Transitions: Questions of Form, 1945-Present, a one day conference 05/09/2014

full name / name of organization: 
University of Bristol
contact email: 
transitionsconference@gmail.com

Transitions: 1945-Present
University of Bristol, Friday, September 5, 2014

This one day conference is intended to explore the role of our concept of ‘transition’ in literary studies. This exploration can be phrased in a series of questions, with the foremost being whether our cultural definitions are more reflective of critical trends than of changes in artistic practice. For example, is James Joyce’s Ulysses the high point of literary modernism and, simultaneously, the beginning of postmodernism? Or does this retroactive critical summation do artistic violence to an open text? If we agree that there are such things as transitions, then we might ask a further set of questions: How do changes in form reflect changing historical or technological conditions? What
happens to the old category upon creation of the new? By exploring these questions, and others, we hope to
understand a little more precisely how categories are (de)constructed, how they are (de)stabilised, and the causes of
their mutations.

We invite abstracts of 250 words for proposed twenty minute papers on the theme of ‘transitions’. These transitions
could be between, though are not limited to:
 National/ Global
 Immigrant/Native
 Colonial/Postcolonial
 Human/Posthuman
 Modern/Postmodern
 Postmodern/post-postmodern
Keynote Speaker: Professor Daniel Katz, University of Warwick
250 word abstracts for 20 minute papers should be sent to Peter Sloane or Theo Savvas at
transitionsconference@gmail.com by July 1, 2014.
Registration fee (includes refreshments and lunch):
Without conference dinner: £35 (£25 students); with dinner: £45 (£35 students).

cfp categories: 
african-american
american
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
ecocriticism_and_environmental_studies
gender_studies_and_sexuality
general_announcements
interdisciplinary
modernist studies
popular_culture
postcolonial
theory
twentieth_century_and_beyond