Creating and Resisting Meaning: Recalibrating the Identity and Agency of the Textual Consumer

full name / name of organization: 
Pacific Rim Conference on Literature and Rhetoric
contact email: 
pacrim2014@gmail.com

Creating and Resisting Meaning: Recalibrating the Identity and Agency of the Textual Consumer

Date: March 7-8, 2014
Location: Administration Building, University of Alaska Anchorage

Keynote Speakers

This information is currently in progress.

The Conference and Call for Papers

Organized by UAA Department of English graduate students, the 19th annual Pacific Rim Conference on Literature and Rhetoric welcomes proposals in literature, composition and rhetoric, linguistics, anthropology, journalism, and other related fields. The theme of this year’s conference is “Creating and Resisting Meaning: Recalibrating the Identity and Agency of the Textual Consumer.” This year’s conference asks presenters and speakers to consider the role of the contemporary textual consumer as well as the challenges associated with locating oneself in and traversing through the landscapes of technology and synchronicity.

Nearly 30 years after the fictional events of George Orwell’s 1984, many scholars continue to ponder how the politics of technology shape both our identities and our capacities to create or resist meaning. In an age when information is becoming more present—textual experiences replacing and overlapping each other with almost no time to digest them—the identity and agency of the textual consumer have never been more at stake. As Brooke Gladstone puts it, “The media landscape is so cluttered with mirrors facing mirrors that we can’t tell where an image begins or ends” (The Influencing Machine, p. xxi). Through various modes of communication, ranging from those speculated in literature to the myriad offered by our booming digital economy, many textual consumers have responded to this challenge in innovative and captivating ways. This year’s theme seeks to examine not only these responses but also the ways in which they define the textual consumer. To these ends, we should seek to answer the following questions:

• How has technology helped or hindered our ability to influence meaning?
• How does literature characterize textual consumers?
• How does language dictate or define the trajectory of textual consumption?

Individual Paper Proposals: Please send a 250 word abstract for a 20-minute presentation, including the title of the paper, the presenter’s name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, phone and fax number, and email address.

cfp categories: 
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
ethnicity_and_national_identity
graduate_conferences
humanities_computing_and_the_internet
interdisciplinary
rhetoric_and_composition
twentieth_century_and_beyond