Populating the Irish Stage - Questioning the identity of contemporary Irish theatre (1990s-2014), 27-28 June 2014

full name / name of organization: 
University College Cork, Ireland
contact email: 
populatingirishstages@umail.ucc.ie

We are happy to announce the participation of:

Frank McGuinness

Patrick Mason

Louise Lowe

Further announcements to be posted before the deadline of March 22nd.

‘We write plays, I feel, in order to populate the stage’. (Thomas Kilroy)

Papers are invited for an international conference to be held at UCC, June 27th-28th, 2014. Coinciding with the Cork Midsummer Festival, the conference will explore the identities of Irish theatre from the Celtic Tiger era to the current economic crisis. It will also offer a fitting opportunity to engage a dialogue between theatre practitioners and academics, notably through a roundtable with established and emerging artists.

Critical mythology has associated the birth of a national Irish theatre with the foundation of the Abbey Theatre. It was not only a response to an aesthetic quest but also an attempt to define the Irish nation at the turn of the 20th century. Without elaborating on Irish theatrical historiography, one may observe that theatre does strongly contribute to the identity of a country and its people. In the current climate, insularity has its limits; contemporary global society questions traditions and identity, while transformations in technology, practice and ideology rearrange creative hierarchies.

It appears timely to gauge the impact of these transmutations on the status of the theatrical text, and question how creative collaborators approach it in contemporary Ireland. How do these changes affect writing, directing, staging, producing and touring? Insofar as theatrical activities are related to space and constitute a cultural identity, it is pertinent to investigate where and how they populate Ireland at the turn of the 21st century.

Papers are invited from a variety of critical, practical and interdisciplinary perspectives. We particularly encourage contributions from those working in theatre history, dramatic literature, live art, performance studies, cultural studies, and Irish studies. Ideally, papers will engage with such informing themes as theatrical literary heritage and tradition, developments in staging, forms and origins/sources of theatrical creations.

Please see full text at conference link: http://wp.me/p4jicZ-4

cfp categories: 
theatre
twentieth_century_and_beyond