CFP The Child in Post-Apocalyptic Cinema

full name / name of organization: 
Debbie Olson
contact email: 
debbieo@okstate.edu or dolson@uta.edu

CFP: The Child in Post-Apocalyptic Cinema

Filmmakers have been fascinated with images of an imagined apocalypse since the first sci-fi films of the early 20th century. Humanity’s search for a Utopian existence has always been accompanied by the fearful counter-imaginings of a monumental dystopian collapse of civilization, a vision that has risen in popularity in cinema during the past two decades. In post-apocalyptic cinema, children have occupied conflicting positions—as harbingers of disaster, such as Children of the Damned (1964)—or as symbols of survival and hope, as in The Children of Men (2006). Recent upcoming films like After Earth (2013) and World War Z (2013) add to the growing trend of post-apocalyptic films with significant child characters. Children are most often symbols of Futurity, as Lee Edelman has argued, but what is the child’s role in a cinema that wallows in the aftermath and widespread devastation of nuclear disaster, alien invasion, ecological collapse, human transformation (zombies or other mutant human forms), technological or cyber disasters, paranormal invasions and/or possessions, divine judgment or widespread pandemics? The child character in many post-apocalyptic films is often overlooked as a significant source of meaning, yet the post-apocalyptic child occupies a unique space within such narratives that oscillates between death and destruction, and faith and hope— symbols of the resilience of life.

This collection seeks well-written essays that explore and interrogate the role of the child character in post-apocalypse cinema, from the classic age to the most recent, and approached from a variety of theoretical perspectives. For the purposes of this collection, post-apocalyptic cinema will be defined as those films that show, or infer, a world-wide catastrophe. International submissions that offer analyses of the child character from international post-apocalyptic films are encouraged. Interested contributors please send a 300-400 word abstract (as an attachment in Word) and full contact information, including affiliation, to debbieo@okstate.edu or dolson@uta.edu.
Abstracts are due by May 1, 2013. Final full drafts will be due December 31, 2013.

cfp categories: 
african-american
american
childrens_literature
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
eighteenth_century
ethnicity_and_national_identity
film_and_television
gender_studies_and_sexuality
humanities_computing_and_the_internet
interdisciplinary
journals_and_collections_of_essays
medieval
modernist studies
popular_culture
postcolonial
renaissance
romantic
science_and_culture
theory
twentieth_century_and_beyond
victorian