CFP Narrative Play -- PCA/ACA Annual Conference: Chicago, April 16-19, 2014

full name / name of organization: 
Popular Culture Association/ American Culture Association
contact email: 
bryanttj@buffalostate.edu

The Game Studies Subject Area of the PCA/ACA offers a forum for critical, cultural, and technical examinations of the social and intellectual aspects of play in all forms and media. This panel seeks to join discussions of two divergent movements in late twentieth-century literature and game studies: the emergence of ergodicism (the preoccupation with texts as forms of work and play) in various movements of experimental literature since mid-century, and the emergence in more recent decades of narrative as a popular framework for gameplay in analog roleplaying. Emerging fusions of fiction, game, narrative, and play signal important shifts in the conceptualization and performance of interpersonal relations, participatory culture, and social order. This panel seeks to explore the immediate and longitudinal sources of such popular fusions, as well as the potential directions they may take in various fields of study and practice.

Potential topics include: literature that is ergodic, metafictional, or otherwise purposely playful; tabletop roleplaying games and analog gamer cultures; tabletop RPG industry trends toward narrative game design and case studies of narrative play; theories of reader response and ludicism; sacred or mythic forms of play and ideological narratives of work and play; and similar subjects of interest to literary and analog game scholars, practitioners, and players.

Send abstracts directly to the PCA database: http://ncp.pcaaca.org/.
 Please indicate in your submission that you wish to present on the Narrative Play panel.

Send questions (not abstracts) to:
Dr. Tim Bryant
SUNY Buffalo State, English Dept. KETC-326, 1300 Elmwood Ave., Buffalo NY 14222
bryanttj@buffalostate.edu
716-878-5404

cfp categories: 
american
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
interdisciplinary
popular_culture
theory
twentieth_century_and_beyond