Kennesaw State University's Third Annual World Literature and Film Conference- [UPDATE] September 25-26, 2014

full name / name of organization: 
Kennesaw State University
contact email: 
kelayan@kennesaw.edu

The figure of the hero underwent a renascence in meaning, visibility, and cultural cachet in the twenty-first century, with the success of the Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings, and World War Z franchises; the Batman, James Bond, and Marvel Cinematic Universe tent-poles; and the 24, Arrow, and Games of Thrones television series. Moreover, the hero took on new significance in other countries’ cultural productions, as with the film series Krrish in India, Zebraman in Japan, and Valley of the Wolves in Turkey. We should also consider the role of the heroine in both ancient and modern representations: Penelope, Shahrazad, and even with television heroines such as Charlie’s Angels or today’s Emily Thorne in the show Revenge (that capitalizes on Dumas’s novel, The Count of Monte Cristo and the Occupy Protests, as well as the Villainy of the One Percenters)
The 2014 World Literature and Film Conference at Kennesaw State University will therefore explore such reconceptualizations of heroism as they travel across different media, genres, cultures, milieus, genders, and audiences. We invite scholars from a number of disciplines to consider representations of heroism in relation to the following items:
• The hero as an intermedial figure, taking shape in film, comic art, literature, radio, and new media and merchandising channels
• Ethnic, racial, and intersectional constructions of the hero across different cultural and ideological constellations
• Gender mappings and the sexual objectification of the hero, especially in relation to the Bechdel and Hawkeye tests
• The impact of the hero on the cognitive, affective, and unconscious identifications and self-understandings of readers, viewers, and consumers
• The sociopolitical resonance of the hero in a post-9/11 context of drone attacks, terrorism, market imperialism, and controversies over American exceptionalism
• Neo-Jungian and neo-structuralist approaches to the archetypes of the hero and the hero’s journey
• The notion of secret identity in relation to issues of identity and multiplicity, “viral” memetics, and schizoanalysis
Conference papers should read no longer than 20 minutes. Please send a 300-word abstract and a 50-word biographical sketch to Larrie Dudenhoeffer at ldudenho@kennesaw.edu or Khalil Elayan at keleyan@kennesaw.edu by Sunday, September 7th. Kennesaw State University is in the north-metro Atlanta area. As of now, Friday, September 26th is the target date for the conference, with a reception taking place on campus the evening of Thursday, September 25th.

cfp categories: 
african-american
american
cultural_studies_and_historical_approaches
ethnicity_and_national_identity
film_and_television
gender_studies_and_sexuality
general_announcements
interdisciplinary
medieval
modernist studies
popular_culture
postcolonial
theory
twentieth_century_and_beyond