Authors, Artists, Audiences: 35th Annual Medieval and Renaissance Forum April 25-26, 2014 (abstracts due Jan 15, 2014)

full name / name of organization: 
Plymouth State University, Plymouth, NH USA
contact email: 
PSUForum@gmail.com

Call for Papers and Sessions
“Authors, Artists, Audiences”
Keynote speaker: Rebecca Krug, Professor of English, University of Minnesota

We invite abstracts or panel proposals in medieval and Early Modern studies that consider how authors, artists, and audiences functioned in personal, political, religious, and aesthetic realms.
● How are authorship and artistry defined in different contexts?
● What roles do audiences play in creativity and expression?
● How are reading and viewing conceived of or portrayed?
● What relationships exist among creator, creation, and consumer?
● How do such ideas hold meaning today?

Papers need not be confined to the theme but may cover many aspects of medieval and Renaissance life, literature, languages, art, philosophy, theology, history and music.

Students, faculty, and independent scholars are welcome.
Undergraduate sessions are welcome and require faculty sponsorship.

This year’s keynote speaker is Rebecca Krug, associate professor of English at the University of Minnesota, who specializes in late medieval English literature and culture. She is the author of Reading Families: Women's Literate Practice in Late Medieval England (Cornell University Press, 2002) and of a number of essays, including recent pieces in The Cambridge Companion to Medieval English Culture and in A Cultural History of Gardens in the Medieval Age. She is currently writing an essay about lunar gardening in the medieval and modern worlds as well as completing a book about Margery Kempe.

Abstract deadline: Monday January 15, 2014
Presenters and early registration: March 15, 2014

Please submit abstracts, a/v needs, and full contact information to Dr. Karolyn Kinane, Director at PSUForum@gmail.com.

For more information visit www.plymouth.edu/medieval

cfp categories: 
interdisciplinary
medieval
renaissance