and all submissions are double-blind peer-reviewed . The due date for submissions is 31 May 2013 and notifications of acceptance for review will follow soon thereafter. Publication is planned for late 2013.

Manuscript submissions:

Submissions should be prepared according the style sheet available at the journal's website. The majority of papers approximate 10-15 pages. A submission to Token should be sent electronically as a Word document, and should not contain the author's name and affiliation but should be accompanied by an email including such personal information.
Submissions should be sent to token.journal@gmail.com .

For more information visit the journal's webpage at http://www.ujk.edu.pl/token.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinary 50004CFP - MLA Convention, Jan. 9-12, 2014John Clare Society of North Americasamanthaharvey@boisestate.edu1360177760ecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesinterdisciplinarypoetryromanticfull name / name of organization: John Clare Society of North Americacontact email: samanthaharvey@boisestate.edu

CFP for a session sponsored by the John Clare Society of North America at the MLA Convention, Chicago, January 9-12, 2014.

"John Clare: The Voices of Nature." Papers addressing any aspect of Clare's poetry and prose, especially regarding the intersection between nature and language. One page abstract by 15 March to Samantha Harvey at samanthaharvey@boisestate.edu

cfp categories: ecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesinterdisciplinarypoetryromantic 500052013 International Conference on Learning2013 International Conference on LearningConferencedirector@home.commongroundpublishing.com1360183402classical_studiesgeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysprofessional_topicsfull name / name of organization: 2013 International Conference on Learningcontact email: Conferencedirector@home.commongroundpublishing.com

Call for Papers
The 2013 Learning Conference, held at the University of the Aegean at Rhodes, will feature sessions on a breadth of topics relevant to Learning. Proposals for paper presentations, workshops, roundtables or colloquia are invited, addressing learning through one of the following themes:
* Pedagogy and Curriculum * Science, Mathematics and Technology Learning
* Assessment and Evaluation * Adult, Community and Professional Learning
* Literacies Learning * Educational Organization and Leadership
* Early Childhood Learning * Technologies in Learning
* Learning in Higher Education * Learner Diversity and Identities

The final deadline for proposal submission is 14 May 2013. Please visit thelearner.com for more information on submitting your proposal, future deadlines, and registering for the conference.

Presenters will have the option to submit their completed papers to the refereed International Journal of Learning. If you are unable to attend the conference in person, virtual registrations are available, which include submission to the journal for refereeing and possible publication, as well as a one-year online subscription to the journal.
Rhodes and the Learning Conference
The 2013 International Conference on Learning will take place from 11-13 July in Rhodes, Greece. We hope that you will join us at the University of the Aegean at Rhodes to continue conversations and start new discussions. After the conference, take time to explore all of the wonderful sights in Rhodes. Once home to the Colossus of Rhodes, the modern city contains the citadel of Rhodes, which is a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of the best preserved medieval towns in Europe.

Plenary Speakers:
The International Conference on Learning is proud to announce the following keynote speakers for our 2013 Conference:

- Mary Kalantzis, College of Education, University of Illinois - "Learning How to Mean: Reflections in New
Learning and New Literacies"

- Chryssi Vitsilaki, University of the Aegean at Rhodes, Eugenia Arvanitis, Greek Ministry of Education,
and Eugenia Kouleza, University of Patra - "Case Studies of Pedagogical Innovation in Greece"

cfp categories: classical_studiesgeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysprofessional_topics 50007The 2013 Third International Conference on Aging: An Interdisciplinary Conference 11-8-2013The 2013 Third International Conference on Aging: An Interdisciplinary Conference conferencedirector@home.commongroundpublishing.com1360185633interdisciplinaryfull name / name of organization: The 2013 Third International Conference on Aging: An Interdisciplinary Conference contact email: conferencedirector@home.commongroundpublishing.com

The 2013 Third International Conference on Aging: An Interdisciplinary Conference is held at the University Center Chicago
on November 8th-9th. Proposals for paper presentations, workshops, roundtables or colloquia are invited, addressing aging and society through one of the following themes:

• Economic and Demographic Perspectives on Aging
• Public Policy and Public Perspectives on Aging
• Medical Perspectives on Aging, Health, Wellness
• Social and Cultural Perspectives on Aging

The final deadline for proposal submission is 10 September 2013. Please visit our http://agingandsociety.com for more information on submitting your proposal, future deadlines, and registering for the conference.

Virtual participation is available for those who are unable to attend the conference in person. Proposals for virtual presentations may be submitted at any time, up to the start of the conference. All conference registrants (in-person and virtual) may also submit their written papers for publication in the refereed http://agingandsociety.com

This year's Aging Conference will take place in Vancouver, Canada at Robson Square, University of British Columbia. A satellite of the University of British Columbia, UBC Robson Square is located in downtown Vancouver, the largest city on Canada's west coast. This year's special theme is Cognition in Aging. Plenary speakers will focus their talks around this theme, but presentations on any of the conference themes are welcome.

cfp categories: interdisciplinary 500086-26-2013 Thirteenth International Diversity in Organizations, Communities and Nations Conference Thirteenth International Diversity in Organizations, Communities and Nations Conference conferencedirector@home.commongroundpublishing.com1360187743americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinternational_conferencesfull name / name of organization: Thirteenth International Diversity in Organizations, Communities and Nations Conference contact email: conferencedirector@home.commongroundpublishing.com

Call for Papers
The 2013 Thirteenth International Diversity in Organizations, Communities and Nations Conference is held at the Charles Darwin University,
Darwin, Australia on
26-28 June 2013.
This Conference has a history of bringing together scholarly, government and practice-based participants with an interest in the issues of diversity and community. The Conference examines the concept of diversity as a positive aspect of a global world and globalized society. Diversity is in many ways reflective of our present world order, but there are ways of taking this further without necessary engendering its alternatives: racism, conflict, discrimination and inequity. Diversity as a mode of social existence can be projected in ways that deepen the range of human experience. The Conference will seek to explore the full range of what diversity means and explore modes of diversity in real-life situations of living together in community. The Conference supports a move away from simple affirmations that 'diversity is good' to a much more nuanced account of the effects and uses of diversity on differently situated communities in the context of our current epoch of globalization.

Proposals for paper presentations, workshops, roundtables or colloquia are invited, addressing diversity through one of the following themes:
• Identity and Belonging
• Education and Learning in a World of Differences
• Organizational Diversity
• Community Diversity and Governance

The final deadline for proposal submission is 2 May 2013. Please visit ondiversity.com for more information on submitting your proposal, future deadlines, and registering for the conference.

Presenters will have the option to submit their completed papers to the refereed International Journal of Diversity in Organizations, Communities, and Nations or its related themed journals. Virtual participation is available for those who are unable to attend the conference in person. Proposals for virtual presentations may be submitted at any time, up to the start of the conference.

Plenary Speakers:
The International Conference on Diversity in Organization, Communities & Nations will feature plenary sessions by some of the world's leading thinkers and innovators in the field, as well as numerous parallel presentations by researchers and practitioners. This year's plenary speakers include:


Linda Ford, Deakin University, Australia

Mary Kalantzis, College of Education, University of Illinois

Peter Kell, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT.

Carol Reid, Associate Professor in Canada and Sweden

Ruth Wallace, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinternational_conferences 50009July 18 2013 Fifth International Conference on Climate: Impacts and Responses, Fifth International Conference on Climate: Impacts and Responses, conferencedirector@home.commongroundpublishing.com1360189152international_conferencesfull name / name of organization: Fifth International Conference on Climate: Impacts and Responses, contact email: conferencedirector@home.commongroundpublishing.com

Call For Papers
The Fifth International Conference on Climate: Impacts and Responses, held in Labourdonnais Waterfront Hotel
Port Louis, Maritius 18-19 July 2013, is for any person with an interest in, and concern for, scientific, policy and strategic perspectives in climate change. It will address a range of critically important themes relating to the vexing question of climate change. Plenary speakers will include some of the world's leading thinkers in the fields of climatology and environmental science, as well as numerous paper, workshop and colloquium presentations by researchers and practitioners. We are inviting proposals for paper presentations, workshops/interactive sessions, posters/exhibits, or colloquia. The themes underlying this community include:
• Scientific Evidence
• Assessing Impacts in Divergent Ecosystems
• Human Impacts and Impacts on Humans
• Technical, Political and Social Responses

The final deadline for proposal submission is 21 May 2013. Please visit http://on-climate.com for more information on submitting your proposal, future deadlines, and registering for the conference.

Virtual participation is available for those who are unable to attend the conference in person. Proposals for virtual presentations may be submitted at any time, up to the start of the conference. All conference registrants (in-person and virtual) may also submit their written papers for publication in the International Journal of Climate Change: Impacts and Responses.

Plenary Speakers:
The Climate Change Conference will feature plenary sessions by some of the world's leading thinkers and innovators in the field, as well as numerous parallel presentations by researchers and practitioners. This year's plenary speakers include:

Mr. Mokshanand Dowarkasing, Senior Advisor to the Prime Minister of Mauritius

cfp categories: international_conferences 50010'Digital Nightmares: Wired Ghosts, CCTV Horror and the Found Footage Phenomenon', Edited Collection, CFP Deadline: 8 April 2013Linnie Blake, Xavier Aldana Reyes (Manchester Metropolitan University)X.Aldana-Reyes@mmu.ac.uk & l.blake@mmu.ac.uk1360190463film_and_televisionhumanities_computing_and_the_internetjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Linnie Blake, Xavier Aldana Reyes (Manchester Metropolitan University)contact email: X.Aldana-Reyes@mmu.ac.uk & l.blake@mmu.ac.uk

Digital Nightmares: Wired Ghosts, CCTV Horror and the Found Footage Phenomenon, ed. by Linnie Blake and Xavier Aldana Reyes

The Blair Witch Project (1999) is responsible for sparking a host of handheld horrors that have led to the commercial success of big blockbusters such as [REC] (2007), Paranormal Activity (2007) or Cloverfield (2008) and to the institutionalisation of the 'found footage' phenomenon or pseudo-documentary. There has also been a systematic application of new digital media to the recording methods and narrative structures of the horror genre, with films such as My Little Eye (2002) shot exclusively from the point of view of closed circuit television. After the success of the televisual nightmare of Ringu (1998), post-millennial films have also registered an important influx of literal ghosts in the machine. In fact, as White Noise (2005), Pulse (2006) or One Missed Call (2008) evince, spectres now haunt every form of information technologies, from phones to computers and radios. The overwhelming virtual world opened up by widespread access to the Internet and the free broadcasting of sites like Youtube or Twitter has seamlessly combined with post-millennial fears centred on the detrimental effects of technology, the easy availability of extreme material and the dangers of surveillance culture. These particular anxieties have been foundational to more mainstream horror films such as Saw (2004) or Hostel: Part II (2007), and there is now a vast and ever-growing number of low-budget films keen on exploring the dark side of the digital zeitgeist. This edited collection seeks to appraise and track the changes experienced by the horror genre in its most recent and technological incarnations. It is particularly interested in exploring the implications of the specific fears these films present, as well as in the articulation of a post- 9/11 neo-liberal subjectivity that lies at the heart of the most notorious examples.

We welcome papers on all aspects of horror in the digital age for a volume to be presented to a major UK or international publisher. We are particularly interested in papers that cover the following topics and/or films:

  • CCTV horror: My Little Eye (2002), Look (2007), I.C.U. (2009).
  • Techno-Ghosts: The Ringu series (1998-2000) and remakes (2002-2005), Kairo (2001) and Pulse series (2006-2008), In Memorium (2005), White Noise (2005), One Missed Call (2008), Lake Mungo (2008).
  • On-line/live snuff: Snuff-Movie (2005), Vacancy (2007), Untraceable (2008), Terror Trap (2010).
  • 'Found footage' horror: The Last Broadcast (1998), The Blair Witch Project (1999), Grave Encounters (2011), V/H/S (2012), Reel Evil (2012), The Chernobyl Diaries (2012).
  • Monster 'found footage': Cloverfield (2008), Troll Hunter (2010).
  • Handheld Survival Horror: the [Rec] series (2007-2014) and American remakes (2008-2011), Diary of the Dead (2007), The Zombie Diaries series (2006-2011).
  • New Extreme Cinema: Benny's Video (1992), Hidden (2005), The Life and Death of a Porno Gang (2009).
  • Viral and Webcam Horror: Vlog (2008), Megan is Missing (2011).
  • Mediated Exorcisms: The Last Exorcism series (2010-2013), Chronicles of an Exorcism (2008), The Devil Inside (2012).
  • Torture porn and reflectionist horror: Saw series (2004-2010), the Hostel series (2005-2011), A Serbian Film (2010), The Human Centipede II: Full Sequence (2011).
  • Video diary horror and mockumentaries: Zero Day (2003), The Last Horror Movie (2003), The Poughkeepsie Tapes (2007), Re-Cut (2010), Apollo 18 (2011), The Tunnel (2011), The Bay (2012), Occult (2014).

Abstracts of between 350 and 400 words for 5500-6500 chapters should be sent to X.Aldana-Reyes@mmu.ac.uk and L.Blake@mmu.ac.uk. The submission deadline is 8 April 2013.

cfp categories: film_and_televisionhumanities_computing_and_the_internetjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 50011Television Midwest Popular Culture and American Culture Associations' Annual Conference October 11-13, 2013, St. Louis, MissouriMidwest Popular Culture and American Culture Associationskatherine.tanski@lmc.gatech.edu1360193920film_and_televisioninterdisciplinarypopular_culturefull name / name of organization: Midwest Popular Culture and American Culture Associationscontact email: katherine.tanski@lmc.gatech.edu

Call for Papers: Television Midwest Popular Culture and American Culture Associations' Annual Conference October 11-13, 2013, St. Louis, Missouri http://www.mpcaaca.org
Abstract or Panel Proposal submission deadline: April 30th
Conference Hotel: St. Louis Union Station Hotel, 1820 Saint Louis Union Station, St. Louis, MO 63103 Tel: 1-314-621-5262

The Midwest Popular Culture and American Culture Associations' annual conference is an annual gathering of scholars across the disciplines. Panels are now forming for all of the MPCA/ACA individual subject areas, including the Television area.

The Television Area Chair invites interested scholars to submit papers on any aspect of television.
Possible topics of interest might include:

  • critical studies of individual programs such as SUPERNATURAL, DOCTOR WHO, BBC'S SHERLOCK, MERLIN, or DOWNTON ABBEY
  • serial narrative
  • rhetoric of television
  • second screen technologies
  • time-shifted viewing
  • television 2.0
  • history of television
  • television adaptation
  • "reboot" television
  • reception theories
  • transatlantic television
  • future of television
  • television effects or cultural impact
  • television and society
  • television artifacts and rituals

Scholars, teachers, professionals, and others interested in television are encouraged to participate. Graduate students and undergraduate students are also particularly welcome, with award opportunities for best graduate and undergraduate papers. If you wish to form your own television-focused panel, I will be glad to help facilitate your needs. Please submit 250-300 word abstract or panel proposal with names of all participants by April 30th to the conference database at http://submissions.mpcaaca.org Questions should be directed to Katherine Tanski, Television Area Chair, katherine.tanski@lmc.gatech.edu, Georgia Institute of Technology.

cfp categories: film_and_televisioninterdisciplinarypopular_culture 50012Call For Papers -- DISCOURSES OF MADNESS / DISCOURS DE LA FOLIE (Neohelicon, 43, 2016 / Guest Editor: R.-L. Etienne Barnett)Neohelicon (Guest-Editor: R.-L. Etienne Barnett)RL_Barnett@msn.com (primary) / RLEBarnett@editionsdegresecond.be (secondary)1360208574african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypostcolonialprofessional_topicsrenaissanceromantictheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Neohelicon (Guest-Editor: R.-L. Etienne Barnett)contact email: RL_Barnett@msn.com (primary) / RLEBarnett@editionsdegresecond.be (secondary)

 

PROSPECTUS

Contributions on any aspect of madness in (of, and) textuality are welcome for consideration. Possible areas of focus, among a plethora of other options: literary representations of the alienated mind; mad protagonists or mad writers; madness as a vehicle of exile, as a form of marginalization, of dissipation, of disintegration, of revelation or self-revelation; interpretations of madness as a manifestation of structure, style, rhetoric, narrative; madness as a reflection of cultural assumptions, values, prohibitions; madness, as prophetic, dionysiac, poetic, or other; the esthetics of madness; philosophical, ethical, ontological, epistemological, hermeneutic and esthetic implications of the narrative or discourse of madness.

From an alternative vantage point, one might question: how does the deviant mind-set of authorial figures and/or fictional characters determine the organization of time, space and plot in the narrative? How does the representation of delusional worlds differ from the representation of other "non-mad" mental acts (dreams, fantasies, aspirations) and from other fictional worlds (magic, imaginings, phantoms), if it does. Contributors are welcome to address these and other questions in a specific work, in a group of works, or in a more general/theoretical reflection, in and across any national tradition(s), literary movement(s) or œuvre(s).

ILLUMINATIONS

Do not mistake for wisdom these fantasies /Of your sick mind. (W. Soyinka)

I could spend my whole life prying loose the secrets of the insane. (A. Breton)

When we remember that we are all mad, the mysteries disappear and life stands explained. (M. Twain)

If we lose our sanity/We can but howl the lugubrious howl of idiots/The howl of the utterly lost/Howling their nowhere-ness. (D. H. Lawrence)

When life itself seems lunatic, who knows where madness lies? (Cervantes)

There is always some reason in madness. (Nietzsche)

No great mind has ever existed without a touch of madness. (Aristotle)

Behind their dark glass, the mad own nothing. (F. Scott Fitzgerald)

The madman will no longer be the exiled one, the one relegated to the margins of our cities, but rather he who becomes a stranger to the self, impugned for being who he is. (M. Foucault)

So long as man is protected by madness, he functions and flourishes. (E. Cioran)

Culture is perishing, as are we … in an avalanche of words, in sheer madness. (M. Kundera)

The most beautiful things are those that madness prompts and reason writes. (A. Gide)

Books have led some to learning and others to madness. (Petrarch)

What is life? A madness. What is life? An illusion, a shadow, a story. And the greatest good is yet minimal; for all life is a dream, and dreams themselves are only dreams. (Calderón de la Barca)

Where am I, I don't know, I'll never know, in the silence you don't know, you'll never know, you must go on, I can't go on, I'll go on. (S. Beckett)

Demoniac frenzy, moping melancholy, and moon-struck madness. (J. Milton)

SUBMISSIONS

Theoretical or applied contributions focused upon "discourses of madness" in the literary "arena"
are invited and will be accorded full and serious consideration.

Manuscripts in English, French German or Italian -- not to exceed twenty (25) double-spaced pages, including notes, bibliography and appendices, where applicable -- are welcome.
Contributions written in any but one's first (or native) language must be scrupulously reviewed, edited and proofed by a "native" specialist prior to submission.

Format and submission requirements: Papers must prepared in strict accordance with APA (not MLA) guidelines and are to be accompanied by an abstract and 6-8 key words or expressions in English. (A second abstract and set of key words in the language of the article, if not in English, is strongly recommended.)

Submit via email in the form of a WORD document (attachment) to: R.-L. Etienne Barnett (Guest-Editor) at: RL_Barnett@msn.com (primary submission address) with a second copy to RLEBarnett@editionsdegresecond.be(secondary submission address).

For further details on Neohelicon, refer to:
http://www.springer.com/education+%26+language/linguistics/journal/11059

SUBMISSION DEADLINE
OCTOBER 1, 2015

 

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypostcolonialprofessional_topicsrenaissanceromantictheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 50013Book Series: Science Fiction Television (ongoing)A. Bowdoin Van Riper/Scarecrow Pressabvanriper@gmail.com1360209567film_and_televisionpopular_culturescience_and_culturefull name / name of organization: A. Bowdoin Van Riper/Scarecrow Presscontact email: abvanriper@gmail.com

CALL FOR AUTHORS: Science Fiction Television

Scarecrow Press, a leading publisher of scholarly books on popular culture, is actively seeking new volumes for its recently launched "Science Fiction Television" book series. Proposals for monographs on neglected aspects of the field, and for single-author encyclopedias, are especially welcome.

Science fiction television has come into its own as a subject for scholarly inquiry, emerging from the shadow of science fiction film, but vast areas of the field remain unexplored. The definitive books on Dr. Who, The X Files, Babylon 5, and Stargate remain to be written, as do the first book-length studies of key figures such as Gerry Anderson and Glenn A. Larson, and television's handling of classic SF themes ranging from space travel and super-beings to parallel worlds and alien observers of the human condition.

Proposals on any aspect of science-fiction television are welcome, but ones dealing with the following topics would be viewed with particular interest:

* The SF television of Gerry Anderson

* Adapting print and film SF to television

* Long-form SF storytelling on television, from Babylon 5 to Fringe

* The history of SF television for children

* Japanese SF television (in Japan and the US)

Volumes in the series will typically run approximately 80,000 words, including notes and bibliography. Proposals should include a discussion of the volume's significance, its relationship to existing scholarly literature, intended readership, a proposed table of contents, estimated length, numbers of images, and projected timeline for completion.

Inquires and proposals may be directed to the Series Editor, A. Bowdoin Van Riper, at abvanriper@gmail.com. More information is available at: www.abvr.net/editing/sf_television

cfp categories: film_and_televisionpopular_culturescience_and_culture 50014Digital Defoe: Studies in Defoe & His ContemporariesThe Daniel Defoe Societyhollyfaithnelson@gmail.com; keellis@ilstu.edu1360210842cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytravel_writingfull name / name of organization: The Daniel Defoe Societycontact email: hollyfaithnelson@gmail.com; keellis@ilstu.edu

Digital Defoe: Studies in Defoe & His Contemporaries is accepting submissions for its fifth anniversary issue. Submissions are due by May 1, 2013.

Submissions on any aspect of the life and works of Daniel Defoe and his contemporaries are welcome.

A special section of the fifth issue will be dedicated to the topic of public intellectualism. Topics may include, but need not be limited to, the following:

• The concept of public intellectualism defined, as it pertains to eighteenth-century studies;

• The figure of the public intellectual in relevant texts or events past and present (for example, rhetoric about or of "the founding fathers" and the influence on past or contemporary politics);

• Public constructions of the past or particular historical concepts (for example, popular understanding of the eighteenth century and the beginnings of capitalism, liberty, individualism, etc.);

• The role of media, past and present, in constructions of or resistance to public intellectualism;

• Analyses of the public, the public sphere, crowds, swarms, mobs, etc.;

• The nature of publication, past and present, and its effects on the field, intellectualism, education, etc.;

• Cultural attitudes toward intellectualism, historical and current, and their influences on eighteenth-century studies;

• The state of public intellectualism during the long eighteenth century;

• Blogs, wikis, Facebook pages, digital projects, television, film, video games, and other social media that communicate findings in, or the cultures of, eighteenth-century studies to larger audiences;

• The role of the teacher as public intellectual/the classroom as intellectual public space;

• The impact of public intellectualism on particular fields relevant to eighteenth-century studies, such as disability studies;

• Children's and adolescent literature as sites for public intellectualism;

• The independent scholar and public intellectualism.

Digital Defoe: Studies in Defoe & His Contemporaries is a peer-reviewed online journal celebrating the works and culture of the eighteenth century and also welcomes multimedia submissions that push the boundaries of scholarship in our field as well as more traditional essays, reviews, notes, and dissertation and conference abstracts. Submissions should be e-mailed to Katherine Ellison (keellis@ilstu.edu) and Holly Faith Nelson (hnelson@sfu.ca) by May 1, 2013. Please send print manuscripts as Word .doc files following the style guide on our website. For multimedia submissions, please send inquiries about file size and format to Katherine Ellison.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytravel_writing 50015[UPDATE] At Face Value: Re-thinking Surfaces, Friends of English Southland Graduate Conference at UCLAUniversity of California, Los Angelessurfaces2013@gmail.com1360215556african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: University of California, Los Angelescontact email: surfaces2013@gmail.com

CFP: Friends of English Southland Graduate Conference at UCLA

At Face Value: Re-thinking Surfaces

Friday, May 31, 2013 at UCLA

Keynote speakers:
Professor Rachel Lee (UCLA)
Professor Daniel Tiffany (USC)

Sir Peter: Aye, ever improving himself!--Mr. Surface, Mr. Surface...Well, well, that's proper; and you make even your screen a source of knowledge...

Joseph Surface: Oh, yes, I find great use in that screen.

-Richard Brinsley Sheridan, The School for Scandal (IV.3)

What does it mean to take something "at face value?" Recent literary scholarship has attempted to reclaim the notion of "surface" in the face of critical tendencies to relegate surface to the superficial and therefore the inconsequential. Such scholarly approaches have taken a number of different forms, ranging from post-suspicious inquiry (Felski) and reparative reading (Sedgwick), to distance reading (Moretti), object-oriented criticism (Latour), and systems theory (Luhmann). Inspired by this recent critical turn, this conference proposes a reorientation of our cultural predisposition towards depth. "Resurfacing" the surface seeks the destabilization of binaries such as true/false, spiritual/corporeal, eternal/ephemeral, complex/simple. Surfaces have been relegated to the realm of the slight, the shallow, the casual or unexamined, the insignificant. We ask: how can we challenge, disrupt, and reconfigure the idea of the surface as we have come to understand it, and what implications for the field of literary study would such a critical move have?

A critical reconsideration or re-theorization demands investigation into broad-ranging literary representations and treatments of surfaces. For example, can the notion of the surface productively counter orthodox understandings of interiority, allegory, symbol, or metaphor? How do literary texts contend with surface (and depth) in relation to categories of identification like race, gender, or disability? How might a serious consideration of surface help us (re)value less popular genres? What is the relationship between surface, bodies, and materiality? What about between surface and wholeness? How does an examination of surface help us to negotiate our own affective attachments to texts?

These are just a few possible lines of inquiry, so we welcome any papers bearing creative relationships to the theme of surfaces, including (but not limited to):

Allegory, symbol, and metaphor
Character
Lyricism
Performance Studies
Environment, geology, & geography
Things, objects, & material culture
Fashion and consumer culture
Critical race studies
Disability studies
Gender, queer, and sexuality studies
Pop culture
Popular genres
Visual culture
Critical approaches such as surface reading, neophenomenology, aesthetic theory, eco-criticism, affect theory, systems theory, and distance reading

Paper presentations should be between 15-20 minutes long. Please email conference abstracts (250-300 words) to surfaces2013@gmail.com by MARCH 1, 2013.

Conference Website:
http://www.english.ucla.edu/news-a-events-/southland

Facebook Page:
www.facebook.com/FriendsOfEnglishSouthlandGraduateConference2013

*We would like to acknowledge that our conference shares lines of inquiry with that of our colleagues at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, "Between Surface and Depth" (MadLit 2013) taking place February 28-March 1. We very much encourage and welcome papers that may wish to continue conversations begun at MadLit!*

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 50016"Age, Identity, and Culture in Global Diasporas." PAMLA Nov 1-3, 2013Weihsin Guiweihsin.gui@ucr.edu1360218612african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitypostcolonialtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Weihsin Guicontact email: weihsin.gui@ucr.edu

This special session has been approved for the 2013 Pacific Ancient and Modern Languages Association (PAMLA) Conference in San Diego, California on November 1-3, 2013.

We are interested in papers that examine literary texts and cultural discourses that represent and examine the relations between diasporas and their homelands and hostlands through cultural identification and historical-temporal differences or "age".

As Vijay Mishra observes in regards to the Indian diaspora and its literature, there is both an "old" and a "new" Indian diaspora produced in different historical and economic moments, distinct from but imbricated with each other. We wish to consider if this "old-new" distinction applies to other diasporas and their literary and cultural representations (such as the African and Chinese diasporas, among others). Furthermore, we wish to consider Gabriel Sheffer's distinction between "transnational communities" and "ethnonational diasporas," where the latter is more closely linked to the homeland through "long-distance nationalism" while the former are better characterized as "informal non-organized networks." Although all diasporas are dispersed across borders, the degree of cultural identification exhibited by individuals or groups with either a cohesive ethnonationalism or a looser transnational community is an open question and bears investigation.

We invite papers on literature produced by writers concerned with diasporic or postcolonial cultural identities, transnational communities, ethnonationalism, and globalization as problem and possibility. Comparative papers on two writers within one diaspora expressing different "old-new" perspectives, or about one writer whose work combines "old-new" and "ethnonational-transnational" perspectives are especially welcome.

Please send questions and proposals (approximately 500 words) to Weihsin Gui at weihsin.gui "at" ucr.edu. Proposals will also need to submitted on the PAMLA website at www.pamla.org when it becomes active. Deadline: March 31, 2013.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitypostcolonialtwentieth_century_and_beyond 50017[UPDATE] Transpacific Memory: Life Writing across the Western Divide2014 Chicago MLA special sessionMary Goodwin at profgood@hotmail.com.1360220153americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialromantictheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: 2014 Chicago MLA special sessioncontact email: Mary Goodwin at profgood@hotmail.com.

While Transpacific Studies often focus on Asian diasporic writing, this panel seeks essays on life writing emerging from travel across the Pacific in all directions, East-West, West-East, North-South. Following Yunte Huang's lead in *Transpacific Imaginations* and *Transpacific Displacements*, we might expand the definition of transpacific to encompass modern Western expatriate memoirs such as Mark Salzman's *Iron and Silk*; Simon Manchester's *The River at the Centre of the World*; Nathan Gray's *First Pass Under Heaven*; Mark Kitto's *Chasing China*; Rachel DeWoskin's *Foreign Babes in Beijing*; Angela Carter in Japan; Bruce S. Feiler's *Learning to Bow*; and life writing by missionaries, diplomats, teachers and businesspeople in Taiwan, Hong Kong, China and Korea. Also welcome are papers that take a fresh or macro view of Transpacific life writing by Asian emigrants to the US, Canada and Central and South America. Please send abstract and a brief bio by March 15 to Mary Goodwin at profgood@hotmail.com.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialromantictheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 50018Update Representing social classes in films on television and in cinema in English-speaking countriesRennes 2 University, Francenicole.cloarec@univ-rennes1.fr ; Delphine.Letort@univ-lemans.fr ; david_haigron@yahoo.fr ; renee.dickason@orange.fr1360228450african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialtheoryfull name / name of organization: Rennes 2 University, Francecontact email: nicole.cloarec@univ-rennes1.fr ; Delphine.Letort@univ-lemans.fr ; david_haigron@yahoo.fr ; renee.dickason@orange.fr

Call for papers-
University of Rennes 2, France – 10-11 October 2013
An international conference organised by research units ACE (EA 1796 at Rennes 2 University) and 3L.AM (EA 4335 University of Le Mans)
In partnership with :
HCTI (EA 4249 at the universities of Bretagne Occidentale and Bretagne Sud)
ERIBIA (EA 2610 at Caen University)
LIDILE (EA 3874 common to Rennes 2 and Rennes 1)

Keynote speakers:
Jonathan Bignell, Professor of Television and Film, University of Reading, UK
Richard Butsch, Professor of Sociology & American Studies, Rider University, New Jersey, US
Michael T Martin, Professor of American Studies, Communication and Culture, Indiana University, Bloomington, US
Andy Medhurst, Senior Lecturer in Media, Film and Cultural Studies, University of Sussex, UK

On becoming Prime Minister in 1990, John Major promised to build a "genuinely classless society". This aspiration sounds all the more daunting and surprising since the British have always appeared so obsessed with class. The notion of social class is now defined not only by someone's occupation and the expression of their social status in language for instance, but also by their lifestyle, their social connections and their habits of cultural consumption (Bourdieu's notion of habitus). The recent advent of David Cameron and Nick Clegg at the head of the government has been described as the "return of the toffs", as both leaders hail from upper class families and have attended prestigious public schools and universities. Conversely, journalists and sociologists have documented the emergence of a new social category called the "chavs", loud, aggressive working class youth. Unsurprisingly, both television and cinema films bear witness to this enduring fascination for class distinctions: from the lasting popular success of television series such as Upstairs, Downstairs (LWT, 1971-1975, updated in 2010 by the BBC) or the multi-award-winning Downton Abbey (ITV, 2010) to the character of Vicky Pollard in Little Britain (BBC, 2003-06), from the nostalgic indulgence of heritage films to the scathing criticisms of films following Ken Loach's social realism, films have shaped and challenged stereotypes that articulate the ideological discourse on class.

In stark contrast to the British class system, other English-speaking countries are geared towards a classless society. In the United States, the American dream and the myth of the self-made man hold the promise of an open society where people have the same opportunity to climb the social ladder. As a tremendous dream machine that has also permitted spectacular social achievements, Hollywood nourishes and sustains the myth of an open society while generally eschewing realistic representation of working class living conditions. Some films do take into account workers' issues. Nevertheless, images of the middle class have prevailed along with racial and political discourses that contribute to marginalizing other classes - be they the ruling dynasties or the underclass. Indeed, cinema and television dramas more often than not mirror the mainstream ideology by extolling the virtues of the middle class, their social aspirations and their conservative values. However, archetypal figures of success have also been parodied or subverted in films produced in times of economic crises or by minority filmmakers.

The aim of the conference is to explore representations of social classes in fiction and non-fiction cinema and television films made in English-speaking countries. Our purpose is to study how films document a social reality that in return seeps into their narrative, how they contribute to building a collective and stereotypical representation of social groups, or how they question and undermine these representations.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:
- The representation of class in different types of medium (cinema / television) and genres (fiction and nonfiction films)
- The representations of social groups and their ideological underpinning
- The representation of class cultures
- Spectatorship, film reception and social classes
- The relationship between the aesthetics of kitsch and class
- The representation of labour conflicts and social unrest
- The relations between class and gender, class and generations, class and ethnic minorities

Proposals (250 words) along with a short biography should be sent by March 1st 2013 to: nicole.cloarec@univ-rennes1.fr Delphine.Letort@univ-lemans.fr david_haigron@yahoo.fr renee.dickason@orange.fr

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialtheory 50019Transnational Professional Relations in the Twentieth CenturyStephan Petzold (University of Leeds)s.petzold@leeds.ac.uk1360228994cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Stephan Petzold (University of Leeds)contact email: s.petzold@leeds.ac.uk

'Transnational Professional Relations in the Twentieth Century', Workshop at the University of Leeds, United Kingdom, 20-21 June 2013

The analysis of transnational relations has been a promising and increasingly prominent field of study that examines interconnections between societies. In shifting the focus away from the arena of high politics, political elites and governments, the new approach has allowed researchers to look at cross-border exchanges of people and ideas from below. This new dimension of historical study has not only broadened the empirical terrain, it has also begun to initiate a profound reconceptualisation of national and international histories. So far, most of the work in transnational history has investigated intercultural transfers, non-governmental organisations and transnational networks.

This workshop aims to complement these existing strands in the study of transnationalism by examining the phenomenon of transnational professionalism. We approach transnational relations from the perspective of how professionals have transcended national boundaries. In particular, we are seeking to explore what impact individual professionals, professional groups and professionalism in general have had on transnational and international relations. The workshop brings together experts who study individual and collective actors from different professional backgrounds, for example businessmen, economists, academics and intellectuals, scientists, lawyers and artists. We also wish to contribute to a conceptualization of transnational professional relations and explore their analytical potential for a more complex understanding of transnationalism in the twentieth century.

We invite the submission of paper proposals from researchers from different disciplinary backgrounds. This may include specialists in transnational and international history, social and cultural history, intellectual history, business and economic history, literary studies, film studies, as well as the history of science, technology and medicine, anthropology, postcolonial studies and cultural studies. Paper proposals should include an abstract of about 300 words, a short biography and contact details. Please send proposals by 1 March 2013 to the workshop organisers. We aim to offer support for travel and accommodation to invited speakers.

Ian Gwinn, University of Liverpool, i.gwinn@liv.ac.uk
Dr Christoph Laucht, University of Leeds, c.laucht@leeds.ac.uk
Dr Stephan Petzold, University of Leeds, s.petzold@leeds.ac.uk

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 50023Call for Papers - IJORCS - Volume 3, Issue 3International Journal of Research in Computer Scienceeditor@ijorcs.org1360231213general_announcementsjournals_and_collections_of_essaysfull name / name of organization: International Journal of Research in Computer Sciencecontact email: editor@ijorcs.org

IMPORTANT DATES

Deadline: 1st April 2013

Notification: 15th April 2013

Revision: 25th April 2013

Publication: 5th May 2013

IJORCS is now accepting manuscripts for its next issue, Volume 3, Issue 3. Authors are encouraged to contribute to the journal by submitting articles that clarify new research results, projects, surveying works and industrial experiences that describe significant advances in field of computer science.

Topics Covered

  • Ad Hoc networks
  • Autonomous Computing
  • Advanced Computing Architectures
  • Bio-Informatics & Biotechnology
  • Cloud Computing and Applications
  • Computational intelligence
  • Comp Architecture
  • Cryptography
  • Data Base Management
  • Data Mining Data
  • Digital signal processing theory
  • E-Commerce
  • Fuzzy algorithms & Fuzzy logics
  • Information Technology
  • Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
  • Image analysis and processing
  • Multimedia applications
  • Neural networks
  • Information and data security
  • Knowledge based systems
  • Medical imaging
  • Natural Language Processing
  • Real-time systems
  • Remote Sensing
  • Supply Chain Management
  • Virtual reality
  • Wireless technology
  • Context-Aware Computing
  • Software Engineering

Submission: Only original research papers will be considered. Authors are requested to submit their papers through the submission form available at: www.ijorcs.org/submit-paper or send it through email to: submission [at] ijorcs . org

cfp categories: general_announcementsjournals_and_collections_of_essays 50024Female Superheroes Collection of Essays Deadline: June 1stNadine Farghaly Nadine.Farghaly@gmx.net1360232234african-americanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Nadine Farghaly contact email: Nadine.Farghaly@gmx.net

From "A" like Aquagirl to "Z" like Zatana. More than 200 female superheroes have been around for the last 70 years. It all started with Fletcher Hanks's minor character Fantomah in the 1940s Fiction House's Jungle Comics #2 and from that moment on the seal was broken. Female superhero after superhero made their appearances on paper as well as on screen. These female superheroes were simultaneously shaping and mirroring society; with the rise of second wave feminism some of these female characters changed as well. Suddenly, they could be more self-assured and more forceful; Marvel Girl transformed from an average superhero to the very powerful Phoenix. Later on, the years 2010/2011 witnessed a huge transformation in the graphic novels realms. Marvel, DC, and other publishers reinvented their superhero franchises; new alliances and relationships were formed, former friends became enemies and lovers who had been an item for decades were suddenly reassigned to other love interests. This new development in the graphic novel universes desperately calls for a close investigation.
Times have changed since the first comics became a mass medium in the 1920s. And while fans' opinions differ greatly about the advantages and disadvantages of these reboots, it must be acknowledged that this will not only be a very exciting, but also eye-opening time for laymen and scholars alike. What kind of changes will their beloved characters have to endure? How will these new superheroes be presented? Are they still going to mimic society or are they trying to push society to the next level? How should these reinterpretations be assessed? What is gained and what is lost, not only for these superheroes, but also for popular culture?

While DC started its revamp in September 2011, Marvel started his in spring 2012. This volume would focus on the reinvention of the female superheroes, and therefore, it will be the first of its kind.

This publication aims to examine these heroines in literature, art, and other media to question issues concerning sexuality, gender, identity, social change and feminism. It will provide an interdisciplinary stage for the development of innovative and creative research and examine this vital and complex female protagonist in all her various manifestations and cultural meanings.

What to Send:

300 - 500 word abstracts (or complete articles, if available) and CVs should be submitted by June 1, 2013. If an abstract is accepted for the collection, a full draft of the essay (5000 – 8000 words) will be required by December 1, 2013.

Abstracts and final articles should be submitted to: Nadine.Farghaly@gmx.net receipt of the abstracts will be send within one week. In case you do not receive an email, please resend your proposal.

cfp categories: african-americanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 50025Female Superheroes Collection of Essays Deadline: June 1stNadine Farghaly Nadine.Farghaly@gmx.net1360232555african-americanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Nadine Farghaly contact email: Nadine.Farghaly@gmx.net

From "A" like Aquagirl to "Z" like Zatana. More than 200 female superheroes have been around for the last 70 years. It all started with Fletcher Hanks's minor character Fantomah in the 1940s Fiction House's Jungle Comics #2 and from that moment on the seal was broken. Female superhero after superhero made their appearances on paper as well as on screen. These female superheroes were simultaneously shaping and mirroring society; with the rise of second wave feminism some of these female characters changed as well. Suddenly, they could be more self-assured and more forceful; Marvel Girl transformed from an average superhero to the very powerful Phoenix. Later on, the years 2010/2011 witnessed a huge transformation in the graphic novels realms. Marvel, DC, and other publishers reinvented their superhero franchises; new alliances and relationships were formed, former friends became enemies and lovers who had been an item for decades were suddenly reassigned to other love interests. This new development in the graphic novel universes desperately calls for a close investigation.
Times have changed since the first comics became a mass medium in the 1920s. And while fans' opinions differ greatly about the advantages and disadvantages of these reboots, it must be acknowledged that this will not only be a very exciting, but also eye-opening time for laymen and scholars alike. What kind of changes will their beloved characters have to endure? How will these new superheroes be presented? Are they still going to mimic society or are they trying to push society to the next level? How should these reinterpretations be assessed? What is gained and what is lost, not only for these superheroes, but also for popular culture?

While DC started its revamp in September 2011, Marvel started his in spring 2012. This volume would focus on the reinvention of the female superheroes, and therefore, it will be the first of its kind.

This publication aims to examine these heroines in literature, art, and other media to question issues concerning sexuality, gender, identity, social change and feminism. It will provide an interdisciplinary stage for the development of innovative and creative research and examine this vital and complex female protagonist in all her various manifestations and cultural meanings.

What to Send:

300 - 500 word abstracts (or complete articles, if available) and CVs should be submitted by June 1, 2013. If an abstract is accepted for the collection, a full draft of the essay (5000 – 8000 words) will be required by December 1, 2013.

Abstracts and final articles should be submitted to: Nadine.Farghaly@gmx.net receipt of the abstracts will be send within one week. In case you do not receive an email, please resend your proposal.

cfp categories: african-americanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 50026Eurasian Multidisciplinary Forum Tbilisi, Georgia 24-26, October 2013 Eurasian Multidisciplinary Forum Tbilisi, Georgia 24-26, October 2013,European Scientific Institute and the University Grigol Robakidze,contact@emforum.eu1360235464african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Eurasian Multidisciplinary Forum Tbilisi, Georgia 24-26, October 2013,European Scientific Institute and the University Grigol Robakidze,contact email: contact@emforum.eu

http://www.emforum.eu/
Eurasian Multidisciplinary Forum
Tbilisi, Georgia 24-26, October 2013

This International summit event is a result of the academic cooperation over the past several years between the European Scientific Institute and the University Grigol Robakidze, expressed through several successfully accomplished projects, primarily in the area of joint publication of scientific works.

Taking into consideration the increasingly popular process of "Universities Internationalization", the Forum will unite the scientists of the whole world, who by presenting their scientific attainments in various academic areas will contribute to the development of the scientific thought.

Promoting the Interdisciplinary concept, publications of all academic areas are welcome. The presentation of the publications will be conducted in several parallel sessions, on which the authors will have the opportunity for an open debate, as well as an exchange of the best practices in their areas of expertise.

The event supports and promotes the open access policy by publication of its scientific discoveries. The scientific explorations obtained by this conference will be published in the international scientific magazine European Scientific Journal (ESJ) and on its website they will be completely available free to the entire academic audience.
he authors of all the accepted papers on the conference will be given the opportunity to present them in the very University premises.

Authors that will not be personally present on the event will be given the opportunity, on their request, to make an online presentation for the present members.

The authors are not obliged to present their works (personally or online).

Please send your papers via e-mail:
contact@emforum.eu

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 50027[UPDATE] Kennesaw State University's Second World Literature and Film Conference / April 5 - 7, 2013Larrie Dudenhoeffer/Kennesaw State Universityldudenho@kennesaw.edu1360242748african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Larrie Dudenhoeffer/Kennesaw State Universitycontact email: ldudenho@kennesaw.edu

Deadline for proposals has been extended to March 2, 2013.

Judith Butler, in the recent monograph Frames of War, argues that the mass media in times of crisis, whether from war, natural disaster, or economic meltdown, iterates certain normative values that shape the ways we react to the loss of others' lives. In short, these media images work to normalize the conditions that make some lives "obviously" worth grieving over and others not. However, as she also contends, they do so in non-deterministic ways: "to call the frame into question is to show that the frame never quite contained the scene it was meant to limn […] The frame never quite determined precisely what it is we see, think, recognize, and apprehend. Something exceeds the frame that troubles our sense of reality."
The 2013 World Literature and Film Conference at Kennesaw State University, in responding to the ethic of Butler's work, will call into question the ways that certain texts frame women's lives, as they mediate, although never fully capture, our sense of women's embattlement in "scenes" fraught with economic shocks, sociopolitical upsets, and revolutionary violence. We thus invite scholars across disciplines to consider the representation of women in relation to the following topics, especially as they concern intermedia (e.g., novels, films, music, poetry, architecture, etc.) and transnational frames for valuing others:
 The role of feminist aesthetics and criticism in making sense of geopolitical issues
 The effects of revolution, catastrophe, or free market fetishism on women
 The intersection of gender with race, class, age, sexuality, ethnicity, or disability
 Queer, straight, or asexual expressions of women in transcultural contexts
 The objectification of women in media utterances
 The fear of menstruation or castration in media representations of women
 The subjectivation of women in non-Western contexts
 The treatment of women and women's issues in Leftist or Rightist discourse
 Abjection or the monstrous feminine in relation to torture, terror, and collective trauma
 Textual constructions of mothering, matriarchy, or infertility
 Scientific, religious, or pornographic constructions of female embodiment
 The male or female gaze
Conference papers should read no longer than 20 minutes. Please send a 300-word abstract and a 50-word biographical sketch to Larrie Dudenhoeffer at ldudenho@kennesaw.edu or Khalil Elayan at keleyan@kennesaw.edu by March 2, 2013. Kennesaw State University is located in Kennesaw, GA (North-metro Atlanta area). The conference is tentatively scheduled for April 5th (the reception) through April 7th.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 50028One World, One Speed? Globalization, Neoliberalism, and the Nation (MLA 2014, Chicago)Juan Menesesjmeneses@purdue.edu1360251316cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfilm_and_televisioninterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Juan Menesescontact email: jmeneses@purdue.edu

Our lives seem to be marked by the fact that the neoliberal clock can be heard ticking throughout the planet as it sets the pace of globalization. Paul Virilio, for instance, has argued that "what is being effectively globalized by instantaneity is time. Everything now happens within the perspective of real time: henceforth we are deemed to live in a 'one-time-system.'" Yet it also seems that globalization advances with different intensities throughout the world, contributing to what could be called a "heterogeneous synchronicity." This proposed special panel seeks papers that investigate specific locales where neoliberalism advances at a different speed with respect to the rest of the world. Are there any possible radical alternatives to the synchronicity of globalization? Can national or regional tempos slow down the speed of globalization? How can these tempos be productive for the construction of an alternative global world? What are the advantages and setbacks of an out-of-pace global movement?

Participants may consider, among others, the following topics and issues:

• National time vs. geological time
• Transnational simultaneity
• Transhistorical connections
• International trade
• Migratory movements
• Human-land relations and environmentalism
• Workers' movements
• Postcolonialism and Neoimperialism
• Spaces of resistance
• Urban development vs. ecological preservation
• Repetition and cyclicality
• Information dissemination
• Pro-democracy activism

Papers that engage with works of literature, film, comics, digital media, and other forms of cultural representation to illustrate their arguments are highly encouraged.

Please note that this is a proposed special panel and is not guaranteed by MLA.

Please send abstracts to Juan Meneses (jmeneses@purdue.edu) by March 15, 2013.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfilm_and_televisioninterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 50029GENDER ROLES IN POSTMODERN WORLD Dr Alka Singh Assistant Professor of English, Department of Humanities and Other Studies Dr Ram Manohar Lohiya National Law University, Lucknow LDA Scheme, Kanpur Road, Lucknow, UP, India Pin- 226012 blueeyemini@gmail.com 1360258632cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturefull name / name of organization: Dr Alka Singh Assistant Professor of English, Department of Humanities and Other Studies Dr Ram Manohar Lohiya National Law University, Lucknow LDA Scheme, Kanpur Road, Lucknow, UP, India Pin- 226012 contact email: blueeyemini@gmail.com

RE ANNOUNCEMENT
Call for Papers
GENDER ROLES IN POSTMODERN WORLD

Editor : Dr Alka Singh

Assistant Professor of English, Department of Humanities and Other Studies
Dr Ram Manohar Lohiya National Law University, Lucknow
LDA Scheme, Kanpur Road, Lucknow, UP, India Pin- 226012
blueeyemini@gmail.com

Early societies had rigid roles for men and women with attributes, labeled as being masculine and feminine. Man was considered as provider of basic necessities for family, and woman as the child bearer and caretaker of home. Till recently women were accorded the role of the inferior sex and prized possession of man. The changes and flexibility in gender roles which are being evident today has its roots in the changing social structure.
While the acceptance of man's gender role has been willingly taken up by women, the same does not always hold true for men. The present scenario is still that while a girl is groomed to become an efficient career woman as well as an efficient house maker, men are expected to excel mainly in professional fields. The situation is that while any effort from men to undertake a domestic job is welcomed and assisted by their counterparts, any such effort by women in the professional field is still seen as a threat to male supremacy. Hence men do not have to struggle hard to prove their worth, women most of the times have to work harder to prove not just that they are efficient but that they can work much harder, and deliver the results.
Lately the domain of feminism has expanded to include the social and professional fields, traditional notions about gender roles are undergoing transformation that has been mainly because of education. An open and educated society is paving the way for role-swapping which seems to be gaining ground in the highly demanding developmental social structure. Domestic life has become almost unthinkable without flexibility in gender roles. While men are beginning to shed their inhibitions about working in the kitchen women are already working late hours. The changing trends are reflected in men and women taking up unconventional work such as pilots and astronauts while men are honing their skills as chefs and fashion designers.
Changing roles to accommodate the social or professional pressures has become a common phenomenon. However it is in the urban centers that the flexibility is most evident. The rural society though in transition has a long way to go in this context. The flexibility in gender roles needs to be taken to the extent where finally the concept of respective gender roles is done away with.
The proposed book (Collection of essays) is open to scholarly papers on different aspects of Gender roles in postmodern world as mentioned above, and from any other perspective.
Full-text manuscripts between 3,000 and 8,000 words in MLA style (with parenthetical internal citations, a Works Cited page, minimal footnotes, and in Times New Roman 12-point font), should be emailed as Microsoft Word attachments to: blueeyemini@gmail.com
Last Date for a 200 words abstract: March 31, 2013
Last Date for Full Paper: June 30, 2013.
Please include a one-paragraph bio with all manuscripts. Topic inquiries are welcome prior to full-text submission.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culture 50030French Feminism: Contexts and ConnotationsDr R. P. Singh Associate Professor of English Department of English and Modern European Languages University of Lucknow Lucknow - 226007, U P, INDIA Cell : +91 94151 59137 Email : rpsingh.lu@gmail.com rpsingh.lu@gmail.com 1360258797gender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Dr R. P. Singh Associate Professor of English Department of English and Modern European Languages University of Lucknow Lucknow - 226007, U P, INDIA Cell : +91 94151 59137 Email : rpsingh.lu@gmail.com contact email: rpsingh.lu@gmail.com

French Feminism: Contexts and Connotations
Contact Email: rpsingh.lu@gmail.com
The proposed book seeks to examine contemporary French feminist thoughts in general and of Monique Wittig, Luce Irigary, and Helen Cixous in particular in view of their anti¬-essentialist orientation toward linguistics and psychoanalysis. Monique Wittig's fictional work Les Gueilleres, published in 1968 not only reflected a very strong defined lesbian feminist orientation but also developed an anti-essentialist orientation towards language that undermined stable subjected positions. Somewhat later, feminist writers would begin exploring what has become known as ecriture feminine. The proposed book welcomes scholarly papers on different aspects of French Feminism.
Full-text manuscripts between 3,000 and 8,000 words in MLA style (with parenthetical internal citations, a Works Cited page, minimal footnotes, and in Times New Roman 12-point font), should be emailed as Microsoft Word attachments to :

Dr R. P. Singh
Associate Professor of English
Department of English and
Modern European Languages
University of Lucknow
Lucknow - 226007, U P, INDIA
Cell : +91 94151 59137
Email : rpsingh.lu@gmail.com

Last Date for a 200 words abstract: March 31,2013
Last Date for Full Paper : June 30,2013.
Please include a one-paragraph bio with all manuscripts. Topic inquiries are welcome prior to full-text submission.

cfp categories: gender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 50031NWSA 2013: Aging Studies/Aging Students: The Politics of Age and the Feminist ClassroomMelanie Cattrell, Western Carolina University macattrell@wcu.edu1360266705gender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_compositionfull name / name of organization: Melanie Cattrell, Western Carolina University contact email: macattrell@wcu.edu

CFP for the National Women's Studies Association (NWSA) Conference
Cincinnati, Ohio, November 7-10, 2013
Abstract deadline: February 15, 2013

In accordance with this year's theme of Negotiating Points of Encounter and subtheme of Practices of Effecting Change, this panel seeks presentations that examine the intersection of Aging Studies and pedagogy. As feminist educators, how do we think about aging in our classroom?

Presentations may include (but are not limited to) the following issues: When we discuss race, gender, class, and sexuality, do we also discuss age as an intersectional point of identity? If so, how? How do we speak about age in Women's/Gender Studies Courses, and what texts do we use during this process? How do we include Aging Studies in our core classes, such English 101 or Biology 101? What role does age play in the way we relate to our students? What impact do students of a "non-traditional" age have in the classroom?

Send 150-250 word abstracts with a title by February 15, 2013, to Melanie Cattrell at macattrell@wcu.edu. Please include your full name, institutional affiliation (if applicable), mailing address, and email address.

cfp categories: gender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_composition 50032Women, Work, and the Web: How the Web Creates Entrepreneurial OpportunitiesCarol Smallwoodsmallwood@tm.net1360267379gender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetpopular_cultureprofessional_topicsfull name / name of organization: Carol Smallwoodcontact email: smallwood@tm.net

Book Publisher: Scarecrow Press

Co-editor: Carol SmallwoodCo-ed., Women on Poetry: Writing, Revising, Publishing and Teaching (McFarland, 2012) on Poets & Writers Magazine "List of Best Books for Writers." Writing After Retirement: Tips by Successful Retired Writers forthcoming from Scarecrow Press.

Co-editor: Joan GelfandDevelopment Chair for the Women's National Book Association, member of the National Book Critics Circle, Joan blogs regularly for the Huffington Post, teaches writing, and is an award winning author.

Seeking chapters of unpublished work from writers in the United States and Canada for an anthology. We are interested in such topics as: Women Founding Companies Existing Only on the Web; Women Working on the Web With Young Children or Physical Disabilities; Woman's Studies Resources and Curriculum Development Webmasters; Women as Founding Editors of Webzines and Blogs; Surveys/Interviews of Women on the Web.

Chapters of 3,000-4,000 words (up to 3 co-authors) on how the Internet has opened doors, leveled the playing field and provided new opportunities for women, are all welcome. Practical, how-to-do-it, anecdotal and innovative writing based on experience. We are interested in communicating how women make money on the Web, further their careers and the status of women. One complimentary copy per chapter, discount on additional orders.

Please e-mail two chapter topics each described in two sentences by March 28, 2013, along with a brief bio to smallwood@tm.net Please place INTERNET/Last Name on the subject line; if co-authored, paste bio sketches for each author.

cfp categories: gender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetpopular_cultureprofessional_topics 50033Writing After Retirement: Tips by Successful Retired WritersCarol Smallwoodsmallwood@tm.net1360267612general_announcementspopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositiontwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Carol Smallwoodcontact email: smallwood@tm.net

Book Publisher: Scarecrow Press

Co-editor: Carol Smallwood co-edited Women on Poetry: Writing, Revising, Publishing and Teaching (McFarland, 2012), on Poets & Writers Magazine's "List of Best Books for Writers"; edited Pre- & Post-Retirement Tips for Librarians (American Library Association, 2012).

Co-editor: Dr. Christine Redman-Waldeyer, Assistant Professor, Coordinator of the Journalism Option Program, Passaic County Community College, Paterson, New Jersey; Editor/Founder, Adanna Literary Journal; Author, Eve Asks (Muse-Pie Press, 2011).

An anthology of unpublished 3,000-4,000 word chapters by successful, retired writers from the U.S. and Canada (up to 3 co-authors) previously following other careers than writing. Looking for topics as: Business Aspects of Writing, Writing as a New Career, Networking, Using Life Experience, Finding Your Niche, Getting Published, Following Dreams Put on Hold, Privacy and Legal Issues, Working With Editors, Time Management. With living longer, early retirement, popularity of memoir writing, this is a how-to for baby boomers who now have time to write. Compensation: one complimentary copy per chapter, discount on additional copies.

Please e-mail two chapter topics each described in two sentences by March 28, 2013 with brief pasted bio to smallwood@tm.net placing RETIREMENT/Last Name on the subject line. If co-authored, pasted bios for each.

cfp categories: general_announcementspopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositiontwentieth_century_and_beyond 50034On the Road: Pilgrims and Fellow-TravellersChristian Literary Studies Groupsecretary@clsg.org1360270313graduate_conferencesmedievalreligionrenaissancetwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Christian Literary Studies Groupcontact email: secretary@clsg.org

Corpus Christi College, Oxford
Saturday 2 November 2013
Conference webpage: http://www.clsg.org/html/conference.html

Call for papers, deadline 31 May
Although pilgrims were originally no more than wanderers or travellers, journeys with spiritual significance have long been undertaken and narrated. The idea of travelling with a spiritual intent, found in the Bible, has been modified and applied in many ways since Constantine's mother Helena visited Biblical sites in the early 4th century. John Bunyan's protagonist was counter-cultural in that pilgrimage was regarded as discredited when he wrote his allegory. But the theme lives, or marches on in secular writing.

Offers of papers to be read at the conference, and subsequently printed in The Glass, are invited before the deadline 31 May 2013. Papers will focus on Christian topics and should have a reading length of 25 minutes. Time will allow up to five papers to be presented during the day. Please send a provisional title and short paragraph (an abstract isn't expected of something not yet written) stating how you will approach your topic, adding some information about your background, to Dr Roger Kojecký: secretary@clsg.org

Christian Literary Studies Group: exploring Christian and Biblical themes in literature
www.clsg.org

cfp categories: graduate_conferencesmedievalreligionrenaissancetwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 50035Writing and Artwork for the Minetta Review's Spring 2013 Issue (by March 15, 2013)The Minetta Reviewminettasubmit@gmail.com1360272061cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarypoetrypopular_culturescience_and_culturefull name / name of organization: The Minetta Reviewcontact email: minettasubmit@gmail.com

The Minetta Review is a literary and arts publication managed by undergraduate students at New York University. Print editions are made available free of charge to the student body and to bookshops in Greenwich Village, and select content is viewable on our WordPress. If you are a poet, proser, prose-poet, painter, sculptor, photographer, digital illustrator—otherwise an experimenter of combining word and visual art—we encourage you to submit your work to minettasubmit@gmail.com. The deadline for the Spring 2013 issue is March, 15 2013.

Check out our WordPress for previous issues and submission guidelines:
http://minettareview.wordpress.com/submit

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarypoetrypopular_culturescience_and_culture 50036Cultural Rhetorics - October 25-26 2013Western States Rhetoric and Literacy Conference http://www.public.asu.edu/~petergo/wsrl/wsrl.htmlmaureen.mathison@hum.utah.edu1360272553cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Western States Rhetoric and Literacy Conference http://www.public.asu.edu/~petergo/wsrl/wsrl.htmlcontact email: maureen.mathison@hum.utah.edu

For the 2013 Western States and Literacy Conference, we turn our attention to the field's ongoing exploration of rhetoric and literacy as material practices. In addition to traditional understandings of rhetoric and literacy as symbolic activity between human actors, the field has begun to consider human and nonhuman bodies, animality, technology, and matter not simply as backdrops for human activity but as contributors to persuasion, communication, and pedagogy. This recent turn is not without precedent or current relevance: Gorgias demonstrated the ways language shapes our understanding of nature; Plato discussed rhetoric amongst the sound of cicadas; Demosthenes trained with a mouthful of pebbles; Quintilian attended to clothing in his pedagogy; Erasmus tailored his writing process in response to the then emerging effects of the printing press, and Wollstonecraft forged the relationship between the material conditions of women and the ways women were instructed and talked about. Today, we can look no further than global digital networks and the effects of climate change as evidence that the material is at least an equal player in a vastly expanded notion of a public. In all, the suasive effects of the material subtend the histories, theories, and practices of rhetoric and writing through which we learn and communicate.

We invite proposals that grapple with these ongoing disciplinary questions of materiality informing our histories, theories, and practices in our pedagogies and research. Of particular interest are presentations that encourage audience participation and discussion, and contribute closely to the conference theme of material rhetorics and to questions concerning aspects of the following:

• Material Theories of Rhetoric & Writing
• Pedagogy as Material Practice
• Rhetoric of the Body
• Digital & Networked Technologies
• Object-Oriented Inquiry
• Nature, Animality, and Materiality

http://www.public.asu.edu/~petergo/wsrl/2013cfp.htm

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 50037Contemporary Studies: Midwest PCA/ACAJasara Hines jhines7@knights.ucf.edu1360274134americancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarypopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Jasara Hines contact email: jhines7@knights.ucf.edu

Call for Papers:
Contemporary Studies
2013 Midwest Popular Culture Association Conference
Friday-Sunday, October 11-13, 2013
St. Louis, MO
St. Louis Union Station Hotel, A Doubletree by Hilton
Deadline: April 30, 2013

Topics can include, but are not limited to all areas of contemporary studies such as:
--remix culture
--art in the contemporary world
--reading visual cultures
--Narrative in a digital age, Meta-narratives
--Philosophy and mass culture
--Community and social networks
--Intellectual property and technology
--Modern Social and Political Thought, The revolutionary transformation of politics and culture
--Digital 'Memento Mori', reflections on death
--theories of the Avant-Garde
--contemporary literary/hypertext theory

Please post the following information by April 30th to: http://submissions.mpcaaca.org:
--Panelist name and institutional affiliation
--250-300 word proposal for a 15 – 20 minute presentation. Please include the title of the paper as it will appear in the conference program.

For further inquiries email Jasara Hines at jhines7@knights.ucf.edu or jasara.hines@ucf.edu

Decisions will be made by May 13, 2013.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarypopular_culturerhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 50038Journal of the Sylvia Townsend Warner Society 20 September 2013The Sylvia Townsend Warner SocietyHelen.Sutherland@glasgow.ac.uk1360276165gender_studies_and_sexualityjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiestwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: The Sylvia Townsend Warner Societycontact email: Helen.Sutherland@glasgow.ac.uk

Articles on any aspect of the life and work of Sylvia Townsend Warner are invited for the 2013 issue of the Journal of the Sylvia Townsend Warner Society.
Contributions should be no more than 5000 words long, and be emailed to the editor by 20 September 2013.
Further information is available from the editor at Helen.Sutherland@glasgow.ac.uk or from The Sylvia Townsend Warner Society at http://www.townsendwarner.com

cfp categories: gender_studies_and_sexualityjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiestwentieth_century_and_beyond 50039"Past Tense, Future Tensions" SCLA Conference Oct. 18-19, 2013 (abstract deadline 5/10/13)Society for Comparative Literature and the Artssclaconference@guilford.edu1360276194americanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Society for Comparative Literature and the Artscontact email: sclaconference@guilford.edu

39th Annual Conference of the SCLA to be held October 18-19, 2013
at Guilford College (Greensboro, NC).

The tenuous relationship between the past, present, and future complicates the practice of creating as well as translating time in imaginary works. Grammatically, tense marks more than temporality; it also highlights degrees of being that remain unreachable or forever distant. At the 2013 SCLA conference we will examine what it means to stage the past and direct the future in our literary and artistic texts. Whether anachronistic, politicized, or asynchronous, tense marks the uneasy space where recollection and projection meet.

We welcome 250 word paper proposals or 500 word panel proposals sent to sclaconference@guilford.edu by May 10, 2013. Graduate students who wish to be considered for an SCLA Travel Scholarship should indicate this in their cover letter and include a short vita (2 pages maximum). We will also hold 2 undergraduate sessions and welcome undergraduate proposals (please specify).

See website for full conference cfp: http://complit-scla.org/id14.html

cfp categories: americanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 50040Special Section on Writing Center Theory and PracticeAcademic Exchange Quarterlykajr10@comcast.net1360290671graduate_conferencesrhetoric_and_compositionfull name / name of organization: Academic Exchange Quarterlycontact email: kajr10@comcast.net

The Winter 2013 (Vol. 17, Iss. 4) Issue of Academic Exchange Quarterly, an independent double-blind-peer-reviewed print journal, is now accepting submissions for its special section on Writing Center Theory and Practice. Articles may explore issues of theory, practice, and experience in writing center work, including qualitative and empirical studies and discussions of pedagogy.

Articles may also consider the following: How writing center professionals cope with change and the eventuality of needing to expand their efforts in response to new economic and demographic challenges. Furthermore, as we move towards increasingly virtual and technologically dependent learning communities, how can these efforts help meet the evolving demands of our students?

In addition to Writing Center Directors and other Administrators, submissions are welcome from professional staff, faculty tutors, and graduate students who work in the writing center. Manuscript length should be between 2,000 and 3,000 words. Please identify your submission with the keyword "Center-2."

Submissions will be accepted now until the end of August; however, early submissions are encouraged as they offer the following incentives:
- longer time for revision
- opportunity to be considered for Editor's Choice
- eligibility to have article's abstract and/or full text posted on journal's main webpage
- opportunity to be considered for inclusion in Sound Instruction Series

For more information, please visit http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/center2.htm.

cfp categories: graduate_conferencesrhetoric_and_composition 5004167th Annual RMMLA Convention: Panel on Contemporary Rhetorical TheoryRocky Mountain Modern Language Association (RMMLA)thubbs2@lsu.edu1360291274americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association (RMMLA)contact email: thubbs2@lsu.edu

67th Annual
RMMLA Convention
Vancouver, Washington, USA
October 10-12, 2013

Contemporary Rhetorical Theory

Please consider submitting one-page abstracts for papers that focus on contemporary rhetorical theory, including but not limited to rhetorical listening, the rhetoric of propaganda, rhetorical practices of social change, 21st century literacies, digital literacies, disability studies, cybernetics and systems thinking, feminist, deconstructionist, Marxist, psychoanalytic and pedagogical approaches to the study, theory and practice of rhetoric today.

March 1st is the deadline for submissions of one-page paper proposals to the session chairs of all RMMLA Regular, Special and Affiliate Sessions. The session chairs have been asked to notify all those who submitted proposals of their acceptance or rejection preferably by March 15, but not later than March 31. Additional information, including the official CFP for all sessions, can be found on the RMMLA website.

Please Submit Proposals Directly to the Panel Chair:
thubbs2@lsu.edu
Travis Hubbs
Dept. of English
Louisiana State University
239 W Parker Blvd
Baton Rouge, LA 70808
936-537-5597

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 50042Illness and Disability Memoir as Embodied KnowledgeModern Language Associationrea15@columbia.edu1360294948americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryfull name / name of organization: Modern Language Associationcontact email: rea15@columbia.edu

Sponsored by MLA Committee on Disability Issues in the Profession

Life writing about illness and disability as a form of theoretical knowledge. New ways of conceiving the relationship of memoir to embodiment, environment, and community. 500 word abstracts by 8 March 2013; Rachel Adams (rea15@columbia.edu) and Helen Deutsch (hdeutsch@humnet.ucla.edu)

This is a sponsored panel to be convened at the 2014 Modern Language Association Conference, Chicago, January 9-12

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinary 50044Farscape - Essay CollectionMargo Collinssupernaturaltelevision@gmail.com1360303669african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturepostcolonialreligionscience_and_culturetheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Margo Collinscontact email: supernaturaltelevision@gmail.com

Articles on issues related to any element of the television series Farscape—including the original series, the concluding mini-series Farscape: The Peacekeeper Wars, the graphic novel continuation of the series, spin-off novels set in the Farscape universe, or fan productions—are invited for inclusion in an edited collection. The following categories suggest possibilities but are by no means exhaustive:

• Science and Fantasy
• Fandom and/or Reception
• Transformation and/or Adaptation
• Gender
• Race
• Desire and Sexuality
• Monstrosity
• Heroism
• Villainy and Monstrosity
• History and Memory
• Family and Community
• Power
• Possession
• Governmental alliances
• Military representations
• Time travel

What to Send:
300 - 500 word abstracts (or complete articles, if available) and CVs should be submitted by April 15, 2013. If an abstract is accepted for the collection, a full draft of the essay (5000 – 8000 words) will be required by September 15, 2013.

Abstracts and final articles should be submitted to supernaturaltelevision@gmail.com. Please include "Farscape Submission" in your subject line.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturepostcolonialreligionscience_and_culturetheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 50047[UPDATE] registration open: ASLE-UKI one-day symposium Literature and Sustainability, March 2013Louise Squire, University of Wales Trinity Saint David, University of Surreyl.squire@surrey.ac.uk1360306820ecocriticism_and_environmental_studiespopular_culturepostcolonialtheoryfull name / name of organization: Louise Squire, University of Wales Trinity Saint David, University of Surreycontact email: l.squire@surrey.ac.uk

Reminder: registration is now open for the ASLE-UKI one-day symposium on Literature and Sustainability, 15th March 2013, to be held on the Lampeter Campus of University of Wales Trinity Saint David. Supported by INSPIRE.

Confirmed keynote speakers:
Claire Colebrook (Penn State University)
Adeline Johns-Putra (University of Surrey)

Reflection on Sustainability
Jane Davidson, Director of INSPIRE and former Minister for Sustainability in Wales.

This symposium seeks to energise scholarly discussions about how literary criticism may fruitfully engage with the sustainability debate.

For details and registration please visit: http://www.trinitysaintdavid.ac.uk/en/inspire/asle-ukisymposium/

Also see the link to Public Lecture Competition from the above web address. Deadline for the competition is 15th Febuary 2013, and the winner presents at the Hay Literature Festival.

cfp categories: ecocriticism_and_environmental_studiespopular_culturepostcolonialtheory 50049SAMLA Bibliography and Textual Criticism Panel, November 8-10, 2013, Atlanta, GASouth Atlantic Modern Language Association Convention (SAMLA)makalaj@mailbox.sc.edu1360332786bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookfull name / name of organization: South Atlantic Modern Language Association Convention (SAMLA)contact email: makalaj@mailbox.sc.edu

Call for Papers: Bibliography and Textual Criticism Panel
SAMLA, November 8-10, 2013
Atlanta, GA

The annual convention of the South Atlantic Modern Language Association will be held this year at the Marriott Atlanta Buckhead Hotel & Coference Center, Atlanta, GA.
http://samla.gsu.edu

The Bibliography and Textual Criticism panel welcomes 15-minute papers related to textual studies, bibliography, the history of the book, authorship, rare books, paratextuality, publishing history, circulation and reader reception, and the study of archives, books, or texts as material objects. The convention theme of "Cultures, Contexts, Images, Texts: Making Meaning in Print, Digital, and Networked Worlds" is particularly relevant to this standing session, so papers addressing the theme are especially welcome.

By June 1, 2013, please email a 300-word abstract and short biography to Jeffrey Makala, University of South Carolina, at makalaj@mailbox.sc.edu.

cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_book 50050Victorian Orientalism(s) - Ragusa Ibla, 28-29 June 2013Centre for the Study of Text and Print Culture (Ghent University) - School of Foreign Languages and Literatures of Ragusa (University of Catania)victorianorientalisms@unict.it1360336410cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespoetryreligiontheorytravel_writingvictorianfull name / name of organization: Centre for the Study of Text and Print Culture (Ghent University) - School of Foreign Languages and Literatures of Ragusa (University of Catania)contact email: victorianorientalisms@unict.it

The 'Victorian Orientalism(s)' joint international conference between the Centre for the Study of Text and Print Culture at Ghent University (Belgium) and the School of Foreign Languages and Literatures of Ragusa (University of Catania, Italy) aims to discuss the continuing relevance of Edward Said's Orientalism (1978) as a paramount attempt to define the latent and manifest traces of the East in Western literature and culture. Starting with the postulate that all Eastern societies are fundamentally different from one another, 'Victorian Orientalism(s)' seeks to explore what Sherry Simon (2000) calls 'aesthetics of cultural pluralism', i.e. the many ways in which the Victorians envisioned the East. Drawing examples from material elements of Orientalism – religious texts, exotic tales, Imperial expeditions, colonial conquests, and so forth – this conference invites submissions which explore nineteenth-century modes of art (narrative, poetic and visual) which position themselves as instruments of knowledge of the Orient.
'Victorian Orientalism(s)' is an interdisciplinary conference, which aims to bring together scholars working in a wide range of research areas to explore in depth the many fields of thought covered by the conference theme and to redefine the task of interpreting the East in the new millennium. Papers should deal with one of the following topics:

• The Pre-Raphaelites and Orientalism;
• Portrayal of Victorian women and oriental society;
• Linguistic exoticism in the Victorian era;
• Japonisme and fin-de-siècle aestheticism;
• Victorian hybridity as the assimilation and adaptation of Oriental practices;
• Magical Orientalism;
• Detective short stories and Orientalism;
• Orientalist Victorian fashion;
• Travel writing and Orientalism;
• Utopia and Orientalism;
• Buddhism and the Victorians.

All abstracts of max. 300 words, along with a brief bio-sketch (max. 60 words), should be sent as Microsoft Word email attachments, at victorianorientalisms@unict.it, by 15 April 2013.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespoetryreligiontheorytravel_writingvictorian 50051Ernest Hemingway in Venice, 2014The Ernest Hemingway SocietyEHVenice2014@gmail.com1360338817americangeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiestravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: The Ernest Hemingway Societycontact email: EHVenice2014@gmail.com

The Ernest Hemingway Society will hold its 16th biennial international conference in Venice, Italy, from 22-27 June 2014. In addition to enjoying one of the most beautiful cities in the world, we will explore the Veneto, a region of the world Hemingway held dear and immortalized in Across the River and Into the Trees.
The conference will be staged at the Venice International University, which will accommodate all paper presentations and panels. VIU is on the island of San Servolo, a ten-minute boat ride from Piazza San Marco. Possible day trips may include Gorizia, Schio, and Fossalta di Piave, the site of Hemingway's wounding. Conference attendees are welcome to explore the other treasures of the Veneto or northern Italy individually or in small groups, and we will be happy to provide information to make those excursions convenient for you.
As information for this conference begins to be posted on the Hemingway Society website, we will be listing suggestions for lodging for travelers of all budgets.
Mark Cirino and Mark P. Ott (EHVenice2014@gmail.com) will serve as co-program directors and will be collaborating with esteemed Hemingway scholar Rosella Mamoli Zorzi of the Università Ca' Foscari Venezia, who will serve as site director.
The Hemingway Society invites proposals for papers to be presented at its 16th biennial international conference in Venice, Italy, from 22-27 June 2014. We welcome paper proposals on any topic relevant to Hemingway's career and life. We are particularly interested in papers related to his engagement with Italy and the Veneto.

For example:

1. Hemingway and World War I
2. Hemingway's short fiction set in Italy
3. Hemingway's journalism set in Italy
4. A Farewell to Arms
5. Across the River and into the Trees
6. The Italian reception to Hemingway's work
7. Hemingway and Fascism
8. Hemingway and Italian writers and critics
9. Hemingway and his other Italian friends
10. Teaching Hemingway

Please e-mail proposals for papers (250-300 words) and panels (with a list of participants and paper topic) to Mark Cirino at mc171@evansville.edu and Mark P. Ott at mott@deerfield.edu.

The deadline for proposals is 31 October 2013.

For information on Hinkle Fund grants to defray travel expenses of graduate students attending the conference see:
http://hemingwaysociety.org/?page_id=278

Please follow us at Twitter @EHVenice2014.

cfp categories: americangeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiestravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 50052Call for Screendance (Dance Film/Media) Papers for April Conference, Burgundy FranceInternational Video Dance Festival of Burgundyinfo@videodansebourgogne.com1360339756african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_cultureprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: International Video Dance Festival of Burgundycontact email: info@videodansebourgogne.com

The International Video Dance Festival of Burgundy (France) seeks 20 minute presentations for its screendance conference to be held April 5, 2013 at the National Theatre of Burgundy (one hour by train from Paris). The 2013 conference's key note speaker will be Patrick Bensard, director of la Cinémathèque de la Danse in Paris. Presentation proposals linked to any aspect of screendance are welcome and may include:

The history of dance films
Contemporary aesthetics and practices
Exhibition and screening platforms and models
Analysis of individual artists or films/videos
Dance and new media in installations
Philosophy and politics of screen dance

To submit, please send a 500 word abstract and a brief bio or C.V. to: specialprograms@videodansebourgogne.com

Deadline to submit is February 20, 2013

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_cultureprofessional_topicsscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 50053Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities at SCMLA (3/31/13; New Orleans 10/3-5/2013)Carol Bunch Davisdavisc@tamug.edu1360342078african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturetheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Carol Bunch Daviscontact email: davisc@tamug.edu

We invite proposals on the topic of Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities for presentation at the 70th annual South Central Modern Language Association conference in New Orleans, Louisiana on October 3-5, 2013.

Please send abstracts of 500 words, your name and affiliation and a statement identifying any A/V needs to the session chair and secretary by March 31, 2013:
Carol Bunch Davis (davisc@tamug.edu)
Dustin Morrow (dustin_morrow@baylor.edu)

Abstracts on all topics are welcome and will receive full consideration, but we are particularly interested in receiving abstracts on interdisciplinary projects.

Presenters must be members of the SCMLA by May 31, 2013 and may deliver only one paper at the conference. For conference and SCMLA membership information, please see www.southcentralmla.org.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturetheatretwentieth_century_and_beyond 5005412th Annual North American Critical Animal Studies Conference, June 20-22, Minneapolis Community and Technical CollegeInstitute for Critical Animal Studiestravis.girard.erickson@gmail.com 1360343562african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarypopular_culturetheoryfull name / name of organization: Institute for Critical Animal Studiescontact email: travis.girard.erickson@gmail.com

Breaking the Silence on Global and Local Intersections of Ethnicity, Spirituality, and Nonhuman Animals

As the poor become poorer, more prisons are constructed, and the global south struggles with exploitation, disease, hunger, and mass displacement, social justice activists are becoming more intolerant of global racism and discrimination. In kind, the theme of this year's annual North American Conference for Critical Animal Studies is the intersectionality of race, ethnicity, animals, and spirituality. Some of the foundational questions that the conference is interested in discussing include: Can activists compare struggles of racism to nonhuman animal suffering? What is the intersectional history of ethnicity and animals? Do you have to be anti-racist to be an animal advocate? How has religion aided in the marginalization of people of color and nonhuman animals? How has religion aided in the liberation of people of color and nonhuman animals? How, if at all, do animal advocates challenge colonization, imperialism, and racism? What are the theoretical and scientific similarities between racism and speciesism? How have different ethnic and spiritual groups addressed animal advocacy?

We welcome proposals from community members including nonprofit organizations, political leaders, activists, and professors, staff, and students from within higher education. We are especially interested in the histories of social movements, spirituality, global religions, race, ethnicity, decolonization, critical race theory, nonviolence, alliance politics, freedom, democracy, total inclusion, global trade, globalization, whiteness, radical feminism, anti-racism, imperialism, prison abolition, labor rights, disability rights, legal issues, and indigenous rights/sovereignty.

Presentations should be fifteen to twenty minutes long. We are receptive to innovative formats including roundtables, panels, community dialogues, theater, and workshops. You may propose individual or group "panel" presentations, but please clearly specify the structure of your proposal and stress in your paper/roundtable/panel/etc. proposal how you will be focusing on the program theme and linking it to ethnicity, spirituality and critical animal studies.

Proposals or abstracts for panels, roundtables, workshops, or paper presentations should be no more than 500 words.

Please send a 100-word (maximum) biography for each facilitator or presenter—speaking to your activism and scholarship—in third person paragraph form.

The deadline for submissions is April 1, 2013.

Accepted presenters will be notified via e-mail by April 15, 2013.

Please send proposals/abstracts and biographies electronically using an MS Word attachment in Times Roman 12 point font to:

Travis Erikson
Conference Co-Chair
travis.girard.erickson@gmail.com

Call for Nominations:
2013 12th Annual International Critical Animal Studies Scholars of the Year

Britches Scholar of the Year
Founded in 2010, ICAS recognizes one graduate student from around the world who is working theoretically and practically on advancing animal rights activism and/or alternatives to animal studies and research. If you are interested in being an ICAS Britches Scholar of the Year please send 1) a 500 to 1000 word statement detailing your accomplishments, academic work, advocacy, and academic and political goals, 2) three recommendation letters, and 3) your CV. The Scholars position is a one year appointment.

Tyke Scholar of the Year
Founded in 2010, ICAS recognizes one graduate student from around the world who is working theoretically and practically on advancing alternatives to violence, domestication, and/or animal entertainment. If you are interested in being an ICAS Tyke Scholar of the Year please send 1) a 500 to 1000 word statement detailing your accomplishments, academic work, advocacy, and academic and political goals, 2) three recommendation letters, and 3) your CV. The Scholars position is a one year appointment.

Process and Responsibilities:
Deadline for Scholar submissions is April 15, 2013.
You will receive notification by April 20, 2013.
Awarded Scholars will be recognized at the Annual North American Conference on Critical Animal Studies.
After being notified of your award, please send us a 220 word biography and picture of yourself, which will be posted with on our website.
Scholars will be expected to send monthly updates on their work for during their one hear appointment for ICAS to post in our newsletter and on our website and blog.
We strongly encourage all nominees to be present at the conference.
Please send scholar nominations and materials to:
Dr. Kimberly Socha
Co-Chair
kimberlyannsocha@gmail.com

Call for Nominations:
2013 Annual International Critical Animal Studies Awards of the Year

Critical Animal Studies Media of the Year – For outstanding media such as documentaries, films, books, visual art, operas, plays, and music in the field of critical animal studies. The media cannot be older than three years. We stress that critical animal studies includes any topic, issue, or concern (from environmentalism to prisoners' rights) that promotes the protection, liberation, and freedom of animals in the world and is based not only on theory, but in practice as well. The media can come from any discipline or topic including, but not limited to, international studies, ethnic studies, gender studies, religion, sociology, environmentalism, critical animal studies, social work, biology, history, economics, public administration, criminology, philosophy, anthropology, chemistry, medicine, agriculture, political science, disability studies and information studies. To nominate media for this award, send the media to the address below (i.e. a book you are nominating).

Critical Animal Studies Undergraduate Paper/Project/Thesis of the Year – Awarded to an undergraduate student who has written an outstanding paper/thesis that promotes, or who has established and organized a project that fosters animal protection, liberation, and freedom. We are strongly interested in projects that bridge the gap between academia and the surrounding community. To nominate an undergraduate student for this award, the nominator must write a one page letter and include the paper or write a one page detailed description of the project.

Critical Animal Studies Graduate Paper/Project/Dissertation of the Year – Awarded to any graduate student working on a masters or doctorate degree who has written an outstanding paper/thesis that promotes, or who has established and organized a project that fosters animal protection, liberation, and freedom. We are strongly interested in projects that bridge the gap between academia and the surrounding community. To nominate a graduate student for this award, the nominator must write a one page letter and include the paper or write a one page detailed description of the project.

Critical Animal Studies Faculty Paper/Project of the Year – Awarded to a faculty member conducting research or working at a college, university or institute who has written an outstanding paper that promotes, or who has established and organized a project that fosters, animal protection, liberation, and freedom. We are strongly interested in projects that bridge the gap between academia and the surrounding community. To nominate a professor for this award, the nominator must write a one page letter and include the paper or write a one page detailed description of the project.

Submitting Nominations:

All nomination letters must be sent via e-mail as an MS Word document attachment of no more than one page with a: (1) a description of the project and person being nominated, (2) how it relates to critical animal studies, and, if applicable, (3) the details of when it was published, who published it, and ISSN or ISBN number. Individuals may nominate themselves.

Deadline for award submissions is April 15, 2013.

You will receive notification by April 20, 2013.

All hardcopy media for nominations for Media of the Year, must be sent to the address below and a nomination letter must be sent via e-mail to Travis Erikson travis.girard.erickson@gmail.com. We strongly encourage all nominees to be present at the conference.

Mail hardcopy material for Media Award to:

Dr. Kimberly Socha
Normandale Community College
English Department
9700 France Avenue South
Bloomington, Minnesota, 55431, USA

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarypopular_culturetheory 50055[UPDATE]University of Chicago Society of Fellowsweissbourd13@gmail.com1360345919classical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturereligionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: University of Chicago Society of Fellowscontact email: weissbourd13@gmail.com

Call for Papers:
Universality and Its Limits
The 2013 Weissbourd Annual Conference
Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts
The University of Chicago
Franke Institute for the Humanities
**May 3–4, 2013**

Keynote Speaker: Prof. Jean-Michel Rabaté, University of Pennsylvania
(Proposal Deadline: March 1, 2013)

The Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts at the University of Chicago invites paper
proposals for the annual Weissbourd Memorial Conference, to be held May 3–4, 2013 at the
Franke Institute for the Humanities. Its theme is "Universality and Its Limits."

It has become relatively commonplace to think of scholarship in the humanities and social
sciences as eschewing an orientation toward universals, and focusing instead on the
exploration of differences, situations, and particularities of various kinds. At a time when the
politics and aesthetics of difference are suspected to be largely compatible with the
universal advent of global capitalism, might the reassessment of universals and their
dissemination remain a critical topic for academic scrutiny? Across vast differences of
history and geography, disciplinary alignments, and theoretical orientations, we propose a
collective reappraisal of how our research topics and our core methods (description,
narration, interpretation, analysis, synthesis, explanation, and speculation) continue to
negotiate and challenge, both implicitly and explicitly, various forms of universality.
Universal declarations of rights and cosmopolitan political principles have been criticized for
their lack of attention to gender, economic inequality, cultural differences and democratic
sovereignty. Ideals of universal "goods" have also been challenged in the name of moral
pluralism. The idea of a progressive (or regressive) universal course to history and a
universalist approach to the divine and the transcendent have been questioned. Does this
mean that we should stop articulating issues of politics, aesthetics, ethics, law, history, or
religion within the language of universalism? Or should we keep a universalist standpoint
and investigate further the processes of negotiation and mediation that allow the
incorporation of the particular, the social or the historical into this universalist frame?

Among the various media of aesthetic production—music, literature, theater, dance, film,
visual art, interactive games, and so on—scholars frequently place emphasis on the
interpretation of works in light of their attendant cultural and historical contexts, emphasizing
their particularity and aesthetic singularity. But what kinds of universals, both implicit and
explicit, still guide our scholarly treatments of aesthetic production? How are we to assess
both poetics and aesthetics after the multi-cultural and vernacular de-centering of the
canon? Is their value still based in fundamental questions they raise about human
experience? Is it based on the theory we use to interpret and understand them? How might
figures, metaphors and paradoxes of the universal be understood as integral to the ontology
of literature, philosophy, and art?

We encourage an exceptionally broad range of answers to these questions from scholars in
all fields of the humanities and social sciences.

In particular, we hope to foster conversations about the following topics:
– progress, stasis, and regression in history
– figures, tropes, and paradoxes of the universal
– the idea of a universal history
– universality in aesthetics, hermeneutics, and/or literary theory
– music and/or image as universal languages and a cultural particulars
– human values, human rights, and the humanities
– capitalism and anti-capitalism, and globalization
– humanism, anti-humanism, and post-humanism
– the interpretation of science, medicine, and technology
– immigrants, outcasts, vagrants, & minor literatures
– social media in history and the present
– work, labor, housing, social welfare, insurance, & money as universals
– the commodification of culture & the contested universality of mass culture
– philosophy and truth, universality and relativism
– the aesthetics, ethics, and politics of translation
– democracy, cosmopolitanism and sovereignty
– the meaning(s) of populism
– criticism and critique as universals
– the universality and particularity of media technologies
– the question of universality in studies of gender and sexuality
– universality and racial difference
– Plato, the Sophists, the Stoics, Aristotle, Aquinas
– Kant, Hegel, Arendt, and Badiou

KEYNOTE ADDRESS Our keynote lecture will be given by Jean-Michel Rabaté, Vartan
Gregorian Professor in the Humanities and Professor of English and Comparative Literature
at the University of Pennsylvania.

The title of Professor Rabaté's lecture will be "Reasons of the 'Absurd': Paradoxes of the
Universal from Kafka to Badiou."

Professor Eric L. Santner, Philip and Ida Romberg Distinguished Service Professor in
Modern Germanic Studies, Professor of Germanic Studies, Committee on Jewish Studies,
and the College will serve as respondent.

TO PROPOSE A PAPER OR PANEL To propose a paper, please submit an abstract of 250
words or less, along with a brief biography of the presenter. Please email this to conference
co-chairs Michael Gallope and Geneviève Rousselière at weissbourd13@gmail.com.
We especially encourage the proposal of entire panels. To propose a panel, provide the
above material for all presenters, along with a panel title and an explanation of its ambit, no
more than 500 words in length.

The deadline for all proposals is March 1, 2013.

cfp categories: classical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturereligionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 50056The Unreal in Literature for Children and Young Adults (PAMLA November 2013)PAMLA San Diego CA November 1-3, 2013kate.watt@ucr.edu1360348147childrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementspopular_culturescience_and_culturefull name / name of organization: PAMLA San Diego CA November 1-3, 2013contact email: kate.watt@ucr.edu

Alternate realities create a challenge, a puzzle, a beacon, perhaps a threat to young readers' sense of the real. Explorations of such literature, whether " science fiction" or not, are invited. Imagined realities might include time/space travel, non-human sentient beings, futuristic/post-apocalyptic city-scapes, alternate social structures or histories, encountering/becoming the Other. …

Contact Kate C. Watt at kate.watt@ucr.edu with questions.

Use PAMLA's online submission form to submit.

cfp categories: childrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementspopular_culturescience_and_culture 5005717th Century Literature Panel - RMMLA Annual Conference - Vancouver, WA, October 10-12, 2013Rocky Mountain MLAkainglis@ucalgary.ca1360348781bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementspoetryreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositiontheatretheoryfull name / name of organization: Rocky Mountain MLAcontact email: kainglis@ucalgary.ca

This session seeks papers on any aspect of seventeenth-century English literature. Abstracts of 250-300 words are invited for papers to be delivered at the annual conference of the Rocky Mountain MLA in Vancouver, Washington, USA, Oct. 10-12, 2013. Email abstracts – including your title, institutional affiliation, and email addresses – to Kirsten Inglis (kainglis@ucalgary.ca) by March 1, 2013. All submissions will be acknowledged and notifications sent by March 15, 2013. Non-members are welcome to submit abstracts, but presenters must be members of the RMMLA by April 1.

More information is available on the conference website: http://rmmla.innoved.org/call/default.asp
English Seventeenth-Century Literature
Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association

cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementspoetryreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositiontheatretheory 50059JNT, Special Issue, "Rethinking 'The Good Life," DEADLINE June 1, 2013Journal of Narrative Theorytchico@umd.edu, kchuh@gc.cuny.edu 1360351782african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Journal of Narrative Theorycontact email: tchico@umd.edu, kchuh@gc.cuny.edu

The Journal of Narrative Theory (JNT) seeks submissions for an upcoming special issue, "Rethinking 'The Good Life.'"

In a conversation that draws upon her work on "the cultures of affect" to posit the urgency of re-imagining state and civil society, Lauren Berlant asks,

"What if people were to take the opportunity to reimagine state/society relations such that the flourishing of reciprocity were differently constructed and assessed, and in which consumer forms of collectivity were not the main way people secure or fantasize securing everyday happiness?"

In other words, how might considerations of the 'good life' be reconfigured through epistemologies, ideologies, and / or disciplinary modes that, for instance, attend to the historical concurrence and seeming naturalization of the relations between capitalism and modernity, broadly construed? What sorts of subjects — political, cultural, aesthetic, economic, creedal, and so forth -- emerge from these re-imaginings?

We invite essays (max. 10,000 words) that engage these questions pertaining to the good life. Some possible points of address might include investigations of the public good; examinations of publicity, or life, or goodness; articulations of alternative versions or visions; illumination of its historicities, its aesthetics, its politics, and/or its economies; analysis of its manifestation into discourses of health or religion or public policy or work; and, consideration of its relationship to the materialization of bodies.

In particular, we are looking for essays that are concerned with the narrative dimensions of the good life in a variety of theoretical and historical moments and geographies. How is narrative key to the ways in which a specific version of the good life is normalized? In what ways does critical engagement with the good life produce insight into the operations of narrative? How do logics and forms of narrative render visible and/or obscure what the good life could be? What is a narrative of the good life and how is it perpetuated?

Information about the journal can be found at the following address: http://www.emich.edu/english/jnt/

Contributors should follow the MLA style (7th edition), with footnotes kept at a minimum and incorporated into the text where possible.

Please send a copy of the submission by email attachment to each of the editors – Tita Chico ( tchico@umd.edu ) and Kandice Chuh ( kchuh@gc.cuny.edu ) by June 1, 2013.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 50060Panel Proposal: CAAS Annual Conference, Waterloo, ON, Oct. 24-27: The Commodification of Masculinity in Contemporary AmericaTerrance McDonald / Brock Universitytm11ld@brocku.ca1360352748african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarypopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Terrance McDonald / Brock Universitycontact email: tm11ld@brocku.ca

Call for Papers for Proposed Panel
Canadian Association for American Studies Conference: "Total Money Makeover": Culture and the Economization of Everything – Oct. 24-27, 2013 - Waterloo, ON

Panel Subject: The Commodification of Masculinity in Contemporary America

In response to the conference's theme, Culture and the Economization of Everything, this panel seeks to analyze masculinity as an increasingly visual commodity in American culture. While masculinity has long been associated with visual characteristics, it can be argued that recently the male image has taken precedent over other characteristics of masculinity – such as attributes or behaviours traditionally associated with masculinity. Given the overwhelming permeation of our culture by visual images (Sturken and Cartwright 2001), what is at stake is how this visualization effects how we think masculinities, and moreover gender, in our contemporary, visually saturated popular culture. As Thomas Elsaesser observes contemporary Hollywood films become the means for after-markets – such as video sales, t-shirts, and other products – which can be extended into a succession of commodities associated with socially constructed masculinities beyond traditional marketing tie-ins, e.g., Tyler Durden's leather pants and abs (Fight Club) or the Dude's white Russians and sunglasses (The Big Lebowski). These after-markets do not simply bring a subject closer to the appearance of an onscreen masculinity; instead, they insert a subject into an endless cycle of consumption in an attempt to embody the lifestyle the onscreen masculinity promotes. Although masculinity and film is a popular topic, few studies have investigated the commodification of masculinity and the role film has in this process as both a catalyst and a critic. This panel aims to analyze the relationship between masculinity and the image in American culture as well as masculinity's commodification as a result of this relationship. Though this call specifically references American cinema, I shall also consider proposals that analyze television, video games, street art, music videos, etc.

Potential topics for the panel include:

- masculinity as a visual commodity
- contemporary Hollywood cinema's construction of masculinity
- critique of masculinity as a visual commodity
- emerging "new" masculinities and their relationship with the image
- subversion of "traditional" and commodified masculinities via the image
- fluctuating or ongoing negotiations of masculinities
- icons of masculinity and their commodification
- popular film's influence on or as marketing
- non-Hollywood representations of masculinities
- images of masculinity that resist commodification

Please send a 300 word abstract with 3 bibliographic references and a brief biographical note to Terrance McDonald (tm11ld@brocku.ca) by March 8, 2013. Selections for the panel will be made by March 10, 2013 – if you have any questions please email me.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarypopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 50061[UPDATE] South Central MLA Biography/Autobiography/Memoir panel South Central Modern Language Associationmge1108@gmail.com1360353640african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: South Central Modern Language Associationcontact email: mge1108@gmail.com

The 2012 South Central MLA Conference is accepting paper proposals for its Biography/Autobiography/Memoir panel. Literary paper proposals on any aspect of biography, autobiography, and memoir are welcome. Please submit a 200-word abstract by 4/1/13 to mge1108@gmail.com.

The SCMLA conference will be held in New Orleans, LA from October 3-5, 2013.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsreligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 5006210-4-2013 Fourth International Conference on the Constructed Environment Common Ground Publishingconferencedirector@home.commongroundpublishing.com1360355826ecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesinternational_conferencesfull name / name of organization: Common Ground Publishingcontact email: conferencedirector@home.commongroundpublishing.com

Call for Papers
The 2013 Fourth International Conference on the Constructed Environment is held at the Universidade Nova de Lisboa,
Lisbon, Portugal on 4-5 October 2013. It will explore the forms and functions of the constructed environment during a time of dramatic and at times disruptive change. The conference is a cross-disciplinary forum which brings together researchers, teachers and practitioners to discuss the past character and future shape of the built environment.

Proposals for paper presentations, workshops, roundtables or colloquia are invited, addressing the constructed environment through one of the following themes:
• Design and Planning Processes
• Building Processes
• Environmental Impacts
• Social Impacts

The final deadline for proposal submission is 15 August 2013. Please visit http://constructedenvironment.com for more information on submitting your proposal, future deadlines, and registering for the conference.

Virtual participation is available for those who are unable to attend the conference in person. Proposals for virtual presentations may be submitted at any time, up to the start of the conference. All conference registrants (in-person and virtual) may also submit their written papers for publication in the refereed International Journal of the Constructed Environment.

cfp categories: ecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesinternational_conferences 50063CFP: Queer Studies and Religion (due April 1)Claremont Journal of Religionkile.jones@cst.edu1360355958religionfull name / name of organization: Claremont Journal of Religioncontact email: kile.jones@cst.edu

CFP: Claremont Journal of Religion

The Claremont Journal of Religion welcomes articles and book reviews pertaining to the topic of queer studies in religion. This issue will focus on the intersectionality of queer lives, queer modernity, and queer space and bodies in the context of religious discourse. Papers can range from topics pertaining to queer theories and theoretical approaches to religion, queer identity in religious spaces, and queer and religious histories. Papers that forward the ways in which "religion" can be understood through the lens of queer studies or LGBTQIAA identities will be given special attention.

As usual, we are also continuously accepting articles and book reviews relating to religion and contemporary life. Please send your article/book review, with an abstract, 5 keywords, and a brief bio by April 1, 2013 to kile.jones@cst.edu. Before sending anything, please visit www.claremontjournal.com and view our "submission guidelines."

cfp categories: religion 500643-6-2013 Seventh International Conference on Design Principles and PracticesCommon Ground Publishingconferencedirector@home.commongroundpublishing.com1360357310international_conferencesfull name / name of organization: Common Ground Publishingcontact email: conferencedirector@home.commongroundpublishing.com

Call for Papers
The 2013 Seventh International Conference on Design Principles and Practices, held at Chiba University, Chiba, Japan on 6-8 March 2013, will address a range of critically important themes relating to design today. It is a place to explore the meaning and purpose of 'design', as well as speaking in grounded ways about the task of design and the use of designed artifacts and processes. The conference is a cross-disciplinary forum which brings together researchers, teachers and practitioners to discuss the nature and future of design. The resulting conversations weave between the theoretical and the empirical, research and application, market pragmatics and social idealism.

Proposals for paper presentations, workshops/interactive sessions, posters/exhibits, or colloquia are invited, addressing design principles and practices through one of the following themes:
• Design Education
• Design in Society
• Designed Objects
• Visual Design
• Design Management and Professional Practice
• Architectonic, Spatial, and Environmental Design

The final deadline for proposal submission is 6 January 2013. Please visit http://designprinciplesandpractices.com for more information on submitting your proposal, future deadlines, and registering for the conference.

Virtual participation is available for those who are unable to attend the conference in person. Proposals for virtual presentations may be submitted at any time, up to the start of the conference. All conference registrants (in-person and virtual) may also submit their written papers for publication in the refereed Design Principles and Practices: An International Journal.

Plenary Speakers:
This year's conference will engage plenary speakers around the theme 'ENTHUSIASM'. The International Conference on Design Principles and Practices is proud to announce the following keynote speakers for our 2013 Conference:

NAOKO HIROTA, PRODUCT DESINER
MASAAKI KANAI, PRESIDENT AND REPRESENTATIVE DIRECTOR OF RYOHIN KEIKAKU CO LTD.
NORIHORO KANEKIYO, LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT AND PRINCIPAL, TAKANO LANDSCAPE PLANNING CO LTD.
YOICHIRO KAWAGUCHI, CG ARTIST AND 
PROFESSOR AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TOKYO
MANABU KAWADA, DESIGNER AND THE DIRECTOR OF YAMAHA DESIGN
TOYOKI KOZAI, PROFESSOR EMERITUS AND FORMER PRESIDENT AT CHIBA UNIVERSITY

cfp categories: international_conferences 50065Northeast Florida Literary ConferenceEnglish Graduate Organization/ University of North Floridajames.beasley@unf.edu1360357446african-americanamericanecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesmodernist studiesrhetoric_and_compositiontheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: English Graduate Organization/ University of North Floridacontact email: james.beasley@unf.edu

Novelist and activist Salman Rushdie observed, "Literature is where I go to explore the highest and lowest places in human society and in the human spirit, where I hope to find not absolute truth but the truth of the tale, of the imagination and of the heart." The exploration of literature provides a unique insight into the human condition, and the celebration of its scholarship is essential. The English Graduate Organization (EGO) at the University of North Florida is pleased to announce the call for abstracts for its spring conference, which will be held April 22nd, 2013.

The purpose of this conference is to recognize the exploration of literature in Northeast Florida, through scholarship as well as the language arts. It is an opportunity for students, graduate and undergraduate, as well as professors to share their ideas, scholarship, and art with likeminded individuals in this strange little territory of the Deep South.

EGO welcomes papers and creative works from all subjects within the collegiate English and Creative Writing programs in Northeast Florida. Abstracts should be approximately 300 words, and presentations should be no longer than 10 -12 minutes.

Email your submissions to james.beasley@unf.edu no later than March 22, 2013. Please remove all identifying markers on the abstract itself, which should be included as a word .doc attachment to your email. We will send confirmations upon the receipt of your proposal.

Thank you,

The English Graduate Organization, University of North Florida

cfp categories: african-americanamericanecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencesmodernist studiesrhetoric_and_compositiontheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 50066"The Art of Mothering," proposed special session for M/MLA (Milwaukee, November 7-10, 2013)Elaina Ross/ Northeastern State Universityrossem@nsuok.edu1360357905americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarypopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Elaina Ross/ Northeastern State Universitycontact email: rossem@nsuok.edu

American literature and culture has represented mothering in various ways over time, from the selfless Marmees of nineteenth-century novels to the permissive enablers and responsibility abdicators of contemporary texts such as The Glass Castle and Thirteen to the overbearing, controversial "Tiger" mother. "The Art of Mothering" seeks to explore the various facets of mothering as seen in American culture and literature. What does the shift in mothering styles say about American society? How do these portrayals compare with representations of fathers, or of mothers in other cultures? How does age play a part in a mother's style of parenting? To what extent does mothering represent the cultural situation of a woman? Send 250-word proposal and CV by February 22 to rossem@nsuok.edu and strong01@nsuok.edu.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarypopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 5006710-15-2013 Third International Conference on Food Studies: An Interdisciplinary ConferenceCommon Ground Publishingconferencedirector@home.commongroundpublishing.com1360358045interdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesfull name / name of organization: Common Ground Publishingcontact email: conferencedirector@home.commongroundpublishing.com

Call for Papers
The 2013 Third International Conference on Food Studies: An Interdisciplinary Conference, travels to the University of Texas, Austin, Texas on 15 October 2013, where local and sustainable food production is a cornerstone of the Austenite culture. A city rich with a dedicated community of locavores, some of the country's longest running farmers markets, and numerous slow foods advocate groups, Austin is an ideal location for the discussion of all the dimensions of food studies including agricultural, environmental, nutritional, health, social, economic and cultural perspectives on food. Plenary speakers include some of the leading thinkers in these areas, as well as numerous paper, colloquium and workshop presentations.

The Conference will address a range of critically important issues and themes relating to the Food Studies community. Proposals for paper presentations, workshops/interactive sessions, posters/exhibits, or colloquia are invited, addressing food studies through one of the following themes:
• Food Production and Sustainability
• Food, Nutrition and Health
• Food Politics, Policies and Cultures

The final deadline for proposal submission is 15 August 2013. Please visit http://food-studies.com for more information on submitting your proposal, future deadlines, and registering for the conference.

Virtual participation is available for those who are unable to attend the conference in person. Proposals for virtual presentations may be submitted at any time, up to the start of the conference. All conference registrants (in-person and virtual) may also submit their written papers for publication in the refereed Food Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal.

cfp categories: interdisciplinaryinternational_conferences 50068Engaging with Eco-ability 4/27 & 4/28/2013Binghamton Universityecoability@gmail.com1360358899african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarypopular_culturetheoryfull name / name of organization: Binghamton Universitycontact email: ecoability@gmail.com

1st Annual Conference "Engaging with Eco-ability"
University of Binghamton, New York
April 27 and 28, 2013

Theme:
A Politics of Disability and Animal Liberation

CALL FOR PAPERS & PRESENTATIONS

The 1st Annual Conference "Engaging with Eco-ability" will be hosted at Binghamton University April 27th & 28th, 2013. The conference will be organized and moderated by Anthony Nocella II and JL Schatz. The goal of this conference is to lay the groundwork for an edited book that's part of the Critical Animal Studies series published by Lexington Books.

TO SUBMIT A PROPOSAL: Send an e-mail to ecoability@gmail.com with an abstract of around 300 words of your paper proposal for the conference. Also include a short biography between 100 to 120 words. Proposals will be accepted on a rolling basis and are due by NO LATER THAN March 23, 2013.

We are looking for papers and presentations concerning, but not limited to, the following 5 topics:

Eco-Ability Intersectional Theories– We are looking for intersectional innovative liberatory theories between dis-ability studies, environmental ethics, critical animal studies, queer studies, critical race theory, transnational feminism, and other radical theories that promote activism.

Activist Stories of exclusion of people with dis-abilities in the animal advocacy movement – What are the problems within the animal advocacy movement that create tension with dis-abled advocates? How can these problems be resolved? What animal advocacy campaigns, projects, events, protests, language, programs, organizations, theories, and practices are exclusionary and ableist to those with dis-abilities?

Activist Stories of exclusion of animal advocacy in the dis-abilities rights movement – How are animal advocates excluded from discussion within disability rights movement? How can these exclusions be resolved? What effective routes of activism can we take to create more effective coalitions between these two struggles? What dis-ability rights campaigns, projects, events, protests, language, programs, organizations, and practices are exclusionary and speciesist to those involved in the animal advocacy movement?

Stories About Nonhuman Animals with Dis-Abilities – Increasingly nonhuman animals are finding themselves "put down" for having dis-abilities in a similar way as fetuses are being aborted for being abnormal. How is it that living with others with a dis-ability makes life so difficult that it justifies depriving the other of life? How is it that we define life and dis-ability? What does it mean to be a nonhuman animal with dis-abilities?

Critiques of Service Nonhuman Animals and Animal Testing/Vivisection – Vivisection and service nonhuman animals are often touted as the "cure" for people with dis-abilities. What does it mean to try to "cure" dis-ability? Is what science does, such as testing on nonhuman animals, while searching for "cures" worth the cost? What is our responsibility to nonhuman animals in relation to people with dis-ability and vice versa?

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarypopular_culturetheory 500699-5-2013 Sixth International Conference on Global StudiesCommon Ground Publishingconferencedirector@home.commongroundpublishing.com1360360307international_conferencesfull name / name of organization: Common Ground Publishingcontact email: conferencedirector@home.commongroundpublishing.com

Call for Papers
The 2013 Sixth International Conference on Global Studies, held in New Delhi, India on 5-7 September 2013, will address a range of critically important ideas relating to globalization in the world today. Following successful conferences in recent years in Moscow, Rid de Janeiro and Dubai, the Global Studies Conference 2013 welcomes participants to New Delhi, India. Once again, this conference will explore the dynamics of globalization, whether those perspectives view global processes from a macro perspective, or explore the minutiae of local manifestations of the global.

Proposals for paper presentations, workshops/interactive sessions, posters/exhibits, or colloquia are invited, addressing globalization through one of the following themes:
• Economy and Trade
• Politics, Power and Institutions
• Society and Culture
• Resources and Environment

The final deadline for proposal submission is 16 July 2013. Please visit http://onglobalisation.com for more information on submitting your proposal, future deadlines, and registering for the conference.

Virtual participation is available for those who are unable to attend the conference in person. Proposals for virtual presentations may be submitted at any time, up to the start of the conference. All conference registrants (in-person and virtual) may also submit their written papers for publication in the Global Studies Journal.

cfp categories: international_conferences 500702014 Tenth International Conference on Environmental, Cultural, Economic & Social SustainabilityCommon Ground Publishingconferencedirector@home.commongroundpublishing.com1360361489international_conferencesfull name / name of organization: Common Ground Publishingcontact email: conferencedirector@home.commongroundpublishing.com

Call for Papers
The 2014 Tenth International Conference on Environmental, Cultural, Economic & Social Sustainability will be held 22 - 24 January 2014
at The University of Split, Split, Croatia. The conference will work in a multidisciplinary way across the various fields and perspectives through which we can address the fundamental and related questions of sustainability. This interdisciplinary forum is for scholars, teachers, and practitioners from any professional discipline who share an interest in—and concern for— sustainability in an holistic perspective, where environmental, cultural, economic and social concerns intersect.

Proposals for paper presentations, workshops/interactive sessions, posters/exhibits, or colloquia are invited, addressing sustainability through one of the following themes:
• Environmental Sustainability
• Sustainability in Economic, Social and Cultural Context
• Sustainability Policy and Practice
• Sustainability Education

The final deadline for proposal submission is 21 November 2013. Please visit http://onsustainability.com for more information on submitting your proposal, future deadlines, and registering for the conference.

Virtual participation is available for those who are unable to attend the conference in person. Proposals for virtual presentations may be submitted at any time, up to the start of the conference. All conference registrants (in-person and virtual) may also submit their written papers for publication in the refereed International Journal of Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability.

cfp categories: international_conferences 50071Washington Irving: The Fantastic in the Time of NationsScott Sprenger / Arnaud Huftier / Otrante: journal of fantastic art and literaturesprengers23@yahoo.com1360363649americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysromanticscience_and_culturefull name / name of organization: Scott Sprenger / Arnaud Huftier / Otrante: journal of fantastic art and literaturecontact email: sprengers23@yahoo.com

Call for contributions:
Otrante : arts et littératures fantastiques
Volume 36: "Washington Irving: le fantastique au temps des nations"

The ways in which Washington Irving's fiction was inflected by European gothic literature has been the subject of a number of previous studies. Critics have been especially interested in explaining how his adaptations of gothic themes to the early American context contributed to the formation of an American identity by its insistence on the frictions between local superstitions and imported ones. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow or Rip Van Winkle, emblematic of Irving's work, can easily be interpreted in this light, but at the risk, perhaps, of a simplification.

The simplification comes from the perception of this new national consciousness solely as a schizoid form or as an aspect of a transatlantic tension arising from the American displacement of European influences. To be sure, this tension is part of the foundational structure of Irving's literary production, but its explanatory power is partial: Irving simultaneously attempts to expose the mystifications of emerging "national" (or nationalist) forms of consciousness, both in America and abroad. Approached in this light, studies of Irving can no longer be content with his emblematic texts or with reading him as an American version of the European gothic. Indeed, we propose here to embrace the entirety of his works (historical, biographical and fictional) and to broaden the frame of analysis to the general problem of emerging national (and rationalist) forms of consciousness. Scrutiny of his histories and biographies has shown that they are unreliable as reflections of "historical reality," but Irving's historiographical unreliability is not due to error or a lack of archival due diligence. The fictional dimensions of his historiography are, on the contrary, coherent with his broader aim to uncover what we might call a moral geography, or an unofficial mapping and reconstruction of experience at the zones of cultural and mental displacement, as nations engaged in internal colonization. Irving seeks to lift to the surface realities that official national discourses, and national(-ist) forms of consciousness, had displaced and repressed under the sign of legend, archaic superstition, barbarity or madness. It is precisely this 'lifting to the surface' of unclassifiable human experience that accounts for the fantastic effects of Irving's writing and recommends revisiting his work.

On both sides of the Atlantic, Washington Irving's originality as a writer has often been misrecognized or undetected by being considered a gothic imitation by Anglo-American critics or a precursor to the fantastic by the French. This special issue of the French journal Otrante is devoted to showing how and why Irving invented literary effects that resist traditional "national" generic and literary historical classifications. Irving's formal originality, we propose, derives from the depth and complexity of his explorations of the hidden causes of nationalist pathologies and its connection to a fundamentally "unconceptualizable" aspect of political and cultural modernity. It is not thus the inventor of a national consciousness that we celebrate here, but more ambitiously, the surprising precursor of cultural anthropology or social psychology.

Articles written in or translated into native French would be appreciated. Strong articles in English will be considered for translation by professionals in France. 1-page proposals due by April 19, 2013. Final papers (30,000 characters including spaces) are due Sept 20, 2013.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysromanticscience_and_culture 50072MLA 2014 CFP Adoption and DisabilityAlliance for the Study of Adoption and Culturemf107@nyu.edu1360369036african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarypopular_culturefull name / name of organization: Alliance for the Study of Adoption and Culturecontact email: mf107@nyu.edu

Alliance for the Study of Adoption and Culture panel invites 15-min. papers that explore connections between adoption and disability (literary and cinematic representation included). Abstracts (<500 words) and a brief CV (2pp.). by 1 March 2013; Marina Fedosik (mf107@nyu.edu).

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarypopular_culture 50073CFP Transnational Comics (MLA 2014)Modern Language Association (MLA)nhora.serrano@csulb.edu1360372795cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinarypopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Modern Language Association (MLA)contact email: nhora.serrano@csulb.edu

Call for Papers for a proposed panel at the Modern Language Association (MLA) Annual Convention, 9-12 Jan. 2014, in Chicago. Jointly sponsored by the MLA Division on Literature and Other Arts and the MLA Discussion Group on Comics and Graphic Narratives.

Spurred by the development of the Internet and wordless communication, transnationalism has come to mean a new way of thinking about the relationships and interconnectivity among cultures, languages, arts, and peoples on the international stage. Comics and graphic narratives have long been the visual and textual testament to this global interaction. From the influence of 19th and early 20th century European comic art on American comics (and vice versa), the cultural links between Japanese manga and comics worldwide, and the rise of graphic novels in non-western countries to current issues of production, translation, and cultural reception, comics and graphic narratives lend themselves to a transnational lens.

Indeed, in these complex and vulnerable times, as globalization refigures what we mean by "worldwide" and cultural forms cross-pollinate across national boundary lines, the prospect of a truly transnational comics studies seems more important than ever.

This panel invites papers that explore the cultural exchange that comics and graphic narratives have had and continue to offer. A few questions to consider:

• How do American comics differ from manga? From bande dessinée?

• How have specific comic artists influenced each other in transnational and intercultural contexts? Papers might consider, for example, how a distinctive style (such as Hergé's ligne claire) has been adopted by artists in other countries, or how comics anthologies (such as RAW or Stripburger) and festivals (such as the FIBD in Angoulême) facilitate transnational connections.

• How have superhero characters been adapted around the world? What are the implications of these transnational adaptations?

• What are the cultural implications when comics are translated into other languages and for other audiences, for example into English for American markets? What aspects of the original context are preserved or lost in this translation?

• How might emerging theories of transnationalism, or analyses of globalization, shed light on comics and comics culture?

Send 200 to 300-word abstracts in .doc or .pdf to Nhora Serrano (nhora [dot] serrano [at] csulb [dot] edu) and Anke Finger (anke [dot] finger [at] uconn [dot] edu) by 8 March 2012. Submitters will receive notification of results by April 1.

PLEASE NOTE: This CFP is for a proposed, not a guaranteed, session at MLA 2014, meaning it is contingent on approval by the MLA Program Committee (which will make its decisions after April 1). All prospective presenters must be current MLA members by no later than 7 April 2012.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinarypopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 50074[UPDATE] Teaching College Literature (ongoing; new resource)Renee Pigeon, Teaching College Literature (TCL)rpigeon@csusb.edu1360381751african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsrenaissanceromantictheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Renee Pigeon, Teaching College Literature (TCL)contact email: rpigeon@csusb.edu

Contributions are solicited for a web resource on teaching English literature at the college/university level, Teaching College Literature (http://teachingcollegelit.com).

Teaching College Literature welcomes submissions in the following areas:
• Articles (length: 3000-6000 words)
• Sample syllabi and/or assignments: please include a brief commentary on the course and remove personal information such as addresses and phone numbers;
• Advice on course planning and design
• Teaching tips (length 1500-3000 words)
• Media: videos, PowerPoints and other media
• Reviews of books, blogs and other resources relevant to teaching English literature at the college/university level
• Suggestions for links to resources including journals, blogs, websites and other media.

Original material should be submitted via email (doc, rtf, or pdf format),following current MLA style, to the TCL editor, Prof. Renée Pigeon: rpigeon@csusb.edu

Please include a brief bio and your academic affiliation.
This is an ongoing project, with updates planned several times a year.

Queries about submissions in the above categories, or other possibilities not listed above, are encouraged; please include "TCL" in the subject line of your email to rpigeon@csusb.edu

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialprofessional_topicsrenaissanceromantictheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 50075[UPDATE] Writing and dramatising the body : violence, discordance and reconfiguration - 21-22 March 2013 - Lille, FranceCharles de Gaulle University, Lille, Francealexandra.poulain@univ-lille3.fr1360398811cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualityinternational_conferencestheatrefull name / name of organization: Charles de Gaulle University, Lille, Francecontact email: alexandra.poulain@univ-lille3.fr

Should violence be considered as one of the experiences the body undergoes in literature or as an ordeal which elicits the very question of what this body is – a body which is mapped in language and speech. As a result of the violence that it undergoes, inflicts or self-inflicts, the body grapples with something which is not simply outside itself: it discovers its own foreignness, its own discordance. It rebelliously slips through the categories in which one attempts to contain it, but it also defies the biological body to which it cannot be reduced. What does a body do when, for no apparent reason, it breaks, splits, is pulled asunder, petrified? What happens when the part usurps the whole or the whole body is reduced to nothing, mere refuse? What occurs when the human body encounters the inhuman and becomes an animal, machine, automaton or doll? If an organism 'functions', the body on the other hand experiences suffering or jouissance, the two sometimes sharing a disturbing intimacy. Could the body also be essentially defined as that which holds together no matter what?
Clearly then the focus should move beyond the body as it is represented in the text to an understanding of how this affects the actual representation, and, more generally, writing and reading. What use are words for a body which cannot escape symbolisation but which nevertheless remains resistant and foreign to it? Is it possible that by endlessly imagining, inventing and reconfiguring, writing in turn violates the body or is writing, on the contrary, capable of accounting for the otherness which inhabits the body? As a site of difference, is not the text one entry to the enigma which the body constitutes? And as it is also a fabric, a canvas, a mesh, is not the text in a position, if need be, to stand in for a failing body threatened by dislocation and collapse? Some parts of the body are particularly solicited by the act of writing and that of reading: the hand, the eye, the ear. We could consider precisely how each of these elements shapes the text from the moment that one accepts to no longer reduce it to a semantic configuration. The body which is brought into play can do without a real stage, but it can also come into being by treading the boards. One might attempt to think (of) the body in terms of presence and absence and, when it comes to theatrical production, of the erasure or the assertion of the body in its own materiality. Aside from the specificities which might distinguish fiction, drama and poetry, the question of genre/gender comes to the fore in the emphasis laid on an eroticised, sexualised, gendered body, which violence prods with particular force: the political and aesthetic issues at stake in the construction and representation of the gendered body are therefore also of chief interest.
These angles of approach are, of course, non-exhaustive and we would welcome papers dealing with these and other issues. Proposals for papers (preferably in English) of 300-500 words should be sent, together with a short CV, to Alexandra Poulain (alexandra.poulain@univ-lille3.fr), Fiona McCann (fiona.mccann@univ-lille3.fr), Pascale Tollance (pascale.tollance@univ-lille3.fr) before 15 January 2012.

Conference languages: English and French.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualityinternational_conferencestheatre 50076[UPDATE] Second Call for Papers: Flann O'Brien Conference Rome 2013"Problems with Authority: The II International Flann O'Brien Conference" (Università Roma Tre, 19-21 June, 2013).viennacis.anglistik@univie.ac.at1360404902cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespostcolonialreligionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: "Problems with Authority: The II International Flann O'Brien Conference" (Università Roma Tre, 19-21 June, 2013).contact email: viennacis.anglistik@univie.ac.at

"Problems with Authority: The II International Flann O'Brien Conference" (Università Roma Tre, 19-21 June, 2013).

Second Call for Papers Updated Deadline: 1 March 2013
http://www.univie.ac.at/flannobrien2011/rome2013.html

Keynotes:
Jed Esty (University of Pennsylvania)
Carol Taaffe (Author of "Ireland Through the Looking-Glass: Flann O'Brien, Myles na gCopaleen & Irish Cultural Debate")
Dirk Van Hulle (University of Antwerp)

Performers:
Mikel Murfi (Director of "John Duffy's Brother")
Mark O'Halloran (Award-winning screenwriter of "Adam and Paul" and "Garage")

The International Flann O'Brien Society is proud to announce that a conference on the works of Brian O'Nolan will be hosted by the Department of Comparative Literatures, at the Università Roma Tre under the title "Problems with Authority: The II International Flann O'Brien Conference".

It is an exciting time for the expanding field of Brian O'Nolan scholarship, as we explore O'Nolan's under-analysed and ever-expanding body of minor texts and start to close the many critical gaps in the academic record. At the centre of these critical projects are explorations of O"Nolan"s texts as fertile territory for mediating between conflicting Authorities: between traditional and modern scripts, local and international perspectives, and between avant-garde and conservative approaches to the authorities of science, history, and literary tradition. With these issues in mind, the conference aims to address questions of canonicity and authority in Brian O'Nolan's work.

2013 sees the publication of collections of O'Nolan's short stories (Neil Murphy & Keith Hopper, Dalkey Archive) and dramatic works (Daniel Jernigan, Dalkey Archive). As these collections give us greater access to a rich variety of overlooked texts in the O'Nolan canon, they also prompt and challenge us to broaden and retrace its borders. Indeed, given the amount of pseudonyms and apocryphal texts in play, we might ask whether these borders can ever be definitively drawn. Similarly, the vast collections of O'Nolan's correspondence, manuscripts, and drafts housed in Illinois, Boston, and Texas, – as well as the Irish Times online digital archive – have given rise to Genetic and Cultural Materialist approaches that seek to explore the borders of authorship and authority in O'Nolan's ever-expanding oeuvre. And while longer-running critical conversations continue to be finessed about the ways in which O'Nolan's texts are shaped by towering 20th Century figures such as Joyce and Beckett (and the more local authorities of Church and State), the increasingly international contexts in which O'Nolan is being read have brought a new set of names to the table: from Jarry, Borges, and Kafka, to Nabokov, Danielewski, and Calvino. This international gaze brings with it other issues, such as the challenges of adaptation and translation, and the opportunities of exploring O'Nolan's broader canon as a fertile ground for a range of critical perspectives, from Cultural Materialism, Queer Theory, and Feminism, to Metafiction, Genre Theory, and Deconstruction.

The organisers invite proposals on any aspect of O'Nolan's writing, but are especially interested in papers that explore questions of authorship and authority in O'Nolan's work, including, but not limited to:

Broadening the Canon
– Problems of Canonicity and the Reception of Minor Works
– O"Nolan on Screen and Stage: The Forgotten Scripts
– O"Nolan as Letter Writer
– Challenges in Adapting/Translating O'Nolan's Writing
– The Gaelic Language Works & Columns

On Whose Authority?
– Ideological Critique & the Comedic Subversion of Authority in O'Nolan's Writing
– Conflicting Authorities: The Traditional vs. the Avant-Garde, the Local vs. the International in O'Nolan's Writing
– Writing Under the Influence: O'Nolan & his Contemporaries
– The Clowning of Science: Menippean Satire and the Encyclopaedic Ideal
– The Reception of Brian O'Nolan in Ireland and Beyond

Theoretical Authorities
– Death of the Author: O'Nolan and Capital "T" Theory
– O'Nolan and Philosophy
– O'Nolan and Theories of Genre
– Cultural Materialist and Genetic Approaches
– Male Authorities / Feminist Readings
– Ideas of Space and Place in O'Nolan's Writing

Please submit paper & panel proposals to viennacis.anglistik@univie.ac.at by 1 March 2013.

John McCourt (Università Roma Tre)
Ruben Borg (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
Paul Fagan (University of Vienna)

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespostcolonialreligionscience_and_culturetheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 50077The Pleasures and Politics of Popular Erotic Fiction (Edited Collection)Dr Kristen Phillips, Claire Trevenen, Curtin University (Bentley, Western Australia)k.phillips@curtin.edu.au; Claire.Trevenen@curtin.edu.au 1360412975cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_cultureromanticfull name / name of organization: Dr Kristen Phillips, Claire Trevenen, Curtin University (Bentley, Western Australia)contact email: k.phillips@curtin.edu.au; Claire.Trevenen@curtin.edu.au

The publication of EL James' Fifty Shades of Grey in 2011 marks a particularly visible moment in what appears to be a proliferation of erotic fiction, written by and for women, since the end of the twentieth century. More than just an instance of a particular genre of fiction, Fifty Shades has spawned considerable discussion of the significance of 'women's popular erotic fiction' generally.
The Pleasures and Politics of Popular Erotic Fiction seeks to explore this phenomenon, its social and textual origins and its attendant conceptual and political effects. In doing so, the book aims to examine the discursive regularities and popular debates framing the production and reception of women's popular erotic fiction; the cultural anxieties and transformations such texts express; the ways in which they reinscribe and negotiate relations of gender, sexuality, race, and kinship. We are interested in exploring the ideological forces underpinning their development and visibility as both a 'new' and 'popular' form; the ever-growing proliferation of subgenres and their role in shaping popular ideas about romance, relationships, desire, and the erotic.
We invite proposals for contributions to an edited collection of critical research on the cultural significance of 'women's popular erotic fiction'. Possible areas of research include (though are not limited to):
• The cultural work of the different subgenres (BDSM, paranormal romance, erotic crime fiction, ménage a trois, 'neighbour from hell', sex confessionals) and the ways of speaking about, categorising and marketing these texts.
• The rise of independently published online erotic fiction (production and consumption) and the discourses surrounding it.
• Debates around originality and derivativeness.
• The continuities and departures of erotic fiction from its predecessors in romance fiction and chick lit, as well as those from more 'respectable' literary traditions.
• The role of popular erotic fiction in reinforcing and/or transgressing the hegemony of whiteness, heterosexuality, patriarchy, the family, etc.
• The role of this fiction in circumscribing an idea of 'the West', as well as the possibilities offered by non-western forms of popular erotic fiction.
• The pleasures of reader consumption and the discourses surrounding it.
• The function of romance in women's erotic fiction.
Expressions of interest, including an abstract (250-300 words), a short author bio and list of recent publications, may be forwarded via email to the editors by 24 May, 2013. The anticipated due date for accepted contributions (6,500 –7,500) is 29 November, 2013.
Dr Kristen Phillips, Claire Trevenen, Curtin University (Bentley, Western Australia)
Contact email: k.phillips@curtin.edu.au, Claire.Trevenen@curtin.edu.au

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_cultureromantic 50078Panel: Randall Jarrell at 100 MLA 2014 and MLA Executive Committee on Children's Literaturecnoimann@bmcc.cuny.edu, MLA in Chicago 20141360414104americanchildrens_literatureinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespoetrypopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: MLA 2014 and MLA Executive Committee on Children's Literaturecontact email: cnoimann@bmcc.cuny.edu, MLA in Chicago 2014

"All that I've never thought of - think of me!"

In commemoration of Randall Jarrell's 100th birthday (May 6, 1914), The Modern Language Association division of Children's Literature is soliciting papers that shed new light on his work. We seek papers that discuss Jarrell as a children's literature author, a poet, a critic, a novelist and an essayist. We are especially interested in papers on his work as a teacher, his collaborations, translations and influence.

Please send an abstract (400-500 words) and a 2-page CV by Friday, March 8, 2013 to Tali Noimann (cnoimann@bmcc.cuny.edu)

cfp categories: americanchildrens_literatureinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespoetrypopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 50079"Whitman North and South" June 28 & 29, 2013, Northwestern UniversityTransatlantic Walt Whitman Associationtwwa@northwestern.edu1360426670americanpoetryfull name / name of organization: Transatlantic Walt Whitman Associationcontact email: twwa@northwestern.edu

Whitman North and South
THE SIXTH ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL WALT WHITMAN SYMPOSIUM
to be held at
Northwestern University
Evanston, Illinois, U.S.A.
June 28 & 29, 2013

In 2013, the 150th anniversary of Lincoln's Gettysburg Address and the Emancipation Proclamation, TWWA welcomes papers discussing Walt Whitman's writings in relation to any aspect of the U.S. Civil War in national or international memory. In addition
to papers that interpret Whitman's work in terms of the War between the Northern and Southern States, we also welcome papers that approach Whitman either hemispherically or globally, focusing on the legacies, significance, and lasting consequences of Whitman's writings as they have circulated, been translated, revised, and reworked by different language constituencies, nationalities, and literary schools in Central and South America and in the Northern and Southern hemispheres of the
globe more generally.

One-page abstracts should be sent electronically, no later than April 1, 2013, to all four Symposium Organizers: Professor Ed Folsom , Professor
Ken Price , Professor Jay Grossman , and
Professor Vanessa Steinroetter .

cfp categories: americanpoetry 50081Representations of Gender & Sexuality in John Dos Passos's WritingJohn Dos Passos Society. (SAMLA: 8-10 Nov 2013, Atlanta)jdpsociety@gmail.com1360428779americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualitymodernist studiestheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: John Dos Passos Society. (SAMLA: 8-10 Nov 2013, Atlanta)contact email: jdpsociety@gmail.com

Like his modernist contemporaries, John Dos Passos engages themes of gender and sexuality. But unlike many of his contemporaries, his works may allow for relatively progressive readings of gender relations, understandings and representations of homosexuality, media-centered representations of the sexualized body, etc. Such progressivism may be due to his inherently activist stance during his writing career. However, merely writing during the first half of the 20th century may dictate a certain amount of problematic representation. Whether his works are read as progressive or problematic, studies that center on gender and sexuality in Dos Passos's writing may help to complicate the general consensus that important male modernists' relations to these subjects were inherently troubled.

We invite applications for fifteen- to twenty-minute papers that explore representations of gender and/or sexuality in any of Dos Passos's works. Presentations may address, but are not limited to, the following topics:
- social policy, government legislation, and matters of the law in the modernist and late-modernist period
- media, representation, and social images of gender/sexuality as demonstrated in Dos Passos's fiction or nonfiction writing
- sex, eroticism, otherness
- the body as subject or object
- sexual or gender identity
- feminism and post-feminism: representation and invisibility
- changing images of femininity and masculinity
- queer readings of specific characters, moments, narratives, novels, etc.

This panel is organized by the John Dos Passos Society. Please submit your 250-word abstract, with your name and affiliation, as a Word document toJDPSociety@gmail.com or Victoria.M.Bryan@gmail.com no later than June 15, 2013, for consideration.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualitymodernist studiestheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 50082CFP: Vonnegut and Attention - a satellite workhop of The Arts of Attention Conference 2013 [September 12-14, 2013, Budapest, HU]Károli Gáspár Universityvonnegut.and.attention@gmail.com1360429867americangender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturereligionrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Károli Gáspár Universitycontact email: vonnegut.and.attention@gmail.com

The works of Kurt Vonnegut prominently feature with issues connected to attention through tropes and topics as well as through literary technique: it is a core motif in many of his writings, and is of key importance with regard to his style. This workshop invites contributed papers approaching the notion of attention in the Vonnegutian œuvre through literary theory, philosophy,anthropology, and psychology among others. We are particularly interested in contributions presenting interdisciplinary investigations.

Please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words to vonnegut.and.attention@gmail.com as an attached Word or PDF file (please do not paste the abstract into the body of your email!), and include your name and affiliation (if applicable) as well as whether you need any kind of multimedia equipment (projector, etc.) for your presentation. Participants will have approximately 20 minutes for presentation, which will be followed by a 10-minute Q&A session and discussion.

The deadline for the submission of abstracts is 12 PM, March 31, 2013. You shall receive a response on acceptance/rejection by April 5.
We are looking forward to receiving your proposals! See you in Budapest!

Best regards,
the Organizers:
Rebeka Sára Szigethy
Ádám T. Bogár

cfp categories: americangender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturereligionrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 50083 Transcendentalist Women and FriendshipMLA 2014abrahae@sunysccc.edu1360431796americangender_studies_and_sexualityfull name / name of organization: MLA 2014contact email: abrahae@sunysccc.edu

This session invites papers on transcendentalist women's conceptions and practices of friendship, especially in comparison to their male counterparts. 250-word abstract by 15 March 2013; Eileen Abrahams (abrahae@sunysccc.edu).

cfp categories: americangender_studies_and_sexuality 50084CFP: Vonnegut and Attention - a satellite workhop of The Arts of Attention Conference 2013 [September 12-14, 2013, Budapest, HU]Károli Gáspár Universityvonnegut.and.attention@gmail.com1360433348americangender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturereligionrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Károli Gáspár Universitycontact email: vonnegut.and.attention@gmail.com

The works of Kurt Vonnegut prominently feature issues connected to attention through tropes and topics as well as through literary technique: it is a core motif in many of his writings, and is of key importance with regard to his style. This workshop invites contributed papers approaching the notion of attention in the Vonnegutian œuvre through literary theory, philosophy,anthropology, and psychology among others. We are particularly interested in contributions presenting interdisciplinary investigations.

Please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words to vonnegut.and.attention@gmail.com as an attached Word or PDF file (please do not paste the abstract into the body of your email!), and include your name and affiliation (if applicable) as well as whether you need any kind of multimedia equipment (projector, etc.) for your presentation. Participants will have approximately 20 minutes for presentation, which will be followed by a 10-minute Q&A session and discussion.

The deadline for the submission of abstracts is 12 PM, March 31, 2013. You shall receive a response on acceptance/rejection by April 5.
We are looking forward to receiving your proposals! See you in Budapest!

Best regards,
the Organizers:
Rebeka Sára Szigethy
Ádám T. Bogár

cfp categories: americangender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespopular_culturereligionrhetoric_and_compositionscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 50085MLA 2014 (Chicago, 9-12 January 2014) Special Session: "Situating the Self: Immigrant Auto/biography"MLA 201411sg28@queensu.ca, 7af15@queensu.ca1360439872african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespostcolonialreligiontravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: MLA 2014contact email: 11sg28@queensu.ca, 7af15@queensu.ca

MLA 2014 (Chicago, 9-12 January 2014)
Special Session: "Situating the Self: Immigrant Auto/biography"

This panel seeks papers which investigate the various ways auto/biography might allow the immigrant subject to negotiate the gendered and religious contexts which shift – often dramatically – with movement from one national and social space to another. How does the immigrant auto/biographer use narrative to situate him or herself in such fluid settings? How is narrativization of a life story a useful tool for adapting to new environments?

We welcome approaches from various disciplines across the humanities and social sciences, as well as interdisciplinary approaches which combine methodologies from two or more disciplines to open innovative and creative pathways of analysis.

Please send a 250-word abstract and 50-word bio to: 7af15@queensu.ca and 11sg28@queensu.ca by 15 March 2013.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespostcolonialreligiontravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 50086Queer Wharton-- Edith Wharton Society Panel at the MLA (9-12 January 2014)Meredith Goldsmith/Edith Wharton Societymgoldsmith@ursinus.edu1360451895americangender_studies_and_sexualitymodernist studiestheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Meredith Goldsmith/Edith Wharton Societycontact email: mgoldsmith@ursinus.edu

Queer Wharton. A panel organized by the Edith Wharton Society at the 2014 MLA (9-12 Homosexuality and homosociality in Wharton; queer authors, intertexts, and aesthetics in Wharton's writing; Wharton's relations with gay men, lesbians, and bisexuals; queering Wharton's travel writing and memoirs.
Submit 250-word abstracts and c.v.s to Meredith Goldsmith by March 15, 2013 (mgoldsmith@ursinus.edu).

cfp categories: americangender_studies_and_sexualitymodernist studiestheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 50087Dreams in Contemporary Women's Narratives Women In French-WIF- Special Sessions at the South Central MLA Colloquiumarocca@salemstate.edu1360461612gender_studies_and_sexualitytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Women In French-WIF- Special Sessions at the South Central MLA Colloquiumcontact email: arocca@salemstate.edu

Rich in symbolic elements as well as mystery and transformation ideas, dreams are often central to women's novels and autobiographies. Dream narratives are frequently used to: engage with differences and to challenge established structures of power; think through and beyond dichotomous representational systems; forge new languages; and finally, transform and reappropriate reality while letting anxiety, fear, and desire find their expression. Some themes to consider: what is the function of dreams within women's narratives and how are they connected with reality? Is there a recurrence of elements and themes in dreams? How does the relationship between narrator and dreamer find its expression? How do time and space function within dream narratives? What is the role of senses and emotions in them? Are dream narratives creating a specific esthetic and language? Please send 250-300 word abstracts to Anna Rocca, Salem State University, by Febraury 22, at arocca@salemstate.edu

cfp categories: gender_studies_and_sexualitytwentieth_century_and_beyond 50088PERSPECTIVES ON PROGRESS, November 27-29, 2013An interdisciplinary postgraduate and early career researcher conference, held at the University of Queensand, Brisbane, Australia.http://perspectives2013.org1360475008classical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: An interdisciplinary postgraduate and early career researcher conference, held at the University of Queensand, Brisbane, Australia.contact email: http://perspectives2013.org

    Call for Papers

In 1968, historian Sidney Pollard defined the Victorian ideal of 'progress' as, "the assumption that a pattern of change exists in the history of mankind... that it consists of irreversible changes in one direction only, and that this direction is towards improvement." Despite the increasingly problematic nature of this ideal, the 'progress myth' still remains pervasive in the Western cultural tradition.

This postgraduate and early career researcher conference seeks to promote innovative interdisciplinary dialogues interrogating the concept of progress by bringing together scholars from across the humanities and social sciences.

Contributions are invited from disciplines ranging from history, classics, religion and philosophy through literary, media and cultural studies to anthropology, psychology and political science.

Conference delegates will be invited to consider how the idea of progress influences their own work, while being given the opportunity to explore how this intersects with scholarship in other disciplines.

The conference committee invites proposals for papers in the form of an abstract of between 250 and 300 words to perspectivesonprogress2013@gmail.com by 31 May 2013.

Paper format is a 20 minute paper with a 10 minute period for questions and answers.

Possible areas of inquiry will include, but will not be limited to:

* the relevance of progress as a methodological framework
* philosophical and cultural understandings of scientific and technological change
* conceptions of national and cultural progress throughout history; notions of degeneration and regeneration
* relations between human progress and environmental transformation
* perspectives on the past as a golden age; progress as teleology
* progress and identity
* political and geopolitical evolution and revolution

Please circulate to all potentially interested parties. Full CFP and additional information available at http://perspectives2013.org

cfp categories: classical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferenceshumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 50089CFP for newly established, peer reviewed International Journal of American StudiesIrakli Tskhvediani Professor of English and American Literature English Studies Department Akaki Tsereteli State University 59 Tamar Mepe st., Kutaisi 4600, Georgiairaklitskhvediani@yahoo.com; jdpag2012@yahoo.com 1360480684americanjournals_and_collections_of_essaysfull name / name of organization: Irakli Tskhvediani Professor of English and American Literature English Studies Department Akaki Tsereteli State University 59 Tamar Mepe st., Kutaisi 4600, Georgiacontact email: iraklitskhvediani@yahoo.com; jdpag2012@yahoo.com

Supporters: US Embassy in Georgia; John Dos Passos Association of Georgia; Prof. Vakhtang Amaglobeli Center for American Studies at Akaki Tsereteli State University

This is a call for papers for the newly established, internationally peer reviewed Journal of American Studies to be launched in spring/summer 2013. The journal will be launched to provide an opportunity for scholars from various disciplines related to American studies to publish high-quality original research articles, essays and critical reviews that meet the general criteria of significance and scientific excellence. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:
• U.S. Literature
• U.S. History
• U.S. Culture and Art
• U.S. Politics and Economics
• U.S. Education System
• Georgian-American Relations

All manuscripts should be sent electronically to: Irakli Tskhvediani (iraklitskhvediani@yahoo.com; jdpag2012@yahoo.com) by the 30th of April, 2013. All submissions will go through a peer review process.

It is most likely that the journal will be published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing. For more information please visit: http://www.c-s-p.org/flyers/series_38.htm.
You can also find the info about the journal at: http://jdpag.ge/ (please see English version) and http://atsu.edu.ge/geo/gancxadebebi/American%20Studies.pdf.

Style guides for papers:
Manuscripts should not ordinarily exceed fifteen standard pages (A4) including the abstract and the contributor's short bio. All papers must conform to The Chicago Manual of Style, 15th Edition in all matters of form and should be typewritten in MS Word 2003. Use Times New Roman: 10 pts fonts for the main text and all additional parts except endnotes and index (where you should use 9pts), and chapter headings (where you should use 16pts). All text should be single-spaced.

cfp categories: americanjournals_and_collections_of_essays 50090Eastern European and US American Cultures, (MLA 2014)2014 MLA special sessionClaudia.Sadowski-Smith@asu.edu, ioana.luca@ntnu.edu.tw, 1360509199americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarypopular_culturetravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: 2014 MLA special sessioncontact email: Claudia.Sadowski-Smith@asu.edu, ioana.luca@ntnu.edu.tw,

Seeking papers on connections between Eastern European and US literatures, cultures, or media post-1989; please send a 300-word abstract and brief CV by 15 March 2013 to Claudia Sadowski-Smith
Claudia.Sadowski-Smith@asu.edu and Ioana Luca
ioana.luca@ntnu.edu.tw
Please note that this is a special session panel proposal for the MLA Convention which will be held January 9-12, 2014 in Chicago.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarypopular_culturetravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 50091South Asian Diasporas Beyond the US, MLA 2014, 3/15/13SALA: South Asian Literary Association quazi@tarleton.edu1360518898ethnicity_and_national_identityinternational_conferencespostcolonialfull name / name of organization: SALA: South Asian Literary Association contact email: quazi@tarleton.edu

Joint session of SALA and South Asian Languages and Literatures (SALL) at MLA 2014
"South Asian Diasporas beyond the US": Intersections, parallels, and tensions between South Asians and other Groups outside the US, including Australia, Africa, and South East Asia. Send 150-word abstracts to quazi@tarleton.edu by March 15.

cfp categories: ethnicity_and_national_identityinternational_conferencespostcolonial 50092100 Years of Bollywood, MLA 2014, 3/15/13SALA: South Asian Literary Associationrgairola@uw.edu1360519075cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisioninternational_conferencespostcolonialfull name / name of organization: SALA: South Asian Literary Associationcontact email: rgairola@uw.edu

"100 Years of Bollywood:"Presenters will offer critical reflections on a century of films coming out of Mumbai and shooting to stardom in the West. Themes can range from directors, film stars, identity and representation, music, global reception, economic impacts, etc. 250-word abstracts by March 15. Rahul K. Gairola (rgairola@uw.edu)

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisioninternational_conferencespostcolonial 50093South Asia At Risk MLA 2014,3/15/13SALA: South Asian Literary Associationniyer@seattleu.edu1360519190cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinternational_conferencespostcolonialfull name / name of organization: SALA: South Asian Literary Associationcontact email: niyer@seattleu.edu

"South Asia at Risk": literary/filmic analyses of violated bodies, homophobia, racism, gender violence, caste barriers, religious intolerance, poverty, economic vulnerability, environmental degradation, oppression of all kinds. 150 word abstracts to niyer@seattleu.edu

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinternational_conferencespostcolonial 50094Forth International Conference in Small Cinemas: Crossing Borders FLORIANÓPOLIS-SC, BRAZIL, September 4-6, 2013Organizing institution: Universidade Federal de Santa Catarinasmallcines@gmail.com 1360521962cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Organizing institution: Universidade Federal de Santa Catarinacontact email: smallcines@gmail.com

Forth International Conference in Small Cinemas: Crossing Borders
FLORIANÓPOLIS-SC, BRAZIL, September 4-6, 2013
Organizing institution: Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina
Keynote speaker: Jorge la Ferla (Argentina)
Invited filmmaker: Eduardo Nunes (Brasil)
The 21st century brings serious reconsideration of sound and image in both film industry and academia. New audiovisual technologies and complex media environment contribute to redefining production and reception practices. In addition, evolving economic and political systems have transformed the world since the last century, and geography was altered by political upheavals, conflicts and diplomatic relations, disputes for markets, etc. Cinema as an art with tremendous power of influence has witnessed and challenged many of these changes, and provided grounds for dominant ideological systems, while also supporting their questioning.
Cinema enters the 21st century raising the question of what world is there to show and how it is shown. The way film represents us and how we manage film production attracts attention to the relationship between producer and representation. In this sense we cannot (or should not) think of a unique practice in cinema. That approach lacks subtleties that could, precisely because of attention to details, reveal other realities. The "small cinema" explores new frontiers and new technological environments. The concept of "small" must be seen as a networked reality. There can be no politic, economic or cultural survival without strongly connected practices that challenge borders.
The fourth international conference in Small Cinemas – Crossing Borders, to be held September 4-6 at the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina – Brazil, invites film scholars and professionals to submit papers on the following themes:
• Aesthetics and poetics;
• New technologies and subjectivities;
• Auteur cinema;
• Production, distribution and exhibition;
• Cultural policies;
• Transnational cinemas.
We are interested, yet not exclusively, in small cinemas in Latin America and its intersections with other cinemas.
Abstracts of up to 300 words accompanied by three or four keywords, and a small biography or the institutional affiliation of the authors should be sent to: smallcines@gmail.com by April 15th 2013. Proposals will be accepted in English, Portuguese and Spanish.
For further information: http://4smallcinemas.ufsc.br/

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 50095"Vulnerability and Survivalism of Humanities in Corporatized Academia" MLA14 ChicagoStacey Lee Donohue/Modern Language Associationsdonohue@cocc.edu1360537635general_announcementsprofessional_topicsfull name / name of organization: Stacey Lee Donohue/Modern Language Associationcontact email: sdonohue@cocc.edu

Vulnerability and Survivalism of Humanities in Corporatized Academia

MLA 2014 in Chicago. Session Arranged by the Community College Humanities Association (an Allied Organization of the MLA).

A roundtable on how humanities faculty can resist adjunctification and other neoliberal "market-driven" values and corporate structures increasingly prevalent in academia. abstracts/ position papers by 11 March 2013; George Louis Scheper (gscheper@jhu.edu) and Stacey Donohue (sdonohue@cocc.edu).

cfp categories: general_announcementsprofessional_topics