[UPDATE] New Methods in Anglo-Saxon Homiletics

full name / name of organization: 
Society for the Study of Anglo-Saxon Homiletics at the 49th International Congress on Medieval Studies
contact email: 
brandon.hawk@uconn.edu

Society for the Study of Anglo-Saxon Homiletics: New Methods in Anglo-Saxon Homiletics

For over ten years at Kalamazoo, the Society for the Study of Anglo-Saxon Homiletics (previously organized by Aaron J Kleist) has thrived in its aims to promote scholarship related to the sources, practices, appropriations, and early studies of Anglo-Saxon homilies. The Society recently experienced a three-year hiatus from Kalamazoo, but scholars have continued to support the possibility of future sessions by the Society. This session seeks to renew the presence of the Society at Kalamazoo, as well as vibrant scholarship and collaborative thinking about new directions for the field. Over the years, the Society has fostered a wide range of interests and methodologies both old and new: for example, source studies, Anglo-Saxon theologies, rhetoric and style, linguistics and philology, the interplay of Christian and pagan practices, paleography and codicology, afterlives of Anglo-Saxon homilies, translation theories, gender studies, and digital initiatives. This session provides a welcome forum for continued discussion of such issues of central importance to Anglo-Saxon studies, especially focused on new avenues of study in the field of homiletics.

Please send abstracts of no more than 500 words with a completed Participant Information Form (available here) to Brandon Hawk (brandon.hawk@uconn.edu) by September 15.

Abstracts not accepted for this session will be forwarded to the Congress Committee for consideration in general sessions.

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