[UPDATE] Colloquium - Sexual Futures: Versions of the Sexual Past, Visions of the Sexual Future - 5-6 September 2013

full name / name of organization: 
University of Exeter
contact email: 
j.funke@exeter.ac.uk

Colloquium

Sexual Futures: Versions of the Sexual Past, Visions of the Sexual Future

University of Exeter, UK

5-6 September 2013

The future offers a critical space to negotiate sexual possibilities. It can serve as a doomsday warning, provide utopian fantasies or aspirational goals for real reform. Such visions of the sexual future are often achieved through an imaginative reworking of motifs and elements from the past. This colloquium investigates how and why sexual knowledge, articulated in science, literature, art, politics, law and religion, turns to the past to envision the future.

When it comes to imagining the future, the past can be cast in manifold ways. It can appear as mythical, traditional, ancestral, atavistic, hereditary, primitive, classical, or historical. It can also serve a number of purposes. It can lend weight or authority; it can provide a rhetoric of objectivity, neutrality and empiricism to support visions of the future. It can galvanise calls for reform by appearing to offer visions of realistic possibility, alternative social worlds that have existed in the past and are therefore more than idle fantasy. The past can also be deployed in narratives about progress and decline, civilization and evolution, which lead towards a utopian or dystopian future. It can be marshalled as evidence to articulate universalising claims about humanity, provide evidence of variability across time, illustrate future possibilities or legitimise change. In addition, the past can offer a space of forgetting and loss and therefore a means of rejecting or engaging critically with the very concept of the future. It is the aim of the colloquium to examine how such uses of the past in the service of the future intersect with sexual knowledge and experience.

Forming part of the Sexual Knowledge, Sexual History project, this colloquium invites scholars from a range of disciplines to examine any aspect of the nexus between past, future and sex. Central questions might include, but are not limited to:

- Why and how have people throughout history turned to the past to imagine sexual futures?
- How does the past facilitate the imagination of future sexualities? Conversely, how does the past restrict what is considered to be a possible future?
- Which aspects or elements of the past are used in the construction of sexual futures?
- What authority does the past hold in the articulation of future visions of sexuality?
- How is the relation between past and future conceptualised differently over time and how does this change the way in which sexuality is understood and experienced?
- How do uses of the past in the service of the future compare across different areas of sexual knowledge, including science, literature, art, politics, law or religion?

Please contact Kate Fisher (k.fisher@exeter.ac.uk), Rebecca Langlands (r.langlands@exeter.ac.uk) or Jana Funke (j.funke@exeter.ac.uk) for further details or to discuss possible research papers.

Abstracts to be emailed to Jana Funke by 24th April 2013.

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american
classical_studies
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
ecocriticism_and_environmental_studies
eighteenth_century
ethnicity_and_national_identity
film_and_television
gender_studies_and_sexuality
interdisciplinary
international_conferences
medieval
modernist studies
popular_culture
postcolonial
religion
renaissance
romantic
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travel_writing
twentieth_century_and_beyond
victorian