NANCY DREW AND HER SISTERS: GIRL DETECTIVES IN THE 20TH CENTURY, SAMLA 2014, Nov. 7-9

full name / name of organization: 
South Atlantic Modern Language Association
contact email: 
lgaillet@gsu.edu

This panel considers depictions of young women in mystery fiction written for the teen audience in the 20th Century. Characters such as Nancy Drew, Cherry Ames, Trixie Belden, and countless others provided role models for young readers, and this panel considers these figures in terms of the intersections between scholarship and fandom. While papers might cover the material and consumer culture associated with these novels and discussions of the authors' representation of adults, friendships, or class, we also encourage submissions that make claims about the enduring “phenomenon” of these characters’ popular appeal examine ways in which feminine/feminist portrayals of characters resonated with female readers, evidenced in the researchers’ personal narratives demonstrate how transparency is critical on the part of archival investigators, as evidenced in the work of existing scholar-fan publications suggest ways to teach researcher positionality to students through study of “girl series” scholarship By June 15, 2014, please submit a 250-word abstract and A/V requirements to Lynee Gaillet, Georgia State University, at lgaillet@gsu.edu.

cfp categories: 
african-american
american
bibliography_and_history_of_the_book
childrens_literature
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
film_and_television
gender_studies_and_sexuality
interdisciplinary
popular_culture
rhetoric_and_composition
twentieth_century_and_beyond