Global Dimensions of English Language Learning and Use, April 5th, 2014

full name / name of organization: 
Purdue University
contact email: 
slssymposium@gmail.com

Call for Papers

Graduate Student Symposium on Second Language Studies & English as a Second Language

Symposium Theme: Global Dimensions of English Language Learning and Use

April 5, 2014

RAWLS Halls, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

The Purdue University Graduate Student Symposium on Second Language Studies & English as a Second Language is a growing forum for research focusing on various aspects and issues of SLS and ESL. The symposium is designed to give graduate students a chance to present their research in a professional setting. We encourage graduate students to submit original research that contribute to an understanding of English language use, learning, and teaching. We also welcome cross-disciplinary proposals. We strongly encourage graduate students to consider Research Discussions (see below) for submissions of works in progress and pilot research.
Keynote Speaker: Cecil Nelson, Indiana State University
Proposals are welcome for any of the following topic strands:

Analysisofdiscourseandinteraction
Appliedlinguistics
Assessmentandevaluation
Bilingual,immersion,heritage,andlanguageminorityeducation o Classroomresearchandpedagogy
Corpuslinguistics
Educationallinguistics
Languageandideology
Languageandglobalization
Language,culture,andsocialization o Languageplanningandpolicy
Researchmethodologies
Secondlanguageacquisition
Secondlanguagewriting
WorldEnglishes

We welcome proposals for the following categories:

Paper presentation: 30 minutes (20 minutes of presentation and 10 minutes of discussion)

Panel: 60 minutes (45 minutes of presentation and 15 minutes of discussion):
A forum for a group of presenters (up to three panelists) to discuss a current teaching or research issue in the field.

Research Discussion: 30 minutes (10 minutes of presentation and 20 minutes of discussion):
An informal in-depth discussion between presenter and attendees. The presenter will spend no longer than 10 minutes speaking about his/her research. The remaining time will allow attendees to discuss the topic, ask questions, and provide feedback to the presenter with respect to his/her research project. This session type may be particularly useful for those students who are currently working on their dissertations or other research projects.
A presentation on any practical or theoretical aspect of language teaching or research. Both individual and group presentations are encouraged.

Submission process guidelines:
Send your proposal to slssymposium@gmail.com by February, 21, 2014.

Proposals should be sent as an attached .pdf or Word document. Please type “SLS Symposium Proposal” in the subject line.
Your proposals must include:

Page 1:
1. Y our contact information
a. Name
b. Affiliation
c. Address
d. Phone number
e. E-mail address
2. A 50-word biographical statement
3. Contact information of co-presenter(s) (if applicable)
4. A 50-word biographical statement of co-presenter(s) (if applicable)

Page 2:
1. Title of the presentation (maximum 10 words)
2. Presentation category (paper, panel, research discussion)
3. Topic strand (choose one of above or specify if other)
4. Abstract (maximum 50 words)
5. Description (maximum 250 words)

Factors affecting selection:
1. The topic reflects the current research developments.
2. The title accurately reflects the content of the presentation.
3. The abstract does not exceed 50 words and accurately conveys the contents of the presentation. The description does not exceed 250 words, has a clearly stated purpose and point of view, shows an appropriate amount of material for the allotted time, and does not make explicit reference to the presenter’s status or work.

Questions? Email: slssymposium@gmail.com
Purdue SLS/ESL Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/117624535104094/

cfp categories: 
american
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
ethnicity_and_national_identity
graduate_conferences
interdisciplinary
postcolonial
rhetoric_and_composition
theory