Word Hoard Issue III Call for Papers: "Pop/Corn"

full name / name of organization: 
Word Hoard
contact email: 
wordhoard.editors@gmail.com

At Word Hoard, we like our popcorn just as much as anyone else: tasty, lightweight, and covered with something that might once have been butter, there’s no better way to watch a movie than with a bag of popcorn at your side. And yet an unwelcome fact intrudes upon this idyllic scene: airborne diacetyl, the chemical used to manufacture popcorn’s artificial butter flavouring, can also cause bronchiolitis obliterans, a condition more lethal than tuberculosis that occurs most frequently in the lungs of microwave popcorn factory workers.

For Word Hoard’s third issue, we are soliciting work that engages with the serious consequences of gratuitous “pop corn-ography.” Pop, corniness, kitsch, nostalgia, camp—we celebrate the fun and subversive potential of “fluff” even as we neglect its troubling implications of disposability, sterility, inauthenticity, and empty calories. The Russian notion of poshlost, or “petty evil or self-satisfied vulgarity,” captures the danger of treating pop/corn as harmless. What are we to do with this fluff that leaves such a bad flavour in our mouths, but is nevertheless so tasty?

Word Hoard is an interdisciplinary journal of the arts and humanities founded upon a unique dialogic editorial model through which content editors respond to accepted submissions. In this issue we hope to create a dialogue concerning the dark sides of both pop and corniness. From bawdy and satirical medieval humour to trope-laden Victorian advertisement, from burlesque, vaudeville, and cabaret to modern hipsterism, how have shifting historical definitions and demarcations of poor taste, low art, and kitsch inflected our political, cultural, and social consciousness? How do we feel about Oprah’s Book Club, the allure of Dan Brown, and the appeal of the Uncle John’s Bathroom Reader series? Closer to home, between MOOCs, pop-culture-centered electives, and re-branding, where does the changing face of the university intersect with excess, disposability, corniness? When scientists are being muzzled even as astronauts become national celebrities, where do we draw the line between popular science and political agendas? Are the pillars of liberal society becoming pop phenomena of corporate culture? Word Hoard’s third issue seeks to challenge the celebration of pop and corniness with submissions that add gravity, depth, and weight to the seemingly innocuous superficiality of “fluff.”

We invite submissions between 3000-5000 words related to the provocation and concept of “Pop/Corn.” Submissions are due 15 November 2013. Accepted submissions can expect online and print publication in the summer of 2014. All submissions will be peer-reviewed, all accepted submissions will be responded to within our dialogic, multi-generic format, and all disciplines relating to arts, culture, and the humanities are invited to submit.

The first two issues of Word Hoard can be found at: http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/wordhoard.

Submissions should be formatted according to MLA guidelines, and should also include a brief biographical sketch of the author; abstracts are appreciated but not required. Articles, interviews, and other forms of content submission should not contain the author’s name or obvious identification marks to ensure an objective peer-reviewing process.

To submit, or for more information, please contact wordhoard.editors@gmail.com.

cfp categories: 
african-american
american
bibliography_and_history_of_the_book
childrens_literature
classical_studies
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
ecocriticism_and_environmental_studies
eighteenth_century
ethnicity_and_national_identity
film_and_television
gender_studies_and_sexuality
humanities_computing_and_the_internet
interdisciplinary
journals_and_collections_of_essays
medieval
modernist studies
poetry
popular_culture
postcolonial
professional_topics
religion
renaissance
romantic
science_and_culture
theatre
theory
travel_writing
twentieth_century_and_beyond
victorian